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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 16, 2022 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... novak djokovic is set to be deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. the orders of the court are, one, the amended application be dismissed with costs. disappointment and dismay from supporters in melbourne — djokovic himself says he is �*extremely disappointed' but respects the decision, and will co—operate fully. australia's prime minister has welcomed the ruling. a sixth conservative mp has publically called for borisjohnson to step down as prime minister — following a series of parties at downing street during lockdown restrictions. prince harry has launched a legal challenge for the right to pay for police protection when he's in the uk. he says without it, it's too dangerous for his family
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to visit the country. new zealand's prime minister says an underwater volcanic eruption in the southern pacific caused �*significant�* damage to the island nation of tonga and some coastal areas are still cut off. no injuries or deaths have been reported. time for a sports update, we can get the latest from holly. novak djokovic says he's disappointed with the ruling that will see him deported from australia but says he'll respect the decision. the world number one will be unable to defend his title in melbourne where he's a nine time champion. his name has been officially removed from the order of play. in a statement djokovic says he's uncomfortable that the focus has been on him over the past few weeks and will take some time to rest recuperate. earlier, i spoke to our tennis correspondent russell fuller who is in melbourne.
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it has been damaging to the tournament in my opinion. they pushed very, very hard to have novak djokovic in melbourne. he is a nine time champion. when they were looking at the prospect of this year's looking at the prospect of this yea r�*s event, looking at the prospect of this year's event, they knew roger federer wouldn't be there, they suspected serena williams wouldn't be there and there was a big question over rafa nadal. so tennis australia thought it would be important to do everything we can to get novak djokovic into the country. they try to do it within the guidelines they have been given, but it backfired spectacularly. quite clearly, they were working very hard behind—the—scenes to get him in, even though they knew he had not been vaccinated and would play with fire. in the ashes, things are looking up for england today, particualrly for bowler mark wood who has his career best return in a test match with six wickets. wood was the scourge of the aussie batters —
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steve smith going for 27 here caught by dawid malan. stuart broad also pitched in with two wickets today. wood dismissed the aussie captain pat cummins to end the innings. australia all out then for 155. england chasing an unlikley — but not impossible — 271 to win. and they made a decent start untiljust before the tea break when rory burns was out for 26 bowled by cameron green. green also got dawid malan out for ten — opener zak crawley still there with captainjoe root. england are 83—3. to the premier league where manchester city are 13 points clear at the top this morning after beating their nearest rivals chelsea 1—0. kevin de bruyne with the only goal fo the game in the second half. it's citys 12th league win in a row. lots of praise too for aston villa after they fought back from 2—0 down to earn a point
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against manchester united. new star signing, phillipe countinho, scoring the equaliser moments after coming off the bench for his first appearance. coutinho making it 2—2 to impress his former liverpool teammate, and now manager steven gerrard. and there's increasing speculation that everton manager rafa benitez may be on the verge of leaving the club after his side were beaten 2—1 at norwich. it's their 9th defeat in 12 premier league games, and sparked angry scenes from fans. englands netballers take on the world champions new zealand today at london's copper box arena. it's the roses second game in 2a hours after a commanding 71—47 victory over south africa yesterday. new zealand lost their opening match of the quad series to australia. it's the final of the masters snooker later — with barry hawkins taking on neil robertson at alexandra palace this afternoon.
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there was plenty of drama in the semis — where hawkins beat the 2019 champion judd trump 6—5. he'd taken a 11—2 lead in the match only for trump to win the next 3 frames to take the match to a decider. he came through though and will meet robertson after the 2012 champion fought back from 4—1 down to win a dramatic final—frame decider against mark williams. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, the papers. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me isjohn crowley who is a businessjournalist and dave wooding, the political editor of the sun on sunday.
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tomorrow's front pages starting with... the sunday telegraph leads with a picture of the prime minister's wife carrie symonds. it says she was snapped breaking covid social distancing rules days after the public was warned that it was "critical" to follow the guidance. according to the observer, tory mps will be ready in sufficient numbers to oust borisjohnson if he tries to dodge responsibility for rule—breaking parties in downing street. the sunday times claims that borisjohnson is preparing a mass clearout of officials in downing street and a raft of what it calls �*populist�* policies — to try and rescue his premiership. the sunday express claims all covid restrictions in england will end in ten days — that's according to a government source. �*andrew�*s tears over titles�* is the people's headline with the paper saying the duke of york is devastated at losing his military honours. the mirror also picks up that story — focusing on a claim
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by prince andrew's lawyers suggesting his accuser might be suffering �*false memories�* from meeting him. the bbc is facing a £2 billion funding cut — according to the mail on sunday. the paper claims the corporation is facing a two—year licence fee freeze after negotiations with the government. and the online independent has a dramatic picture of the volcanic eruption in tonga which triggered a tsumani in the south pacific. one of the stories that wasn�*t mentioned because it broke too late for the papers, but the expulsion of novak djokovic from australia after the court ruled the immigration minister was right to reject his visa. let�*s take a look at the melbourne herald sun and bring in their coverage of this. john, what is your take on this and the fallout
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from it? , , , ., , is your take on this and the fallout fromit? , ,,._ , is your take on this and the fallout fromit? , ., from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man _ from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man in _ from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man in the _ from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man in the public - from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man in the public eye - from it? yes, this story is about an entitled man in the public eye who | entitled man in the public eye who thought he was above the law. that could apply to any number of people over the last seven days, in this case it is novak djokovic, the ten day saga has come to an end after a panel of threejudges day saga has come to an end after a panel of three judges agreed with the australian government, that novak was a risk on public health grounds and that he risked fanning anti—vaccine sentiment. what this means, it is a personal blow to novak djokovic, he has accepted the ruling and says he is bitterly disappointed, but he stands on 20 grand slam titles along with roger federer. and rafa nadal. what this means is he cannot go for it this year, he is the world number one. what is unclear from the ruling, which was talked about in the days
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preceding this, he may be banned for three years. he is 3a now, still going great guns, obviously. he is no spring chicken although he is the world number one. does this mean the australian open will ever see novak again? he has one nine titles which is almost half of his 20 grand slam. it is all down to the pandemic. there is all down to the pandemic. there is always— is all down to the pandemic. there is always the backdrop of the pandemic being the story. in this case: _ pandemic being the story. in this case, a _ pandemic being the story. in this case, a bizarre turn of events, band and then_ case, a bizarre turn of events, band and then allowed back in again. he has had _
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and then allowed back in again. he has had two of these exemptions. what _ has had two of these exemptions. what strikes me as really odd, is the grounds on which the case was finally— the grounds on which the case was finally settled. asjohn the grounds on which the case was finally settled. as john just said, he would — finally settled. as john just said, he would be a public health risk and he would be a public health risk and he would _ he would be a public health risk and he would give some succour to the anti-vaccine — he would give some succour to the anti—vaccine brigade. it is unlikely in australia — anti—vaccine brigade. it is unlikely in australia when 95% of the population are vaccinated and most people _ population are vaccinated and most people have bought into the vaccine, more _ people have bought into the vaccine, more so _ people have bought into the vaccine, more so than anywhere else. they don't _ more so than anywhere else. they don't have — more so than anywhere else. they don't have many anti—vaccine is there — don't have many anti—vaccine is there but _ don't have many anti—vaccine is there. but it seems he has been made an example _ there. but it seems he has been made an example of in australia and many of the _ an example of in australia and many of the people there with an election coming _ of the people there with an election coming up. — of the people there with an election coming up, it will say good thing, too. coming up, it will say good thing, too there — coming up, it will say good thing, too. there should not be one rule for the _ too. there should not be one rule for the rich, — too. there should not be one rule for the rich, famous and powerful and another for the rest of us. that line has been _ and another for the rest of us. that line has been used _ and another for the rest of us. that line has been used a _ and another for the rest of us. twat line has been used a lot here recently with the backdrop of covid providing the context for so much thatis providing the context for so much that is happening in our lives and we will turn to the political coverage, the sunday times front
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page. the latest on the fallout for borisjohnson over partygate. johnson prepares mass clear out to save his own skin. it is called operation save big dog. trying to turn boris johnson�*s fortunes around. john, turn borisjohnson�*s fortunes around. john, what is in that article? if around. john, what is in that article? ., article? if the title of the operation _ article? if the title of the operation is _ article? if the title of the operation is called - article? if the title of the - operation is called operation red meat like hounds chasing after their prize. what we have here is that borisjohnson, who we haven�*t seen incidentally since wednesday when he apologised in parliament, is going to announce a series of crowd pleasing measures, so speak. all
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coronavirus measures restrictions will end. there is a freeze on the bbc licence fee for the next two years that he will hand over control of the policing of the channel to the army and he announced a series of other measures, including trying to deal with the operations backlog and maybe david will speak about this a little bit more. he is also blaming everyone else apart from himself and he wants to remove a few people in 10 downing street, too. we will come to your coverage in a moment on the sun on sunday, because you have a number of no confidence letters sent by mps. in terms of that operation red meat? timer;r
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letters sent by mps. in terms of that operation red meat? they talk about a clear _ that operation red meat? they talk about a clear out _ that operation red meat? they talk about a clear out of _ that operation red meat? they talk about a clear out of the _ that operation red meat? they talk about a clear out of the downing - about a clear out of the downing street _ about a clear out of the downing street staff. your viewers may remember there was one of those at the track— remember there was one of those at the back end of last year when dominic— the back end of last year when dominic cummings, his most senior aide and _ dominic cummings, his most senior aide and his — dominic cummings, his most senior aide and his director of communications were turfed out of number— communications were turfed out of number ten. that only lead to more trouble _ number ten. that only lead to more trouble. another lot of officials have _ trouble. another lot of officials have been brought in and it might be fairto— have been brought in and it might be fair to say, _ have been brought in and it might be fairto say, are have been brought in and it might be fair to say, are not doing much better — fair to say, are not doing much better so _ fair to say, are not doing much better. so it is a third bunch of people — better. so it is a third bunch of people in— better. so it is a third bunch of people in there going to make any difference — people in there going to make any difference or is it all down to the prime _ difference or is it all down to the prime minister himself? as for operation red meat a lot of these things— operation red meat a lot of these things being announced have already been announced and we know they are coming _ been announced and we know they are coming down the pipeline. we know on january— coming down the pipeline. we know on january the _ coming down the pipeline. we know on january the 26th he is likely to take _ january the 26th he is likely to take some action about lifting restrictions, we know the bbc licence — restrictions, we know the bbc licence fee was under review and was likely— licence fee was under review and was likely to _ licence fee was under review and was likely to be _ licence fee was under review and was likely to be the subject of a freeze _ likely to be the subject of a freeze. we know are levelling up agenda _ freeze. we know are levelling up agenda is — freeze. we know are levelling up agenda is on the way and that action is being _
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agenda is on the way and that action is being done in the channel. these are the _ is being done in the channel. these are the ongoing business of government being wrapped together and thrown at us and saying, look, we are _ and thrown at us and saying, look, we are moving forward, doing a lot of different — we are moving forward, doing a lot of different things. i would regard that as _ of different things. i would regard that as spin rather than fresh action~ — that as spin rather than fresh action. �* , that as spin rather than fresh action. 3 ., ~ that as spin rather than fresh action. �*, ., ,, ., ., i. action. let's take a look at your covera . e action. let's take a look at your coverage inside _ action. let's take a look at your coverage inside your _ action. let's take a look at your coverage inside your paper- action. let's take a look at your i coverage inside your paper today, and as i mentioned you have got a specific number of mps who have sent no—confidence letters, 35 mps, you say, tell us more about what you are reporting this morning? you say, tell us more about what you are reporting this morning?— reporting this morning? you have to take these figures _ reporting this morning? you have to take these figures with _ reporting this morning? you have to take these figures with a _ reporting this morning? you have to take these figures with a little - take these figures with a little pinch — take these figures with a little pinch of— take these figures with a little pinch of salt. i know the source who .ave pinch of salt. i know the source who gave me _ pinch of salt. i know the source who gave me this, it is a very senior political— gave me this, it is a very senior political figure who said they had heard _ political figure who said they had heard 35— political figure who said they had heard 35 letters had gone into the chairman — heard 35 letters had gone into the chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, said graham brady. he always— committee, said graham brady. he always keeps them locked in a safe and is _ always keeps them locked in a safe and is very— always keeps them locked in a safe and is very punctilious about not telling _ and is very punctilious about not telling anybody how many they have
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-ot. telling anybody how many they have got two _ telling anybody how many they have got. two level that, downing street officials _ got. two level that, downing street officials seem to think they are in the 20s— officials seem to think they are in the 20s and i know a couple of ministers _ the 20s and i know a couple of ministers who used a whiteboard the other— ministers who used a whiteboard the other day— ministers who used a whiteboard the other day and wrote the names of the people _ other day and wrote the names of the people who _ other day and wrote the names of the people who have fully aware put letters _ people who have fully aware put letters in — people who have fully aware put letters in that have been confirmed and it— letters in that have been confirmed and it got— letters in that have been confirmed and it got into 15. it is somewhere in that— and it got into 15. it is somewhere in that region. all it takes is for a lot— in that region. all it takes is for a lot of— in that region. all it takes is for a lot of mps who have had a big ear—bashing from the constituency chairman. — ear—bashing from the constituency chairman, their voters ear—bashing from the constituency chairman, theirvoters and ear—bashing from the constituency chairman, their voters and their local— chairman, their voters and their local party— chairman, their voters and their local party officials to come back and say, — local party officials to come back and say, i — local party officials to come back and say, i have had enough i am putting — and say, i have had enough i am putting the — and say, i have had enough i am putting the letter in. oh, then there — putting the letter in. oh, then there is— putting the letter in. oh, then there is sue gray when she does her review— there is sue gray when she does her review next— there is sue gray when she does her review next week. if that comes back with some _ review next week. if that comes back with some bad news and that drives a few more _ with some bad news and that drives a few more over the edge, it could all happen— few more over the edge, it could all happen by— few more over the edge, it could all happen by accident rather than by plan and — happen by accident rather than by plan and design. happen by accident rather than by plan and design-— happen by accident rather than by plan and design. john, the observer front -a~e plan and design. john, the observer front page says _ plan and design. john, the observer front page says the _ plan and design. john, the observer front page says the tories _ plan and design. john, the observer front page says the tories will - plan and design. john, the observer front page says the tories will oust l front page says the tories will oust the prime minister if he tries to
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dodge partygate blame. all the papers are looking into, as dave is describing, what the mechanism is if mps decide they want to go in the end? i mps decide they want to go in the end? ~ mps decide they want to go in the end?
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not wash with them. they will have gone back to their surgeries at the weekend and listening to the reports on the news that the public at large are not pleased. there was a poll yesterday saying seven out of ten people did not believe the prime minister�*s account of what had happened. if minister's account of what had happened-— minister's account of what had hauened. v ., ., ., happened. if let's move on to the sunday telegraph, _ happened. if let's move on to the sunday telegraph, is _ happened. if let's move on to the sunday telegraph, is the - happened. if let's move on to the sunday telegraph, is the prime i sunday telegraph, is the prime minister ass—macro wife on front page saying she broke the rules. john, what is the paper saying there? �* ., ~ , there? again, the prime minister will have been _ there? again, the prime minister will have been looking _ there? again, the prime minister will have been looking for - there? again, the prime minister will have been looking for some i will have been looking for some respite and no more revelations. now it comes to his wife, who was pictured at an event hugging a friend. herfriend was having an engagement party and carrie was there. two ways of looking at that, she is not a member of the
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government and this happened in september 2020. government and this happened in september2020. she government and this happened in september 2020. she has acknowledged she was in breach of the restrictions but it wasn�*t at —— is severe, at the start of the pandemic. doesn�*t everyone have a relative who broke the rules in some way. but millions are saying, they didn�*t see their relatives, they had to miss funerals and they were not able to hug or hold family members in care homes. this will hurt boris johnson particularly because it is in the daily telegraph, the house journal, if you like, of the tory party. the prime minister wrote for the telegraph, an opinion piece each week for many years. this will wound him that they will have gone with this. whether this will mean a huge amount in the scheme of things, let�*s wait and see. amount in the scheme of things, let's wait and see.—
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amount in the scheme of things, let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on — let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on sunday, _ let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on sunday, it— let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on sunday, it was - let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on sunday, it was in - let's wait and see. let's go back to the mail on sunday, it was in the l the mail on sunday, it was in the sunday times we were discussing previously, davies said the news of the freeze of the licence fee for two years, the mail on sunday goes with it as its front page. i also want to bring in a tweet from nadine dorries this morning. she says this licence fee announcement will be the last, the days of the elderly being threatened with prison sentences and bailiffs knocking on doors are over. time to discuss and debate new ways of funding, supporting and selling great british content. if what is your take on that, dave? nadine dorries has _ your take on that, dave? nadine dorries has talked _ your take on that, dave? nadine dorries has talked about - your take on that, dave? nadine| dorries has talked about levelling up dorries has talked about levelling up across — dorries has talked about levelling up across all media, in the showbiz world _ up across all media, in the showbiz world as _ up across all media, in the showbiz world as well where she felt it was employing too many people from privileged backgrounds. that was 'ust privileged backgrounds. that was just one — privileged backgrounds. that was just one of the issues she was
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talking — just one of the issues she was talking about. but the licence fee, we all— talking about. but the licence fee, we all feared there was going to be a two-year— we all feared there was going to be a two—year freeze. this will cost about _ a two—year freeze. this will cost about £2 — a two—year freeze. this will cost about £2 million in savings the bbc is going _ about £2 million in savings the bbc is going to — about £2 million in savings the bbc is going to have to make. but it is true, _ is going to have to make. but it is true the — is going to have to make. but it is true, the whole of the media is changing — true, the whole of the media is changing. we are having the same issues _ changing. we are having the same issues in _ changing. we are having the same issues in newspapers, people get their news— issues in newspapers, people get their news now through the internet as well— their news now through the internet as well as _ their news now through the internet as well as printed copies. we are all having — as well as printed copies. we are all having to change and the bbc is ”p all having to change and the bbc is up against — all having to change and the bbc is up against the likes of netflix, streaming and all sorts of other competition. and perhaps it is worth the government's while to look at that fee _ the government's while to look at that fee of— the government's while to look at that fee of £159 a year which people regard _ that fee of £159 a year which people regard as _ that fee of £159 a year which people regard as a — that fee of £159 a year which people regard as a tax. i must say, the bbc is a much _ regard as a tax. i must say, the bbc is a much treasured institution and some _ is a much treasured institution and some of— is a much treasured institution and some of the — is a much treasured institution and some of the public service broadcasting it does must be protected. the arts, classical
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music, — protected. the arts, classical music, drama, high quality broadcasting which you won't get from _ broadcasting which you won't get from any— broadcasting which you won't get from any other commercial outlets. in from any other commercial outlets. in terms— from any other commercial outlets. in terms of— from any other commercial outlets. in terms of saying this license fee announcement will be the last, it is time to discuss new ways of funding, thatis time to discuss new ways of funding, that is something that has been discussed potentially how the bbc could be funded going forward without a licence fee? absolutely, let's see how _ without a licence fee? absolutely, let's see how long _ without a licence fee? absolutely, let's see how long nadine - without a licence fee? absolutely, let's see how long nadine dorries| without a licence fee? absolutely, i let's see how long nadine dorries is let�*s see how long nadine dorries is in power to see that through, she is very close to the prime minister. inflation might touch six or 7% this year, so if there is a freeze for the next two years, this will represent a huge real terms cut for the bbc and you know, in terms of slicing and dicing, i completely agree with what they�*ve said about some of the things the bbc does really well. but how you can manage
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to keep its that some people want that other people don�*t like, we all have a stake in the bbc, so that will be very difficult for the bbc to take on board if this freeze does actually happen. we to take on board if this freeze does actually happen-— to take on board if this freeze does actually happen. we are going to end with two royal — actually happen. we are going to end with two royal stories, _ actually happen. we are going to end with two royal stories, difficult - with two royal stories, difficult issues for the queen, particularly in her platinum jubilee year. harry is on the front of the mail on sunday and the other story on the front of that paper, he is starting legal action to allow for security, tele— security to be provided for him and his family while in the uk. he says he will pay for it, but without it, they cannot be properly rotected. , , ., protected. it is true there is a secial protected. it is true there is a special type _ protected. it is true there is a special type of— protected. it is true there is a special type of security - protected. it is true there is a special type of security that i protected. it is true there is a j special type of security that is required — special type of security that is required for members of the royal family. _ required for members of the royal family, which only scotland yard know _ family, which only scotland yard know how — family, which only scotland yard know how to provide. however, prince harry— know how to provide. however, prince harry has _ know how to provide. however, prince harry has decided he is no
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some people are happy he has gone to live a new— some people are happy he has gone to live a new life and will not cause him any— live a new life and will not cause him any harm. it is the first time a royal— him any harm. it is the first time a royal has— him any harm. it is the first time a royal has taken on the government in the courts _ royal has taken on the government in the courts it — royal has taken on the government in the courts. it will be interesting to see _ the courts. it will be interesting to see how this one plays out. i think— to see how this one plays out. i think he — to see how this one plays out. i think he only found out when he came over for— think he only found out when he came over for the _ think he only found out when he came over for the unveiling of princess diana's_ over for the unveiling of princess diana's statue several months ago that he _ diana's statue several months ago that he realised things have changed. but he is really taking people — changed. but he is really taking people on and this is another chapter— people on and this is another chapter in— people on and this is another chapter in his new life. that people on and this is another chapter in his new life. that of the
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leual chapter in his new life. that of the legal row. — chapter in his new life. that of the legal row. the _ chapter in his new life. that of the legal row, the one _ chapter in his new life. that of the legal row, the one involving - chapter in his new life. that of the | legal row, the one involving prince andrew. the sunday times saying the new legal tactics sparked a victim blaming row. the duke �*s lawyers demanding to see the mental health records of his accuser. john, tell us more that one? the records of his accuser. john, tell us more that one?— us more that one? the prince's la ers us more that one? the prince's lawyers are _ us more that one? the prince's lawyers are going _ us more that one? the prince's lawyers are going to _ us more that one? the prince's lawyers are going to get - us more that one? the prince's lawyers are going to get dirty l us more that one? the prince's| lawyers are going to get dirty to take on virginia giuffre�*s accusations. the prince denies all of the allegations strenuously, but the point is around false memories that virginia giuffre may have had, which is a controversial tactic to take. if they are going to challenge what she says, they are going to have to tackle her allegations head on. it should also be noted that 95% of civil cases in the us don�*t actually go to court. they might be going in tough and seeing how people react, but if he has got enough
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money down the back of the sofa, he might be looking to come to an agreement, a financial agreement for the case not to go ahead. let�*s agreement, a financial agreement for the case not to go ahead.— the case not to go ahead. let's end with something _ the case not to go ahead. let's end with something a _ the case not to go ahead. let's end with something a bit _ the case not to go ahead. let's end with something a bit lighter, - the case not to go ahead. let's end | with something a bit lighter, maybe not, i don�*t know? i don�*t know if you have a mother—in—law and what your relationships are, but there is a piece on the mail on sunday, les dawson was right, we do fight more with mothers who wants to go first? go on, dave, it is a tricky one. i have fond memories of my late mother—in—law. i used to pull her le- mother—in—law. i used to pull her leg endlessly, but always to her face _ leg endlessly, but always to her face les — leg endlessly, but always to her face. les dawson made an occupation out of— face. les dawson made an occupation out of it _ face. les dawson made an occupation out of it it _ face. les dawson made an occupation out of it. it says in this article it is— out of it. it says in this article it is all— out of it. it says in this article it is all down to the fact it is a biological— it is all down to the fact it is a biological thing, it is all down to the fact it is a biologicalthing, because it is all down to the fact it is a biological thing, because we feel closer— biological thing, because we feel closer to — biological thing, because we feel closer to our own mother than the mother—in—law. but there is a joke about— mother—in—law. but there is a joke about where —
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mother—in—law. but there is a joke about where she said to les dawson, i am about where she said to les dawson, i am going _ about where she said to les dawson, i am going to dance on your grave when _ i am going to dance on your grave when you — i am going to dance on your grave when you are gone. he said good, i am getting — when you are gone. he said good, i am getting buried at sea. the other one was, _ am getting buried at sea. the other one was, you could always tell when his mother—in—law was coming to visit _ his mother—in—law was coming to visit because the mice used tojump into the _ visit because the mice used tojump into the traps. great fun, very funny— into the traps. great fun, very funny and _ into the traps. great fun, very funny and nostalgic.— into the traps. great fun, very funny and nostalgic. john, your thoughts? _ funny and nostalgic. john, your thoughts? i— funny and nostalgic. john, your thoughts? i have _ funny and nostalgic. john, your thoughts? i have got _ funny and nostalgic. john, your thoughts? i have got to - thoughts? i have got to mother-in-law - thoughts? i have got to mother-in-law is. - thoughts? i have got to mother-in-law is. my i thoughts? i have got to - mother-in-law is. my wife's thoughts? i have got to _ mother-in-law is. my wife's family mother—in—law is. my wife�*s family have remarried. i have an incredibly harmonious and wonderful relationship with them both. that is a aood relationship with them both. that is a good note — relationship with them both. that is a good note to _ relationship with them both. that is a good note to end _ relationship with them both. that is a good note to end it _ relationship with them both. that is a good note to end it on, _ relationship with them both. that is a good note to end it on, thank - relationship with them both. that is a good note to end it on, thank you| a good note to end it on, thank you forjoining us and have a good day. that�*s it for the papers today, i hope you have a good day. hello, i think a pleasant enough day for most of us in store. could be a
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few showers for a time today, but on the whole we will focus on the sunny spells. let�*s have a look at the big picture across our neck of the woods. a weather front has been moving into scotland and northern ireland and this weather front has brought temporarily cloudy conditions in the north, a little bit of rain but also behind it, you can see slightly milder air which is riding around this area of high pressure here. the milder air has pushed across the uk, hence it wasn�*t so frosty this morning. he is the weather front around three o�*clock in the afternoon, a line of cloud across parts of east anglia, the midlands, southern parts of wales, few spots of rain at most. further north, sunny weather. a bit blustery with a few showers in the northern isles. tonight, the winds for light commits area of high pressure waddles back across the uk. a frost to come tonight, temperatures in city centres will be close to freezing across england, wales and northern ireland. milder
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in the north of scotland because of the ocean wind. the high pressure is over the uk and france on monday, so dominating the weather across many western parts of europe and it will stick around for most of the week. that means the week ahead will have frosty and foggy mornings, but sunshine during the day. early on monday we will have patchy mist and fog across parts of england and wales, but on the whole it is a sunny start for most of us and that is how it will be during the day. whether you are in the south of the country or the north, a fine start to the week. temperatures will be around 8 degrees pretty much across the board. this is the forecast map for tuesday, the board. this is the forecast map fortuesday, high the board. this is the forecast map for tuesday, high pressure in the south so calm conditions here. the weather front moving through the northern half of the uk and the north—west, so rain may be for northern ireland and scotland. but to the south, dense fog likely early on tuesday morning across parts of england, particularly east anglia and the south—east. i think on tuesday, a chance of some showers in
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the north of the country but staying brighter, sunnier weather in the south. this is the outlook for the week ahead, generally seeking with high pressure, we are in for a fine, calm and settled week. enjoy the rest of the weekend.
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this is bbc news, broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i�*m joanna gosling. our top stories... novak djokovic is set to be deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star�*s appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. the orders of the court are, one, the amended application be dismissed with costs. disappointment and dismay from supporters in melbourne — djokovic himself says he is "extremely disappointed" but will co—operate fully. australia�*s prime minister has welcomed the ruling, tennis australia said it respects the court�*s decision. a sixth conservative mp has publically called for borisjohnson to step down as prime minister — following a series of parties at downing street during lockdown restrictions.

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