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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 16, 2022 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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this is bbc news: i'm annita mcveigh with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. running out of time — novak djokovic arrives to hear his lawyers�* final appeal against the cancellation of his australian visa. police in texas are negotiating with a man who appears to have taken hostages at a synagogue. the first case of the omicron variant confirmed in beijing, just three weeks before the start of the winter olympics. a huge underwater volcanic eruption near tonga triggers tsunami warnings across the pacific ocean.
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hello and welcome. the world's number one tennis player, novak djokovic, has begun his appeal against his deportation from australia. the government says that djokovic, who hasn't had a covid jab, is a threat to public order and might foster "anti—vaccination sentiment". his lawyers say the decision to throw him out the country is irrational. djokovic still hopes to begin defending his australian open title on monday. judges from the australian federal court are hearing the appeal via video—link. our correspondent, phil mercer, is outside the court in melbourne. he's scheduled to play his
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opening round match against a fellow serbian on monday as well. time is of the essence. we know that he left he is following proceedings that his lawyers office, so he should know sometime today whether he is free to compete in the australian open or will be forced to depart, be deported from australia. obviously, he has had his supporters throughout all of this there in australia, but how would you sum up the majority of the public mood right now?— majority of the public mood riaht now? . ., ., right now? there are a handful of novak djokovic's _ right now? there are a handfull of novak djokovic's supporters, many serbian and australians who have rallied to the cause.
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some of them are here today, they are following proceedings online on their phones and having spoken to a couple of them a few minutes ago, they say they are confident that their hero will be exonerated, that his visa will be reinstated and that he will be allowed to play. as for the broader australian population, a country of 25 billion people, various online polls have shown that the majority of people want to see novak djokovic expeued want to see novak djokovic expelled from this country. australia has high rates of vaccination, but also very high rates of covid—19 infection, we are seeing tens of thousands of new infections being reported every day in this country this is uncharted territory throughout the pandemic for australia. this is a nervous uncertain time, and many australians believe that here we have an unvaccinated tennis player who has come into the country, and their opinion, flouting the rules, and they
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want to see him gone. not everyone agrees with that, of course, some believe that novak djokovic has been treated unfairly. at the real decision that matters of crisper today and the australian open is the decision by the full courts of the federal court here in australia deciding whether his visa should be reinstated, or he will be on his way back home. in the united states the fbi are negotiating with a man who has taken people hostage at a synagogue. homes nearby in the city of colleyville are being evacuated. it's not thought anyone has been injured. our correspondent nomia iqbal is following latest developments from washington. what we do know so far is that this started around about three hours ago. so the congregation shabbat service was under way, it was being live streamed, there were no images, though — but people that were listening to it could hear a man. and he, before the live feed was cut off, could be heard
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speaking, cursing at times, he was sounding angry, talking about his sister, demanding she be released from prison. there's been also speculation about who this man is, but we don't have any confirmation yet from police so far. the police say that they've made contact with him and that they conducted operations on the block where the congregation is located, which is close to dallas. they say the situation is ongoing and they have, as you mentioned, told residents to avoid the area. a white house official has also said that the white house is monitoring things. amie liebowitz reports on anti—semitism and jewish culture for the bbc world service. shejoins me now. no coincidence that would seem that this incident began on saturday morning land, of course, the synagogue would be full of worshipers.— full of worshipers. definitely not a coincidence. _ full of worshipers. definitely not a coincidence. it - full of worshipers. definitely not a coincidence. it 10096 i not a coincidence. it 100% would've been planned. every
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saturday, sabbath, jewish people attend synagogue services, even during colder times, even during colder times. �* , , , times. and typically, there would be _ times. and typically, there would be security - times. and typically, there would be security at - times. and typically, there would be security at the i would be security at the entrance to synagogues. we have got to wonder how this individual is able to get in. yes, definitely. what we can see from the imaging is that there was security there and generally outside of an american synagogue, you would see police, both local and state, possibly. security guards, fences, bulletproof dories, you know, people walking around in plain clothing, say you have to wonder how this person got inside. ., , . , wonder how this person got inside. . , . , , inside. that security in place, it has been — inside. that security in place, it has been for— inside. that security in place, it has been for a _ inside. that security in place, it has been for a long - inside. that security in place, it has been for a long time, l it has been for a long time, but certainly there's been a rise in anti—semitic attacks, hasn't there? rise in anti-semitic attacks, hasn't there?— rise in anti-semitic attacks, hasn't there? yes there has.
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it's an all-time _ hasn't there? yes there has. it's an all-time high - hasn't there? yes there has. it's an all-time high at - hasn't there? yes there has. it's an all-time high at the i it's an all—time high at the moment in terms of anti—semitic attacks. according to the anti—defamation league, over 2000 attacks where recorded in the us in 2020. this 2000 attacks where recorded in the us in 2020.— the us in 2020. this is a reform _ the us in 2020. this is a reform synagogue, - the us in 2020. this is a reform synagogue, we | reform synagogue, we understand. why is that? —— significant? understand. why is that? -- significant?— significant? this is on a live stream. _ significant? this is on a live stream, which _ significant? this is on a live stream, which is _ significant? this is on a live stream, which is quite - stream, which is quite untypicalfor stream, which is quite untypical for shabbat services. synagogues in terms of performing judaism for various —— preserves judaism performing judaism for various —— preservesjudaism but adapts to the common area, they usually do not use electronics or electricity during shabbat, which is friday, sundown to saturday sundown. but that's reform synagogue, they did use zuma. and supposedly, that was because they have been doing weekly covid—i9 zoom recordings to allow their congregants to watch and pray together during this difficult time. it's also
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recorded by the post that this was during a bar mitzvah, which means that young children would have been there as well. qm. have been there as well. 0k, am , have been there as well. 0k, amy. thank _ have been there as well. 0k, amy. thank you _ have been there as well. 0k, amy, thank you for _ have been there as well. 0k, amy, thank you for that. - specialist on anti—semitism and jewish culture for bbc world service. lawyers for the duke of york, want to question two people, as part of the civil sexual abuse case being brought by virginia giuffre in america. according to court documents, prince andrew's legal team argue ms giuffre may be suffering from false memories, and they want to hear from her husband and her psychologist. yesterday, ms giuffre's team asked for evidence from two people in the uk, including the duke's former assistant. prince andrew denies all the allegations against him. the senior conservative mp and former minister, tobias ellwood, says borisjohnson must "lead or step aside," following the controversy over gatherings at downing st, while covid restrictions were in place.
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a number of tory backbenchers, say they've been inundated with messages from angry constituents, about the growing list of parties, dating back to the spring of 2020. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says it's now in the national interest, for mrjohnson to be removed from office. our political correspondent, iain watson has the latest. borisjohnson has come under renewed pressure following number 10's apology to buckingham palace over a leaving do held last year on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. so today the labour leader urged conservative mps to force him out. of course there's a party advantage in him going, but actually it's now in the national interest that he goes, so it's very important now that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. usually when opposition mps call for a prime minister to go, the troops rally round, but tonight the former government minister — tim loughton — tweeted...
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the chairmen of the commons defence committee, tobias ellwood, told the bbc, borisjohnson should lead, or step aside. outside downing street, demonstrators against a forthcoming police bill were making their views of the prime minister known. far more subtly, some of his own mps have also been doing so. what may be worrying the prime minister is that some of his former supporters now want him to go. one mp, elected in 2019, told me he owed his seat to borisjohnson but now, he says, "this feels terminal, and he should go quickly." and another mp i spoke to several days ago, who told me then that he thought borisjohnson could ride out this political storm, got back in touch today to say he's now damaging the conservative brand and it was a question of when,
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not if, he leaves number 10. no cabinet minister, though, has broken ranks. inside downsting street, there is hope hat an investigation by a senior civil servant may say that the prime minister has not broken covid rules. and the expected lifting of restrictions later this month could improve his mps' mood. the conservatives snatched a seat in yorkshire from labour in 2015, but now conservative voters here are in market for a different leader. i'm 50—50 as to whether i think he should go or not. there are so many people who have lost people, and they have stood there telling us to do one thing and doing another. ijust think it's disgraceful. some conservative mps are saying it's now the mood on doorstep that could determine whether borisjohnson is shown the door. iain watson, bbc news. beijing has confirmed its first locally transmitted case of the omicron variant of covid, just three weeks before the chinese capital hosts the winter olympics. it was detected in the haidian district, home to many tech firms. here's stephanie prentice.
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the world's bus populist capital city trying to avoid the most contagious form of coal that yet, jet three weeks ahead of the games, beijing's luck is running out. in ahead of the games, bei'ing's luck is running outfi luck is running out. in the morning _ luck is running out. in the morning of— luck is running out. in the morning ofjanuary - luck is running out. in the morning ofjanuary 15, - luck is running out. in the morning ofjanuary15, a l morning of january 15, a testing morning ofjanuary15, a testing agency reported abnormal nucleic acid testing results. the results remain positive but the detection of the mutations of the omicron variant. . ., �* , the mutations of the omicron variant. . ., �*, , . variant. omicron's distinctive mutations — variant. omicron's distinctive mutations found _ variant. omicron's distinctive mutations found in _ variant. omicron's distinctive mutations found in one - variant. omicron's distinctive mutations found in one of. variant. omicron's distinctive | mutations found in one of the cities 21 million residents testing due to work requirements medicaid set to the china's biggest counsel prior to their zero covid strategy. at the pressure on, officials say the containment plans are working since the country's rest omicron case was reported a week ago with cases then appearing in shanghai. the
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sill-over then appearing in shanghai. the spill-over of _ then appearing in shanghai. tie: spill—over of infections is gradually declining. it's necessary to continue to do a good job in the management and control of the quarantine sites. , , . ., control of the quarantine sites. ,, . ., . , sites. the district of the city known as — sites. the district of the city known as its _ sites. the district of the city known as its tech _ sites. the district of the city known as its tech hub - sites. the district of the city known as its tech hub is - sites. the district of the city| known as its tech hub is now facing restrictions on places linked to the omicron case. the latest in a series of experimental measure like crackdowns on public buses in cities across the country. the winter games will not be held in what officials call a closed loop, meaning limited spectators in venues, no overseas visitors and personnel only interacting with an air bubble. whether that will be enough to stop a wave of cases and safeguard the games will only become clear in the coming weeks. let's cross to new york and get more now from yanzhong huang — senior fellow for global health at the council on foreign relations. thank you very much forjoining us. if beijing is confirming
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its first locally transmitted case of omicron and the city, how many more cases do you think there might actually be? we don't know, and i think that's what everybody is concerned about because of that activity from the first confirmed case was tracked back to december 31. you can have a hidden spread of the virus in the city. you know, how widespread this situation is, we do not know yet. my broader oints, we do not know yet. my broader points. and _ we do not know yet. my broader points. and you _ we do not know yet. my broader points, and you have _ we do not know yet. my broader points, and you have alluded - we do not know yet. my broader points, and you have alluded to | points, and you have alluded to it than that period of time, given what we know about the transmissibility of omicron, it is likely that there are more locally transmitted case is. that is quite possible, but the
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data also depends on how you factor in the government the containment measures are. china is pursuing _ containment measures are. china is pursuing a _ containment measures are. china is pursuing a zero _ containment measures are. china is pursuing a zero covid _ is pursuing a zero covid policy. how much pressure do you think that the winter olympics are going to put on that and indeed the lunar new year coming up on the 1st of february. year coming up on the 1st of february-— year coming up on the 1st of februa . february. on the three weeks away from — february. on the three weeks away from the _ february. on the three weeks away from the opening - february. on the three weeks away from the opening of- february. on the three weeks away from the opening of the | away from the opening of the winter olympics in the chinese union. the government definitely has doubled down on the campaign against covid—19, including the looming omicron crisis. might have heard that the government has already china has cancelled many flights to the united states, so i think they are still confident that their existing approach will work, but the problem is that they think the worst is not yet to come, given
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that we see thousands of athletes and logistical staff arriving in beijing to attend the winter olympics tablet do you think authorities may have to contend a different strategy because of that transmissibility of omicron? i think the government is now in a conundrum of zero covid, because they've abandoned the approach that would be tantamount to admitting the failure of this strategy, at the time they want to use the old winter olympics to showcase not just athletic achievement, but also the success of that strategy, but if they don't, right, if they choose not to take draconian measures like the whole city locked down, you can see the silent spread of the omicron variant and could
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be inundated with the variance in a couple of weeks. find be inundated with the variance in a couple of weeks. and where is china on _ in a couple of weeks. and where is china on its _ in a couple of weeks. and where is china on its vaccination - in a couple of weeks. and where is china on its vaccination and i is china on its vaccination and rate at the moment is how is it doing? rate at the moment is how is it doinu ? ~ ., , ., doing? while china is doing very good _ doing? while china is doing very good in _ doing? while china is doing very good in terms - doing? while china is doing very good in terms of- very good in terms of vaccinating its people. 83% of the population have been fully vaccinated, but the thing is, we know, even the best vaccines are not effective in preventing new infections. and that chinese vaccine studies seem to have shown a relatively not as effective in preventing the effective in preventing the effect —— infections. effective in preventing the effect -- infections. thank you very much _ effect -- infections. thank you very much professor. - tsunami alerts have been issued, after the eruption of a giant underwater volcano, near the island of tonga in the pacific ocean. australia's east coast has been put on alert along with the west coast of america,and hawaii.
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injapan too, there are warnings of possible waves, three metres high. here'sjon donnison. the violence of this underwater volcano was captured from space, triggering tsunami warnings across the pacific. tonga, made up of more than 170 islands, was the first to be hit. this video, which is yet to be verified, is thought to be from within a church. 500 miles away in fiji, they felt the force too. widespread coastal flooding, but thankfully no casualties reported so far. the volcano erupted just north of tonga's main island. but the shock waves swept across the globe, with tsunami alerts stretching from chile to japan. it was very short but very explosive. so it tells us there was enough
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energy released in this very short lived blast that was able to essentially explode water, push water out of the way and create this shock wave that sent ripples literally across the globe. in california, many beaches were closed as a precaution — and that's more than 5,000 miles from where the volcano erupted. john donnison, bbc news. jacinda ardern said on sunday that images of volcanic eruptionnear tonga were "hugely concerning" and agencies were stilltrying to establish full communications with the country. communications in all of tonga were cut off as a result ofthe eruption, making any assessment difficult, ardern said. butthe defence force and foreign ministry are working to establishwhat�*s needed and how new zealand can help, she added.
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police in sweden are trying to track down a drone that was seen flying over a nuclear power plant north of stockholm. the incidents took place on the same day that sweden deployed armed troops and combat vehicles to the strategic island of gotland, against a backdrop of increased russian activity in the baltic. sweden is not a nato member, but has close ties to the alliance. scientists at the university of hull have developed a new way of cooling—down computers and reducing their impact on the planet. the system can be used in computer data centres that generate huge amounts of heat from internet activity. the new technology is saving money and co2 — as our environment correspondent paul murphy reports.
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in a laboratory on the outskirts of hull, a high—tech system that has taken 15 years to develop. essentially, it is a way of cooling computers down without the expense and carbon emissions associated with conventional air conditioning. it's driven by water evaporation, not by a refrigerant. it's the stability of the nature. if it evaporates the water, you have loads of energy being taken away by changing the waterfrom liquid to the moisture in the air. data centres are a few of us will ever visit, but they are the backbone of our internet use. processing everything from simple e—mail to online shopping. and all of this generates heat. hull city council has its own data centre, and by using this new technology the authority's been able to save thousands of its cooling bills and reduce emissions. everything we have nowadays, we just store electronically. so it is a growing carbon impact for the council, but also globally as well. it is a big global challenge.
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so the opportunity to work with the university is really important, to actually take advantage of the innovation at the university and the research that is done there. and this new cooling technology is generating interest from outside the world of computers. what is very exciting. it is not only for data centres, it can be used for other areas of cooling, including agriculture and including other industrial process cooling. and also office cooling. this is still a pilot project, but the technology is ground—breaking and is already attracting attention from around the world. paul murphy, bbc look north, at the university of hull's aura innovation centre. a year of events to celebrate france's most famous playwright, moliere, are getting under way. it's the 400th anniversary of moliere's baptism — his birth date isn't known. although he is considered the father of french theatre, his influence has been felt across the world, including here in the uk. earlier, the bbc spoke to bafta—winning aneel gupta,
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the man behind famous comedies including the office and citizan khan. he told us about his experience adapting moliere's play tartuffe into a story about a british—pakistani family in modern—day birmingham. i was expecting, i was thinking a 400—year—old french comedy, those aren't things that go together, in my mind. so, i was very pleasantly surprised at how funny ifound it, actually, and a realjoy of it and the real genius of moliere is the comic structure. you know, when you are constructing a farce, which this is, essentially, the comic structure. you know, when you are constructing a farce, which this is, essentially, it is an incredibly intricate and very difficult and precise thing to do, and what we realised when we read the original play was that structure is absolutely watertight. it is a gold—plated structure and we really didn't change. we were given licence to change whatever we wanted,
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but we realised that this is a gift, we will keep all of this because it all still works, all the comic beats are there and that was the real revelation for us. wildlife experts in scotland are hopeful that progress is being made, in efforts to save the native red squirrel from extinction. alexandra mackenzie has that story. the native red squirrel. not a common sight in the uk, but now limited to areas like here in barhill wood in dumfries & galloway. how many red squirrels would you have in this wood? in november last year we had over 30, which is an exceptional amount. you know, there's not many places in scotland where you'd find that level. so what makes this the ideal habitat for the red squirrel? principally it's the age of the trees, that they are now producing cones regularly and that enables food to be available at different
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times of the year. the larch produces cones in the summertime, the scots pine in the winter, so it gives the squirrels a good wide feeding pattern. but of course, they are in competition with the grey squirrels. wherever you get the grey squirrels, the reds are going to disappear, unfortunately. the scottish wildlife trust said having a predator, the pine marten, helps to control the grey squirrel population. but that is not enough. grey squirrel control is going to be necessary for a long time yet. so that will be the key thing that needs to keep continuing in a targeted and landscape—scale approach, you know, which is tricky and hard work but what is needed if we want to keep our red squirrels. the battle for survival with the more feisty grey squirrel is likely to continue for some time. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news, kirkcudbright. you can reach me on twitter —
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i'm @annitabbc. you are watching bbc news. hello, there. saturday was a rather cloudy day across much of the country. sunday looks brighter once we lose this weather front which is spreading southwards across the country, being a band of cloud and showers. and you'll also notice it will be a breezy day pretty much across the board, but certainly in the north, where we'll have gales across northern scotland. you can see why on the pressure chart, quite a few isobars here. this is the weather front spreading its way southwards across the country — this one brought some showers to southern areas overnight, that will eventually clear away and take any showers for the far south east of england. this weather front in the north will continue to sink southward through the day — barely anything on it by the time it reaches england and wales, in fact, and to be fragmenting to allow for quite a bit of sunshine to develop. and there'll be lots of sunshine across the northern
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half of the country. a breezy day, like i mentioned, windy in the north with gales for the northern isles. our air source will be coming in off the atlantic and, with quite a bit of sunshine around, it should feel a touch milder with highs of 8—11 celsius for many of us. now, as we move into sunday evening and overnight, the winds ease down for many — still quite breezy across the north uk, further showers for the northern isles, but high pressure begins to build in clear skies. temperatures will drop — and again, it's going to be a colder one than what we've seen through saturday night, with temperatures below freezing, and also some dense mist and fog patches around. our area of high pressure then, building in for monday, will bring a lot of settled weather — you can see barely any isobars on the chart, so winds will remain light all day for most of us. still some breeze and some cloud for the far north of scotland, but elsewhere, it's a chilly start with some frost and fog, which will clear and then leave actually a pretty pleasant day. quite a lot of sunshine up and down the country. after the chilly start, temperatures will reach highs of 7—9 celsius for most of us. as we move out of monday into tuesday, we see this frontal system sweep in off
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the atlantic, and that'll bring a wetter and windy day for the northern half of the country, the south still influenced by this area of high pressure. so it turns wet and windy for northern ireland, western scotland first, spreading across the rest of scotland, perhaps northern england into the afternoon. a chilly start with some fog across central and southern areas, but also a little bit of sunshine tending to break through in the afternoon as temperatures range from 7—11 celsius. thereafter, high pressure dominates the scene for the rest of the week and into the following weekend. so a lot of fine, unsettled weather with overnight frost and fog. see you later.
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this is bbc news, the headlines...
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a court in australia is hearing the final appeal of the tennis player, novak djokovic, against the cancellation of his visa. his lawyers are laying out their case in front of three federal courtjudges. if djokovic loses this appeal, he faces deportation and a three—year visa ban. the fbi in texas is negotiating with a man believed to have taken four people hostage at a synagogue. police at the scene in a dallas suburb say the man is armed, and have told residents to avoid the area. the incident happened as a service was being streamed live. an underwater volcanic eruption near tonga has triggered tsunami warnings across the pacific ocean. waves of more than a metre have crashed into tonga. alerts are in place from the west coast of the united states to japan, where people are warned of waves as high as three metres.

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