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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 15, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the prime minister is told to lead or step aside, as details of lockdown parties continue to emerge. the leader of the opposition says it's now in the national interest for borisjohnson to go. we're witnessing every day the broken spectacle of the prime minister mired in deceit, deception, and unable to lead. prince andrew's lawyers say virginia giuffre who has accused him of sexual assault may suffer from false memories as both sides in the civil case seek more evidence. the prince has repeatedly denied the allegations. a hearing is geting underway in melbourne shortly which will decide whether novak djokovic will be deported from australia after the government removed his visa for a second time.
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the eruption of a giant underwater volcano near the island nation of tonga has triggered tsunami waves across the southwestern pacific. the prime minister is being urged to lead or step aside, following the controversy over downing street gatherings while covid restrictions were in place. the call comes from senior conservative mp and former minister, tobias ellwood. a number of tory backbenchers say they've been inundated with messages from angry constituents, about the growing list of parties, dating back to the spring of 2020. labour says it's now in the national interest for mrjohnson to be removed from office.
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our political correspondent, iain watson, reports. borisjohnson has come under renewed pressure following number 10's apology to buckingham palace over a leaving do held last year on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. so today the labour leader urged conservative mps to force him out. of course there's a party advantage in him going, but actually it's now in the national interest that he goes, so it's very important that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. usually when opposition mps call for a prime minister to go, the troops rally round, but today the conservative chairman of the commons defence committee, tobias ellwood, did not exactly defend his boss when he told the bbc borisjohnson should lead, or step aside. outside downing street, demonstrators against a forthcoming police bill were making their views of the prime minister known. far more subtly, some of his own mps have also been doing so. what may be worrying
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the prime minister is that some of his former supporters now want him to go. one mp, elected in 2019, told me he owed his seat to borisjohnson but now, he says, this feels terminal, and he should go quickly. and another mp i spoke to several days ago, who told me then that he thought borisjohnson could ride out this political storm, got back in touch today to say he's now damaging the conservative brand and it was a question of when, not if, he leaves number 10. no cabinet minister, though, has broken ranks and there is hope inside downing street that an investigation by a senior civil servant may say that the prime minister has not broken covid rules. and the expected lifting of restrictions later this month could improve his mps�* mood. this weekend, conservative mps will be listening closely to their voters and the mood on the doorstep could determine whether the prime minister is shown the door. iain watson, bbc news. lawyers for the duke of york
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want to question two people we're just hearing that the duke of has applied for a rigid —— judicial review regarding paying for police for himself and his family when they are in the uk. that is all the information we have at the moment, he has applied for a judicial review of a home office decision not to allow him to pay personally for police protection for himself and his family when they are in the uk. we will bring you some more details on that as and when we get them but thatis on that as and when we get them but that is all we are hearing at the moment. lawyers for the duke of york want to question two people as part of the civil sexual abuse case being brought by virginia giuffre in america. according to court documents,
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prince andrew's legal team argue ms giuffre may be suffering from false memories, and they want to hear from her husband and her psychologist. prince andrew denies all the allegations against him. our correspondent in washington, nomia iqbal has more. this comes 2a hours after virginia giuffre requested witness accounts from prince andrew's former assistant and a woman at a nightclub at the time of the allegations, and now the prince has hit back with requests of his own. as you mentioned, his legal team wants to hearfrom her husband, robert giuffre. they want to know how he met his wife in 2002, the household finances. they also want to ask about virginia giuffre�*s relationship with the convicted sex offenders jeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell. the duke's side is claiming that mr giuffre had a role in recruiting underage girls to be trafficked. they also contend, as you mentioned there, that she may suffer from false memories, which is why they want to examine the second person, her doctor, a psychologist, judith lightfoot. now both the husband and doctor are residents of australia, so the duke's legal team have requested that letters
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are issued from the us court to the central authority of australia to get the testimonies. a hearing is geting underway in melbourne shortly, which will decide whether novak djokovic will be deported from australia after the government removed his visa for a second time. the government says the men's world number one tennis player, who hasn't been vaccinated against covid, is a threat to public health. his lawyers are appealing, describing the latest decision to cancel his visa, as irrational. today marks 25 years since princess diana walked through a minefield in angola to raise awareness of the lasting impact of conflict. diana captured global attention when she walked through the live minefield in 1997, escorted by the british landmine clearance charity the halo trust. she never lived to see the full
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impact of her visit — such as the signing of an international treaty to outlaw the weapons — as she died later that year. we've been speaking to louise vaughan from the halo trust who explained how that walk was organised. she was already very much involved with the international red cross and she was planning a trip to angola to highlight the terrible impact that these weapons were having on normal people who had absolutely nothing to do with the war, and particularly children. so when we heard she wanted to visit a minefield to showcase what was happening, we agreed that we would accompany her. the minefield had very recently been cleared by my colleagues there. essentially, it was amazingly brave of her. it is important to realise that when she visited the civil war was still raging, things were very dangerous there. she was clearly quite nervous about walking through the minefield but she was very shrewd — she knew that those images of her would absolutely become global front—page news everywhere and that would make it impossible to ignore that there had to be a universal ban on these
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totally indiscriminate weapons. the instant impact was tremendous — it stopped global headlines. everybody is now familiar with those images, one of the most iconic of her life. within months. there had been a grassroots campaign to ban landmines throughout the world for a number of years, but by making it front—page news she made it impossible for governments to ignore. and so, as you say, the anti—landmine ban treaty, the ottawa treaty, came into being by the end of the year. tragically she didn't live to see that, but that treaty is still one of the most successful of all time — 164 signatories, landmines are virtually obsolete now from production and from use, and we've seen over 30 countries cleared of landmines, including mozambique which was one of the most heavily land—mined countries on earth. so it's been an extremely powerful treaty and has saved literally millions and millions of lives.
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will he stay or will go? novak djokovic's fate in australia will soon be in the hands of a federal court. the world number one tennis player, who's unvaccinated, is appealing a government decision to cancel his visa. the second court hearing is under way in just a few minutes with a full bench of three judges deciding whether the defendant champion stays to compete or gets deported from australia. also on the programme. in america, police are negotiating with a man who's taken hostages
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in a synagogue, in texas. a former tory minister calls for borisjohnson to resign after the controversy over downing street parties. and, the moment a giant underwater volcano erupts, prompting tsunami warnings across the pacific. good evening. a court hearing is due to begin in the next few minutes, to decide whether novak djokovic should be allowed to remain in australia. his visa was cancelled for a second time, after the government decided the world number one tennis player, who isn't vaccinated against covid, was a threat to public health. his lawyers are appealing, describing the decision as "irrational. djokovic is due to play in the australian open
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tournament on monday. from melbourne, here's shaimaa khalil. free, free the refugee! once again, novak djokovic is in detention, and once again, the world number one is challenging the cancellation of his visa. in court documents, we learned that the immigration minister alex hawke made his decision because the player's presence in australia may foster anti—vaccination sentiment. the tennis star's legal team say the argument was invalid and irrational, and that deporting him would potentially undermine support for the vaccination programme. we want novak djokovic to play! and while some of djokovic's supporters gathered to back him, there has been little sympathy for the tennis player. i do feel that to make a statement to the rest of the world that we are sticking by what we have been calling for the last two years, i feel it is best for djokovic to probably sit this one out. i hope that the government and the judges hold their ground
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and say, no, if you don't want to get a vaccination and you don't want to follow our rules, then you can't come in. his rival rafael nadal said the grand slam is not just about djokovic. the australian open is much more important than any player so if he is playing, finally, ok. if he's not playing, the australian open will be a great australia open with or without him. that is my point of view. sunday's court decision is crucial for both sides — the top seed whose chance at a 21st grand slam rides on it, and a government that has been hugely embarrassed by the mishandling of this saga. novak djokovic has been allowed out of the immigration detention hotel where he spent the night not to be on the tennis court or go to practice but in his glorious office while a court decide his fate. this
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is 2a hours, less than 2a hours before the grand slam is due to start. he is in the draw to play on monday and we are still far away from any certainty about what will happen. but the government would the decision is will come out of this usually bruised by what has turned into a chaotic scene politically and diplomatically and we also know that novak djokovic right now is not where he wants to be. lawyers for the duke of york want to question two people as part of the civil sexual abuse case being brought by virginia giuffre in america. according to court documents, prince andrew's legal team argue ms giuffre may be suffering from false memories, and they want to hear from her husband and her psychologist. yesterday, ms giuffre�*s team asked for evidence from two people in the uk, including the duke's former assistant. prince andrew denies all the allegations against him.
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a former conservative minister, tim lawton, says borisjohnson�*s position is now untenable following the controversy over gatherings at downing street while covid restrictions were in place. a number of tory backbenchers say they've been inundated with messages from angry constituents, about the growing list of parties dating back to the spring of 2020. the labour leader, sir keir starmer says it's now in the national interest for mrjohnson to be removed from office. our political correspondent, iain watson has the latest. borisjohnson has come under renewed pressure following number ten's apology to buckingham palace over a leaving do held last year on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. so today the labour leader urged conservative mps to force him out. of course there is a party advantage in him going, but now it is in the national interest that he goes, so it is important that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. usually when opposition mps call
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for a prime minister to go, the troops rally round, but today the conservative chairman of the commons defence committee tobias ellwood did not exactly defend his boss, when he told the bbc borisjohnson should lead, or step aside. and tim lawton said that he has come to the conclusion that his position was untenable. outside downing street demonstrators against a forthcoming police bill were making their views of the prime minister known, and far more subtly, some of his own mps have also been doing so. what may be worrying the prime minister is that some of his former supporters now want him to go. one mp, elected in 2019, told me he owed his seat to borisjohnson but now, he says, this feels terminal, and he should go quickly. and another mp i spoke to several days ago, who told me then he thought borisjohnson could ride out
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this political storm, got back in touch today to say he is now damaging the conservative brand and it was a question of when, not if, he leaves number ten. but no cabinet minister has broken ranks and there is hope inside downing street that the investigation by a senior civil servant may say that the prime minister has not broken covid rules. and the expected lifting of restrictions later this month could improve his mps�* mood. the conservatives snatched the seat of morley and outwood in yorkshire from labour in 2015. but now, are conservative voters here in the market for a different leader? i'm 50—50 as to whether i think he should go or not. you know so many people have lost people and there i stood there telling us to do one thing, and doing another. ijust think it's disgraceful. some conservative mps are saying it is now the mood on the doorstep that could determine whether boris johnson is shown the door.
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to continue conservative figures, former ministers, now questioning the future of borisjohnson. how significant is this? tobias ellwood has said that the prime minister should lead or step aside and to matt lowton has been a bit less cagey in his comments i think it is fair to say. but of course just because they are speaking out tonight does not mean to say we are close to the 5a needed to say we are close to the 5a needed to trigger a leadership contest. but tim lawton says that prevarication and evasion have been the order of the day and he cannot see how the facts reported by super eight can change the damage done to the reputation of the prime minister. that is significant because this enquiry by sue gray into allegations of these gatherings in downing street we are told is likely to report by the end of the week and
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several conservative mps are saying that they will be waiting for that report before reaching a conclusion. he has if you likejump the gun and i think many more will be following in a matter of days. police in texas are negotiating with a man, who's currently holding four people hostage, including a rabbi, at a synagogue in the town of colleyville. special weapons teams are on the scene, and local residents are being evacuated. nomia iqbal is in washington. what more do we know? there are many reports and information coming out but these are the details we can tell you so far. it started about three hours ago, the congregational service was under way and being live streamed. there were no images but a man could be heard speaking and at
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times cursing and also getting very angry and demanding that his sister be released from prison. police have not confirmed who he is. we have no confirmation of his identity so far although there has been speculation but no confirmation yet. police have said they made contact with him and conducted operations on the block where the congregation beth israel is located. they also told residents to avoid the area and one house official also said that they are monitoring things so this is very much an ongoing situation. thank you for that. the government's latest daily coronavirus figures show there were 81,713 new infections in the latest 24—hour period. that means there were 117,800 new cases on average per day in the last week. another 287 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 263 deaths per day.
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vaccinations are continuing, but at a slower pace. on average in the last week “14,015 people had a boosterjab, which means 63.1% of the population, aged 12 or over, have now had three doses. the authorities in beijing have confirmed the city's first locally transmitted case of the omicron variant of covid—19, just weeks before hosting the winter olympics. the infected individual�*s residence and workplace have been sealed. the games are due to start in the chinese capital on february 4th. tsunami alerts have been issued after the eruption of a giant underwater volcano near the island of tonga in the pacific ocean. australia's east coast has been put on alert along with the west coast of america, and hawaii. injapan too, there are warnings of possible waves, three metres high. here'sjon donnison. the violence of this underwater
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volcano was captured from space, triggering tsunami warnings across the pacific. tonga, made up of more than 170 islands, was the first to be hit. this video, which is yet to be verified, is thought to be from inside a church. 500 miles away in fiji, they felt the force, too. widespread coastal flooding, but thankfully no casualties reported so far. the volcano erupted just north of tonga's main island. but the shock wave swept across the globe, with tsunami alerts stretching from chile to japan. it was very short but it was very explosive, so it tells us that there was enough energy released in this very short blast to be able to essentially explode water, push water out of the way and create this shock wave that sent ripples, literally across the globe. even in california, many beaches
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were closed as a precaution. and that's more than 5000 miles from where the volcano erupted. jon donnison, bbc news. now, with all the sport, here's karthi gnanasegaram, at the bbc sport centre. clive, good evening. the fifth and final ashes test is in a new venue, hobart, but it's a rather familiar situation after an england batting collapse on day two. england were all out for 188 in theirfirst innings. and although australia lost three wickets at the start of their second innings, they lead england by 152 runs with play on day three starting in a few hours' time. our correspondent joe wilson reports. batting is the biggest problem for england and it is recurring. they began the innings with miscommunication and rory burns scampering for something he could
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not reach. run out on his return to the team he was dismissed. that is how the series began as you may recall. this training captain got rid ofjoe root lbw and what good could come after that? ollie pope recall to the team out for a frustrating to chris woakes made 36 of australia had earlier dropped him twice. his partnership with sam billings was at least something but 188 all out seemed to deplete little. might as well sing while still can. and england did the bowling well. the flying catch to get rid of david warner. and mark would rocketing. but australia may resume 152 ahead which may be enough already. joe wilson, bbc news. it's time to pop out of the room if you don't want to know today's
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football results as match of the day follows soon on bbc one. an excellent curling goal from kevin de bruyne gave manchester city a 1—0 win over chelsea at the etihad stadium. the victory extends city's lead at the top of the premier league table to 13 points. newcastle and watford drew 1—all. norwich move off the bottom of the table with a 2—1win over everton. wolverhampton wanderers beat southampton 3—1. and aston villa came from 2—0 down to draw 2—2 with manchester united. tomorrow's north london derby between spurs and arsenal has been postponed. and in the women's super league, manchester united move up to third place after a 5—0 win over birmingham city. while manchester city beat aston villa 3—nil. tennis and andy murray's attempt to win a first atp title for three years ended in defeat to the world number 20, aslan karatsev. the sydney classic final was murray's first atp final since 2019 and the three time grand slam champion described it as having been "a long road to get back here". karatsev, who was a semi finalist at last year's australian open, played explosive tennis winning
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in straight sets to take the title. with the commonwealth games just six months away, england's preparations are going well with victory in theirfirst game at the netball quad series. they beat south africa 71 points to 47 at the copper box in london. while world champions new zealand lost against the world number one side, australia. wasps claimed an important victory over toulouse in rugby union's european champions cup. despite having jacob umanga sent off during the first half of the game, wasps beat last year's champions toulouse by 30 points to 22. it was an impressive win that means they still have a chance to claim a place in the last 16 of the competition. you can find the rest of the day's european rugby union results on the bbc sport website as well as news of the masters snooker semi finals. that's it. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel.
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but from me and the team, have a very good night. saturday was a rather cloudy day around much of the country, saturday looks —— sunday looks brighter. you'll also notice it will be a breezy day across the board, certainly in the north where we will have gales. you can see why pressure chart, quite few isobars. this weather front is moving southwards, that will clear away. weather front in the north will sink southward through the day, barely anything on it by the time it reaches england and wales, and it will be fragmented and wales, and it will be fragmented and allow a lot of sunshine to
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develop. a breezy day, when dean and author, gales in a northern isles, our air source will be coming in off the atlantic and with quite a bit of sunshine around, it will feel a touch milder with highs of eight to 11 degrees. as we move into sunday evening and overnight, the wind is down for many. further showers in the northern isles. the high pressure begins to build in, clear skies, temperatures will drop and it will be a colder one than what we have seen three saturday night with temperatures below freezing and also some dense mist and fog patches around. ourarea of some dense mist and fog patches around. our area of high pressure building info monday will bring settled weather, you can see barely any isobars on the charts, the wind remain light all day for most of us. elsewhere, actually start with frost and fog which will clear and then leave a pretty peasant day, sunshine up leave a pretty peasant day, sunshine up and down the country, after the chilly start, temperatures will
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reach highs of seven to nine celsius for most of us. on tuesday, we see this frontal system sweeping off the atlantic and that will bring a wet and windy date for the influenced by this area of high pressure. it turns wet and windy for northern ireland. a chilly start with some fog across central and southern areas but also a little bit of sunshine tending to break through in the afternoon as temperatures range from seven to 11 degrees. thereafter, high dominates for the rest of the week. a lot of fine and settled weather with overnight frost and fog. goodbye. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be
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bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster and journalist mihir bose and former pensions minister and conservative peer, ros altmann. tomorrow's front pages. the sunday telegraph leads with a picture of the prime minister's wife, carrie symonds. it says she was snapped breaking covid social distancing rules days after the public was warned that it was "critical" to follow the guidance. according to the observer, tory mps will be ready in sufficient numbers to oust borisjohnson if he tries to dodge responsibility for rule—breaking parties in downing street. the sunday express claims all covid restrictions in england will end in ten days — that's according to a government source. "andrew's tears over titles" is the people's headline with the paper saying the duke of york is devastated at losing his military honours. and the online independent has a dramatic picture of the volcanic eruption in tonga which triggered a tsumani.

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