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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 15, 2022 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm kasia madera with the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk's prime minister is told to lead or step aside, as details of lockdown parties continue to emerge. the leader of the opposition says it's now in the national interest for borisjohnson to go. lawyers for virginia giuffre want two people in the uk to give evidence in her civil case against prince andrew. the duke's legal team argue ms giuffre may suffer from false memories. prince andrew has repeatedly denied allegations of sexual assault. novak djokovic spends the night in an immigration detention hotel in melbourne ahead of a court hearing to decide whether he'll be deported from australia. the eruption of a giant underwater volcano near the island nation of tonga has triggered
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tsunami waves across the southwestern pacific. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk's prime minister is being urged to lead or step aside, following the controversy downing street gatherings while covid restrictions were in place. the call comes from senior conservative mp and former minister, tobias ellwood. a number of tory backbenchers say they've been inundated with messages from angry constituents, about the growing list of parties, dating back to the spring of 2020. the opposition labour party says it's now in the national interest for mrjohnson to be removed from office. our political correspondent,
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iain watson, reports. borisjohnson has come under renewed pressure following number 10's apology to buckingham palace over a leaving do held last year on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. so today the labour leader urged conservative mps to force him out. of course there's a party advantage in him going, but actually it's now in the national interest that he goes, so it's very important that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. usually when opposition mps call for a prime minister to go, the troops rally round, but today the conservative chairman of the commons defence committee, tobias ellwood, did not exactly defend his boss when he told the bbc borisjohnson should lead, or step aside. outside downing street, demonstrators against a forthcoming police bill were making their views of the prime minister known. far more subtly, some of his own mps have also been doing so. what may be worrying the prime minister is that some
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of his former supporters now want him to go. one mp, elected in 2019, told me he owed his seat to borisjohnson but now, he says, this feels terminal, and he should go quickly. and another mp i spoke to several days ago, who told me then that he thought borisjohnson could ride out this political storm, got back in touch today to say he's now damaging the conservative brand and it was a question of when, not if, he leaves number 10. no cabinet minister, though, has broken ranks and there is hope inside downing street that an investigation by a senior civil servant may say that the prime minister has not broken covid rules. and the expected lifting of restrictions later this month could improve his mps�* mood. this weekend, conservative mps will be listening closely to their voters and it mood on the doorstep could determine whether the prime minister is shown the door. iain watson, bbc news. lawyers for the duke of york want to question two people
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as part of the civil sexual abuse case being brought by virginia giuffre in america. according to court documents, prince andrew's legal team argue ms giuffre may be suffering from false memories, and they want to hear from her husband and her psychologist. prince andrew denies all the allegations against him. 0ur correspondent in washington, nomia iqbal has more. this comes 2a hours after virginia giuffre requested witness accounts from prince andrew's former assistant and a woman at a nightclub at the time of the allegations, and now the prince has hit back with requests of his own. as you mentioned, his legal team wants to hearfrom her husband, robert giuffre. they want to know how he met his wife in 2002, the household finances. they also want to ask about virginia giuffre�*s relationship with the convicted sex offenders jeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell. the duke's side is claiming that mr giuffre had a role in recruiting underage girls to be trafficked. they also contend, as you mentioned there, that she may suffer from false memories, which is why they want to examine
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the second person, her doctor, a psychologist, judith lightfoot. now both the husband and doctor are residents of australia, so the duke's legal team have requested that letters are issued from the us court to the central authority of australia to get the testimonies. novak djokovic will hear in the next few hours whether or not he'll be allowed to remain in australia. the government says the world number one tennis player who hasn't been vaccinated against covid, is a threat to public health. his lawyers are appealing, describing the latest decision to cancel his visa as irrational. shaimaa khalil has more from melbourne. free the refugee! once again, novak djokovic is in detention, and once again, the world number one is challenging the cancellation of his visa. in court documents which were released today, we learned that the immigration minister alex hawke made his decision because the player's
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presence in australia may foster anti—vaccination sentiment. the tennis star's legal team says the argument was invalid and irrational, and that deporting him would potentially undermine support for the vaccination programme. we want novak djokovic to play! and while some of djokovic�*s supporters gathered to back him, there has been little sympathy for the tennis player. i do feel that to make a statement that we are sticking by what we have been calling for the last two years, i feel it is best for djokovic to probably sit this one out. i hope that the government and the judges hold their ground and say, you don't want to get a vaccination and you don't want to follow our rules, then you can't come in. when novak djokovic�*s visa was revoked the first time, he was held here at this immigration detention hotel. more than a week later, he's back. only two days before he is meant to compete in the australian open and defend his title,
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this is where he will be spending the night. and when he does get out on sunday, it won't be to go to practice — he will be in his lawyer's office while a court decides his fate. his rival rafael nadal said the grand slam is not just about djokovic. the australian open is much more important than any player so if he is playing, finally, ok, if he's not playing, the australian open will be a great tournament with or without him. that is my point of view. sunday's court decision is crucial for both sides — the top seed whose chance at a 21st grand slam rides on it, and a government that has been hugely embarrassed by the mishandling of the saga. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. the africa cup of nations continues in cameroon, where nigeria beat sudan 3—1. the pressure is now on egypt, the record seven—time afcon winners. the team lost their first match
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to nigeria, and are trying to get back on track with a win against guinea—bissau, although no goals have been scored yet. i'm joined now by the bbc�*s isaac fanin who is in yaounde. what's the latest in the egypt versus guinea—bissau match? it has been a good first half, the second half has just got under way. egypt had been the team who had dominated most of the game, they really need the winds, they are led by their captain mohamed salah who plays for liverpool. egypt hit the post twice. their coach, who some fans may remember was the assistant coach at manchester united, he has come under little bit of pressure after the way egypt were beaten by nigeria in the first game. so, they need to get a win in this one because if they lose this, they
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cannot qualify in a second spot for the next round but they still will be able to qualify with a win in theirfinal be able to qualify with a win in their final game be able to qualify with a win in theirfinal game against sudan, be able to qualify with a win in their final game against sudan, but a lot of pressure on the egyptians, micellar and bash mohamed salah and the coach. nigeria won both matches in this round, do you think they have a shot at becoming this year's champions? yes, i think they have been the most impressive team of the tournament so far, they have been fantastic. against egypt, they were brilliant, they stopped mohamed salah from playing, he was a danger man for the whole competition, he is arguably one of the best players in the world and the nigerian hardly let him get and the nigerian hardly let him get a sniff. and against sudan earlier on today, they showed their class, they didn't really get out of gear, they didn't really get out of gear, they went ahead, thanks to goals from two players. the second player didn't see the ball hitting in as he went into the back of the net but
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hidden and in it went. the third goal was scored 35 seconds after the second half had resumed, for the nigerians. sudan got a late consolation penalty but the nigerians are definitely the penalty —— the team to watch in this competition. a lot of nigerians will be sleeping easy this evening. thank you. the government's latest daily coronavirus figures show there were 81,713 new infections, in the latest 24—hour period. that means there were 117,800 new cases on average per day, in the last week. another 287 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 263 deaths per day. vaccinations are continuing, but at a slower pace. on average in the last week “14,015
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people had a boosterjab, which means 63.1% of the population, aged 12 or over, have now had three doses. new research into the consequences of rising global temperatures on human health have revealed worrying effects on foetuses, babies and infants. a number of studies have shown evidence that extreme heat, hurricanes and wildfires can increase the risk of premature births by as much as 15%. the researchers say urgent action is needed to protect pre—natal and paediatric health as the climate changes. thieves are leaving thousands of opened and damaged packages strewn across the railway tracks in east los angeles after looting goods trains passing through. products that are difficult to move or re—sell, or are too cheap, like covid—19 test kits, furniture and televisions, are just dumped on the tracks. the thefts are affecting major us mail order
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and courier companies like amazon, ups and fedex. james reynolds reports. if you live in los angeles and your package hasn't been delivered, you might want to check the rail line in the east of the city. freight trains passing through this area have become an easy target for thieves, who leave evidence of their raids all over the tracks. as trains head into a busyjunction, they often slow down or stop, and looters are ready. theyjump on these trains, these locks that these containers have are really sometimes plastic seals, the locks aren't really sturdy or strong, you know. they don't care if the train is moving or not. theyjump on the train, pop the lock and just start grabbing whatever they see. all of this has accumulated over the last month alone. looters aim for the most valuable items they can find,
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ripping through packages and avoiding cheaper bulk cargo items like toilet roll. towards the end of last year, more than 90 containers were vandalised every day. thefts peaked around christmas. according to the rail operator union pacific, over the last year looting along the train line in los angeles county has risen by 160%, costing millions of dollars. the thefts have hit major companies, including amazon, ups and fedex. the rail operator says it has now increased security along the line. tsunami waves a metre high have hit the pacific island nation of tonga after an underwater volcano erupted for the second time in two days. satellite images captured the moment, as huge plumes of black ash darkened the sky.
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local people have been urged to move to higher ground. david tappin is a marine geologist at the british geological survey. talk to us through how unusual this particular underwater volcanic eruption is, and also the strength of it. i eruption is, and also the strength of it. ~ ., , eruption is, and also the strength of it. ~ . , . ., of it. i think that this particular event, it of it. i think that this particular event. it is _ of it. i think that this particular event, it is quite _ of it. i think that this particular event, it is quite a _ of it. i think that this particular event, it is quite a surprise. i event, it is quite a surprise. underwater eruptions generating tsunamis are well studied and well known. there is a classic example in 1883 in indonesia when 36,000 people died when a volcano exploded and resulted in an devastating tsunami. along the tonga margin, there have been tsunamis, the most recent in
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2009, and also there volcanic eruptions that this recent event generating this tsunami is a major surprise. generating this tsunami is a ma'or surrise. �* m, ., surprise. and the scale of it, there is sheer force _ surprise. and the scale of it, there is sheer force of _ surprise. and the scale of it, there is sheer force of it _ surprise. and the scale of it, there is sheer force of it as _ surprise. and the scale of it, there is sheer force of it as well, - is sheer force of it as well, because this happened quite near to tonga, the alert, the tsunami warnings totally across the whole region, as far afield as the western coast of the us, japan, australia, new zealand. coast of the us, japan, australia, new zealand-_ new zealand. yes, indeed, it is a surrise new zealand. yes, indeed, it is a surprise event — new zealand. yes, indeed, it is a surprise event at _ new zealand. yes, indeed, it is a surprise event at this _ new zealand. yes, indeed, it is a surprise event at this location. i surprise event at this location. there have been about six volcanoes along the tonga margin, they are intermittently active, the particular one is one of the most active and it was erupting in 2019, 2014, the earliest historical record isn't 1912, 2014, the earliest historical record isn't1912, but the eruption has not been so vigorous or dynamic and the
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generation of the tsunami is a surprise. it is all on diving, tonga is 13 hours ahead of us so the eruption has been going on for, since late 2021, and there have been various phases of it but this particular vigorous part of it and generating this tsunami is, as i have said, a surprise. we're pretty certain that the will only be local, but of course, tsunamis can be very hazardous, we know from events in japan in 2011, and in the indian ocean in 2004, they can strike not just local coastlines but much further afield. and so within the pacific, which has a warning system, obviously it is a safety first approach, as i said, we don't really
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think that the tsunami will be dangerous outside for example tonga or fiji or new zealand, but of course, we have to take precautions and make sure that people are warned. , ., , warned. yes, and it is understandable - warned. yes, and it is understandable why l warned. yes, and it is| understandable why so warned. yes, and it is - understandable why so many warned. yes, and it is _ understandable why so many alerts have been issued in that case. from your experience, you know tonga really well, you lived there for five years, it is an area of seismic activity, help us understand what that means for the local —— local people, because they are having to cope with this, how do they deal with this on such an extent? that is a aood with this on such an extent? that is a good question- — with this on such an extent? that is a good question. in _ with this on such an extent? that is a good question. in the _ with this on such an extent? that is a good question. in the pacific, - with this on such an extent? that is a good question. in the pacific, as l a good question. in the pacific, as i have said, there is a warning system, and the warning system is based in hawaii but it is based upon earthquakes because earthquakes are the primary source of tsunamis and they are relatively easy to monitor.
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in the pacific, for example, there are psychographic nations around, the base and margins in the warning system is set up on the basis of a major earthquake, for example an eight or nine, it will generate a tsunami. in tonga in 2009, there was a major earthquake in the northern part of the country, it's generated a tsunami which killed about 200 people. with volcanoes and eruptions, it is much harder to identify whether an eruption will develop into a major event which causes a tsunami, but with our modern communication systems, and in the case of this event, it was being monitored, there are some fantastic satellite images which i am sure that you have seen, and also the
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fact that it is within the country, there is an organisation which warns against storms, it has the filleted —— facilities to warn local people of any hazard associated with this eruption. of any hazard associated with this eru tion. ~ ., ., ~' of any hazard associated with this eru tion. ~ ., ., ~ ., eruption. when we look at the imaues, eruption. when we look at the images. it _ eruption. when we look at the images. itjust _ eruption. when we look at the images, itjust looks - eruption. when we look at the | images, itjust looks extremely powerful but is it right to say this is not being classified as a major event? is not being classified as a ma'or event? ~ �* , ., ~' event? well, it's not. i think ou've event? well, it's not. i think you've got — event? well, it's not. i think you've got to _ event? well, it's not. i think you've got to be _ event? well, it's not. i think you've got to be careful, - event? well, it's not. i think- you've got to be careful, because actually when i first looked at this i was pretty flabbergasted, but actually it's the time series and when you look at it it looks like it is cataclysmic eruption, it is actually taking place over two hours, so what we are looking at here, and the images are from the early hours of this morning, as i have said, tonga is 13 hours ahead of us so it was about between four and six o'clock, and again, it comes back to these images being part of
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the warning. and, so, the eruption is causing a tsunami but we are still really trying to understand how and the wide, what we think, as i have said, we know about earthquake tsunamis, that is when the sea bed moves vertically, it causes a step in the ocean which collapses in the water congregate and travels outwards, here what we're looking at a huge ash cloud and this is what has been recorded on the internet and on twitter and we are thinking it is a huge ash cloud that is offending and we know it is going up to 17 kilometres, ten miles into the air, and then i guess it is collapsing and it is falling into the ocean and in falling into the ocean, it is causing the salami that has been identified in tonga. —— causing the tsunami.
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that has been identified in tonga. -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank ou -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank you so — -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank you so much _ -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank you so much for— -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank you so much for clearing - -- causing the tsunami. fascinating. thank you so much for clearing up i thank you so much for clearing up some of the many questions that we have on this. thank you. large crowds of hindu worshippers have gathered on the banks of india's ganges river for a holy bath, in spite of a 30—fold increase in coronavirus cases in the past one month. similar festivals are taking place across the country. doctors in west bengal applied to stop its festival this year, worrying it would become a super spreader event. india reported over 260,000 new coronavirus cases on friday. aru na iyengar reports. varanasi in the northern state of uttar pradesh. thousands of pilgrims throng the ganges river banks to take part in the magh mela festival. they believe bathing in these sacred waters will wash away their sins. translation: nobody - is following the guidelines. announcements are being made to urge people to wear masks. what can the government do? the mistake is on our part that we should be
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following the rules, but nobody is following the rules, nobody is ready to listen to the rules. at the gangasagar festival in west bengal, officials try to enforce covid restrictions. pilgrims have to show their vaccine certificates along with an rt—pcr test report ta ken two days before arrival. but most here believe god will save them from covid. three million people are expected here. doctors asked the state high court to stop the festival, fearing it would become a super spreader event, but that was rejected. they are worried because last april there was a record rise in coronavirus cases after the government of uttarakhand state in the north allowed the massive kumbh mela festival to go ahead. the indian prime minister, narendra modi, says the festivals show india's vibrant cultural diversity. meanwhile, coronavirus cases are predicted to peak next week
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in new delhi and mumbai as the country battles with the highest number of cases since may last year. aruna iyengar, bbc news. here in the uk, the coastguard is celebrating a major anniversary, founded exactly 200 years ago. luxmy gopal has been looking back at how the vital public service came into existence. search and rescue. for 200 years, the coastguard has been searching, rescuing and saving lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people who've really been at a really low point, and just make that situation at the time a little bit better for them to bear, and then long—term it means somebody goes home who maybe wouldn't have done. 0riginally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty's coastguard was formally established on the 15th of january, 1822. newsreel: there's a certain amount i of mystery about the coastguard - l who he is and what he does.
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it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at sea ever since. this is coastguard control. as illustrated in this video from 1972. ahoy there, coastguard here! we'll be down with you in a few minutes. hang on! when we started, it was horseback patrols, looking for smugglers and people like that. that's where the coast and the guard bit comes from. it's changed hugely. we still rely massively on our volunteers, as we have done for almost the entirety of the 200—year history of the organisation. the coastguard now has 3,500 volunteers across 310 rescue teams, in addition to ten helicopter bases. the way the coastguard saves lives at sea has changed almost beyond recognition since its creation 200 years ago, with a new updated radio network and with new technology such as drones and unmanned vehicles playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations. you've got to embrace
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new technology, you've got to look to improve. you can't sit still and think, "we're doing the best we can." there's always improvements to be made, so we have to look at technology. so we're looking at fibre communications, improving ourfleet to bring in electric vehicles, drone technology and how that can assist in searches, and speed up finding people that are in difficulty. so really, we've just got to be open to change and embrace it and look to improve at any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone birthday, 200 throw lines are being cast into the seas around the four nations today, as a symbol of the coastguard's life—saving role, past and present, on our shores and at sea. luxmy gopal, bbc news. wildlife experts in scotland are hopeful that progress is being made in efforts to save the native red squirrel from extinction. grey squirrels have been better able to adapt to changing habitats over the years, and they carry a virus that's
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fatal for red squirrels. alexandra mackenzie has that story. the native red squirrel. not a common sight in the uk, but now limited to areas like here in barhill wood in dumfries & galloway. how many red squirrels would you have in this wood? in november last year we had over 30, which is an exceptional amount. you know, there's not many places in scotland where you'd find that level. so what makes this the ideal habitat for the red squirrel? principally it's the age of the treesm that they are now producing cones regularly and that enables food to be available at different times of the year. the larch produces cones in the summertime, the scots pine in the winter, so it gives the squirrels a good wide feeding pattern. but of course, they are in competition with the grey squirrels. wherever you get the grey squirrels, the reds are going to
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disappear, unfortunately. the scottish wildlife trust said having a predator, the pine marten, helps to control the grey squirrel population. but that is not enough. grey squirrel control is going to be necessary for a long time yet. so that will be the key thing that needs to keep continuing in a targeted and landscape—scale approach, you know, which is tricky and hard work but what is needed if we want to keep our red squirrels. the battle for survival with the more feisty grey squirrel is likely to continue for some time. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news, kirkcudbright. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. there was a lot more cloud around today than in recent days but it wasn't as cold, slightly milder air moving in of the atlantic. what we will see through tonight as less cold conditions because we
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have this atlantic air mass and also a few showers around. you can see them here on these weather fronts. this one pushing into the south—west quadrant of the country and this one have this atlantic air mass and also a few showers around. you can see them here on these weather fronts. this one pushing into the south—west quadrant of the country and this one spreading south across scotland and northern ireland overnight. quite a few isobars in the charts so it will be turning windier here. a cluster of showers pushing on to south—west england, south wales, perhaps in southern england, through the night. this band of cloud and rain will move south across scotland and northern ireland, with blustery showers following behind, and windy with gales developing across the far north of scotland. a chilly night, certainly across eastern areas where we have clear skies, but you can see generally not as cold as it has been of late. and we shouldn't have any problems with mist and fog because of the breeze. that weather front starts sunday lying through central parts of the country, barely anything on it as it moves south, it will be fizzling out, no more than a band of cloud by the end of the day. a breezy day for most, windy across scotland
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with gales certainly for the north highlands and on to the northern isles. temperatures where they should be for the time of year, 7—10. there will be plenty of sunshine around. the weather front clears away as we head into monday and a new area of high pressure builds on across the country. monday looks pretty fine, but with light winds and clear skies it is going to be chilly again, some frost and a bit of fog, but widespread dry and sunny weather. a bit more cloud and breeze for the north and west of scotland, and temperatures after a chilly start rising to around 7—9 for most of us. subtle changes into tuesday but high pressure holds on for most, this frontal system rushes past the north of the uk bringing more cloud, more breeze, showers or outbreaks of rain for northern ireland, scotland and northern england through the day, but some milder south—westerly winds here. central and southern england and south wales, another chilly start, dry with some sunshine here. single figure values across the south, 10, 11, maybe 12 across the north. thereafter for the rest of the week,
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high pressure dominates the scene, even as we head into next weekend, with some sunshine and a return to overnight frost. bye for now. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the uk's prime minister is told to "lead or step aside" as details of lockdown parties continue to emerge. the leader of the opposition says it's now in the national interest for borisjohnson to go. lawyers for virginia giuffre want two people in the uk to give evidence in her civil case against prince andrew. the duke's legal team argue ms giuffre "may suffer from false memories". prince andrew has repeatedly denied allegations of sexual assault. novak djokovic spends the night in an immigration detention hotel in melbourne, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether he'll be deported from australia.

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