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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 15, 2022 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. some conservative mps say they're being inundated with complaints from angry constituents, as more details emerge about lockdown parties in downing street. the leader of the opposition says the prime minister has lost his moral authority, and has to go. we are witnessing every day the broken spectacle of the prime minister mired in deceit and its deception, and unable to lead. novak djokovic has been detained in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country for the australian open. tsunami waves have hit the island nation of tonga — after a huge underwater volcanic eruption, which sent shock waves across the south pacific.
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washington and kyiv accuse russia of preparing to carry out "false sabotage operations" — to create a "pretext" for an invasion of ukraine. the kremlin denies the claims. andy murray's bid for a first tennis title in more than two years has ended in defeat. he was beaten in straight sets in the final of the sydney classic by russia's aslan karatsev. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a prominent conservative mp has told the bbc that borisjohnson must "lead or step aside." tobias ellwood, who chairs the defence select committee, said leadership was required. it comes as some conservative mps say they've been inundated
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with emails from constituents angry about reports that downing street staff held parties during lockdowns. at a speech in london this morning, the labour leader sir keir starmer has urged tory mps to "get rid" of the prime minister "in the national interest". the moral authority matters in relation to enforcing coronavirus rules. we have massive challenges. we have a prime minister who is absent. who is literally in hiding at the moment. and unable to lead. and so that is why i have concluded that he has got to go. and of course there is a party advantage in him going, but actually it is now in the national interest that he goes. it is very important now that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. 5ir party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him.— the government has repeatedly urged people to reserve judgment
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until the outcome of an inquiry. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral. our political correspondent ione wells reports. "it is the expectation that more and more will come out" — the fear of one brexiteer tory mp, who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast". another said their email inbox was "horrendous". one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election. "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week that he attended drinks in the downing street garden
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on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don't think it's acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties. on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's funeral, leading foreign secretary liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue gray has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this inquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster that the police should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act. because the primary objective of encouraging people
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to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. ione wells, bbc news. joining me now is claire pearsall, a conservative councillor in kent, who was formerly a home office special adviser. have you been having many conversations with local residents? what is the sense? yes, i've had a number_ what is the sense? yes, i've had a number of— what is the sense? yes, i've had a number of conversations this week. the general— number of conversations this week. the general mood is that people are incredibly— the general mood is that people are incredibly angry. they have abided by the _ incredibly angry. they have abided by the rules all of the way through and face _ by the rules all of the way through and face to— by the rules all of the way through and face to some real hardships. but they did _ and face to some real hardships. but they did it— and face to some real hardships. but they did it because they were told to, it _ they did it because they were told to, it was — they did it because they were told to, it was the right thing to do, and to— to, it was the right thing to do, and to protect their family and friends — and to protect their family and friends and people in my village.
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and to _ friends and people in my village. and to see — friends and people in my village. and to see the prime minister's team and the _ and to see the prime minister's team and the prime minister himself flocked — and the prime minister himself flocked to those rules has hit very hard _ flocked to those rules has hit very hard. sir— flocked to those rules has hit very hard. ,, flocked to those rules has hit very hard, ,, ,, ., flocked to those rules has hit very hard. ,, ,, ., ., , , hard. sir keir starmer has said this mornin: hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that _ hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that it _ hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that it is _ hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that it is time _ hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that it is time for- hard. sir keir starmer has said this morning that it is time for boris . morning that it is time for boris johnson to go. he says of course there is a party advantage for labour in him going, but actually says it is now in the national interest that he does. do you think that this does transcend party politics now?— that this does transcend party olitics now? , ,, ., , politics now? yes, i think it does. i know supporters _ politics now? yes, i think it does. i know supporters who _ politics now? yes, i think it does. i know supporters who are - politics now? yes, i think it does. | i know supporters who are equally politics now? yes, i think it does. i i know supporters who are equally as angry— i know supporters who are equally as angry as _ i know supporters who are equally as angry as those who support the green party or— angry as those who support the green party or the _ angry as those who support the green party or the liberal democrats, for example — party or the liberal democrats, for example. so i think this does transcend _ example. so i think this does transcend those kinds of barriers. and colleagues are going to have to work out _ and colleagues are going to have to work out what it is they want from the prime — work out what it is they want from the prime minister going forward, and that— the prime minister going forward, and that has to happen quickly. what do ou and that has to happen quickly. what do you think — and that has to happen quickly. what do you think should _ and that has to happen quickly. twist do you think should happen? and that has to happen quickly. what do you think should happen? i - and that has to happen quickly. what do you think should happen? i think. do you think should happen? i think there is more _ do you think should happen? i think there is more to _ do you think should happen? i think there is more to come _ do you think should happen? i think there is more to come out - do you think should happen? i think there is more to come out and - do you think should happen? i think there is more to come out and i - there is more to come out and i think— there is more to come out and i think it — there is more to come out and i think it is — there is more to come out and i think it is not going to be very long _ think it is not going to be very long before we see another revelation, so the prime minister now needs —
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revelation, so the prime minister now needs to think very long and hard _ now needs to think very long and hard as— now needs to think very long and hard as to — now needs to think very long and hard as to whether he is doing the right— hard as to whether he is doing the rightiob _ hard as to whether he is doing the rightjob for the hard as to whether he is doing the right job for the country, hard as to whether he is doing the rightjob for the country, and certainly— rightjob for the country, and certainly for the party. do right job for the country, and certainly for the party. do you think you _ certainly for the party. do you think you should _ certainly for the party. do you think you should go? - certainly for the party. do you think you should go? i - certainly for the party. do you think you should go? i think l certainly for the party. do you think you should go? i think it certainly for the party. do you i think you should go? i think it is robabl think you should go? i think it is probably time — think you should go? i think it is probably time for _ think you should go? i think it is probably time for him _ think you should go? i think it is probably time for him to - think you should go? i think it is probably time for him to move l think you should go? i think it is i probably time for him to move on. think you should go? i think it is - probably time for him to move on. i think— probably time for him to move on. i think that _ probably time for him to move on. i think that a — probably time for him to move on. i think that a number of colleagues and are _ think that a number of colleagues and are looking at that as an option _ and are looking at that as an option. we have seen some very senior— option. we have seen some very senior tories come out this morning and say— senior tories come out this morning and sayjust— senior tories come out this morning and sayjust that, and i agree with them _ and say 'ust that, and i agree with them. ., ., , ., ., them. you have been a former adviser, them. you have been a former adviser. you — them. you have been a former adviser, you know— them. you have been a former adviser, you know that - them. you have been a former adviser, you know that world l them. you have been a former- adviser, you know that world well. how much will there be... how much of the various conversations be very straight forward in terms of looking ahead and saying, "well, if you don't do this or you do do that, this is where it's going to end up." because it feels like currently there is a sense of buying time and living by the day. you are a local councillor, you are not up for election in may, you are up for election in may, you are up for election next year, but there are some councillors facing pretty imminent elections.— some councillors facing pretty imminent elections. that's right. i
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think members _ imminent elections. that's right. i think members of _ imminent elections. that's right. i think members of parliament - imminent elections. that's right. i think members of parliament willl think members of parliament will force _ think members of parliament will force the — think members of parliament will force the prime minister to look lon- force the prime minister to look long and — force the prime minister to look long and hard. you've got to understand there are two camps, there _ understand there are two camps, there are — understand there are two camps, there are the internal criticisms that are — there are the internal criticisms that are happening inside number ten. that are happening inside number ten~ he _ that are happening inside number ten. he has a team around him who seem _ ten. he has a team around him who seem to _ ten. he has a team around him who seem to agree with him. so that is the problem. members of parliament in westminster themselves are pretty outspoken— in westminster themselves are pretty outspoken and a pretty brutal party, to be _ outspoken and a pretty brutal party, to be honest. we have done it before when _ to be honest. we have done it before when leaders have outlived their usefulness. there are going to be really _ usefulness. there are going to be really tricky conversations, and those _ really tricky conversations, and those mps are going to be looking at what losses they are going to have come _ what losses they are going to have come the — what losses they are going to have come the may elections. and what losses they are going to have come the may elections.— what losses they are going to have come the may elections. and you say it is a pretty — come the may elections. and you say it is a pretty brutal _ come the may elections. and you say it is a pretty brutal party. _ come the may elections. and you say it is a pretty brutal party. the - it is a pretty brutal party. the party has forced people out previously. it is not that straightforward a system. there have to be a number of mps who write letters. can you see that happening? it is quite a complicated system, and you — it is quite a complicated system, and you need to look at the timing quite _ and you need to look at the timing quite carefully to ensure that you have _ quite carefully to ensure that you have the —
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quite carefully to ensure that you have the numbers. everybody knows the magic— have the numbers. everybody knows the magic number of 54 for the letters— the magic number of 54 for the letters submitted to sir graham brady, — letters submitted to sir graham brady, and quite obviously we haven't— brady, and quite obviously we haven't reached that boundary yet. but other— haven't reached that boundary yet. but other than that, if you do pass that boundary, you then have to go for a _ that boundary, you then have to go for a vote _ that boundary, you then have to go for a vote in— that boundary, you then have to go for a vote in no confidence in the fora vote in no confidence in the chamber— for a vote in no confidence in the chamber of— for a vote in no confidence in the chamber of the house of commons. so you have _ chamber of the house of commons. so you have to— chamber of the house of commons. so you have to have the numbers to back that up. _ you have to have the numbers to back that up, because it should the prime minister— that up, because it should the prime minister when that vote he is now safe for— minister when that vote he is now safe for another 12 months. if minister when that vote he is now safe for another 12 months.- safe for another 12 months. if you could talk to _ safe for another 12 months. if you could talk to the _ safe for another 12 months. if you could talk to the prime _ safe for another 12 months. if you could talk to the prime minister l could talk to the prime minister now, what would you be advising? would you say wait and see if the letters come in the more in looking at how you handle this and shaping your destiny? and maybe taking the decision himself? yes. your destiny? and maybe taking the decision himself?— decision himself? yes, i would be tellin: decision himself? yes, i would be telling him _ decision himself? yes, i would be telling him that _ decision himself? yes, i would be telling him that he _ decision himself? yes, i would be telling him that he needs - decision himself? yes, i would be telling him that he needs to - decision himself? yes, i would be telling him that he needs to do i decision himself? yes, i would be. telling him that he needs to do this very. _ telling him that he needs to do this very. very— telling him that he needs to do this very, very quickly. he needs to assess— very, very quickly. he needs to assess his _ very, very quickly. he needs to assess his position, he needs to start— assess his position, he needs to start by— assess his position, he needs to start by looking at the people surrounding him in numberten and perhaps— surrounding him in numberten and perhaps changing up that team. that would _ perhaps changing up that team. that would go _ perhaps changing up that team. that would go a _ perhaps changing up that team. that would go a long way to help. but i do agree _ would go a long way to help. but i do agree with some of the colleagues
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who have _ do agree with some of the colleagues who have already said that this feels _ who have already said that this feels terminal, because it really does _ feels terminal, because it really does now — feels terminal, because it really does now. if feels terminal, because it really does now— feels terminal, because it really does now. , ., , ., ., does now. if people in the team go and he stays. _ does now. if people in the team go and he stays, how _ does now. if people in the team go and he stays, how would _ does now. if people in the team go and he stays, how would that - does now. if people in the team go| and he stays, how would that look? where is the culture come from? what is your experience, your understanding of the culture into drives it? ~ . , drives it? well, the culture is fed down from _ drives it? well, the culture is fed down from the _ drives it? well, the culture is fed down from the top. _ drives it? well, the culture is fed down from the top. removing . drives it? well, the culture is fed down from the top. removing a i drives it? well, the culture is fed - down from the top. removing a team are part _ down from the top. removing a team are part of— down from the top. removing a team are part of a — down from the top. removing a team are part of a team is only a little bit of— are part of a team is only a little bit of the — are part of a team is only a little bit of the solution. realistically, the buck— bit of the solution. realistically, the buck stops with the person at the buck stops with the person at the top, — the buck stops with the person at the top, who is the prime minister. if he the top, who is the prime minister. if he has— the top, who is the prime minister. if he has presided over this attitude _ if he has presided over this attitude that the rules didn't apply to them, _ attitude that the rules didn't apply to them, which is exactly how it looks— to them, which is exactly how it looks to — to them, which is exactly how it looks to everybody, then he needs to accept _ looks to everybody, then he needs to accept that _ looks to everybody, then he needs to accept that and he is the one that needs— accept that and he is the one that needs to — accept that and he is the one that needs to go. so, accept that and he is the one that needs to go— accept that and he is the one that needs to go. so, what would your predictions _ needs to go. so, what would your predictions be? _ needs to go. so, what would your predictions be? the _ needs to go. so, what would your predictions be? the coming - needs to go. so, what would your predictions be? the coming week| needs to go. so, what would your l predictions be? the coming week is going to be vital. you have said you were there, you are a local councillor, a local politician, but you are having conversations, politicians across the piece are going to be in their constituencies
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this weekend having conversations. i this weekend having conversations. i think what you will see is the report— think what you will see is the report coming out at some point next week, _ report coming out at some point next week, which— report coming out at some point next week, which will list, i should imagine. _ week, which will list, i should imagine, the events that have taken place _ imagine, the events that have taken place and _ imagine, the events that have taken place and who knew about it. but really. _ place and who knew about it. but really, colleagues are now going to have to _ really, colleagues are now going to have to step up and decide what it is they— have to step up and decide what it is they want to do. they are in that position _ is they want to do. they are in that position i'm — is they want to do. they are in that position. i'm not. i don't have any position. i'm not. idon't have any power— position. i'm not. idon't have any power over— position. i'm not. i don't have any power over that. position. i'm not. i don't have any power overthat. but position. i'm not. i don't have any power over that. but i would hope that they— power over that. but i would hope that they are going to come together and make _ that they are going to come together and make the right decision. thank ou ve and make the right decision. thank you very much _ and make the right decision. thank you very much for _ and make the right decision. thank you very much forjoining _ and make the right decision. thank you very much forjoining us. - novak djokovic has been detained in australia ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in the country. the serbian faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time, with the government labelling the 34—year—old a threat to the public — because he's unvaccinated against coronavirus. djokovic is still scheduled to play in the australian open in melbourne on monday. with the latest from melbourne, here's our correspondent shaimaa khalil. novak djokovic is back in detention.
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earlier today, he was at his lawyer's office while a procedural online hearing was taking place. we have a bit of clarity now about what to expect for sunday's hearing. we know it is going to be a full bench of threejudges and we know that his legal team is going to challenge alex hawke, the immigration minister's, decision to revoke his visa. we understand from legal documents that were released later today that the immigration minister chose to cancel novak djokovic's visa because, according to him, the presence of the unvaccinated athlete could provoke anti—vaccination sentiments. the legal team says this is invalid, it's irrational, and deporting him could actually cause the very thing that the government is trying to avoid. remember, this is a very tight timeframe. the australian open is set to start on monday, and today we've heard from tennis star rafael nadal, who says this is notjust about novak djokovic. tennis keeps going.
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and the australian open is much more important than any player. so if he is playing finally, ok. if he's not playing, the australian open will be a great australian open with or without him. that's my point of view. when djokovic is allowed to leave this hotel on sunday morning, it won't be to go to practice. he'll be at his lawyer's office while a court decides his fate. the controversy around djokovic's attendance at the australia open has divided people in the city of melbourne, where locals have lived through months of lockdown and restrictions. i would love for him to not be allowed to play, for him to go home, but the cynical part of me thinks that he will be allowed to play. i do feel that, to make a statement to the rest of the world, that we are sticking by what we've been calling for the last few years, i feel it's best if djokovic should probably sit out this one.
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i hope that, you know, - the government, the judges hold their ground and say, "no, you don't want to get _ a vaccination and you don't want to follow our rules, . then you can't come in." "let him play!" there has been support for djokovic outside the venue where he's meant to play the australian open on monday — that's obviously if he's not deported. opponents to vaccination mandates took part in the rally and asked authorities to let the serbian compete on monday and keep alive his bid for a record 21st major title at the australian open. our correspondent guy de launey is in belgrade and has more now on reaction from there. outrage — that's where we're at here in serbia. and we're hearing outrage both on a sporting front and on a diplomatic front. so, on the sporting front, a nice little pithy quote from the serbian tennis federation, who said that preventing novak djokovic from playing was "unacceptable for the entire sports world on the planet and contradicts the sacred olympic principles, which are well known."
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i must admit, i've forgotten which the sacred olympic principles are to which they're referring, but i'll take their word for it. but there's also been a lot of political reaction now. the leaders of serbia's political... their political leaders, the government, have been quite quiet in the days running up to the ministerial intervention. i think they were hoping that, by standing back, they wouldn't do novak djokovic's case any harm. now, though, they've come out all guns blazing, with president aleksandar vucic blazing in particular, asking, "why do you mistreat him? "why do you harass him as well as his family and a nation that is free and proud?" so this is now being very much cast here in serbia as an attack, notjust on one man, but on the entire serbian people. earlier, i spoke to immigration lawyer daniel estrin. he told me what both sides will have to prove in court tomorrow. it's a remarkable turn of events, really. the minister's decision was based on vastly different reasons.
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as you rightly say, he made very different decision on the basis of the risk or the fact that he may be a risk to the good health and order of australia. what the court can and cannot do is very important. the court may not agree with the minister, it might even think that the mr�*s decision was unfair or incorrect, but that doesn't matter. what matters here is whether there was some sort ofjurisdictional error. the need to be some sort of legal error in the mr�*s decision. so it is very, very narrow because the powers of the minister are very broad. �* .., powers of the minister are very broad. . .., i. , powers of the minister are very broad. . , ., ,~ ., broad. and can you see any area where there _ broad. and can you see any area where there may _ broad. and can you see any area where there may have _ broad. and can you see any area where there may have been - broad. and can you see any area where there may have been a i broad. and can you see any area i where there may have been a legal error in this?— error in this? well, i think from an administrative _ error in this? well, i think from an administrative perspective, - error in this? well, i think from an administrative perspective, this i error in this? well, i think from an administrative perspective, this is| administrative perspective, this is one of the best crafted decisions
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that i have seen in a long time. it is obviously had an army of lawyers looking at this. the decision itself is very sober, very considered, and it has really looked at every single angen it has really looked at every single anger. so i think attacking it is going to be very difficult. the threshold for attacking any decision on a jurisdictional error basis is very high. most of these court cases don't win. in terms of decision making, ithink don't win. in terms of decision making, i think it is the gold standard of decision—making. however, we do have a federal court consisting of the chiefjustice, three of the best legal minds in the country who are very used to the immigration law framework. and they are going to be looking at this very, very closely. do i like his chances? i would probably say no. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people —
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based in the uk — to give evidence in her civil case, including one of his former aides. prince andrew denies all the allegations. our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. virginia giuffre's legal team here in america is seeking testimony from two people in the uk. one of those people is shukri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. miss giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting that club. the second person is the prince's former assistant, major rob olney. and ms giuffre's lawyers say she has reason to believe that major olney has information that relates to the relationship between prince andrew and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who's now dead. virginia giuffre's legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they haven't ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn't go to trial. but they've also indicated that they wouldn't just want that settlement to be financial.
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as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. but he is running out of legal manoeuvres and miss giuffre's legal team have him exactly where they want him. he's now in a position where he has said he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronagees, as well as his title, hrh. the pressure is increasing on him. tsunami waves caused by a giant underwater volcanic eruption have hit the pacific island of tonga. satellite images show the eruption which was followed by darkened skies as the volcano sent black ash shooting into the air. a tsunami warning sent residents of tonga scrambling to higher ground. a nearby inhabited island is reported to have submerged completely.
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ukraine has accused russia of being behind a large scale cyber—attack that hit numerous government websites. the nato secretary general, jens stoltenberg, has condemned the cyber attack. he said the alliance's experts had been in touch with their ukrainian counterparts on the issue. russia has also arrested members of the revil hacker group. revil were responsible for last year hack which disabled the us colonial pipeline. moscow said it was cracking down on the hackers at the request of the us. john hultquist is vice president of the cyber security firm mandiant and says the hack is not as sophisticated as it might first appear. i think it's easy to overestimate this, this actual incident, right? you see it, this is an incident where a lot of different organisations were affected. the mod, the mfa, several other government organisations, their websites were defaced with these messages. but the important thing to remember
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is you can actually oftentimes access those websites through a single point of failure. and that's probably what happened here. one system was accessed, and that allowed the attacker to essentially affect many systems at once. so these defacements are really superficial, and it didn't mean that the networks beneath these these organisations were actually affected. even though it's not necessarily highly advanced, there does seem to be these little interesting details to the incident. for one, the attackers are sort of claiming to be polish nationalists. they made reference to, like, historic disputes between poland and ukraine, rather than disputes between ukraine and russia. there was also an interesting artefact in the picture files they used. there's a gps co—ordinate associated with poland. even though this was not a photograph, which is where you generally see gps co—ordinates. so, there's... we have reason to believe that these
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things were were planted on there, that somebody is trying to suggest that these are polish nationalists, and we know that is a tactic that russia uses often. in fact, when they had targeted the olympics and olympic organisations, they pretended to be polish nationalists, and that was the russian military intelligence agency doing that. and we have more coverage on the ukraine crisis later. global questions has travelled to the country's capital kyiv where zeinab badawi and her panel of politicians and experts will take questions from a local audience to discuss the situation there. that's today on bbc news at 17:30 gmt. andy murray's bid for a first tennis title in more than two years has ended in defeat. he was beaten in straight sets in the final of the sydney classic by russia's aslan karatsev — who ranks number 20. next up for the 34—year—old scot is melbourne — and the australian open. england's cricketers have collapsed with the bat against australia at the ashes in hobart.
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they were dismissed for 188 in their first innings in the final session of the second day. australia lead the series 3—0. here in the uk, the coastguard is celebrating a major anniversary. it was founded exactly 200 years ago. luxmy gopal reports. search and rescue. for 200 years, the coastguard has been searching, rescuing and saving lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people who've really been at a really low point, and just make that situation at the time a little bit better for them to bear, and then long—term it means somebody goes home who maybe wouldn't have done. originally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty's coastguard was formally established on the 15th of january, 1822. newsreel: there's a certain amount i of mystery about the coastguard - l who he is and what he does. it's worked to keep people safe
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at the coast and at sea ever since. this is coastguard control. as illustrated in this video from 1972. ahoy there, coastguard here! we'll be down with you in a few minutes. hang on! when we started, it was horseback patrols looking for smugglers and people like that. that's where the "coast" and the "guard" bit comes from. it's changed hugely. we still rely massively on our volunteers, as we have done for almost the entirety of the 200—year history of the organisation. the coastguard now has 3,500 volunteers across 310 rescue teams, in addition to ten helicopter bases. the way the coastguard saves lives at sea has changed almost beyond recognition since its creation 200 years ago, with a new updated radio network and with new technology such as drones and unmanned vehicles playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations.
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you've got to embrace new technology, you've got to look to improve. you can't sit still and think, "we're doing the best we can." there's always improvements to be made, so we have to look at technology. so we're looking at fibre communications, improving ourfleet to bring in electric vehicles, drone technology and how that can assist in searches, and speed up finding people that are in difficulty. so, really, we'vejust got to be open to change and embrace it and look to improve at any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone birthday, 200 throw lines are being cast into the seas around the four nations today, as a symbol of the coastguard's life—saving role, past and present, on our shores and at sea. luxmy gopal, bbc news. let's get some of the day's other news. a group of people including one child have been rescued by the rnli. they were brought into dover at the early hours of this morning. yesterday, a city nice man died
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while attempting to make the journey. alex baldwin has turned over his phone to police investigating a fatal shooting on the set of a film in the united states last year. the cinematographer, halyna hutchins, was killed when the hollywood star rehearsed drawing a prop gun while making the movie, rust, in new mexico. mr baldwin denies pulling the trigger. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. hello. it's been another frosty and foggy morning for some of us today. most of the fog should clear by lunch and many of us are in for a bright if not sunny day. the big picture — high pressure still with us, it has been around for a few days and it is dominating the weather notjust in the uk but across much of europe. out in the atlantic, there are weather systems
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gathering just to the west of our neighbourhood and they will sneak in to bring a little bit of rain tomorrow. for some of us, as early as tonight. this is the forecast for the coming hours. the mist and fog lingering before clearing away, at least most of it will. sunny spells, in some areas blue skies. for example, the north and east of scotland, the lake district, some decent weather, too. temperatures on average today seven degrees. i mentioned weather fronts and this is one approaching scotland and northern ireland through tonight and through the small hours of sunday morning approaching the lake district. winds coming off the atlantic, milder air and more of a breeze. so we're not expecting a widespread frost tonight. we aren't expecting much fog on sunday morning either. you can see the weather front moving across northern and central england early in the morning and into the afternoon. some rain for a time, not lasting very long,
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moving through yorkshire, into northern wales. it will end up somewhere in the south in the middle of the afternoon. by then, very little rain associated with this weather front. for many of us, sunday will be a bright or sunny day with temperatures around eight degrees. the high pressure is back almost right on top of us on monday. certainly across southern england and northern france, that means windless conditions, stable and calm conditions once again. and i think a recipe for that fog to reform once again. it won't reform until monday night, into tuesday. monday itself is looking fine. again, similar temperatures compared to what we have been used to, around seven or eight degrees. this is the summary — very little changes. bright, sunny weather. and, at times, foggy in the morning. that's it from me, bye.
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hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: some conservative mps say they're
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being inundated with complaints from angry constituents, as more details emerge about lockdown parties in downing street. the leader of the opposition says the prime minister has lost his moral authority, and has to go. we are witnessing every day the broken spectacle of a prime minister mired in deceit and deception and unable to lead. novak djokovic has been detained in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country for the australian open. tsunami waves have hit the island nation of tonga — after a huge underwater volcanic eruption, which sent shockwaves across the south pacific. washington and kyiv accuse russia of preparing to carry out �*false sabotage operations' — to create a �*pretext�* for an invasion of ukraine. the kremlin denies the claims. andy murray's bid for a first tennis title in more than two years has ended in defeat. he was beaten in straight sets in the final of the sydney classic
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by russia's aslan karatsev.

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