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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 15, 2022 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. novak djokovic has been detained in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country. more details emerge about further lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being inundated with complaints from angry constituents. borisjohnson boris johnson and borisjohnson and those in his inner circle can do what they want and the rest of us have to do as we're told. that's not acceptable to me. that's not acceptable for my constituents or i believe most people in the country. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people
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based in the uk to give evidence in her civil case. prince andrew denies all the allegations. washington and kyiv accuse russia of preparing to carry out "false sabotage operations" — to create a "pretext" for an invasion of ukraine. the kremlin denies the claims. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. novak djokovic has been detained in australia ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether the tennis star can stay in the country. the serbian faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time, with the government labelling the 34—year—old a threat to the public — because he's unvaccinated against coronavirus. djokovic is still scheduled to play in the australian open in melbourne on monday. tanya dendrinos reports.
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free, free, the refugee! off the court and back in immigration detention at the park hotel in melbourne, it's far from the ideal lead up to the first major of the year for the unvaccinated tennis world number one. after days of deliberating, australian immigration minister alex hawke made the decision to use his power under the migration act to cancel djokovic�*s visa, saying it was on health and good order grounds on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so. and marking the second visa cancellation since his arrival in the country. unsurprisingly, an appeal was lodged by djokovic�*s lawyers, who filed their final submissions on saturday, ahead of a hearing in the federal court on sunday. australian open is much more important than any player, so if he's playing, finally, 0k. if he's not playing, australian open will be a great australian open
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with or without him, that's my point of view. the timeframe is tight. the australian open gets under way on monday with the top seed drawn to play fellow serb miomir kecmanovic. but whether or not djokovic will be free to play is still under a heavy cloud of doubt. the stakes are high for all parties. the world number one looking to secure a record—breaking 21st grand slam title, while the australian government looks for a political win months out from a federal election. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. the controversy around djokovic�*s attendance at the australia open has divided people in the city of melbourne — where locals have lived through months of lockdown and restrictions. i would love for him to not be allowed to play, for him to go home, but the cynical part of me thinks that he will be allowed to play. i do feel that, to make a statement to the rest of the world, that we are sticking by what we've
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been calling for the last few years. i feel it's best is if djokovic should probably sit out this one. i hope that, you know, - the government, the judges hold their ground and say, "no, you don't want to get _ a vaccination and you don't want to follow our rules, . then you can't come in." there has been support for djokovic outside the venue where he's meant to play the open on monday — that's obviously if he's not deported. opponents to vaccination mandates took part in the rally and asked authorities to let the serbian compete on monday and keep alive his bid for a record 21st major title at the australian open. with the latest from melbourne, here's our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil. we know that novak djokovic is back in immigration detention, this is the hotel where he was brought when his visa was revoked, the first time, and we understand he is back here. earlier, he was at his lawyer's
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office, after being interviewed by the immigration officials. and there was a procedural online hearing today, essentially planning out what happens on sunday morning. we also have learned in the past hour or so that it's going to be a full bench of three judges in that hearing tomorrow, when both sides are going to present their arguments. essentially, novak djokovic's team are going to argue against the basis of the immigration minister, alex hawke�*s decision, which is, in his view, the fact that an unvaccinated athlete is here could provoke anti—vaccination sentiments. the lawyers say that this is invalid, irrational, and by deporting him, he could actually provoke the thing that he is trying to prevent. and if our viewers feel like they've seen and heard this before, it's true because, once again, novak djokovic faces deportation. once again, it's down to a court to decide his fate. the difference is in the time frame, it is extremely tight. we are talking about less than two days now before the australian open, and we don't know whether or not, still, if he gets to play and compete
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and fight for his title, or he gets to leave the country and be deported. our correspondent, guy de launey, is in belgrade and has more now on reaction from there. outrage, that's where we're at here in serbia. and we're hearing outrage both on a sporting front and on a diplomatic front. so, on the sporting front, a nice little pithy quote from the serbian tennis federation, who said that preventing novak djokovic from playing was "unacceptable for the entire "sports world on the planet and contradicts the sacred olympic "principles, which are well known." i must admit, i've forgotten which the sacred olympic principles are to which they're referring, but i'll take their word for it. but there's also been a lot of political reaction, now. the leaders of serbia's political... their political leaders, the government, have been quite quiet in the days running up to the ministerial intervention. i think they were hoping that by standing back,
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they wouldn't do novak djokovic's case any harm. now, though, they've come out all guns blazing, with the president aleksandar vucic, blazing in particular, asking, "why do you mistreat him? "why do you harass him as well as his family and a nation "that is free and proud?" so this is now being very much cast here in serbia as an attack, not just on one man, but on the entire serbian people. rob maul, reports on tennis for the sun newspaper. hejoins us. welcome. thanks for joining us. it couldn't be more dramatic, could it? he is due in court on monday and his lawyers will be in court in 12 hours�* time to argue against his detention and deportation. argue against his detention and deportation-— argue against his detention and de ortation. ,., ., ., g ., deportation. good morning, joanna. as ou deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say. — deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say. 1030 — deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say, 1030 uk _ deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say, 1030 uk time, - deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say, 1030 uk time, 930 - deportation. good morning, joanna. as you say, 1030 uk time, 930 in i as you say, 1030 uk time, 930 in melbourne. it feels like the endgame now for novak djokovic. the australian open haven�*t done him any favours pencilling him in on monday because he is the defending
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champion. he has no wriggle room if he loses this case. it seems like it is black and white now. if he does lose the case, he is getting out of the country. they will have to withdraw from the main draw. you�*ll probably never play the australian open back again because he will face a three—year ban. if he wins his case, he will probably have just over 2a hours to get ready for that defence of his title at park and to a crowd that i don�*t want him there, potentially. as your packages have sort of projected. a lot of people in australia will be in happy if he is to stay unvaccinated, given all the difficulties we�*ve had over the past ten days. as i say, his biggest challenge to this australian defence might come in this court case overnight in melbourne. how might come in this court case overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here — overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here for— overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here for him _ overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here for him in _ overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here for him in terms - overnight in melbourne. how much is at stake here for him in terms of- at stake here for him in terms of his career?— his career? everything, to be honest. his career? everything, to be honest- he — his career? everything, to be honest. he is _ his career? everything, to be honest. he is 34, _ his career? everything, to be honest. he is 34, 35 - his career? everything, to be honest. he is 34, 35 in - his career? everything, to be honest. he is 34, 35 in may. | his career? everything, to be i honest. he is 34, 35 in may. he never plays the australian open back again where he is king of melbourne, he will have to go to paris. we have
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already seen micron, the president of france, clamping down on unvaccinated players. —— we have already seen macron. it is easy if you are vaccinated in new york. it mightjust be london, wimbledon, in the summer that might be the only grand slam way he would be given open arms to play. there is a long way to go before that. he is tied on 20 slams with rafa nadal at roger federer. rafa and novak are desperate to overtake the record of 24 on the women�*s side. it is everything for him to do this and he has a very good chance. if he wants to win his case, you would expect a fired up djokovic in the draw, at least. fired up d'okovic in the draw, at least. ., ~' , ., fired up d'okovic in the draw, at least. . ~ , ., ., , daniel estrin is a lawyer with extensive experience in australian immigration law — hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us. the government says the decision has been taken on health and good order grounds in the public interest. how
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much scope is there in terms of a specific court hearing, what will they have to prove and what will djokovic�*s lawyers have to prove? it's djokovic�*s lawyers have to prove? it�*s a remarkable turn of events, really, because the minister�*s decision was based on vastly different reasons. he essentially accepted most of what mr djokovic went through in terms of exemptions. as you rightly say, he made a very different decision on the basis of the risk, the fact that he may be a risk to the good order and health in australia. what the court can do and can�*t do is important. the court may not agree with the minister. they might even think that the minister�*s decision was possibly unfair or incorrect but that doesn�*t matter. what matters here is whether there was some sort ofjurisdictional error. there needs to be some sort of legal error in the minister�*s decision in order for that decision to be quashed and declared null. it is very narrow.
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the powers of the minister in fact a very, very broad. find the powers of the minister in fact a very. very broad-— very, very broad. and can you see an area very, very broad. and can you see any area where — very, very broad. and can you see any area where there _ very, very broad. and can you see any area where there may - very, very broad. and can you see any area where there may have i very, very broad. and can you see i any area where there may have been very, very broad. and can you see - any area where there may have been a legal error in this?— legal error in this? well... from an administrative _ legal error in this? well... from an administrative law— legal error in this? well... from an administrative law perspective, - legal error in this? well... from an| administrative law perspective, this is one of the best crafted decisions i�*ve seen in a long time. it�*s obviously had an army of lawyers looking into this. the minister is very used to making these kinds of decisions. the decision itself is a very sober, very considered. and it has really looked at every single angle. i think attacking it is going to be extremely difficult. the threshold for attacking any decision onjurisdictional threshold for attacking any decision on jurisdictional error is very, very high. and most of these court cases don�*t win. in terms of decision making, i think it�*s the gold standard of decision—making. however, we do have a federal court consisting of the chiefjustice also. we have three of some of the
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best legal minds in the country. they are very, very used immigration law framework and they will be looking at this very, very closely. do i like his chances? i would probably say no.— do i like his chances? i would probably say no. what do you think about his lawyers' _ probably say no. what do you think about his lawyers' argument - probably say no. what do you think about his lawyers' argument that l about his lawyers�* argument that it�*s about the government�*s fear of stoking anti—vax sentiment in australia? stoking anti-vax sentiment in australia?— australia? the lawyers for mr d'okovic australia? the lawyers for mr djokovic have _ australia? the lawyers for mr djokovic have raised - australia? the lawyers for mr djokovic have raised three i australia? the lawyers for mr - djokovic have raised three grounds, lots based on what is called no evidence. basically, ifa lots based on what is called no evidence. basically, if a decision maker makes a decision based on no evidence, it could be a jurisdictional error. evidence means no evidence at all, nothing, not even a scintilla of evidence. i don�*t think that is the case here, there is something on the file. it may not necessarily be very strong but there is something on the file thatis but there is something on the file that is ammunition to say you shouldn�*t look at this too closely, i have very broad powers. i will weigh everything up at the end of the day, i looked at me the articles, statements by mr djokovic and the actions of mr djokovic and
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the impact it had on his career and i were weigh that up and i made the decision. that decision is well within my power and i had some evidence to go by. whilst some of the grounds have some legs, i don�*t think they�*re going to be enough to get over the threshold, from my experience in immigration law. daniel estrin, thank you very much forjoining us. daniel estrin, thank you very much forjoining us— a prominent conservative mp has told the bbc that borisjohnson must "lead or step aside". tobias ellwood, who chairs the defence select committee, said leadership was required. it comes as some conservative mps say they�*ve been inundated with emails from constituents, angry about reports that downing street staff held parties during lockdowns. the government has urged people to reserve judgment until the outcome of an inquiry. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip�*s funeral. our political correspondent ione wells reports. "it is the expectation that more and more will come out" — the fear of one brexiteer tory mp,
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who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast." another said their email inbox was "horrendous." one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won�*t be leader at the next general election. "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week that he attended drinks in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don�*t think it�*s acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn�*t able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties. on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace,
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after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip�*s funeral, leading foreign secretary liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue gray has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this inquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4�*s week in westminster that the police should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act. because the primary objective of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week
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to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. ione wells, bbc news. our political correspondent, nick eardley, is here. what is the sentiment, this weekend? it's what is the sentiment, this weekend? it�*s not good, joanna. the thing we�*re watching for is conservative mps backing their constituencies testing the public mood. cash back in. certainly from the ones we�*ve spoken to, the overwhelming feeling is this has gone down extremely badly. mps are being inundated with e—mails almost on a daily basis, now. because when you think about what�*s happened over the last few days, there was the prime minister�*s apology. that seemed to spur a flurry of more e—mails from people saying it didn�*t go far enough. yesterday, the reports about the party the night before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral. that seems to
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have sparked a fresh wave of fury amongst the public. i spoke to one cabinet minister, former cabinet minister last night who said that the mood was hardening and that things looked terrible. i spoke to one former ally of borisjohnson, someone who had been banging the drum for him in 2019 who said that it looked bad, like a question of when and not if he is forced to stand down. if you look at the conservative supporting websites, they are all talking about boris johnson potentially being forced to stand down, that members being unhappy. some unscientific polls suggesting that a majority want him to go. does that mean borisjohnson will go? not necessarily. i don�*t think he is minded to resign and the process for actually getting rid of him is complicated. but itjazz meat does suggest ahead of the parliament returning next week and ahead of the sue gray report could be a pivotal
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moment —— but it does suggest. the mood is hardening among conservative mps and the public. it would suggest boris johnson�*s authority mps and the public. it would suggest borisjohnson�*s authority is extremely weak at the moment. and that some of his mps may be persuaded that they need to act soon. ., ~' persuaded that they need to act soon. . ~ i. persuaded that they need to act soon. ., ~ ,, y persuaded that they need to act soon. . ~ i. , . persuaded that they need to act soon. ., ~ ,, y . w seb payne is the whitehall correspondent at the financial times — hejoins me now. welcome, thank you forjoining us. what�*s your sense of how much support borisjohnson has around him? support boris johnson has around him? ~ ~ �* , , him? well, i think i've been very struck by a _ him? well, i think i've been very struck by a server _ him? well, i think i've been very struck by a server that _ him? well, i think i've been very struck by a server that just - him? well, i think i've been very struck by a server thatjust come out from conservative cabinet home, a website, and they say that 53% say borisjohnson should go now. —— conservative home. the 43% who say he shouldn�*t think you probably should go later. that is a fair representation of the mood across the conservative party will stop in the conservative party will stop in the cabinet people are trying to rally round borisjohnson in public, nobody has broke cover but in private, ministers certainly think
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the situation is pretty bad, as nick was just saying. the question really is going to be where things are on monday. crucially, are there more revelations because after mr johnson�*s apology on wednesday, it felt the mood had stabilised a bit and that mps were ok, lets wait for this report into the downing street party is but then we got the revelations in the daily telegraph saying there was a party on the eve of prince philip�*s funeral with wine being spilt on carpets, children�*s toys being broken and invisible image of people in downing street party and while the queen was sitting, alone at prince philip�*s funeral. that has ignited anger. if more of that keeps happening, it is only going to deteriorate boris johnson�*s position. only going to deteriorate boris johnson's position.— only going to deteriorate boris johnson's position. what's your readina johnson's position. what's your reading of— johnson's position. what's your reading of the _ johnson's position. what's your reading of the jumped - johnson's position. what's your reading of the jumped so - johnson's position. what's your. reading of the jumped so quickly johnson's position. what's your - reading of the jumped so quickly to apologise over that one when there have been countless examples of individuals around the country who are burying their loved ones on the days of other parties they were having other life changing events
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happening? and the response every time to the detail of those parties has been to say, you know, ranging from, "well, no rules are broken" to, "wait for the inquiry". i from, "well, no rules are broken" to, "wait for the inquiry".- to, "wait for the inquiry". i think it is because _ to, "wait for the inquiry". i think it is because it _ to, "wait for the inquiry". i think it is because it involves - to, "wait for the inquiry". i think it is because it involves the - to, "wait for the inquiry". i think i it is because it involves the queen and buckingham palace. it was such a potent moment in people�*s minds for the last lockdown in april 2021. clearly, the reports of that, which downing street had not denied, or that they are not going into the details, saying they are waiting on the inquiry from sue gray, senior civil servant. that was damage control in terms of trying to not make the situation even worse. people have dug up these tweets and comments that were made by the government about finds and you must have large gatherings, you must have parties. the details of that gathering havejust parties. the details of that gathering have just highlighted this kind of cultural disconnect that seemed to exist within the top of government and whitehall and the rest of the country. that people
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were at home, observing those rules, and if they weren�*t, they were getting fined by the police. the heart of government who were making that will act very differently. i think that kind of... that... that... that will anger that people haveis that... that will anger that people have is about, as borisjohnson put it himself, people who make the rules were not observing the rules. when sue gray�*s report comes out, which we are expecting it to be the end of this coming week, but it could also kick into the week after because every new party means more investigation she�*s got to look into. there will be even more apologies. i think that is the prime minister�*s hope of trying to get through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because every through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because every new through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because every new party through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because every new party means through this, me a call but it could also kick into the week after because every new party means more investigation she�*s got to look into. there will be even more apologies. i think that is the prime minister�*s hope of trying to get through this, mia culpa after me after mea culpa. seb through this, mia culpa after me after mea culpa.— through this, mia culpa after me after mea culpa. seb payne, thank ou. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who�*s accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people — based in the uk — to give evidence in her civil case, including his former equerry. prince andrew denies all the allegations. our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. virginia giuffre�*s legal team here in america is seeking testimony
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from two people in the uk. one of those people is shukri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. miss giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting that club. the second person is the prince�*s former assistant, major rob olney. and ms giuffre�*s lawyers say she has reason to believe that major olney has information that relates to the relationship between prince andrew and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who is now dead. virginia giuffre�*s legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they haven�*t ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn�*t go to trial. but they�*ve also indicated that they wouldn�*t just want that settlement to be financial. as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. but he is running out of legal manoeuvres and miss giuffre�*s legal
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team have him exactly where they want him. he is now in a position where he has said he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronagees, as well as his title, hrh. the pressure is increasing on him. washington and kyiv have accused russia of preparing to carry out "false sabotage operations" — to create a "pretext" for an invasion of ukraine. the pentagon said moscow had sent a group of trained operatives into eastern ukraine. they could then carry out acts of sabotage against russia�*s own proxy forces there, which are concentrated in the donestk and luhansk regions. ukraine�*s defence ministry said russia was plotting to stage similar operations in the disputed moldovan region known as transnistria, on the ukrainian border. the kremlin has denied the reports, but the pentagon says its inteligence showed the plans were well under way... we do have information that indicates that russia is already working actively to create
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a pretext for a potential invasion. and, again, we�*ve seen this kind of thing before out of russia. when there isn�*t an actual crisis to suit their needs, they will make one up. and so we�*re watching for that. ukraine has also accused russia of being behind a large scale cyber—attack, that hit numerous government websites. the nato secretary general, jens stoltenberg, has condemned the cyber attack. he said the alliance�*s experts had been in touch with their ukrainian counterparts on the issue. russia has also arrested members of the revil hacker group. revil were responsible for last year�*s hack, which disabled the us colonial pipeline. moscow said it was cracking down on the hackers at the request of the us. john hultquist is vice president of the cyber security firm mandiant and says the hack is not as sophisticated as it might first appear.
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i think it�*s easy to overestimate this, this actual incident, right? you see it, this is an incident where a lot of different organisations were affected. the mod, the mfa, several other government organisations, their websites were defaced with these messages. but the important thing to remember is you can actually often times access those websites through a single point of failure. and that�*s probably what happened here. one or one system was accessed, and that allowed the attacker to essentially affect many systems at once. so, these defacements are really superficial, and it didn�*t mean that the networks beneath these these organisations were actually affected. even though it�*s not necessarily highly advanced, there does seem to be these little interesting details to the incident. for one, the attackers are sort of claiming to be polish nationalists. they made reference to this, like, historic disputes
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you are watching bbc news. there is always the website if you want to keep up—to—date. that was goodbye to viewers around the world. we are still with you in the uk. there�*s an appeal for more people to become foster carers, amid predictions that almost 100,000 children and young people in england could be in the care system by 2025. placements for older children and teenagers are particularly hard to find, as megan paterson reports. it�*s hard not being with your birth family, i think. when you�*re growing up in foster care, you kind of have two mindsets, when you love your birth family so much, but it�*s adjusting and realising that actually what happened isn�*t very good and it shouldn�*t have happened. skye is 21. when she was ten years old, she moved in with foster carer patsy marshall in gateshead. hey, skye, look at this photo of you.
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oh, my god. over 23 years, she's cared for more than 50 young people, many from challenging backgrounds. over 23 years, she�*s cared for more than 50 young people, many from challenging backgrounds. you just try and make them feel as relaxed as possible. never put any pressure on them to suddenly start talking to you about everything, just let them ease themselves in. it sounds really silly, butjust being able to eat grapes whenever i wanted was a big thing. not having to ask for food. it was a big adjustment, to kind of have this freedom here. across the region, foster carers like patsy are in high demand. alongside local authority placements, independent foster care agencies are often key in finding homes for older children and teenagers — young people often left waiting for appropriate care. teenagers who come into care - sometimes have been in care before, they may have been in and out- of care, and perhaps do have more complicated life stories. that's a fact. however, i think foster carers - caring for teenagers sort of realise that often, stability and security and care to those young people | is immensely rewarding and valuable.
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it�*s undoubtably a challenging role, but one that can change lives. you know, when you see them develop into these young people and they go on, after they leave you — long after they leave you — and they've settled down and they've got their own children, they're holding downjobs or they're going to university, they're all things that they probably couldn't do prior to coming to live with you. skye left foster care when she was 18, but is still part of patsy�*s family. training to become a nurse, she�*ll graduate later this year. would you say patsy changed your life? i genuinely think i wouldn�*t be the woman i am today without... sorry. i wouldn�*t have been at uni, i wouldn�*t be doing all of these amazing things, and she definitely gave me so many experiences, like, i never would have had, and confidence, and nothing i could ever say thank you enough for that. nothing.
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that could ever say thank you enough for that. nothing. tomasz schafernaker. it's it�*s a foggy morning for some of us today. most of the function to clear by lunch and many are in for a bright and sunny day. the big picture, high pressure still with us, it has been around for a few days and it is dominating the weather notjust in the uk but across much of europe. out in the atlantic, there are weather systems gathering just to the west of our neighbourhood and they will sneak into bring a bit of rain tomorrow. for some of us as early as tonight. this is the forecast for the coming hours. the mist and fog lingering before clearing away and most of it will. sunny spells in some areas blue skies. for example, north and east of scotland, the lake district,
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some decent weather, too. temperatures on average 7 degrees. i mentioned a weather front and this is one approaching scotland and northern ireland through to night and the small hours of sunday morning approaching the lake district. wind is coming off the atlantic, milderand more district. wind is coming off the atlantic, milder and more of a breeze. so we not expecting a widespread frost. we are expecting much on sunday morning either. you can see the weather front moving across northern and central england early in the morning and into the afternoon. some rain for a time, not lasting long, moving to yorkshire and northern wales. it will end up somewhere in the south in the middle of the afternoon. by then, very little rain associated with this weather front. little rain associated with this weatherfront. for many little rain associated with this weather front. for many of us, sunday will be a bright for sunny day with temperatures around 8 degrees. the high pressure is back almost right on top of us on monday. certainly across southern england and northern france, that means
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windless conditions, stable and calm

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