Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 15, 2022 6:00am-10:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "wine time fridays". more revelations emerge about lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being bombarded with emails from angry constituents. detained again. novak djokovic waits to hear whether his latest appeal against deportation from australia is succesful. 200 years of saving lives at sea. the coastguard celebrates its bicentenary. the final ashes test but the same old story for england — except this time, they're the masters of their own downfall, as opener rory burns is run
6:01 am
out without scoring. and it is a frosty and foggy start to saturday for many of us. the good news is, it should be a bright day. it's saturday, the 15th of january. our top story: there are more allegations of parties in downing street during the pandemic this morning, with newspaper reports that staff at number 10 held regular drinks on friday evenings while restrictions were in force. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral last april. meanwhile some conservative mps have told bbc news they've been inundated with emails over the issue from angry constituents as our political correspondent ione wells reports. it is the expectation that more and more will come out. the fear of one
6:02 am
brexiteer tory mp, who previously backed borisjohnson, and is worried about the stream of allegations about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast". another said their email inbox was horrendous. one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election. for many of us, this feels terminal. borisjohnson this feels terminal. boris johnson admitted this week he attended drinks in the downing street garden on may 20, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after birth. 1 don't think it is acceptable sons died shortly after birth. i don't think it is acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making —— facing
6:03 am
these difficulties. fin same time they were making -- facing these difficulties.— these difficulties. on friday downin: these difficulties. on friday downing street _ these difficulties. on friday downing street also - these difficulties. on friday downing street also had . these difficulties. on friday downing street also had to| these difficulties. on friday - downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's funeral, leaving foreign secretary liz truss to admit mistakes were made. ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an enquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant, sue grey, has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this enquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster but the police should now be involved in this investigation. it the police should now be involved in this investigation.— this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, _ this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing - this investigation. if there is a - cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, and the police should act. because the primary object of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. maw; follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting _ intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with _ intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with baited _ intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with baited breath - are now waiting with baited breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be
6:04 am
congregating next week to work out just how they are going to bring this to an end. i only wells, bbc news. —— ione wells. at around 9:30am we'll be speaking to andrew bridgen, one of the conservative mps who has written a letter of no—confidence in the prime minister. novak djokovic has been detained again in melbourne ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in australia to defend his open title. the tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in melbourne. shaimaa, the saga continues? so, now here's in detention? good morninu. so, now here's in detention? good morning. novak— so, now here's in detention? good morning. novak djokovic— so, now here's in detention? good morning. novak djokovic is - so, now here's in detention? (13mm morning. novak djokovic is back in detention, the world number one is believed to be in that hotel behind me and it may look familiar because this is the same immigration detention hotel where he was brought when his visa was revoked the first time when he arrived here in
6:05 am
australia. today there was a procedural online court hearing, he was in his lawyer's office, accompanied by immigration officers and then brought here, we believe, to the immigration detention hotel. we understand there is going to be a hearing where both parties are going to present their arguments to a judge on sunday morning, australia time, and we also know from court documents that were released after the hearing today that his lawyers are going to argue against the immigration minister's decision to revoke his visa, and we know now from those documents that alex hawke chose to deport and cancel novak djokovic's visa, because he said the unvaccinated athlete's presence could then encourage or provoke anti—vaccination sentiments, and the lawyer said, well, this is irrational and invalid, and this is what they are going to argue. but
6:06 am
once again he is back in detention, once again he is back in detention, once again he is back in detention, once again he is fighting to defend his title, and once again it is up to a judge to decide whether he stays or goes. to a judge to decide whether he stays or gm— stays or goes. ok, we will be waitinu. stays or goes. ok, we will be waiting. thank _ stays or goes. ok, we will be waiting. thank you. - prince andrew's former assistant is being asked to give a statement by the legal team representing virgina giuffre, the woman who has accused the duke of sexual assault when she was 17. virginia giuffre's legal team are also seeking evidence from a woman who claims she saw the prince in a london nightclub in 2001. prince andrew, who is facing a civil case in the us, denies the allegations. our us correspondent nomia iqbal has the latest. virginia jaffray�*s legal team here in america is seeking testimony from two people in the uk. one of those people is shikri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. ms giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting nightclub. the second
6:07 am
person as the prince's former assistant, major rob olney. mr ponder�*s lawyers say that she has reason to believe that mr only has information that relates to the relationship between prince andrew and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who is now dead. virginia giuffre's legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they have not ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn't go to trial. they have also indicated they wouldn'tjust want that settlement to be financial. as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. and he is running out of legal manoeuvres. ms giuffre's legal team had him exactly where they want him, he is now in a position where he has said that he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronage is, as well as his royal patronage is, as well as his title hrh. the pressure is
6:08 am
increasing on him. thousands of people have attended vigils across the republic of ireland in memory of the murdered primary school teacher, ashling murphy. the 23—year—old was attacked while she was jogging by a canal in county offaly on wednesday afternoon. a man who was arrested over her death has been released without charge. covid restrictions in wales will start to ease from today, with the number of people allowed to gather for outdoor events increasing from 50 to 500. that means parkruns and smaller sporting fixtures are back on from today. nightclubs will be allowed to open from january 28th and the welsh government is hoping to lift all restrictions by february 10th. we love a bit of drone filming on breakfast, and here are some shots which give a dramatic illustration of coastal erosion. this is happisburgh, in norfolk, where huge chunks of the cliff regularly fall into the sea.
6:09 am
geologists say this tree—shaped ravine was caused by water running off the field and cascading over the cliff after heavy rain. a clear illustration, isn't it? we can no a clear illustration, isn't it? we can go from _ a clear illustration, isn't it? - can go from that to this. it's probably safe to say most of us won't be planning a trip to the beach today, but the staff and volunteers of her majesty's coastguard will be turning out as usual, just as they have done for the last 200 years. the organisation is marking its double century today. luxmy gopal has been finding out more about its history and its future. for 200 years, the coastguard has been searching, rescuing and saving lives. it’s been searching, rescuing and saving lives. �* , , ~ been searching, rescuing and saving lives. 3 , ~ . been searching, rescuing and saving lives. �*, , . ., ., been searching, rescuing and saving lives. . ., lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help _ lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people. - lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people. so - lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people. so being lives. it's such a feeling to be i able to help people. so being at that point, make that situation at the time a little bit better for them, and long—term it means somebody goes home he might not have
6:10 am
done. . , , , ., _, done. originally set up to combat smuggling. _ done. originally set up to combat smuggling. her— done. originally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty - done. originally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty 's - done. originally set up to combat - smuggling, her majesty 's coastguard smuggling, her majesty �*s coastguard was formally established on the 15th of january, 1822. was formally established on the 15th ofjanuary. 1822— ofjanuary, 1822. there is a certain amount of— ofjanuary, 1822. there is a certain amount of mystery _ ofjanuary, 1822. there is a certain amount of mystery about - ofjanuary, 1822. there is a certain amount of mystery about the - amount of mystery about the coastguard. who he is and what he does. it coastguard. who he is and what he does. . , coastguard. who he is and what he does. ., , ., ~ ., coastguard. who he is and what he does. ., ~ ., ~ , , does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast _ does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and _ does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at _ does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at sea - does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at sea ever i safe at the coast and at sea ever since. as illustrated in this video from 1972. there are high, coastguard here. we'll be down with you in a few minutes. hang on! started as horseback patrols, looking — started as horseback patrols, looking for smugglers and things like that — looking for smugglers and things like that. that is where the coast under_ like that. that is where the coast under the — like that. that is where the coast under the guard bit comes from. it has changed usually. we still rely massively — has changed usually. we still rely massively on our volunteers, as we have _ massively on our volunteers, as we have done — massively on our volunteers, as we have done for almost the entirety of the 200 _ have done for almost the entirety of the 200 year history of the organisation.— the 200 year history of the organisation. the 200 year history of the oruanisation. . , ., ., the 200 year history of the oruanisation. ., ., ., .,, organisation. the coastguard now has three and half— organisation. the coastguard now has three and half thousand _ organisation. the coastguard now has three and half thousand volunteers. l three and half thousand volunteers. across 310 rescue teams. in addition to ten helicopter bases. thea;t across 310 rescue teams. in addition to ten helicopter bases.— to ten helicopter bases. they way the coastguard _ to ten helicopter bases. they way the coastguard saves _ to ten helicopter bases. they way the coastguard saves lives - to ten helicopter bases. they way the coastguard saves lives at - to ten helicopter bases. they way the coastguard saves lives at sea| the coastguard saves lives at sea has changed almost beyond
6:11 am
recognition since its creation 200 years ago, with a new updated radio network and bit of technology such as drones and unmanned vehicles playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations.— playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new — and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new technology, _ and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new technology, you've - and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new technology, you've gotj embrace new technology, you've got to look_ embrace new technology, you've got to look to _ embrace new technology, you've got to look to improve community can't sit still— to look to improve community can't sit still and — to look to improve community can't sit still and do the best you can. as always— sit still and do the best you can. as always improvements to be made, so we _ as always improvements to be made, so we got _ as always improvements to be made, so we got to— as always improvements to be made, so we got to look at technology. we're _ so we got to look at technology. we're looking at fibre communications, bringing electric vehicles, — communications, bringing electric vehicles, drone technology and how that can _ vehicles, drone technology and how that can in — vehicles, drone technology and how that can in searches. so really, we 'ust that can in searches. so really, we just got— that can in searches. so really, we just got to — that can in searches. so really, we just got to be open to change and embrace — just got to be open to change and embrace it — just got to be open to change and embrace it and look to improve it at any point _ embrace it and look to improve it at any point that we can. to embrace it and look to improve it at any point that we can.— any point that we can. to mark the organisation's _ any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone _ any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone birthday, | organisation's milestone birthday, 200 throw lines are being cast into the seas around the four nations today, as a symbol of the coastguard's lifesaving role, past and present, on our shores and unperceived. luxmy gopal, bbc news.
6:12 am
let's take a look at the papers. not for the first time this week, many of the front pages focus on the allegations of parties at downing street while lockdown restrictions were in place. boris' wine time fridays is the daily mirror's headline, accompanied by a photo of a special "booze fridge," which was reportedly bought so staff could chill alcoholic drinks. the times reports that cabinet ministers have warned the prime minister he is in the "last chance saloon". it comes after downing street apologised to buckingham palace for two staff parties held in number 10 on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. "devoted queen deserves better than this" is the headline in the daily express. a photograph of the queen sitting alone at her husband's funeral is featured on the front page. meanwhile, the i newspaper has a list of who could replace borisjohnson as prime minister if he is forced to step down. the chancellor rishi sunak and foreign secretary liz truss are among the contenders mentioned.
6:13 am
what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. _ what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. there _ what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. there is - what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. there is a - what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. there is a lot - what have we got inside? well, it is saturday morning. there is a lot of. saturday morning. there is a lot of stuff we have talked about this week, i was drawn to one image this morning, it is a story in the daily mail, can we get the camera on this? it is a purely visual story. are we there yet? so, do you know sometimes people say, you know, my auntie, my sister, my cousin, looks exactly like, i don't know, whoever. charlie sta . like, i don't know, whoever. charlie stavt- no. — like, i don't know, whoever. charlie stayt. no, somebody _ like, i don't know, whoever. charlie stayt. no, somebody more - like, i don't know, whoever. charlie i stayt. no, somebody more interesting than that. stayt. no, somebody more interesting than that- you — stayt. no, somebody more interesting than that. you know, _ stayt. no, somebody more interesting than that. you know, looks _ stayt. no, somebody more interesting than that. you know, looks exactly - than that. you know, looks exactly like... i suddenly can't think of anybody. like... i suddenly can't think of an bod . ' . ., like... i suddenly can't think of anbod. ' .. ., ., anybody. cliff richard, or elton john. but then _ anybody. cliff richard, or elton john. but then you can - anybody. cliff richard, or elton john. but then you can say, - anybody. cliff richard, or elton john. but then you can say, it i john. but then you can say, it doesnt john. but then you can say, it doesn't look _ john. but then you can say, it doesn't look anything - john. but then you can say, it doesn't look anything like - john. but then you can say, it i doesn't look anything like them. look at best. add sherron, he is from suffolk, as you know. this is a student, there was a family reunion in slovakia, where they were gathering pictures for a family
6:14 am
tree, and this picture emerged, and this is edward romkovic�*s grandmother's sister and everybody looked at and said, that is at sherron. it exactly like add sherron. the family are not in contact with the great aunt currently, they think she is in her 80s and lives near prague. they think she is around 19 years old in this photo. honestly, you can linger on that, it is quite extraordinary. do we all agree about that? i think that is a strong... that is a very strong, a very strong likeness. , , that is a very strong, a very strong likeness-_ for— that is a very strong, a very strong likeness._ for the - that is a very strong, a very strong likeness._ for the sake l likeness. definitely. for the sake of not being _ likeness. definitely. for the sake of not being confused, _ likeness. definitely. for the sake of not being confused, and - likeness. definitely. for the sake l of not being confused, and sherron is on the left. there you go. —— ed sheeran. if the family is watching, they can get in contact. in slovakia?— they can get in contact. in slovakia? ~ ., , , slovakia? well, the family is in cepenhagen- — slovakia? well, the family is in copenhagen. but _ slovakia? well, the family is in copenhagen. but they - slovakia? well, the family is in copenhagen. but they have - slovakia? well, the family is in copenhagen. but they have a l slovakia? well, the family is in - copenhagen. but they have a ringing in slovakia. brute copenhagen. but they have a ringing in slovakia. ~ , ., , ., in slovakia. we 'ust need lots of doppelgangers _ in slovakia. we just need lots of
6:15 am
doppelgangers now. _ in slovakia. we just need lots of - doppelgangers now. doppelgangers, it can't be the only one.— can't be the only one. people who look like people? _ can't be the only one. people who look like people? yes, _ can't be the only one. people who look like people? yes, a - look like people? yes, a deppelganger- - look like people? yes, a| doppelganger. preferably look like people? yes, a - doppelganger. preferably ones look like people? yes, a _ doppelganger. preferably ones that actuall do, doppelganger. preferably ones that actually do. a _ doppelganger. preferably ones that actually do, a little _ doppelganger. preferably ones that actually do, a little bit. _ doppelganger. preferably ones that actually do, a little bit. charlie - actually do, a little bit. charlie is auoin actually do, a little bit. charlie is going to _ actually do, a little bit. charlie is going to be _ actually do, a little bit. charlie is going to be the _ actually do, a little bit. charlie is going to be the judge - actually do, a little bit. charlie is going to be the judge of- actually do, a little bit. charliel is going to be the judge of that. otherwise... is going to be the 'udge of that. otherwise. . ._ otherwise... who is your doppelganger? _ i don't know. sometimes people offer you an example. but i don't really know. maybe... maybe the viewers have some ideas. i know. maybe. .. maybe the viewers have some ideas.— have some ideas. i think they will have. i have some ideas. i think they will have- ithink— have some ideas. i think they will have. i think you _ have some ideas. i think they will have. i think you do _ have some ideas. i think they will have. i think you do no _ have some ideas. i think they will have. i think you do no frosty, i have. i think you do no frosty, frosty today. it is frosty. my left home at about four o'clock in the morning and it was quite icy, frosty. a lot of fog around today. this is something we have had for quite a few days now with high pressure. frost and fog in the morning. for most of us, during the afternoon, halley�*s comet will be bright or sunny. here is the high pressure that has been around for days now, it is still dominating me
6:16 am
weather across the uk and out towards the continent, towards the west and in the atlantic, swells of cloud, weather happening, heading in our direction, that does mean, you canjust about see our direction, that does mean, you can just about see the weather front coming out the top of my head, it is just there. that'll be heading our way. let us concentrate on the fog. it is very dense, 50— 100 metres on some routes. this is in central and eastern parts of england over the next few hours. these areas stretching from the london area into yorkshire as well. most of it will clear. then, think, for many of us it is a case of right or sunny weather, could be minor showers here or there, that is pretty much it. about average temperatures for the time of year. then tonight, i mentioned anything on the top of my head,is mentioned anything on the top of my head, is the weather front. you mentioned anything on the top of my head, is the weatherfront. you can see some spots of rain moving on, could be quite heavy for a time, but not for very long, in scotland and northern ireland. look at the winter
6:17 am
is coming off the atlantic, mild air moving away. more of a breeze into the night and into tomorrow, not as much fog tomorrow morning. the weather front moving across the uk tomorrow. you can see that line, the weather front, tomorrow. you can see that line, the weatherfront, that tomorrow. you can see that line, the weather front, that means for a time during the morning, across england and wales, clouds may gather a little bit, you might have a little rain, then it will clear to sunny skies. i think, rain, then it will clear to sunny skies. ithink, overall, a fine rain, then it will clear to sunny skies. i think, overall, a fine day on the way tomorrow. temperatures of 10 degrees in london, eight in glasgow. high pressure still with us into monday and tuesday. we have that weak weather front moving through in the next day or so. high pressure still pretty much winds. we will be in the middle of that high on monday, so once again we will see mist and fog returning. so really quiet on the weather front now, just a few spots of rain it may be tomorrow, but that is pretty much
6:18 am
it. there you go. not much change in the weather icons.— the weather icons. tomasz, we will see later on- _ the weather icons. tomasz, we will see later on. thank _ the weather icons. tomasz, we will see later on. thank you _ the weather icons. tomasz, we will see later on. thank you very - the weather icons. tomasz, we willj see later on. thank you very much. ever wondered what kind of cars we'll be driving in the future? this week, the click team has been on a mission to find out. hey, welcome back to the consumer electronics show in las vegas. we have cars for you this week, lots of them. one of the biggest draws of this show in recent years has been the motor hall. so, lara, are you ready to get your driving shoes on? i'm revved up and ready. 0k. on your marks...set...go! every year, ces is
6:19 am
full of concept cars. often outlandish ideas as to how we're going to be travelling on roads in future. maybe that'll be having a chat to your vehicle... do you like it? yes. sounds good. ..or turning the back into a really impractical and uncomfortable living room. this year, though, there was at least one idea with a somewhat more convincing purpose. what i'm filming here is a concept that hopes to be able to create uncrashable cars. now, i'm getting in this vehicle, which is embedded with lidar sensors, which should stop it from hitting the, luckily, pretend child at the end of this track. this is a tesla, which is already fitted with a system that's in most new cars, which uses cameras and radars to hopefully prevent it from hitting something if an accident�*s likely to happen. but what are its limitations? suspenseful music. this feels horrible. you so just want it to stop if it gets really close...
6:20 am
and it has quite a jolt, obviously, but we haven't hit the child. whereas the tesla... suspenseful music. that was quite something. this technology is already being built into cars right now as a safety function, and in the future, could be used in autonomous vehicles too. this tesla and other cars with current collision avoidance systems have their limits as to what they can prevent. accidents still happen but lidar has the potential to raise the bar, even in low light. there is a general assumption right now that automatic emergency braking or collision avoidance systems that solve problem on cars. but the reality is actually quite the opposite. you know, people still get into car accidents all the time, and this is despite, you know, now, the substantial majority of new vehicles being produced with assisted driving capabilities, the reality is that you would think it would be easy to build system that willjust prevent you from hitting the thing right in front of you, but that's simply not the case with these existing
6:21 am
camera and radar systems. luminar�*s laser—sensing technology measures how far away objects are, perception software interpreting that data, feeding what it finds into the control software that tells the car how and where to stop. and because it's using lidar, should also workjust as well in low light. you take a look at most of the autonomous vehicle companies that have been out there. they have generally been stuck in sort of this r&d mode, you have these giant roof racks full of sensing systems and a supercomputer in the trunk that's there to run the thing, where the objective is to try to replace the driver altogether and just take a passenger from point a to point b in a right—hailing robotaxi—like environment. but the thing is, is that what we're doing is not about that, it's about actually making the drivers better, giving them almost superhuman capabilities to be able to actually save lives and have something that has an opportunity to do this today as opposed to decades from now.
6:22 am
and another thing many drivers might like right now is an electric car with better range. well, mercedes unveiled the vision eqxx, a concept car capable of up to 648 miles on a single charge. that could take you from berlin to paris. it says that it's made possible due to a higher density battery, lower weight, 117 solar panels in the roof and better aerodynamics. it took a bit of work then! of course, it will be up to others to certify the range estimate independently, and those extra miles mean there are some compromises with a top speed of only around 87mph. not that you should be driving any faster anyway! this particular model won't be going on sale, but mercedes say that many of the features are going to be added to theirfuture evs from 2024 or 2025. meanwhile, here's something that caused its fair share of attention.
6:23 am
this bmw changes colour! it's a colour—changing car! and to do so, it uses e—ink, the same as an e—reader. we have here is the world's first real colour—changing car. the technology e—ink is amazing. we know it from the e—readers, from the kindles, it's very low energy, it's sunlight readable and it's just colour change, there's no light, there's no leds, there's no backlight there's no oleds, it isjust colour change. so you just need a little bit of energy to change colour and absolutely no energy to hold it. so it's bi—stable and, as an engineer, that's a wonderful property to have. the driver can manually choose to change colour or you can do it via the sensors that are embedded in the vehicle. so you can have a temperature sensor, that when it's hot, the car will be white, and when it's cold, it'll be black, or you can have a light sensor so it changes colour at night time. so, there could be an actual purpose, apart from driving around wrapped in a copy of war and peace.
6:24 am
and finally, here's a car that wants to use its power to post on social media. this is the indi one, and it's very keen to show off its supercomputer. it's capable of high—quality mobile gaming and even has vr connectivity, not that that's much use to the driver whilst driving. its power also means it could be very productive for work on the go. this car isn'tjust about the supercomputer, though. it's also covered in cameras. on the outside, there's one up front and back. internally, there are three as well. and if you're so inclined, you could post your journey on social media. yes, if getting from a to b is an interruption to your constant posting or the thing you actually want to share is yourjourney, then this car has the solution...? from the social media side, it's interesting now because so much of our life is shaped by instant media, whether it's news or social—related, and with our product,
6:25 am
you know, when you talk influencers, of course they get really excited because for the first time, they can real—time at any time in their day or movements through the city in their vehicle, they can basically treat their vehicle as an extension of their mobile phone or their home pc. but also, the idea of archiving, you know, that type of information and for those of us, you know, thinking about using the same type of hardware for our families, being able to document those moments in the car with the kids when they're learning to sing their first songs or the family singalongs or even discussions with the teenagers in the car. i'm sure they'd love that! but for looking at a baby in the back, well, this camera probably does beat the usual mirror. so, whilst every feature on every car clearly won't be for everyone, at least there are plenty of new ideas out there to make our roads safer and smoother, and to get us noticed if we want to be.
6:26 am
now, having been to vegas every year since the beginning of time, i thought i'd seen everything here. but it turns out there's something new this year. now, you know area 51 is near here, and it's kind of weird. yeah. well, there is now area15, which is also all kinds of strange, and we sent chris fox to check it out. i've popped out to do a big shop at the most talked about supermarket in las vegas. i've heard the prices here are to die for. but at this supermarket, nothing is quite as it seems. omega mart looks just like a regular supermarket — they've got food and drink you can actually buy — but everything's been infused with a secret additive, and the ceo, walter dram, hasn't been seen for a while. it makes you think there could be a mystery lying just. . . beneath
6:27 am
the surface. stepping through one of the shop's portals takes you to another dimension where more of the mystery unfolds. but what you do there is up to you. there's a story to immerse yourself in using one of the store's loyalty cards to track your progress, or you can simply treat it as a very instagrammable multisensory playground. more than 300 artists have worked on creating the experience, with more than a0 projectors providing some of the visuals. in the parallel dimension, i met drew dicostanzo, and i asked him whether this was more art or escape room. i think it's both of those things and more. it's really whatever you make it. you know, we're not going to tell you how to experience omega mart, what to do. it's like an open—world video game and we're going to reward your explanation and play. there's a lot of opportunities here to take a good instagram photo. how much of the design was based around making something like this instagrammable? yeah, social media's massive for us because, obviously, there's all of the posts that — the user—generated content
6:28 am
that people provide. i mean, we're full ofjust jaw—dropping art, you know, throughout the 52,000 square feet of this exhibition. but really, that's just scratching the surface. as you start to wander and explore these different areas, you'll start to discover there's a story, there's a few different narratives that are happening. there's mysteries to solve. and if you dive even deeper down the rabbit hole, you can go through some rfid progressive digital gameplay that will take you a couple of hours to hack and unlock secrets throughout the entire exhibition. drew, what inspired the omega mart? it's something that started as a small backyard art project that evolved eventually into this huge project that took three years to create. it took 325 artists from concept to opening and, you know, we have everything from digital creators, sculptors, painters, experiential artists all working together to create, you know, this narrative and build it out. so, a really giant process
6:29 am
that took a long time. while the traditional high street has struggled in the internet age, the omega mart is thriving, and the company is already planning an expansion to this immersive experience, and opening some others. so, the next time you're out shopping, do be on the lookout for any suspicious looking wormholes to another dimension. that was chris fox. that looked right up your street. absolutely was. i love weird and wonderful stuff. give me a weird supermarket, i'm all over it. should we go now? sure. alright. ok, that's it for the short version of this week's click. the full length is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever, you can find the team on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
6:30 am
hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. let's talk sport, and there is so much to talk about. you are smiling. i love ashes mornings. it is much to talk about. you are smiling. i love ashes mornings.— i love ashes mornings. it is the second day _ i love ashes mornings. it is the second day of— i love ashes mornings. it is the second day of the _ i love ashes mornings. it is the second day of the final - i love ashes mornings. it is the second day of the final ashes . i love ashes mornings. it is the i second day of the final ashes test, and what australia can't get england out they cut themselves out. it led to a lot of laughing from the australian commentators who just said, well, burns has been stuck on the barbecue by his own teammate there. . the barbecue by his own teammate there-- ouch _ the barbecue by his own teammate there.- ouch is _ the barbecue by his own teammate there.- ouch is indeed - the barbecue by his own teammate there. flush. ouch is indeed the there. ouch. ouch is indeed the word. england's cricketers, suffered an early setback of their own doing, as they once again try to give australia a compeititive contest in this final ashes test in hobart. earlier on day two, australia got past 300 in theirfirst innings — something england haven't managed
6:31 am
as yet in this series. can they achieve that now? cricketjournalist adam collins joins us live from hobart. morning, adam. england don't make it easy for themselves? good morning. i don't know how many times i have come on your programme and said, england are so close to kind of getting to a contribution worthwhile in the series, but as you say, rory burns run out 40, into the team. the first time he has opened the batting and test cricket into series, with zak crawley. a bit of indecision. a disastrous later start, that response, after a pretty good session with the ball, taking four wickets, good session with the ball, taking fourwickets, knocking good session with the ball, taking four wickets, knocking over australia for 303, which might be about what turned out to be a pretty good pitch, but losing trolley not long before the interval of 18. they have lots of work to do through this middle session.— have lots of work to do through this middle session. let's talk about the australian innings. _ middle session. let's talk about the australian innings. for— middle session. let's talk about the australian innings. for once, - australian innings. for once, yesterday, they were wobbling, but i recovered brilliantly and got past
6:32 am
300 once more. but that is quite a low score?— 300 once more. but that is quite a low score? ~ ., , ., , ., low score? well, lots of complaining about the pitch. _ low score? well, lots of complaining about the pitch, given _ low score? well, lots of complaining about the pitch, given how— low score? well, lots of complaining about the pitch, given how green - low score? well, lots of complaining about the pitch, given how green it | about the pitch, given how green it is. i didn't mind that compared to the balance between ball and but in the balance between ball and but in the first session. it was good england were able to come to bellerive oval and have the ball around, australia were under pressure. it was a splendid century from travis head, counter—attacking century as well. he hit the ball so hard, back to swing alongside marnus labuschagne before the long break, and then cameron green, 21—year—old, who has been going from strength to strength, they managed to get australia to a good point by the time the rain came last night. two centuries into series, he was probably the one player they were not too sure about what they want to the gabba a couple of months ago, welcome here is the leading run scorer in the series now. everything the australian selectors have touched has turned to gold so far. we have some footage of nathan lyon smacking would around. i was talking to a couple of australians last night and there was almost a feeling of annoyance that england have not made it a more competitive series,
6:33 am
almost disappointment that it isn't closer. is that the feeling you would say, in hobart, as they go there for the first time, the first—ever ashes test hobart? i think there is a bit of that. lonsdale hit four sixes and test bowls and test cricket, but seems remarkable, insult to injury today. take more generally, i genuinely believe that at the start of this series there was a lot from australia to win here, but for it to be a contest like it wasn't 2005 in england 2009 in england, or indeed a couple of years ago after the ben stokes miracle at headingley, it just hasn't played out like that. the rot set in from brisbane, they were beaten heavily at melbourne to go 3—0 down. a brave draw last week, most fans were savouring that, that england were able to hold on on the final day to create some can —— competitive tension that wasn't there earlier in the series. england were underprepared, they were dealt travel cards having to play the first test after two weeks of quarantine, which was thoroughly unnecessary as far as i'm concerned. they could have played the first test in one of the cities that was
6:34 am
open. but that wasn't to be. where australia have made a lot of good selection because, almost every big decision and would have had to make has gone wrong. this decision and would have had to make has gone wrong-— has gone wrong. as you say, at least it is not the — has gone wrong. as you say, at least it is not the whitewash. _ has gone wrong. as you say, at least it is not the whitewash. just - it is not the whitewash. just wondering, we won't hobart, has it in a case of djokovic being on everybody�*s time? or is that a survey djokovic freezone over there? what is the mood? ida. survey djokovic freezone over there? what is the mood?— what is the mood? no, this is the bi est what is the mood? no, this is the biggest sports _ what is the mood? no, this is the biggest sports story _ what is the mood? no, this is the biggest sports story in _ what is the mood? no, this is the biggest sports story in australia i biggest sports story in australia since the sandpaper saga in cape town a couple of years ago. it might even be bigger than that given the broader political involvement, the federal government now involved in counselling djokovic's visa, at 5:55pm last night, taking out the trash and newspeak in the making sure they tried to limit the damage of what was going to be a huge international story, but no, that is the biggest talk when it comes to the biggest talk when it comes to the news agenda over here, what on earth is going to happen as novak djokovic goes through the appeals process in the next couple of days. i am not surprised it is on everybody�*s time, it is such a huge story, as you say. thank you so much, adam. and what a backdrop,
6:35 am
that has to be the best backdrop of any interview we have seen so far. the beach and tasmanian sunshine. i think i saw the sea. obviously, just to update the novak djokovic story, we are now waiting for the outcome of this second court battle. it is in a way like when we were last weekend, except this time there has been more evidence, the australian government have more time to make their case. we will find out more tonight with two more days to go before the australian open starts. we won't find out until tonight with a well number one will be part of that. i a well number one will be part of that. ., , ., ., ,, ., , that. i we able to talk about tennis in another way. — that. i we able to talk about tennis in another way, other _ that. i we able to talk about tennis in another way, other than - that. i we able to talk about tennis in another way, other than novakl in another way, other than novak djokovic's problems? titer? in another way, other than novak djokovic's problems?— in another way, other than novak djokovic's problems? very much so. thank ou djokovic's problems? very much so. thank you for— djokovic's problems? very much so. thank you for letting _ djokovic's problems? very much so. thank you for letting me _ djokovic's problems? very much so. thank you for letting me to - djokovic's problems? very much so. thank you for letting me to this - thank you for letting me to this positive story. because in contrast, andy murray's australian open warmup is going very well. in contrast, andy murray's australian open warm—up is going very well. at 8:00am he'll face russia's aslan karatsev in the final of the sydney classic. murray went a set down against reilly opelka and said it
6:36 am
felt like "quite a long way back", but he recovered to win and reach his first final on the atp tour for over two years. karatsev knocked out british number two dan evans to get there. you can watch it live on the bbc iplayer, the red button and the bbc sport website. i tell you what, you could just stay with us and i will update you, or haveit with us and i will update you, or have it on the ipad as well as watching this, we don't want to lose those viewers. it was another late, late show for brighton in their premier league game against fierce rivals crystal palace. palace had gone ahead through connor gallagher, but there's been a 90th minute goal in the last three encounters between these two sides, and this time it was an own goal that meant the match finished 1—1. i think the level of the performance meant that we got something good from the game, the match, you need to take something just the supporters, i thought were fantastic. it gives everybody a good feeling. like i said, we wanted to win. but the performance overall was really good, we can take that, if we can maintain a performance we will pick up points.
6:37 am
we're waiting to hear whether tomorrow's north london derby will go ahead after arsenal asked for the match at tottenham to be postponed. they say they don't have enough players due to covid, injuries, and players away at the africa cup of nations. the premier league board will consider the request today. the have been 20 premier league games postponed this season because of covid. one match that is definitely on this lunchtime is the clash of the titans between manchester city and chelsea. already there's been a difference of opinion between the two managers. chelsea are ten points behind city, and pep guardiola took exception to thomas tuchel�*s suggestion that city have been lucky not to have been as heavily impacted by covid as other teams. the biggest difference so far in the season, as i am concerned, is that they dealt better with injuries and they dealt better with injuries and they dealt better with injuries and they dealt better with the covid situation. maybe it is unlucky, maybe they do it better or whatever, but they have less injuries from key
6:38 am
players, less weeks where they miss them, they did not suffer from players, less weeks where they miss them, they did not sufferfrom covid as we did. are you saying that here in manchester we are martyrs, but omicron — manchester we are martyrs, but omicron doesn't like to come here to visit us? _ omicron doesn't like to come here to visit us? we — omicron doesn't like to come here to visit us? we had a lot of cases and a lot— visit us? we had a lot of cases and a lot of— visit us? we had a lot of cases and a lot of injuries. so the last four, five, _ a lot of injuries. so the last four, five. six — a lot of injuries. so the last four, five. six or— a lot of injuries. so the last four, five, six or seven games, so that we are in— five, six or seven games, so that we are in the _ five, six or seven games, so that we are in the same situation as all other— are in the same situation as all other clubs. judd trump said he was feeding off the atmosphere at alexandra palace where he's through to the semifinals of the masters snooker. he thrashed karan wilson 6—1 to set up a meeting with barry hawkins. there are 2,000 spectators in the arena and trump says there's a different energy this year, and it feels like everyone wants to let their hair down and see live sport again. come on, baby! yeah! it is
6:39 am
incredible, it's why i play the game. just look at it, it is absolutely unbelievable. the reception but we had yesterday and today, i can't wait to play out here again. so today, i can't wait to play out here aaain. today, i can't wait to play out here aiain. , . ., again. so he is getting the crowd auoin , again. so he is getting the crowd ioini , the again. so he is getting the crowd going, the crowd _ again. so he is getting the crowd going, the crowd getting - again. so he is getting the crowd going, the crowd getting him - again. so he is getting the crowd i going, the crowd getting him going, they are feeding off each other, it is brilliant. in the cricket, i think theyjust is brilliant. in the cricket, i think they just about to come back out after the dinner breaks i will update you again later. hopefully the 'll update you again later. hopefully they'll minimal— update you again later. hopefully they'll minimal be _ update you again later. hopefully they'll minimal be no _ update you again later. hopefully they'll minimal be no more - update you again later. hopefully i they'll minimal be no more laughing but accommodate us. ila! there's an appeal for more people to become foster carers, amid predictions that almost 100,000 children and young people in england could be in the care system by 2025, which would be an increase of around 30% in the last ten years. placements for older children and teenagers are particularly hard to find. megan paterson went to meet one young woman, skye, who was fostered, and heard about the huge difference it has made to her life. it is hard not being with your birth family, i think when you are growing up family, i think when you are growing up in foster family, i think when you are growing up infoster care, family, i think when you are growing up in foster care, you kind of have
6:40 am
to mindsets, when you love your family so much, but it is adjusting and realising that actually what happened isn't very good and it shouldn't have happened. ska; happened isn't very good and it shouldn't have happened. sky is 21. when she was _ shouldn't have happened. sky is 21. when she was ten _ shouldn't have happened. sky is 21. when she was ten years _ shouldn't have happened. sky is 21. when she was ten years old, - shouldn't have happened. sky is 21. when she was ten years old, she i when she was ten years old, she moved in with foster carer patsy marshall in gateshead. over 23 years, she has cared for more than 50 young people, many from challenging backgrounds. you 'ust t and challenging backgrounds. you 'ust try and make fl challenging backgrounds. you 'ust try and make them i challenging backgrounds. you 'ust try and make them feelfi challenging backgrounds. you 'ust try and make them feel as i challenging backgrounds. you just j try and make them feel as relaxed challenging backgrounds. you just i try and make them feel as relaxed as possible. never put any pressure on them to suddenly start talking to you about everything, just let them ease themselves in. it you about everything, 'ust let them ease themselves in._ you about everything, 'ust let them ease themselves in. it sounds silly, but 'ust ease themselves in. it sounds silly, butjust being _ ease themselves in. it sounds silly, butjust being able _ ease themselves in. it sounds silly, butjust being able to _ ease themselves in. it sounds silly, butjust being able to eat _ ease themselves in. it sounds silly, butjust being able to eat grapes i but just being able to eat grapes whenever i wanted was a big thing. not having — whenever i wanted was a big thing. not having to ask for food. it was a bil not having to ask for food. it was a big adjustment, to kind of have this freedom _ big adjustment, to kind of have this freedom here.— freedom here. across the region, foster carers _ freedom here. across the region, foster carers like _ freedom here. across the region, foster carers like patsy _ freedom here. across the region, foster carers like patsy are - freedom here. across the region, foster carers like patsy are in - freedom here. across the region, | foster carers like patsy are in high demand, alongside local authority placements, independent foster care agencies are often key in finding homes for older children and teenagers. young people often left waiting for appropriate care.
6:41 am
teenagers who come into care sometimes have been in care before, they may have been in and out of care, and perhaps do have more complicated life stories. that is a fact. however, ithink complicated life stories. that is a fact. however, i think foster carers caring for teenagers sort of realise that often, stability and security and care to those young people is immensely rewarding and valuable. it is undoubtably a challenging role, but one that can change lives. iuntimely but one that can change lives. when ou see but one that can change lives. when you see them _ but one that can change lives. when you see them develop _ but one that can change lives. when you see them develop into - but one that can change lives. iii"i;a:"i you see them develop into these young people and they go on, after they leave you long after they have believed you and they settled down and they got their own children, they are holding downjobs going and they got their own children, they are holding down jobs going to university, they are all things that they probably couldn't do prior to coming to live with you. skate they probably couldn't do prior to coming to live with you. skye left foster care _ coming to live with you. skye left foster care when _ coming to live with you. skye left foster care when she _ coming to live with you. skye left foster care when she was - coming to live with you. skye left foster care when she was 18, - coming to live with you. skye left foster care when she was 18, but| coming to live with you. skye left i foster care when she was 18, but is still part of patsy�*s family. training to become a nurse, she will graduate later this year. would you say to change your life? i
6:42 am
definitely think i wouldn't be the woman i am today without patsy. i wouldn't have been at university, i wouldn't have been at university, i wouldn't be doing all of these amazing things, and she definitely gave me so many experiences, like, i never would have had, and confidence and i could never say thank you enough for that. and i could never say thank you enoughforthat. nothing. and i could never say thank you enough for that. nothing. many thanks to skye _ enough for that. nothing. many thanks to skye for— enough for that. nothing. many thanks to skye for sharing - enough forthat. nothing. many thanks to skye for sharing that story. we have had the pleasure of interviewing foster parents from time to time, i am always staggered by them, by what they do, their passion, how many lives they change. megan patterson with that report. if you're struggling to find the motivation to get up and do some exercise this morning, our next story mightjust help. tony bowman is still running — andjumping, and throwing — at the grand age of 86. he's just won the european masters sprint champion of the year, and he's got more medals in his sights. olivia richwald went to meet him.
6:43 am
at the age of 86, tony bowman refuses to slow down. in fact, he trains every other day to get quicker, compete longer, and when more sporting a collards. i do quicker, compete longer, and when more sporting a collards.— more sporting a collards. i do the hurdles, more sporting a collards. i do the hurdles. they _ more sporting a collards. i do the hurdles, they shortened - more sporting a collards. i do the hurdles, they shortened the - more sporting a collards. i do the hurdles, they shortened the long | hurdles, they shortened the long hurdles, they shortened the long hurdles, i do the hundred metres, i do it cuff line, pentathlon, heptathlon, highjump, longjump, heptathlon, high jump, long jump, triplejump, heptathlon, highjump, longjump, triplejump, pole vault, no, idon't do the pole vault anymore. but triplejump, pole vault, no, i don't do the pole vault anymore.- do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the _ do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the age _ do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the age of _ do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the age of 70, _ do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the age of 70, when - do the pole vault anymore. but he did until the age of 70, when he i did until the age of 70, when he cleared two metres. tony holds two paddling world records and numerous british athletic records, and has just received another european acolyte. masters sprint of the year, acolyte. masters sprint of the year, a title he won over every other european athlete over the age of 35.
6:44 am
well, i am european athlete over the age of 35. well, iam hoping european athlete over the age of 35. well, i am hoping to do a pentathlon a week's time, and a habitat run weeks time. a week's time, and a habitat run weeks time-— a week's time, and a habitat run weeks time. ., , �* , weeks time. you 'ust can't give up competing. — weeks time. you 'ust can't give up competing. can — weeks time. you just can't give up competing, can you? _ weeks time. you just can't give up competing, can you? i— weeks time. you just can't give up competing, can you? i absolutely| competing, can you? i absolutely love it. competing, can you? i absolutely love it- the _ competing, can you? i absolutely love it. the adrenaline _ competing, can you? i absolutely love it. the adrenaline rush - competing, can you? i absolutely love it. the adrenaline rush is - love it. the adrenaline rush is unbelievable. when that guy says get to your marks, there is nothing like getting down there and then, if you do well, the exhilaration afterwards is wonderful. he do well, the exhilaration afterwards is wonderful-— is wonderful. he plays hockey, too, and before — is wonderful. he plays hockey, too, and before the _ is wonderful. he plays hockey, too, and before the pandemic _ is wonderful. he plays hockey, too, l and before the pandemic represented great britain in over 80s tournament. i great britain in over 80s tournament.— great britain in over 80s tournament. . ., , ., tournament. i am hoping to get in the over 80s _ tournament. i am hoping to get in the over 80s team _ tournament. i am hoping to get in the over 80s team again, - tournament. i am hoping to get in the over 80s team again, but - tournament. i am hoping to get in the over 80s team again, but now tournament. i am hoping to get in - the over 80s team again, but now i'm 86, i don't know whether i will make the team or not, because those youngsters of 18 might be a bit quicker. he youngsters of 18 might be a bit iuicker. . ., , quicker. he participating longevity down to good _ quicker. he participating longevity down to good genes, _ quicker. he participating longevity down to good genes, healthy - down to good genes, healthy lifestyle, and his sport loving parents. i've been to five olympics to watch as well. i parents. i've been to five olympics to watch as well.— to watch as well. i love watching the olympics- — to watch as well. i love watching the olympics- my _ to watch as well. i love watching the olympics. my dad _ to watch as well. i love watching the olympics. my dad took - to watch as well. i love watching the olympics. my dad took me l to watch as well. i love watching | the olympics. my dad took me to to watch as well. i love watching - the olympics. my dad took me to my first olympics in 1948, when it was at wembley. went for one day. it
6:45 am
really inspired me, i can.- really inspired me, i can. despite two heart attacks _ really inspired me, i can. despite two heart attacks and _ really inspired me, i can. despite two heart attacks and heart - really inspired me, i can. despite| two heart attacks and heart failure three times, he still has goals he is let —— yet to complete. what is your ambition? is let —— yet to complete. what is yourambition? mr; is let -- yet to complete. what is your ambition?— is let -- yet to complete. what is your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres _ your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres when _ your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres when i'm _ your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres when i'm100, - your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres when i'm100, and i the 100 metres when i'm100, and lived to 120. i think if anybody can achieve that, you certainly can! good luck! olivia richwald, bbc news. so tony is not quite twice my age and here can do loads more than i can do. ., , and here can do loads more than i can do. ., i i i and here can do loads more than i cando. . ,,. . and here can do loads more than i cando. . ii. ., ., and here can do loads more than i cando. . ., ., can do. that is such a great story. one of the — can do. that is such a great story. one of the things _ can do. that is such a great story. one of the things they _ can do. that is such a great story. one of the things they love - can do. that is such a great story. one of the things they love about| one of the things they love about that, in amongst all this achievements, that literally when here was being filmed here would not stand still. i, ii �* stand still. crosstalk. brilliant. _ stand still. crosstalk. brilliant. there - stand still. crosstalk. brilliant. there is - stand still. crosstalk. i brilliant. there is saturday stand still. crosstalk. _ brilliant. there is saturday morning inspiration for you. you may need it because it is chilly outside. to motivate yourself to get out there and be careful because it might be slippery as well, tomasz. absolutely summed it up _ slippery as well, tomasz. absolutely summed it up perfectly, _ slippery as well, tomasz. absolutely summed it up perfectly, naga. - slippery as well, tomasz. absolutely summed it up perfectly, naga. it - slippery as well, tomasz. absolutely summed it up perfectly, naga. it is i summed it up perfectly, naga. it is chilly out there for sure as a frost
6:46 am
and some thick fog around as well. we have been getting fog for quite a few days now, big high pressure sitting on top of us with light winds and that is the perfect meteorological situation set up for fog to form. you can see how big the high pressure is, notjust in the uk but stretching right across the continent. weather fronts are lining up continent. weather fronts are lining up in the atlantic, they adjust to west of our neighbourhood, they are approaching. that means tomorrow there will be a few splits and spots of rain brought by these weather fronts. you can see them in the atlantic, there still some mild away. here is the fog across some parts of the country, central england as well. visibility over the next few hours, 50— 100 metres, really quite dense, it is freezing fog as well, frosty, slippy, on the roads, take it steady. other than that, lots of sunshine developing through the morning and into the afternoon. i don't think it will be clear blue skies everywhere, there
6:47 am
will be clouds around, but a decent enough day will take it in one or two areas here, the fog mailing into the afternoon so we could end up being pretty grey and murky. here is the weather front arrives tonight in scotland and northern ireland. there will be a little rain, only moving through temporarily. the winds are coming off the atlantic, so that is milder at lentigo, coming off the atlantic, so that is milderat lentigo, more coming off the atlantic, so that is milder at lentigo, more of a breeze tonight and into tomorrow, less of a frost, when you have more of a breeze you don't get the fog, it will not be quite as foggy tomorrow morning. you can see where the weather front is, morning. you can see where the weatherfront is, moving into northern england, into merseyside, the north of wales early in the morning. immense temporarily in the morning. immense temporarily in the morning it will cloud over and there will be spots of rain and showers going through, that is pretty much it, liveable, your, newcastle, belfast, i think you will be a fine and sunny sunday with highs of around nine degrees. more of a breeze though. once the weather front is out of the way, you can just about sit on the edge of the
6:48 am
screen, high pressure builds once again and that means unsettled conditions on monday and i think again monday night into tuesday we will have a return of that fog stop at the moment, very persistent high pressure, very little change on the weather front.— weather front. tomasz, thank you very much- _ weather front. tomasz, thank you very much- a _ weather front. tomasz, thank you very much. a lovely _ weather front. tomasz, thank you very much. a lovely picture - weather front. tomasz, thank you very much. a lovely picture to - very much. a lovely picture to finish with _ very much. a lovely picture to finish with as _ very much. a lovely picture to finish with as well. _ time now for the film review with mark kermode and jane hill. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. hi, mark, what have you been watching? you can say happy new year. this is the first show we have done together.
6:49 am
we have a canonjury prize winner. the scream franchise's back with scream and scream five, but it's just called scream. and andre are not�*s feature documentary cow. there is a good mixture. kick us off. it isa it is a really wonderful film. tilda swinton who is great in almost everything is a botanist and she is in bogota, where her sister is in hospital. we see her visiting her sister and talking to her sister and her partner, she is woekn in the middle of the night by a sound. a strange booming sound. and she thinks there must be building work going on next—door and she starts hearing the sound wherever she is and it's a really peculiar sound and she becomes obsessed with the idea that nobody else appears to be able to hear it. so she goes to a sound engineer to say can you make a copy of the sound for me to describe it?
6:50 am
6:51 am
the film was columbia submission for their best international feature and it's very elusive and meditative. he was thought of of the high priest of slow cinema and if somebody says what's the film is about the temptation is to say it's about two and a quarter hours. it's about the disjuncture between the past and present in between man and nature and people have memories that are not their memories and there are people who appeared to be dead but then they aren't dead and a lot of this is to do with her wondering if everything is in her own mind as she makes a journey into the jungle to discover some kind of ecstatic truth. i have to say i really liked it because i find this something meditative about this kind of cinema. imean, you i mean, you just watch. you look at things for a really long time, this is the opening shot
6:52 am
before she even wakes up and it's not for everybody. but if you are a fan, which i am, this is a really intriguing film and in the third act it does something which is completely out of the blue. and i think some people will think this is ridiculous and some people think this is very important and others will think it's a bit of both. i love the fact that with his movies you never know where they are going. the key to this is tilda swinton. if you didn't have an active her skill holding it together. what you're doing is you are watching the world through her eyes. you are watching her befuddlement about the sound. what does it mean, where is it going? why is everything i know about the world suddenly uncertain? and when the film provides an answer or at least some of an answer you would either go below or you go but it's watching her respondent that really makes it work and it's in is on the and i thought it was really impressive, i really liked it. 0k. ok. intriguing. definitely intriguing.
6:53 am
something rather different. it is horror movie time again. hgppy happy days. happy days happy happy days. happy new year. alan jones are said — happy days. happy new year. alan jones are said to _ happy days. happy new year. alan jones are said to try _ happy days. happy new year. jiisgn jones are said to try and sell this horror movie. this is the scream franchise which is part sequal, part reboot in much the same way as the 28th in halloween, it was not called halloween. this is scream. and we are back in modern—day winnsboro, the ghost face killings, which have been immortalised in the film, are starting up again and there's the usual cocktail of meta—textual gags, because the whole thing about the scream franchises it's a scary movie, which people talk about being in a scary movie but there's original cast members and there's also a fresh new blood. the co—directors and writer of this made a film called ready or not. you and i talked about this before. it's a horror movie—black comedy hybrid and i really liked it. so i went into this with high expectations. they were not generally met because the film is fine — so if you've never seen the wes craven original
6:54 am
in the cinema, ok, fine, there will be a new generation of people wanting to see this on the big—screen. the problem is what you don't have is the fear of the original. the original scream scary. it was scary and also you don't have that an amazing thread of originality. i'm hoping i would say is if you are really interested in scream and you want to see something else go back and that at wes craven's new nightmare which is the film before scream which is also the film that basically inspired matrix resurrections and every year that goes by that film looks better and better. this is fine and i have no doubt it will be a crowd pleaser but for somebody of my vintage it's there the first time around with scream and it feels a bit like show us a new trick. do we need five of them? 0k. a documentary for your third choice. this is direct goodbye andrea arnold. i know you are a fan of andre arnold.
6:55 am
it follows the life of a luna, who is cow on a dairy farm and the cycle of her life is basically impregnation, then birth, lactation, separation from calfs, largely within barns fairly industrial barns, but very briefly out in the open. here is a clip.
6:56 am
i have to say that is an unusual moment in the film, most of it takes place within very confined spaces and it's very industrialised environment. in the remember this film which was just an observational documentary about a pig and what the director said he was trying to do is demonstrate the animals living and experiencing creatures, but without a narration telling you about that. you get that here and it was shot in very elegant black and white. this is much more urgent hand—held, very up close and personal and a lot of looking straight into the child's eyes. i have to say it's very well done and very upsetting. i was about to say, is it upsetting? it is. it absolutely is. here's the thing
6:57 am
thatis it absolutely is. here's the thing that is important about it. it's not a film which tells you what to think about where lectures you or anything, but what it does is it says if you are partaking of the dairy industry you need to be aware of how it works and you need to know where to produce that's on your table comes from. and i think the thing that is really powerful about this is without lecturing or without seeming like it's banging this drum, he tells its story and its visual images and it says ok, this is what it is. you make of this what you will. i know one film critic friend of mine who was in tears for a lot of it. not everybody will feel the same way. i think that's one of its strengths. it is here it is, you make your own decisions. yes. i want to see it but i have slight a knot in my stomach at the thought of seeing it. ii'ma i i'm a big fan of omdia. the chris
6:58 am
s-encer. i want to know what you think. i think it's great. i think it's a great coming—of—age movie. i think it's the implication of the valley in the 19705. it is brilliant and a lengthy use of music in it. i think they are brilliant in their first starring roles i know that you don;t like it. some of that i agree with. i think the two leads are just fantastic. both of them. and so captivating. the first 45 minutes to an hour i was loving it. and then it dips in the middle and i have spoken to a lot of people who do agree with me they think it's too long and could have done with some editing and use the fundamental problem with that central premise of a 15—year—old boy and a 25—year—old woman. who are not having a relationship. just doesn't work. who aren't having a relationship- _ but i'm trying not to say anything... it is not a potboiler. it's not.
6:59 am
she does say that. she has to get him off the phone and he finds her up and it's a really scary thing to do. let me ask you a question. did you like punch—drunk love? i can't remember enough about it. punch—drunk love is that items and their movie after having made my brilliant they said what will you do now and he said will make a 90 minute comedy with adam sandler and he did. it has turned out to be a marmite film and it's currently in the lead for the best on nomination. —— pack leaders for best film nomination. it looks beautiful. it's beautifully made and i love the two performances. love them. let's consolidate that part of that we like. this might be do i need to watch it again? it gave it a fair hearing. i just love it. it looks beautiful. i've seen it three times. have you? we may never agree on that one.
7:00 am
so, streaming, dvd? tragedy of macbeth has come to apple tv. i think it looks brilliant. it has got a look of the set with german expressionism and great cast, denzel washington, have you seen it? no, very recently seen a stage production. so why am interested to compare. i have seen a lot of versions of it. i admired it but from a distance. i thought this looks really good, these individual performances are great but they all seem to be in their own movie and particularly when you see macbeth on stage it's all about if they appear to be in two different films it's like where is the central conflict? so people love it i've read loads of 5—star reviews, i feel the same way that you do about licorice pizza. there are things in there that are great. but i'm not buying the whole thing. we will go without for that that's our theme for this week. thank you for watching and enjoy your cinema going. goodbye.
7:01 am
olivia richwald, bbc news. good morning, welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "wine time fridays." more revelations emerge about lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being bombarded with emails from angry constituents. detained again. novak djokovic waits to hear whether his latest appeal against deportation from australia is succesful. we are at crosby beach to wish happy birthday to her majesty 's coastguard, keeping a safe day or night, whatever the weather the past 200 years. —— keeping us safe. england up against it again in the final ashes test. both opening batsmen fall cheaply. having run out his team—mate, zak crawley is then dismissed himself, as australia
7:02 am
look to take charge. and it is a frosty and foggy start to saturday, for many of us. the good news is that it should be a bright day. it's saturday, the 15th of january. our top story: there are more allegations of parties in downing street during the pandemic, with newspaper reports that staff at number 10 held regular drinks on friday evenings while restrictions were in force. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral. some conservative mps have told bbc news they've been inundated with emails from angry constituents. here's our political correspondent ione wells reports. it is the expectation that more and more will come out. the fear of one brexiteer tory mp, who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions.
7:03 am
one former minister said the prime minister was "toast." another said their email inbox was "horrendous." one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election: "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week he attended drinks in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don't think it's acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties. on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's
7:04 am
funeral, leading foreign secretary liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue grey has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this enquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster that the police should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act, because the primary objective of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. ione wells, bbc news.
7:05 am
our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us now. nick, further revelations on the front page of the newspapers again today — what does this mean for boris johnson's future? there may be people feeling wary, another day, more revelations. yeah, morning, charlie. ithink you're right, and i think that's the biggest problem for borisjohnson, but we are speaking about this every day at the moment, because there are more and more allegations about what was going on. daily mirror has this picture of a fridge that was in downing street for wine to be stored. we have known for a while but drinks were a regular occurrence at the end of the working day, sometimes at the end of the working week, and the argument that was always made was that it was covid secure and people were sitting at their desks, but what we have increasingly heard this week is events which just don't sound like
7:06 am
they were work at all, that sounds like they were primarily social, like they were primarily social, like they were primarily social, like the one we were talking about yesterday. and i think if i was borisjohnson i would be sitting there this morning thinking, what on earth are people hearing back and their constituencies? because from all the mps i have in speaking to over the past 24 hours, and we heard in ione's piece there and other accounts, tory mps are angry and they are getting angrier, because they are getting angrier, because they are getting angrier, because they are going back to their constituencies this weekend and they are healing from really angry voters who are telling them that they think it is hypocrisy, those messages from the public seem to be getting worse for the prime minister, one former cabinet minister i spoke to last night said it got considerably worse after those daily telegraph revelations yesterday, so the question now is whether some of those tory mps started to speak out, what they do at the start of next week, and crucially, what i start to think that chris johnston week, and crucially, what i start to think that chrisjohnston has to go. thank you very much, nick.
7:07 am
nick was alluding to conversations he has had with conservative mps about their reservations at this point in time. not many have gone public or spoken publicly, about what they think about boris johnson, one of those is andrew bridgeman, conservative mp. he will speak to at 9:30am. several —— so we will hear his thoughts then. novak djokovic has been detained again in melbourne ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in australia to defend his open title. the tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is in melbourne. shaimaa, the saga continues. when can we expect the next installment? so he was in a detention hotel, he came out, he practised, then he went back in. i ii came out, he practised, then he went back in. i i,
7:08 am
back in. yes. if that looks familiar. _ back in. yes. if that looks familiar, naga, _ back in. yes. if that looks familiar, naga, good - back in. yes. if that looks - familiar, naga, good morning to back in. yes. if that looks _ familiar, naga, good morning to you and charlie, we understand it is because novak djokovic has been brought back to the same immigration detention hotel he was brought to when his visa was revoked the first time. this is an immigration detention hotel but holds many refugees, some of them have been here for months and months. we also know that earlier in the day, he was at his lawyer's office for a court hearing, a procedural online court hearing, a procedural online court hearing, and now we know that there is going to be a hearing on saturday morning, australia time, this is when the government and his lawyers will present their arguments, and essentially his lawyers are going to challenge the immigration minister, alex hawke's decision. it is decided, we understand from court documents that he chose to cancel his visa again because he thought that an unvaccinated athlete could provoke or fuel opposition to the covid—19jab stop his provoke or fuel opposition to the covid—19 jab stop his lawyers say this is a rational, and that they are going to argue and challenge
7:09 am
that notion. but once again, he is in detention. once again, he is waiting for a judge to decide whether he stays or goes, this time with two days ahead of the australian open and a title but he is trying to defend, and for which you should be preparing, he is spending his time here or at his lawyer's office. our balkans correspondent guy de launey is in belgrade. guy, what's been the reaction there? iam certain, i am certain, you can tell us more, that this is being followed so closely by people in belgrade and in serbia more generally. it has the reaction being, not least from politicians?— reaction being, not least from ioliticians? ii i, i, politicians? certainly people are followini politicians? certainly people are following it _ politicians? certainly people are following it extremely _ politicians? certainly people are following it extremely closely, i politicians? certainly people are| following it extremely closely, as you can imagine, the court hearings in australia, they will live treated under livestreamed on the serbia newspaper sites. under livestreamed on the serbia newspapersites. but under livestreamed on the serbia newspaper sites. but we have had some interesting reaction from serbia's president, alexander vestige, to all of this. the government here was quiet for a while, i think they were hoping that
7:10 am
by being seen not to interfere, that would be best novak djokovic. now they have clearly decided they are going to go writing support paramount. the president saying, why do you mistreat him, why do you harass him, as well as his family and a nation that is free and proud? so this is notjust about novak djokovic, this is about serbia itself. mr vucich says, they often preach to us about the rule of law. could you imagine what it would look like if they minister in serbia could annul the decisions ofjudges? it seems he a reasonable point. i wonder when they are going to start saying, well, if these parties are happening in downing street and nobody is resigning, why should novak djokovic be tracked out of australia? there is a feeling he had a double standards are being applied to novak djokovic, the world's number one tennis player who only wants to play tennis and do wonderful humanitarian things, lest we forget. wonderful humanitarian things, lest we foriet. , i i, we forget. very interesting how it has been perceived _ we forget. very interesting how it has been perceived over - we forget. very interesting how it has been perceived over there. i we forget. very interesting how it - has been perceived over there. thank you very much. that was guided launey, our correspondence in
7:11 am
belgrade. —— guy de launey. prince andrew's former assistant is being asked to give a statement by the legal team representing virgina giuffre, the woman who has accused the duke of sexual assault when she was 17. her legal team is also seeking evidence from a woman who claims to have seen the prince in a london nightclub with a young girl around the time ms giuffre claims she was abused. prince andrew, who is facing a civil case in the united states, denies the allegations. our us correspondent nomia iqbal has the latest. virginia giuffre's legal team here in america is seeking testimony from two people in the uk. one of those people is shukri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. ms giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting nightclub. the second person as the prince's former assistant, major rob olney. ms giuffre's lawyers say she has reason to believe that major olney has information that relates to the relationship between prince andrew
7:12 am
and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who is now dead. virginia giuffre's legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they haven't ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn't go to trial. but they have also indicated that they wouldn't just want that settlement to be financial. as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. but he's running out of legal manoeuvres. ms giuffre's legal team have him exactly where they want him, he is now in a position where he has said that he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronages, as well as his title hrh. the pressure is increasing on him. thousands of people have attended
7:13 am
vigils across the republic of ireland in memory of the murdered primary school teacher, ashling murphy. the 23—year—old was attacked while she was jogging by a canal in county offaly on wednesday afternoon. a man who was arrested over her death has been released without charge. covid restrictions in wales will start to ease from today, with the number of people allowed to gather for outdoor events increasing from 50 to 500. that means parkruns and smaller sporting fixtures are back on from today. nightclubs will be allowed to open from january 28th and the welsh government is hoping to lift all restrictions by february 10th. here's tomasz with a look at this morning's weather. it is looking frosty, at the moment. very nippy. also, lots of fog has formed overnight, that fog is going to stick around right through the morning and into the afternoon. for
7:14 am
many of us, though, it should be a bright and sunny day. the settled weather that we have had for quite some time has been brought by this large area of high pressure which is dominating the weather across much of western and central europe, and it is here to stay. it will wobble a bit over the next few days, allowing for these weather fronts to sneak in temporarily tomorrow, so that does mean a bit more cloud and a few spots of rain into tomorrow, but generally speaking, the outlook is settled. here is the fog, you just saw it there. this foggy picture behind me really does tell the story. these kinds of conditions we can expect through this morning. 50— 100 metres visibility, and on top of that it 100 metres visibility, and on top of thatitis 100 metres visibility, and on top of that it is frosty. so there is frost on the ground, a bit sleepy in places. fog through yorkshire, parts of central england and mr east anglia, the london area, in some cases i have already mentioned it will link into the afternoon, so it could be pretty cold. i think a lot of sunshine with bright weather at the very least developing. i mentioned something about weather fronts coming in. here is the
7:15 am
wonderment expected tonight in northern ireland and scotland. they will be some rain in belfast, glasgow and edinburgh through the night. the winds are also blowing off the slightly mild atlantic, so that means, and together with a breeze, that means it will be frost free tonight, so we're not expecting much fog into tomorrow morning either. when there is more of a breeze under the weather front comes threatens to stop the fog from forming. tomorrow morning there could be rain around the lake district, lancashire, parts of yorkshire, maybe wales as well. you can just about make out that weather fun. as it sinks out it rains itself out, so by the time it gets to london and cardiff i do not think it will be much rain at all, just a bit of cloud. generally tomorrow, certainly the vast majority of the uk, in for a fine day. but when the front clears away, you can see it across germany and poland, high pressure building back in again, that means settled weather. you can see the high pressure and the winds are blowing around more or less, high—pressure, we are in the middle of it, and when you are in the
7:16 am
middle of the high pressure that calm, stable conditions and a return of fog. so monday night coming into tuesday and through next week, we will see a return of foggy conditions. you can see from the outlook, that will certainly be reflected in your app, very little change over the next few days, just bright or sunny, let's say. back to you. bright or sunny, let's say. back to ou. i, bright or sunny, let's say. back to oh. .i i, bright or sunny, let's say. back to oh. ., i, i, , bright or sunny, let's say. back to ou. i, i, i, i i i you. for four it does look sunny. lots of yellow _ you. for four it does look sunny. lots of yellow bits. _ you. for four it does look sunny. lots of yellow bits. one. - you. for four it does look sunny. lots of yellow bits. one. we - you. for four it does look sunny. j lots of yellow bits. one. we will take it. lots of yellow bits. one. we will take it- it's— lots of yellow bits. one. we will take it. it's winter. _ the number of new covid infections in the uk fell below 100,000 yesterday, for the first time since just before christmas. it's a glimmer of hope but the nhs is still planning for a potential influx of new patients by setting up nightingale "surge hubs." they're temporary structures in eight hospitals across england, one of which is the royal preston hospital. gill dummigan went to take a look.
7:17 am
this morning the hospital has taken delivery of a large consignment of new beds. fit} delivery of a large consignment of new beds. ~:: i i �* i, i] new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about — new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about 30 _ new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about 30 order _ new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about 30 order to _ new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about 30 order to come - new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i know about 30 order to come out. i new beds. 60 beds we've got here. i | know about 30 order to come out. of the old _ know about 30 order to come out. of the old ones — know about 30 order to come out. of the old ones. the know about 30 order to come out. of the old ones-— the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into _ the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into a _ the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into a large _ the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into a large room - the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into a large room at - the old ones. the beds are being wheeled into a large room at thej wheeled into a large room at the back of the building, where another team is carrying out safety tests. we are checking all the beds, making sure they are fit for purpose before they are onto the patient then removing all the old beds from the hospital. it removing all the old beds from the hos-ital. i ii i i, hospital. it is a player -- part of the planned _ hospital. it is a player -- part of the planned upgrade _ hospital. it is a player -- part of the planned upgrade of - hospital. it is a player -- part of the planned upgrade of around i hospital. it is a player -- part of. the planned upgrade of around 600 beds, but many of the existing ones are now going to stay here to allow the hospital to expand. itide are now going to stay here to allow the hospital to expand.— the hospital to expand. we are keeiini the hospital to expand. we are keeping some _ the hospital to expand. we are keeping some of— the hospital to expand. we are keeping some of the _ the hospital to expand. we are keeping some of the best - the hospital to expand. we are | keeping some of the best ones, the hospital to expand. we are - keeping some of the best ones, so we are keeping 150, where we can go at very short notice into a surcharge. in theory you could have extra beds just set up really weekly if you needed? i i i, i needed? yes. it is not 'ust the beds, is everything h needed? yes. it is notjust the beds, is everything that - needed? yes. it is notjust the beds, is everything that goes i needed? yes. it is notjust the i beds, is everything that goes with the bed, it's a patient space, it will include the locker, a table, a lot of other equipment. fiend will include the locker, a table, a lot of other equipment.— will include the locker, a table, a lot of other equipment. and this is
7:18 am
where most _ lot of other equipment. and this is where most of _ lot of other equipment. and this is where most of them _ lot of other equipment. and this is where most of them will _ lot of other equipment. and this is where most of them will be - lot of other equipment. and this is j where most of them will be ending up, an entirely new structure covering what was a car park at the front of the hospital. this is going to be the surgery centre for the whole of the north—west stop it was begun a few days ago and, at the moment, itjust looks like a big tent. before the end of the month it will be kitted out for the beds and ready to go. will be kitted out for the beds and ready to go-_ ready to go. this is going to be a completely _ ready to go. this is going to be a completely standalone _ ready to go. this is going to be a completely standalone facility. i ready to go. this is going to be a i completely standalone facility. it's not connected to the hospital in any way for electricity or water, there's generators, there is a separate heating system supplied by diesel, the what is tanks. ianthem separate heating system supplied by diesel, the what is tanks.— diesel, the what is tanks. when it's all finished then _ diesel, the what is tanks. when it's all finished then it _ diesel, the what is tanks. when it's all finished then it will _ diesel, the what is tanks. when it's all finished then it will look - diesel, the what is tanks. when it's all finished then it will look like - all finished then it will look like all finished then it will look like a hospital ward?— all finished then it will look like a hospital ward? effectively well, es. the a hospital ward? effectively well, yes. the centre _ a hospital ward? effectively well, yes. the centre would _ a hospital ward? effectively well, yes. the centre would be - a hospital ward? effectively well, yes. the centre would be used i a hospital ward? effectively well, | yes. the centre would be used for iatients yes. the centre would be used for patients who _ yes. the centre would be used for patients who no _ yes. the centre would be used for patients who no longer _ yes. the centre would be used for patients who no longer need - yes. the centre would be used for patients who no longer need full i patients who no longer need full hospital services, patients who no longer need full hospitalservices, but patients who no longer need full hospital services, but do need some extra care before being discharged. this is capacity shall be needed. it's planning for the future. it's an insurance policy. we don't use i will be successful and we will not have to go into it. but it's there if necessary. have to go into it. but it's there if necessary-—
7:19 am
have to go into it. but it's there if necessary. the hospital is also converting _ if necessary. the hospital is also converting the _ if necessary. the hospital is also converting the staff _ if necessary. the hospital is also converting the staff camping -- | converting the staff camping —— canteen and physiotherapy gym to take extra beds if needed. january is alwa s take extra beds if needed. january is always our— take extra beds if needed. january is always our busiest _ take extra beds if needed. january is always our busiest time - take extra beds if needed. january is always our busiest time in - take extra beds if needed. january is always our busiest time in the i is always our busiest time in the hospital. on top of that we have around about 120 covid positive patients in our beds, on top of that we have about 10% sickness. all of that together gives us a cocktail, is a really pressurised position. there are around as many covid patients here now as last year, but while the numbers are similar situation is very different. test while the numbers are similar situation is very different. at the moment we _ situation is very different. at the moment we have _ situation is very different. at the moment we have quite - situation is very different. at the moment we have quite a - situation is very different. at the moment we have quite a few- situation is very different. at the - moment we have quite a few patients where covid is purely, i will say, a spectator rather than the culprit, because they do not have severe infection of the lungs, they do not require oxygen. and that's where vaccines have made a massive difference. vaccines have made a massive difference-— vaccines have made a massive difference. �* i i, i difference. but this covid board is still seeing _ difference. but this covid board is still seeing high _ difference. but this covid board is still seeing high numbers- difference. but this covid board is still seeing high numbers of- still seeing high numbers of unvaccinated patients and the professor says that prospects are very different. professor says that prospects are very different-— professor says that prospects are very different. most of the patients who have not _ very different. most of the patients who have not had _ very different. most of the patients who have not had the _ very different. most of the patients who have not had the vaccination i very different. most of the patients l who have not had the vaccination and come in become very, very seriously
7:20 am
ill. they still end up requiring oxygen and needing intensive care treatment, high flow oxygen, and sometimes even ventilation. christina arrived in a&e the previous evening and went straight to be assessed. to previous evening and went straight to be assessed.— to be assessed. to me it was my stomach and _ to be assessed. to me it was my stomach and may _ to be assessed. to me it was my stomach and may had _ to be assessed. to me it was my stomach and may had was, - to be assessed. to me it was my stomach and may had was, like, | to be assessed. to me it was my - stomach and may had was, like, was in excruciating pain. then i think they were concerned about a clot somewhere within my body, around my lungs, i think. somewhere within my body, around my lungs. i think-— lungs, i think. what do you thinking at this point? _ lungs, i think. what do you thinking at this point? well, _ lungs, i think. what do you thinking at this point? well, just _ lungs, i think. what do you thinking at this point? well, just scares - at this point? well, 'ust scares ou, at this point? well, 'ust scares you. deesnth at this point? well, 'ust scares you, doesn't it, _ at this point? well, just scares you, doesn't it, because - at this point? well, just scares - you, doesn't it, because obviously, for me, covid is one thing, as well as flu symptoms, whatever, but when they start talking about a clot, then that is a lot more serious than. i i i ix ii, then that is a lot more serious than. i i i ix i than. christine is 'ust 28, so she is than. christine is 'ust 28, so she is generally — than. christine is 'ust 28, so she is generally fit _ than. christine isjust 28, so she is generally fit and _ than. christine isjust 28, so she is generally fit and healthy, - than. christine isjust 28, so she is generally fit and healthy, but| is generally fit and healthy, but didn't get the vaccine because she was worried about potential side—effects. me was worried about potential side-effects.— was worried about potential side-effects. ~ i ii i i, side-effects. me being naive should have 'ust side-effects. me being naive should have just have _ side-effects. me being naive should have just have it, _ side-effects. me being naive should have just have it, because _ side-effects. me being naive should have just have it, because i - side-effects. me being naive should have just have it, because i bet - side-effects. me being naive should have just have it, because i bet the | havejust have it, because i bet the outcome would have been a lot more mild than the position i'm in now. sojust go and mild than the position i'm in now. so just go and get the vaccine, that is what i would advised. that is what i will do in four weeks' time
7:21 am
when they can do.— when they can do. christina is off to iet is when they can do. christina is off to get is going — when they can do. christina is off to get is going to _ when they can do. christina is off to get is going to check- when they can do. christina is off to get is going to check for- when they can do. christina is off to get is going to check for blood j to get is going to check for blood clots. she is hoping to be out in a day or two. with more than 100 new patients coming in here every week, those extra beds may well see some use. gill dummigan, bbc news. a lookfairat a look fair at nightingale hospitals. one of our regular gps, dr sarahjarvis, can tell us more. away from the construction of nightingale hospitals in the press in hospitals generally, how are things in gp practice?- things in gp practice? tough. lariel things in gp practice? tough. largely because _ things in gp practice? tough. largely because we _ things in gp practice? tough. largely because we have - things in gp practice? tough. largely because we have got| things in gp practice? tough. | largely because we have got a things in gp practice? tough. - largely because we have got a lot of people off sick. now, it may be that the change to five—day self isolation will improve things, but it may be will not apply to general practice, but certainly we have got the normal winter pressures, we have just come out of doing all those flu vaccines, just coming to the end or giving a vast number of boosters and that we have so many people off sick with a lot more people ringing us up about covid, so it's really, really busy. about covid, so it's really, really bus . i ii i, i,
7:22 am
about covid, so it's really, really bus. iii i, i, i about covid, so it's really, really busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, i busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, i presume — busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, i presume yameen _ busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, i presume yameen within - busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, i presume yameen within your - busy. yes, a lot of people off sick, | i presume yameen within your own practice, so this is about staffing and who can work. this will apply to you just as everyone else, the changes with the seven—day to five day rule. do you think it is the right thing and will it help in a practical sense?— practical sense? alchemy interestingly, _ practical sense? alchemy interestingly, if— practical sense? alchemy interestingly, if you - practical sense? alchemy interestingly, if you look | practical sense? alchemy i interestingly, if you look at practical sense? alchemy - interestingly, if you look at the government website they say there are some groups to whom this may not apply. are some groups to whom this may not apply, so this is a change coming in from monday, where you treat the zero is the day you start getting symptoms of the day you take the test comes up positive. on day five after that you then take a lateral flow test. if that is negative you take another one next day and if both of those are negative then you can leave isolation on day six stop but, and this is a really big but, the website is very, very clear that there are going to be significant numbers of people who are still infectious at that time, so they do recommend that you be really careful about working from home if you can,
7:23 am
avoiding poorly ventilated spaces, wearing face coverings, and trying to avoid people who could be really vulnerable, because we estimate that even at the current system of leaving on day seven about 40% of people who have two negative test and leave isolation on day seven are still infectious. it is and leave isolation on day seven are still infectious.— still infectious. it is interesting what ou still infectious. it is interesting what you are — still infectious. it is interesting what you are saying, _ still infectious. it is interesting what you are saying, sarah, i still infectious. it is interesting - what you are saying, sarah, because how will you, i'm curious now, within your practice, someone who works within the practice there, when the five day rule comes in, will they be welcome at work after five days or are you guys, of your own volition, you have a different timeline you were conquest i certainly think we are going to be very cautious. bill certainly think we are going to be very cautious-— certainly think we are going to be very cautious. all general practices are beini very cautious. all general practices are being very _ very cautious. all general practices are being very cautious. _ very cautious. all general practices are being very cautious. we - very cautious. all general practices are being very cautious. we do - very cautious. all general practices i are being very cautious. we do know the uk security agency estimates that two—thirds of people are no longer infectious at day five. so in some respects this change makes a
7:24 am
lot of sense, because two—thirds of people are self—isolating unnecessarily. but we do need to be aware that even, as they say, leaving at day seven means about 40% of infectious cases will be missed. so we will certainly be looking at whether those people can work, if they feel well enough, from home or if they can they can be working in areas where they are further away from patients, particularly vulnerable patients. from patients, particularly vulnerable iatients. ii ii vulnerable patients. sarah, we have often talked — vulnerable patients. sarah, we have often talked about _ vulnerable patients. sarah, we have often talked about whether - vulnerable patients. sarah, we have often talked about whether people i often talked about whether people are presenting themselves to gps like yourself the way they did pre—pandemic, is that changing now? it is changing. we have had a huge surge of people who hadn't perhaps come forward in the first year and over the last few months's huge increase in november, for instance, there were 25% this than there were in the novemberjust before the pandemic, so we are seeing all the
7:25 am
usual people, we are seeing a catch up usual people, we are seeing a catch up of people who didn't come in in the first year also of the pandemic. we are trying to catch up as much as we can but, for instance, we are now faced with, london, certainly, if they refer somebody for potential breast cancer i am told it would be “p breast cancer i am told it would be up to eight weeks before they are seen, ratherthan up to eight weeks before they are seen, rather than what we expect, which just two weeks. that seen, rather than what we expect, which just two weeks.— which just two weeks. that is whatever's — which just two weeks. that is whatever's going _ which just two weeks. that is whatever's going to - which just two weeks. that is whatever's going to ask - which just two weeks. that is whatever's going to ask you i which just two weeks. that is - whatever's going to ask you about, can refer people on and there will be people you refer on for surgery, of course, as well, and we know that there is extreme pressure in the department. there is extreme pressure in the department-— department. absolutely. if we consider that, _ department. absolutely. if we consider that, yes, _ department. absolutely. if we - consider that, yes, hospitalisations are stabilising and very, very slightly coming down, but we now have 19 points 7000 people in hospital compared to 8000 on boxing day, they are not as sick courtesy of vaccination, courtesy of vaccination, they are coming up more quickly, but that doesn't mean there
7:26 am
is virtually no capacity, certainly in the north of england, in the manchester —— area all routine surgery has been stopped and in our area, in london, we have been given warning that cancer referrals in some cases are going to be significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis, significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis. good — significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis. good to _ significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis, good to chat. _ significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis, good to chat. we - significantly delayed. dr sarah jarvis, good to chat. we wish i significantly delayed. dr sarah i jarvis, good to chat. we wish you well feel we can. thank you very much. 26 minutes past seven. her majesty's coastguard is marking a major milestone today — its 200th birthday. luxmy gopal is on a beach just north of liverpool to tell us how they'll be celebrating. no daylight of course yet, but a little windy by the look of things. tell us a bit were more.- little windy by the look of things. tell us a bit were more. yes, 'ust a tad, tell us a bit were more. yes, 'ust a tag. charlie. — tell us a bit were more. yes, 'ust a tad, charlie. good * tell us a bit were more. yes, 'ust a tad, charlie. good morning. _ tell us a bit were more. yes, just a tad, charlie. good morning. we - tell us a bit were more. yes, just a | tad, charlie. good morning. we are here at crosby beach on the merseyside coastline and coming is, as you say, it is pretty breezy, near freezing, as you say, it is pretty breezy, nearfreezing, and it is as you say, it is pretty breezy, near freezing, and it is still pretty much pitch black, but these are the conditions that the coastguard are very used to working
7:27 am
on as they carry out their search and rescue missions and help keep people safe at the coast and at sea. and just behind me the team here are ringing upfora and just behind me the team here are ringing up for a mud rescue, and just behind me the team here are ringing upfora mud rescue, it and just behind me the team here are ringing up for a mud rescue, it is an illustration to demonstrate the equipment they use and how they work and how they prepare for these sorts of things. very different, of course, from when it was established 200 years ago, from its origins as a service to be set up to prevent smuggling. things have changed greatly since that time. not just with the equipment they use, but also the role the coastguard service, beyondjust also the role the coastguard service, beyond just giving people safe at the coast and at sea, they also orchestrate missions to do search and rescue in international waters and support in national emergencies. and today, to mark at milestone 200 that they, around the seas of england, northern ireland, scotland, and wales coastguard is going to be casting 200 through lines into the sea as a
7:28 am
commemoration of two centuries of this life—saving service. commemoration of two centuries of this life-saving service.— this life-saving service. well, we can be nothing — this life-saving service. well, we can be nothing but— this life-saving service. well, we can be nothing but grateful, - this life-saving service. well, we can be nothing but grateful, can| this life-saving service. well, we i can be nothing but grateful, can we, it is fascinating seeing how they are preparing for the day had. luxmy, we will speak later. thank you. luxmy, we will speak later. thank ou. i, i luxmy, we will speak later. thank ou. ii i i, luxmy, we will speak later. thank ou. i, i i, you. seven, 27 is it over so it has been a difficult _ you. seven, 27 is it over so it has been a difficult and _ you. seven, 27 is it over so it has been a difficult and damaging - you. seven, 27 is it over so it has l been a difficult and damaging week for borisjohnson been a difficult and damaging week for boris johnson following the revelations. his for boris johnson following the revelations.— for boris johnson following the revelations. i i i i revelations. his cabinet ministers are callini revelations. his cabinet ministers are calling for _ revelations. his cabinet ministers are calling for a _ revelations. his cabinet ministers are calling for a new— revelations. his cabinet ministers are calling for a newjudgement l revelations. his cabinet ministersl are calling for a newjudgement on the prime minister's position to be reserved until after an investigation that has been carried out by sue grey. ros atkins has been taking a look at what will be or could be included in that report. there is one name that has been repeatedly mentioned by boris johnson's supporters over the past week... ii i johnson's supporters over the past week- - -- sue _ johnson's supporters over the past week. . .- sue grey. - johnson's supporters over the past week. . .- sue grey.- week... sue grey. sue grey. sue ire . week... sue grey. sue grey. sue grey- sue _ week... sue grey. sue grey. sue grey- sue grey — week... sue grey. sue grey. sue grey. sue grey will _ week... sue grey. sue grey. sue grey. sue grey will decide. - week... sue grey. sue grey. sue grey. sue grey will decide. thisi week... sue grey. sue grey. sue| grey. sue grey will decide. this is a sue grey- _ grey. sue grey will decide. this is a sue grey- a _ grey. sue grey will decide. this is a sue grey. a senior— grey. sue grey will decide. this is a sue grey. a senior civil - grey. sue grey will decide. this is a sue grey. a senior civil servant | a sue grey. a senior civil servant who has worked with both labour and conservative governments. he shares with cabinet minister michael gove,
7:29 am
her second job is permanent secretary cabinet office. that is the one that supports the premise and the cabinet, located next door to number 10. and the cabinet, located next door to number10. it and the cabinet, located next door to number 10. it is the very centre of government. she is now the centre of government. she is now the centre of attention because she is investigating allegations about a number of different parties and gatherings in downing street while england was under a variety of covid restrictions. the former labour minister douglas alexander used to work with the. she minister douglas alexander used to work with the-— work with the. she is an extraordinarily - work with the. she is an - extraordinarily accomplished and capable — extraordinarily accomplished and capable civil servant. the guardian re iorts capable civil servant. the guardian reports that _ capable civil servant. the guardian reports that she _ capable civil servant. the guardian reports that she has _ capable civil servant. the guardian reports that she has a _ capable civil servant. the guardian reports that she has a reputation l reports that she has a reputation for vigorous internal investigations and the times that she was once considered whitehall�*s sleaze buster in chief. sue grey was previously in charge of ethics at the cabinet office and run a number of investigations, including one in 2017 that led to the sacking of damian green, a close ally of the then prime minister theresa may. he admitted to having porn on his computer. now she turns her attention to what happened in downing street during the pandemic. borisjohnson insists rules were not
7:30 am
broken. hertask borisjohnson insists rules were not broken. her task is to establish if thatis broken. her task is to establish if that is true. there is the paymaster general outlining the terms of her investigation. it general outlining the terms of her investigation.— investigation. it will establish the fact and if wrong _ investigation. it will establish the fact and if wrong doing _ investigation. it will establish the fact and if wrong doing is - fact and if wrong doing is established there will be requisite disciplinary action taken. disciplinary action may be taken. here's how we gets, gater, once has finished her report is not up to her what happens next. here is douglas alexander again.— alexander again. ultimately, it is a iolitical alexander again. ultimately, it is a politicaljudgement, _ alexander again. ultimately, it is a politicaljudgement, not _ alexander again. ultimately, it is a politicaljudgement, not a - alexander again. ultimately, it is a politicaljudgement, not a legal- politicaljudgement, not a legal judgement, because sue gray's report will be. _ judgement, because sue gray's report will be. and _ judgement, because sue gray's report will be, and seven detailed but will deal with— will be, and seven detailed but will deal with the facts, what happens with those that will then be determined by the politicians. it determined by the politicians. happens determined by the politicians. it happens next is up to the prime minister, other ministers, and mps to determine, which leads us to this question. is to determine, which leads us to this iuestion. i �* i, i . i, to determine, which leads us to this iuestion. i �* i, i g i, i, question. is it boris johnson who decides what _ question. is it boris johnson who decides what will _ question. is it boris johnson who decides what will happen - question. is it boris johnson who| decides what will happen without report, because a lot of people think is absurd.— think is absurd. well, he has already been _ think is absurd. well, he has already been very _ think is absurd. well, he has already been very clear, - think is absurd. well, he has already been very clear, the | already been very clear, the findings of that have been made
7:31 am
public. fir findings of that have been made iublic. i i, findings of that have been made iublic. , i, ii, findings of that have been made iublic. i i, ii, i ii i, public. or you could put it another wa . we public. or you could put it another way- we will _ public. or you could put it another way. we will decide _ public. or you could put it another way. we will decide what - public. or you could put it another way. we will decide what happens j public. or you could put it another. way. we will decide what happens to him if it is determined _ way. we will decide what happens to him if it is determined he _ way. we will decide what happens to him if it is determined he broke - way. we will decide what happens to him if it is determined he broke thel him if it is determined he broke the rules? ~ i i rules? the prime minister is accountable _ rules? the prime minister is accountable notjust - rules? the prime minister is accountable not just to - rules? the prime minister is- accountable notjust to parliament and obviously conservative mps, but the country — and obviously conservative mps, but the country as a whole.— the country as a whole. there is also the question _ the country as a whole. there is also the question of— the country as a whole. there is also the question of whether i the country as a whole. there is also the question of whether a i also the question of whether a senior civil servant, working closely with the prime minister, and act as an independent investigator. ms bryant, a labour mp, a former minister, is concerned. he tweeted this. but not everyone agrees with that. one insider told the guardian that the biggest mistake they had made... now, we don't know what sue gray's enquiry will find or what it will include, it is always possible the matter could be taken out of our hands. ii matter could be taken out of our hands. i i i, ii hands. if evidence emerges of what was potentially _ hands. if evidence emerges of what was potentially a _ hands. if evidence emerges of what was potentially a criminal— hands. if evidence emerges of what was potentially a criminal offence, i was potentially a criminal offence, the matter would be referred to the
7:32 am
metropolitan police. and the cabinet offers a's work may be paused. test offers a's work may be paused. at the moment, though, we made for sue gray to share her report. and some certainly do not understand this agger. david laws, here on the left, recalls being told by another minister on the ride. it took me precisely two years before a now, no doubt she would not categorise it in that way. but it is not an exaggeration to say about sue grey�*s report impacts the future of the uk. it may find rules weren't broken, but if it finds that they were under the prime minister was a willing participant, borisjohnson's position will come under extreme pressure. she still wouldn't be running the country, but the report has the potential to change truly dead. more revelations in the papers this morning. the mirror reports on "wine time fridays" in number 10. and the times says borisjohnson is in the "last chance saloon".
7:33 am
one of the reporters behind that front page is times radio presenter matt chorley, and we're also joined by sonia sodha, from the observer. matthew, just reading the front page of the times today, tell me just kind of how you have worked on this? because one of the lines, as well, is that sue grey, who ros atkins was explaining her role in this investigation, she has felt completely blindsided by these latest revelations that we are seeing? —— sue grey. latest revelations that we are seeing? -- sue grey.- latest revelations that we are seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i thinkthat — seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is _ seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is where _ seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is where it _ seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is where it is _ seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is where it is going - seeing? -- sue grey. yeah, and i think that is where it is going to l think that is where it is going to get problematic. because we were told a week or so ago that sue grey had access to everything, diaries, cctv, she was trawling through everything. i think the suitcase party, as it is now called, where somebody went to the co—op to stock up somebody went to the co—op to stock up with a suitcase full of booze, that one was not on her radar. this
7:34 am
culture, the fridge we have heard about, the 34 bottle wine fridge that was installed in number ten, the drinking on fridays, as you are just saying, if sue grey feels she is not getting the information, essentially what she can't do is say that boris johnson essentially what she can't do is say that borisjohnson must resign. but what we thought she was going to be able to do was produce the definitive list, and every website, the bbc website, the times, everybody has the list of parties which keeps being added to, but sue grey was supposed to be the one with the definitive list, and if she isn't getting out, you know, she is a professional and independently minded and all that, but she will be pretty furious if she feels that even now, people in number ten are not playing ball. even now, people in number ten are not playing ball-— not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to ou. not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to you- can _ not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to you- can i _ not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to you. can ijust _ not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to you. can ijust ask, _ not playing ball. sonia, let's talk to you. can ijust ask, is - not playing ball. sonia, let's talk| to you. can ijust ask, is anything coming out tomorrow in the observer that we should know about? i couldn't possibly reveal that here. but i'm glad that has started
7:35 am
nickname invest parties, the suitcase _ nickname invest parties, the suitcase party under the fridge party. — suitcase party under the fridge party, because i am starting to lose truck _ party, because i am starting to lose truck. ii i i i party, because i am starting to lose truck. ii ii i i truck. that is beeping. i suppose, ou truck. that is beeping. i suppose, you know. — truck. that is beeping. i suppose, you know. as _ truck. that is beeping. i suppose, you know, as matt _ truck. that is beeping. i suppose, you know, as matt alluded - truck. that is beeping. i suppose, you know, as matt alluded to, - truck. that is beeping. i suppose, | you know, as matt alluded to, sue grey is kind of waiting for these things to come in the papers, the thinking than being that surely everybody would have been told, give us your diaries, look back on your calendars and tell us what happened, and that isn't happening? absolutely.— and that isn't happening? absolutel . ii i ii absolutely. that is the thing about an investigation _ absolutely. that is the thing about an investigation carried _ absolutely. that is the thing about an investigation carried out - absolutely. that is the thing about an investigation carried out by - absolutely. that is the thing about an investigation carried out by a i an investigation carried out by a civil servant. it is not a court, she _ civil servant. it is not a court, she doesn't— civil servant. it is not a court, she doesn't have the power to compel people _ she doesn't have the power to compel people to _ she doesn't have the power to compel people to give testimony under oath. ithink— people to give testimony under oath. i think this _ people to give testimony under oath. i think this is a problem with the process. — i think this is a problem with the process. as _ i think this is a problem with the process, as muchjust outlined so well. _ process, as muchjust outlined so well. which — process, as muchjust outlined so well, which is with this latest breaking _ well, which is with this latest breaking story in the mirror, friday wine _ breaking story in the mirror, friday wine time. — breaking story in the mirror, friday wine time. i— breaking story in the mirror, friday wine time, i think this is really damaging _ wine time, i think this is really damaging to the prime minister, because — damaging to the prime minister, because it — damaging to the prime minister, because it takes it to a new level. we were — because it takes it to a new level. we were all— because it takes it to a new level. we were all supposed to believe this defence _ we were all supposed to believe this defence that he gave us last week, which _ defence that he gave us last week, which was — defence that he gave us last week, which was that there was one party in the _ which was that there was one party in the downing street garden or it was not _ in the downing street garden or it was not a — in the downing street garden or it was not a party, he thought it was a work— was not a party, he thought it was a work gathering, even though they were trestle tables and wine being
7:36 am
served _ were trestle tables and wine being served. he gave a speech. he should have got— served. he gave a speech. he should have got people to come back in, with hindsight, but he didn't. in now regrets about. you know, we were supposed _ now regrets about. you know, we were supposed to _ now regrets about. you know, we were supposed to believe that maybe that was a _ supposed to believe that maybe that was a one—off, but now we find out in the _ was a one—off, but now we find out in the mirror— was a one—off, but now we find out in the mirror that sources say he was regularly popping into social gatherings on a friday evening and staff felt— gatherings on a friday evening and staff felt tacitly encouraged by the he was _ staff felt tacitly encouraged by the he was saying, you know, you are letting _ he was saying, you know, you are letting off— he was saying, you know, you are letting off steam. i think it is damaging to the prime minister and the problem is that it sounds like these _ the problem is that it sounds like these gatherings were happening more fridays _ these gatherings were happening more fridays and not stop so how on earth is sue _ fridays and not stop so how on earth is sue grey— fridays and not stop so how on earth is sue grey supposed to produce a timeline _ is sue grey supposed to produce a timeline that looks at every friday and the _ timeline that looks at every friday and the last 18 months? i think it is really— and the last 18 months? i think it is really difficult.— is really difficult. matt, can i ask ou this is really difficult. matt, can i ask you this one? — is really difficult. matt, can i ask you this one? there _ is really difficult. matt, can i ask you this one? there is _ is really difficult. matt, can i ask i you this one? there is terminology that political reporters use a lot, people understand less, when downing street sends an apology to the queen, do you take that to mean borisjohnson has apologised to the
7:37 am
queen? how are we supposed to read that one? i queen? how are we supposed to read that one? 4' i queen? how are we supposed to read that one? ~ i ii i, that one? i think it is fair to say that one? i think it is fair to say that the lobby _ that one? i think it is fair to say that the lobby briefings - that one? i think it is fair to say that the lobby briefings this - that one? i think it is fair to say i that the lobby briefings this week, and they normally take place when i am now, so sadly i do not have the joy am now, so sadly i do not have the joy of sitting through the game of cat and mouse when journalists try to get to the bottom of things and number ten says, i don't actually know, in this particular case. my understanding is that it is not borisjohnson picking up the phone to the queen and saying, i am really sorry that my staff had to knees ups the night before prince philip's funeral. —— two knees ups. the other thing is that it is only the latest thing is that it is only the latest thing that has been really bad the relationship between borisjohnson and the queen, it goes right back to be prorogation, whether they misled parliament of proroguing parliament. the relationship has already been quite tested, the queen has had an off a lot of prime ministers on her watch and i am not borisjohnson would be the top of the list for her favourite. —— awful lot.
7:38 am
would be the top of the list for her favourite. -- awful lot.— favourite. -- awful lot. there is a ihrase favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that _ favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that is _ favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that is often _ favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that is often used, - favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that is often used, to - favourite. -- awful lot. there is a phrase that is often used, to cut| phrase that is often used, to cut through moments and issues. on this occasion, to do with parties at downing street. has there been a genuine cut through moment when the public is fully engaged and takes a position? public is fully engaged and takes a iosition? i e' public is fully engaged and takes a iosition? i «l ii position? yes, i think that absolutely _ position? yes, i think that absolutely has. _ position? yes, i think that absolutely has. you - position? yes, i think that absolutely has. you don't| position? yes, i think that - absolutely has. you don't need to trust _ absolutely has. you don't need to trust me — absolutely has. you don't need to trust me on— absolutely has. you don't need to trust me on that, when you speak to mpsi _ trust me on that, when you speak to mps. they— trust me on that, when you speak to mps, they are reporting that they are getting correspondence from angry— are getting correspondence from angry constituents. there are very few issues— angry constituents. there are very few issues that exrocise people who do not _ few issues that exrocise people who do not normally write to their mps to write _ do not normally write to their mps to write to — do not normally write to their mps to write to them. —— exorcise. we saw _ to write to them. —— exorcise. we saw that _ to write to them. —— exorcise. we saw that with _ to write to them. —— exorcise. we saw that with barnard castle and we are seeing _ saw that with barnard castle and we are seeing it again with party gait. ithink— are seeing it again with party gait. i think this — are seeing it again with party gait. i think this is something that that public— i think this is something that that public have latched onto. if there is one _ public have latched onto. if there is one thing people don't like it is political— is one thing people don't like it is political hypocrisy, people not playing — political hypocrisy, people not playing by the rules they are making the rest _ playing by the rules they are making the rest of— playing by the rules they are making the rest of the country. and it was everybody. — the rest of the country. and it was everybody, apart from the government, it seems, he was complying _ government, it seems, he was complying with those rules, from the queen— complying with those rules, from the queen down. we saw the queen morning her husband. _ queen down. we saw the queen morning her husband, sat by herself at a
7:39 am
funeral. — her husband, sat by herself at a funeral, get downing street staff thought — funeral, get downing street staff thought it was ok to have raucous parties _ thought it was ok to have raucous parties the — thought it was ok to have raucous parties the night before. so this is absolutely— parties the night before. so this is absolutely something that has cut through — absolutely something that has cut through. if you look at the polls in the last— through. if you look at the polls in the last two or three days, really bad trends — the last two or three days, really bad trends for the government. labour— bad trends for the government. labour getting some of the biggest leads we _ labour getting some of the biggest leads we have seen in years over the conservatives, so there is no question— conservatives, so there is no question that this is really, really hurting _ question that this is really, really hurting the conservatives.- question that this is really, really hurting the conservatives. thank you very much- — mikejoins us again. good morning. now, there is so much going on, i don't know how you have kept your head on straight with this, but novak djokovic was detained, he was not detained... it novak djokovic was detained, he was not detained. . .— not detained... it has been a bit of a tennis match _ not detained... it has been a bit of a tennis match this _ not detained... it has been a bit of a tennis match this week - not detained... it has been a bit of a tennis match this week between | not detained... it has been a bit of. a tennis match this week between the government, the immigration minister, the courts, djokovic's lawyers, djokovic training on the court as well. i never thought we would be in a situation for a second week running, waiting for an appeal. tonight our time, rather than monday...
7:40 am
tonight our time, rather than monday- - -— tonight our time, rather than monda ii i monday... so, as we speak this mornini monday... so, as we speak this morning here. _ monday. .. so, as we speak this morning here, it— monday. .. so, as we speak this morning here, it is— monday... so, as we speak this morning here, it is evening - monday... so, as we speak this morning here, it is evening in l morning here, it is evening in australia, in what situation is djokovic literally? where is he? what is happening to him? iatgfeilii. djokovic literally? where is he? what is happening to him? well, he has been detained _ what is happening to him? well, he has been detained at _ what is happening to him? well, he has been detained at another - what is happening to him? well, he has been detained at another of - has been detained at another of these immigration hotels. we understand it is not the same one as last weekend. this is in melbourne. yes, waiting for this appeal, which will be around 10:30pm tonight, that is what it will start in the court, where hopefully, withjust two is what it will start in the court, where hopefully, with just two days to go, before the australian open starts, and he is the defending champion, two days before that, tonight, hopefully we should find out. whether it will be the final decision, well, we have learned not to guess that haven't we? not to think that. for the moment he is in melbourne, novak djokovic detained head of a court hearing that will decide whether or not he can stay in australia to defend his open title. probably a good time to remind you of the saga so far. on 4th january, djokovic tweeted that after spending time with family over christmas, he was heading to australia with a covid vaccine "exemption permission." two days later, the world number one arrived at melbourne airport,
7:41 am
but was detained by authorities and taken to a quarantine hotel, where protestors gathered outside. on monday, he was freed, after a judge quashed the government's decision, and djokovic tweeted again, saying he was focused on competing. but yesterday the australian immigration minister cancelled his visa again. djokovic's lawyers have called the judgement "irrational" and an appeal date has been set for10:30pm uk time. well, our tennis correspondent russell fullerjoins us now. russell, it's a race against time to get this sorted, with the ball back in the judges' court. what could be different this time? bar in the course of three judges, because that is one win already for novak djokovic's legal team. they wanted three judges to hear this appeal and that has been granted. so at 10:30pm uk appeal and that has been granted. so at10:30pm uk time appeal and that has been granted. so at 10:30pm uk time tonight, as you say, this hearing will begin. we have moved on, it is no longer about
7:42 am
whether djokovic was entitled to have a medical exemption to avoid taking vaccination. he is challenging alex hawke, the immigration minister, and his decision to cancel his visa for a second time, and i quote, "on health and good order grounds", on the basis that it wasn't a public interest to do so. we have learned more about hawke's argument today. he is saying that somebody was very high profile, somebody who has publicly said they do not want to get vaccinated, he is worried that will drive anti—vaxxers sentiment within australia. fewer people will get vaccinated, the booster take—up will be affected, and if more people get infected but will have a drain on hospital resources and also financial resources. djokovic's legal team have argued that this is over—the—top, you are painting him as a talisman of the anti—vaxxer movement, and i think that is far from the case. if. movement, and i think that is far from the case.— from the case. is there a cut-off ioint? from the case. is there a cut-off point? itut— from the case. is there a cut-off point? but tomorrow _ from the case. is there a cut-off point? but tomorrow it - from the case. is there a cut-off point? but tomorrow it will - from the case. is there a cut-off point? but tomorrow it will be i from the case. is there a cut-off l point? but tomorrow it will be one date to go until the australian open
7:43 am
starts, is there a cut—off point where this will have to and one way or the other and we will know, going back to the other side? i or the other and we will know, going back to the other side?— back to the other side? i suppose the cut-off _ back to the other side? i suppose the cut-off point _ back to the other side? i suppose the cut-off point for _ back to the other side? i suppose the cut-off point for djokovic - back to the other side? i suppose the cut-off point for djokovic and | the cut—off point for djokovic and his australian open chances comes monday evening. we have not seen the order of play for monday yet, which we normally would have had by this stage. but we know he is going to play on monday and the word is that he is going to be scheduled in the evening session, as you would expect. a massive television audience, if you did play. so if it had not been resolved and he was still in the immigration hotel, the asylum hotel, there isjust no way that he could pay —— play at melbourne park. that would be the end of his australian open adventure, perhaps not quite the right word. difficult to second—guess what happens after tomorrow, but i think this is pretty much the last throw of the dice for novak djokovic, as far as playing in the australian open is concerned. in far as playing in the australian open is concerned. in contrast, andy murra 's open is concerned. in contrast, andy murray's reparations _ open is concerned. in contrast, andy murray's reparations for _ open is concerned. in contrast, andy murray's reparations for the - murray's reparations for the australian open are going rather well? he
7:44 am
australian open are going rather well? ii i i i, i i, i, well? he had been promising to do this for a while, _ well? he had been promising to do this for a while, the _ well? he had been promising to do this for a while, the last _ well? he had been promising to do this for a while, the last three - this for a while, the last three months of the last season, he was playing as if he were 25 again, but wasn't getting the results, much to his frustration, but moving so much better, despite the metal hip. there were signs that if he stayed free of injury, which he has managed to do so far, fingers crossed, he could begin to string results together. so here he is in the final in sydney, here he is in the final in sydney, he will play the russian aslan karatsev in the next 45 minutes or so, and if he wins the title it will be his first atp title since october of 2019, and would also mean a welcome return to the top 100 in the rankings. it might mean he has played a little too much tennis going into the australian open, but i think right now he would just be delighted to get back into the winners' circle again. absolutely, to be talking _ winners' circle again. absolutely, to be talking about _ winners' circle again. absolutely, to be talking about andy - winners' circle again. absolutely, to be talking about andy murray l winners' circle again. absolutely, i to be talking about andy murray and titles again. russell, thank you so much indeed. it will be a busy day ahead, so get some sleep, hopefully, before sunday. if you have an ipad or a iphone, you
7:45 am
before sunday. if you have an ipad ora iphone, you can before sunday. if you have an ipad or a iphone, you can stay on breakfast but also keep in touch with the anti— moment shortly. england's batters are up against it once again in the final ashes test. after that brilliant start in hobart, they let australia off the hook. bowler nathan lyon taking them past the 300 mark. he was eventually stopped by stuart broad, with his third wicket of the innings. england's reply was just ten balls old when rory burns was run out for a duck, on his recall to the side — opening partner zak crawley creating some indecision. and crawley himself went not long afterwards, leaving england 29—2. and they've since lost dawid malan and captainjoe root. england now 81—4. crystal palace manager patrick vieira said goalkeeper jack butland was to thank for the point they took away from brighton last night. he made several key saves, including this from pascal gross's penalty kick in the first half. brighton were the better side throughout, but it was palace who went ahead, through conor gallagher, before a late
7:46 am
own goal from joachim andersen capped off an eventful encounter. 1—1 it finished. great to see jack butland back to his best in the match. with the cricket, england still haven't got past 300 in this series. i was hoping... past 300 in this series. i was hoping- - -_ past 300 in this series. i was hoping. . .- that - past 300 in this series. i was hoping. . .- that they i past 300 in this series. i was i hoping. . .- that they would past 300 in this series. i was hoping... iatgfhg�*? that they would get hoping... why? that they would get there but now _ hoping... why? that they would get there but now they _ hoping... i! that they would get there but now they have lost too many wickets. there but now they have lost too many wickets-— there but now they have lost too man wickets. ~ i i i, i, i many wickets. why were you hoping? because i many wickets. why were you hoping? because i may _ many wickets. why were you hoping? because i may be _ many wickets. why were you hoping? because i may be an _ many wickets. why were you hoping? because i may be an optimist. - many wickets. why were you hoping? because i may be an optimist. you i because i may be an optimist. you are, because i may be an optimist. you are. actually- _ because i may be an optimist. you are, actually. stay _ because i may be an optimist. you are, actually. stay that _ because i may be an optimist. you are, actually. stay that way. - because i may be an optimist. you are, actually. stay that way. a - because i may be an optimist. you| are, actually. stay that way. a dose of realism. — are, actually. stay that way. a dose of realism, though, _ are, actually. stay that way. a dose of realism, though, perhaps, - are, actually. stay that way. a dose of realism, though, perhaps, with i of realism, though, perhaps, with what it is like outside. a complete contrast to what it is like in australia. contrast to what it is like in australia-— contrast to what it is like in australia. i, i, i, australia. tomasz, good morning to ou. good australia. tomasz, good morning to you. good morning, _ australia. tomasz, good morning to you. good morning, naga. - australia. tomasz, good morning to you. good morning, naga. it- australia. tomasz, good morning to you. good morning, naga. it is- australia. tomasz, good morning to you. good morning, naga. it is coldj you. good morning, naga. it is cold and frosty and foggy and we have had this kind of weatherfor quite and frosty and foggy and we have had this kind of weather for quite some time. high pressure over us. we have the stable conditions in full forms
7:47 am
and that, very little wind to move it around. here is the stable area of high pressure. you can see it is notjust of high pressure. you can see it is not just across the of high pressure. you can see it is notjust across the uk, but much of europe and it will wobble a little bit over the next few days, sort of move position, and allow these weather fronts here in the atlantic to sneak in, just for a short while, and bring some rain tomorrow. not just in the atlantic air the moment. here is the fog and this is what it could still look like for a few hours. it will obviously be getting a bit brighter. this ability is 50— 100 metres across some parts of northern and central england, east anglia in the south as well. with that we have the frost. really steady on the roads if you are planning to travel. most of the fog will clear as we go in through the morning and into the afternoon and the weather will be bright, even signing on a number of areas, lovely sunshine in the north and east of scotland, running lake district, sunny spells rather than clear blue skies in the forecast today. there
7:48 am
is a weather front moving into northern ireland and scotland tonight and into tomorrow morning. it will bring sports a range to glasgow, edinburgh, belfast as well, carlisle and newcastle. the winds are of the atlantic, more of a breeze out there, not as frosty tonight, generally frost free. i don't think we will have much fog around tomorrow morning either. here is a weather front. this basically means a line of cloud and some rain moving through, may be lasting an hour or two at the most. you can see most of northern britain during the course of sunday is sunny. in the south, in the middle of the afternoon, there might be more cloud. on balance it is a fine day tomorrow with lots of sunny weather. the high pressure, i mentioned about the high pressure wobbling a little bit, it is kind of back right over us, welcome to the south of the uk, on monday, so that means sunny conditions, probably mist and fog me again, and very, they will use the
7:49 am
word stable, weather. very little on the horizon in the coming days. but you two. thank you so much. see you later. we are back with the at eight o'clock. now it's time for newswatch. hello, and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. has the bbc�*s coverage of those downing street party allegations been a witch—hunt that has played unfairly on the audience's emotions? and we delve into the archive to look at some opening titles from news bulletins in years gone by. the latest in a string of allegations of lockdown parties at downing street has led to a febrile atmosphere in westminster over the past few days and one can imagine, to a bit of a frenzy in newsrooms around the country, too. although this week's revelations have made many newswatch viewers angry, others have accused bbc news of getting overexcited by the story. here's caroline.
7:50 am
surely there are far more important news items that the bbc should be concentrating on, like the panic stories of omicron issues, current economic situation, housing the afghan refugees or even what vladimir putin is doing rather than whether or not there was a socially distanced get—together in the garden for those who are working extremely hard together in 2020 at a very stressful time and were invited to use a beautiful space to chat with each other and support each other. i'm sure that nurses and doctors also met in staff rooms that were not nearly as luxurious as the number 10 garden to unwind and unload but none of this is being covered by the press who are holding onto this story and making it much bigger than it needs to be. please can the bbc stop this witch—hunt and report on the stories that are relevant and will impact us now. some of the coverage took us away from westminster to hear from families of those bereaved by covid—19.
7:51 am
here's mark easton on tuesday's news at six. the day of the downing street party, no family attended the funeral of this 75—year—old. lockdown meant her daughter was never able to say goodbye. we went there, there wasjust a coffin. so how do you feel about the prime minister having a party? i'll be honest with you, i really hate him. i'm sorry to say it because my mum wouldn't want me to say that, but he's just a disgrace. grace fairway was watching that, and contacted us to say: similar interviews continued over the next couple of days with this one on thursday, coming after borisjohnson and apologised in the house of commons for attending the drinks event in may 2020. the funeral was the 20th of may.
7:52 am
it was very difficult for us again, pretty emotional as you can imagine to have, not be able to celebrate his life, so to hear the news that there was a law passed that we all abided to and on the day that we buried my father, there was a party in downing street, and that the prime minister was there, itjust leaves such a bitter taste. donald walker had this reaction: we asked to interview someone from the bbc on this issue but nobody was available. instead we were given
7:53 am
this statement: that mention of the word "impartiality" raises one of the trickiest and most hotly debated concepts in broadcast news: what exactly is impartiality, and how should the bbc apply it to its journalism? the corporation's director—general tim davie has made answering those questions a top priority for the news division, setting up a series of rolling external investigations into the output. on tuesday, we got some insight into mr davie's thinking
7:54 am
and also that of the bbc�*s director of editorial policy david jordan when they spoke to the house of lords communications committee. mrjordan said the bbc did not subscribe to a cancel culture, adding this. it is absolutely critical to the bbc that we represent all points of view, given due weight and to take the example, flat earthers are not going to get as much space as people who believe that the earth is round, but very occasionally it might be appropriate to interview a flat earther and if a lot of people believed in flat earth we would need to address it more than we do at the present time. so it is very, very important that people out in our audience, across the whole of our audience, think their viewpoints are being expressed, challenged and heard and seen on our output. not everyone agreed with that approach, with laura phillips writing:
7:55 am
sam freedman agreed: and the journalist ian dunt was clear in his views: but the bbc editor and former guest on this programme mike wendling tweeted:
7:56 am
david jordan was not available to expand on the comments he made this week but a spokesperson gave us this statement: subtitles on television were originally introduced for the hard of hearing and provide a valuable service for those audiences. but their use is now much more widespread with four out of five 18—25—year—olds watching with captions some or all of the time, a sign perhaps of tv being consumed more on the go via smartphones. the accuracy of the words appearing on the screen then is more important than ever, particularly on live programmes such as news.
7:57 am
when it goes wrong, for example when queueing is transcribed as killing, it can go very wrong and the results can be ludicrous. "fairies" being disrupted? travelling in this "cabbage"? but for viewers who are partially or totally deaf, it's nojoke. sue davis recorded a video for us recently, here are her thoughts. i watch the news with my brother who is profoundly deaf and ifind i have to interpret a lot of what is being said, because the words that come up are so wrong. for example, this week, i found that poland had become pollen, a 25—year—old became 25 euros. examples like that. subtitles are supposed to help deaf people, people with hearing impairment understand what's going on, and when you've got confusing things like that you get stuck thinking about it and you can't move on. so how does it get measured?
7:58 am
who looks at it? who decides that somebody�*s good enough? does anybody do that? we asked the department responsible at the bbc how live subtitles are generated and why mistakes are made, and they told us: finally, this year marks the centenary of the bbc and the corporations announced some of the ways in which it is going to mark that anniversary on air. michael szymanski wrote to us
7:59 am
with this suggestion: well, we will see if any bosses will actually take up that brilliant idea but in the meantime, we have had a rummage in the archives to give michael a taste of what he is proposing. old theme music plays sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister.
8:00 am
here's the news. a thaw is on the way but it's frost again tonight in many parts. the middlesex hospital and crowds gathering to see sir winston churchill leave in a few minutes. i would quite fancy one of those for some new newswatch titles. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see, read or hear on bbc news, on tv, radio, online and social media, e—mail:
8:01 am
that's all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "wine time friday's". more details emerge about lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being bombarded with emails from angry constituents. detained again. novak djokovic waits to hear whether his latest appeal against deportation from australia is succesful. it is happy 200th birthday to her majesty's coastguard. join us later when we will be heading down to the beach, casting a throw line or two and celebrating two centuries of
8:02 am
this life—saving service. and celebrating two centuries of this life-saving service.- this life-saving service. good morning- _ another ashes test, another england collapse. their chances of restoring pride in this final test, are fading, with the fifth wicket of ben stokes, and less than 100 runs on the board. and it's a frosty and foggy start to saturday for many of us. - the good news is, it. should be a bright day. good morning. it's saturday the 15th of january. there are more allegations of parties in downing street during the pandemic, with newspaper reports detailing how staff at number ten held regular drinks on friday evenings while restrictions were in force. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral. some conservative mps have told bbc news they've been inundated with emails from angry constituents. here's our political correspondent, ione wells. it is the expectation that more and more will come out. the fear of one brexiteer tory mp,
8:03 am
who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast." another said their email inbox was "horrendous." one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election. "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week that he attended drinks in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don't think it's acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties.
8:04 am
on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's funeral, leading foreign secretary liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue grey has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this inquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster that the police should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act. because the primary objective of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives.
8:05 am
but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. ione wells, bbc news. our political correspondent, nick eardleyjoins us now. good morning. really interesting, isn't it? a couple of lines. the conservative mps saying they have had complaints from angry constituents, perhaps to be expected but also with this headline, "wine time fridays" just how much the prime minister knew about this. yes. prime minister knew about this. yes, i think it's prime minister knew about this. yes, i think it's quite _ prime minister knew about this. is: i think it's quite significant, this question about whether borisjohnson question about whether boris johnson knew there were regular drinks happening in number ten. we have known for a while that there were fairly regular drinks distanced. the question that kind of blown up this week, though, is whether that there was that culture of drinking in downing street and
8:06 am
whether those lines between working and socialising had become blurred, like we saw in the allegations yesterday of people dancing and playing music in the downing street basement. the really interesting thing this weekend is going to be whether the mood amongst tory mps hardens because they are back in their constituencies, they are hearing from their voters about what they think about all of the allegations that have blown up this week. i've got to say, the tory mps that i've been chatting to last night and this morning, it does feel like that mood is hardening. one former cabinet minister told me the mood was terrible and that those allegations yesterday that staff partied the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral led to that apology to buckingham palace yesterday that are not just made things even worse. some mps are speculating that it's a question of when and not if borisjohnson goes.
8:07 am
look, next week is going to be really crucial, as well, how mps talk about this when they are back in parliament, what potentially happens with that sue gray report into this, when we get it. but it does feel like the mood is getting a lot worse amongst the conservative party rather than better. hick. party rather than better. nick, thanks so _ party rather than better. nick, thanks so much, _ party rather than better. nick, thanks so much, we _ party rather than better. nick, thanks so much, we will- party rather than better. nick, thanks so much, we will talk. party rather than better. nick, - thanks so much, we will talk later. at around 9:30, we'll be speaking to andrew bridgen, one of the conservative mps who has written a letter of no—confidence in the prime minister. novak djokovic has been detained again in melbourne ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in australia to defend his open title. the tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, is in melbourne. she has been following the story closely in melbourne. in short, you can tell me more detail, novak djokovic back this morning in hotel detention awaiting what will be a
8:08 am
final verdict tomorrow, how's that? yes, yes, charlie, and if that sounds familiar to our viewers, if they feel they have seen and heard this before, they are right. this is the second time this has happened, now. once again, novak djokovic is back here we believe in the immigration detention hotel. once again, the government is trying to deport him. once again, it down to is the court to decide whether he stays and defends his title or whether he leaves the country. there was a procedural hearing, this morning, an online one, and in it we now have a time, sunday morning is when both parties are going to present their arguments to the court. we know his legal team will challenge that notion, that his presence here, novak djokovic is provoking anti—vaccination sentiment. this is the argument from the immigration minister, alex hawke. the lawyers say it is irrational and invalid and by deporting him, he could cause the thing he is trying to avoid. but
8:09 am
what is different is the time frame. it is saturday afternoon here in melbourne. he is in the draw to play in the australian open back next week, which starts monday. and in less than two days, a judge has to decide what happens to novak djokovic. and instead of preparing, he is going to be spending his time either here in the immigration centre or his lawyers' office to watch that hearing.— centre or his lawyers' office to watch that hearing. thank you very much. our balkans correspondent, guy de launey, is in belgrade. guy, what's been the reaction there? good to see you, such an interesting reaction there must be where you are? �* i ii, i reaction there must be where you are? �* i , ~ reaction there must be where you are? absolutely. we have president alexander lou _ are? absolutely. we have president alexander lou church _ are? absolutely. we have president alexander lou church very - are? absolutely. we have president alexander lou church very much i alexander lou church very much getting in behind his man novak djokovic. and taking it quite personally on the behalf of the republic of serbia asking why you mistreat him and her harass him. a nation that is free and proud, meaning serbia, of course. and pointing out there may be a double
8:10 am
standard at play. we often hear serbia criticised that they are not upholding the rule of law, the european union and the us and others are hot on that. and that the president, aleksandar vucic, said it often preach to us about the rule of law. can you imagine what it would look like if a minister in serbia could annul the decision ofjudges? rhetoric employing double standards at play. rhetoric employing double standards at ila . i , rhetoric employing double standards at ila _ , , ., ~' rhetoric employing double standards atiiia, ., rhetoric employing double standards atla. _ h rhetoric employing double standards atla. _ a, a prince andrew's former assistant is being asked to give a statement by the legal team representing virgina giuffre, the woman who has accused the duke of sexual assault when she was 17. her legal team is also seeking evidence from a woman who claims to have seen the prince in a london nightclub with a young girl around the time ms giuffre claims she was abused. prince andrew, who is facing a civil case in the united states, denies the allegations. our us correspondent, nomia iqbal, has the latest. virginia giuffre�*s legal team here in america is seeking testimony from two people in the uk. one of those people
8:11 am
is shukri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. miss giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting that club. the second person is the prince's former assistant, major rob olney. and ms giuffre�*s lawyers say she has reason to believe that major olney has information that relates to the relationship between prince andrew and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who is now dead. virginia giuffre�*s legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they haven't ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn't go to trial. but they've also indicated that they wouldn't just want that settlement to be financial. as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. but he is running out of legal manoeuvres and miss giuffre�*s legal team have him exactly
8:12 am
where they want him. he is now in a position where he has said he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronagees, thousands of people have attended vigils across the republic of ireland in memory of the murdered primary school teacher, ashling murphy. the 23—year—old was attacked while she was jogging by a canal in county offaly on wednesday afternoon. a man who was arrested over her death has been released without charge. covid restrictions in wales will start to ease from today, with the number of people allowed to gather for outdoor events increasing from 50 to 500. that means parkruns and smaller sporting fixtures are back on from today. nightclubs will be allowed to open from january 28th and the welsh government is hoping to lift all restrictions by february 10th.
8:13 am
if you were with us just after six o'clock you may have seen us discussing a story which caught charlie's i in the papers this morning. about an old photograph of a woman — taken around 60 years ago — who bears an uncanny resemblance to the singer ed sheeran. just hold on, the picture needs a bit of explaining. this is a family in copenhagen, they got together to look through their family history. this is a 23—year—old's great aunt on the right. apparently, she is still alive and in her 80s. lives near prague and think this photograph with, i think we all agree... sometimes these likenesses not so much... she was 19 apparently when this picture was taken. they sat there looking at the old photographs having a laugh and they
8:14 am
went, "it is ed sheeran". it is. it prompted us to do, breakfast�*s style. we asked for your doppelganger pictures and we really have to show you this one. ed sheeran is the one on the left, in case you were confused. the other one is a cat on the right. it was sent in by nathan james via twitter. iam not i am not sure what they cat's name is but honestly, there is... is it one of those ones where if you squint your eyes, you can see? i think you don't even need to, it is, it is there, it works. the longer you look at it... if it lingers up there for a while, it really does. shall we hold on that shot for a while? this is great tv, charlie! 0h, while? this is great tv, charlie! oh, come on! if ed sheeran is watching, by the way, i don't know what to say, really... get in touch and we can talk about it, if you like. and if you have more pictures,
8:15 am
send them in. doesn't have to be of ed sheeran. doesn't have to be an animal. we were expecting people rather than animals, but there you go! ed sheeran might be watching. i think he watches. he has been hit a few times. why wouldn't you? 8:15am. lovely pictures from around the uk. this is crosby, look at that sky! it is a stunning place, anyway. with the gormley statues on the beach. fabulous place to go for a walk. this is what it looks like outside our window. we are slightly winning in salford with that sky. there is the view across the key just outside our studio. what do you think about that, thomas schaaf and acker? definitely winning in salford. but other one was... nice, i guess. who other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got— other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? _ other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? there _ other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? there is - other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? there is a - other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? there is a bit - other one was... nice, i guess. who else has got that? there is a bit of. else has got that? there is a bit of ink in else has got that? there is a bit of pink in those... _ else has got that? there is a bit of pink in those... strata _ else has got that? there is a bit of pink in those... strata cumulus - pink in those... strata cumulus clouds. there _ pink in those... strata cumulus clouds. there you _ pink in those... strata cumulus clouds. there you go, - pink in those. .. strata cumulus clouds. there you go, i - pink in those... strata cumulus clouds. there you go, i knew i pink in those... strata cumulus l clouds. there you go, i knew you
8:16 am
would bring something to the table. what else have you got for us? i'v e i've got a warning of fog, something we have been having for a few days now. just keeps reforming at night. most of it will clear in the coming hours too bright if not sunny weather. it is brought by calm conditions —— to bright. this is dominating the weather across many parts of europe, notjust here in the uk. in the atlantic we have cloud gathering. these are weather systems and they will sneak in to pay us a bit of a visit tonight and into tomorrow, ringing a bit of rain but generally and settled weather the story. this is the fog and this is what it looked like earlier on. when it was much darker. 50—100 metres is still possible in the next couple of hours or so across these areas in here. also frosty but that
8:17 am
frost lifts. most of it disburses but we are in for a bright and sunny day and the best of the sunshine in the north—east of scotland and decent enough in the north of england. tropical in plymouth, 11 degrees! most of us less miles. tonight, that weather front moves in. a bit of rain tonight for northern ireland. for scotland and the north of england. milder air toppling around the area of high pressure, mild as spreading in but generally frost free tonight. more of a breeze and when weather fronts move through, they bring... the wind picks up. the fog doesn't form. it doesn't like to form into breezy weather. not much fog around tomorrow. fora weather. not much fog around tomorrow. for a time, weather. not much fog around tomorrow. fora time, it weather. not much fog around tomorrow. for a time, it might cloud over across yorkshire, may be the midlands, wales, they could be a bit of rain. it won't be a wash—out by any means, it will come and go and you will find that skies will brighten up and turned sunny. on the whole, even if there is a blip in the weather tomorrow, sunday still looking really good for most of us.
8:18 am
high pressure and one little weather front moving away. high pressure back on the scene on monday and into next week. we could stick around for quite some time. wind arrows blowing around and we are in the middle of that high. calm conditions and once again, monday night into tuesday we will start to see fog forming. you will start to see fog forming. you will probably find on your apps these will change to grey clouds, bright clouds, sunny clouds, basically means the same thing, calm and stable. bright or sunny weather. it is what it is. and stable. bright or sunny weather. n is what it is.— and stable. bright or sunny weather. it is what it is.— it is what it is. thanks, see you later on- _ if you've ever played a contact sport, you'll know how important a good mouthguard can be to protect your teeth. now they're being used to help safeguard another part of players' bodies — their brains. they're notjust any old mouthguards, though. these ones — which are being tested by leeds rhinos rugby league players — are fitted with technology to measure the impact of tackles
8:19 am
which may cause concussion. tanya arnold has more. rugby league is a collision sport. you can't change that. but these new mouthguards will gather data on what each player is experiencing. so, a normal gum shield will obviously be to protect the teeth. and these are... these have embedded technologies, so, batteries, and gyroscopes and because the teeth and the upperjaw is fixed to the skull, we can then look at how fast and how forceful the head is moving on impact. leeds is leading the study, testing out several different makes to determine which they feel performs the best. we are looking at how these mouthguards perform in a laboratory, so when we hit them with a pendulum, how they perform on the field, when a player gets tackled or doesn't get tackled. so, we're looking at the force, positive force or negative, so the accuracy of them. and then it's also really important to understand the players' fit, comfort and function,
8:20 am
because they have to wear them. they have to embrace the new technology. this is leeds rhinos academy player mackenzie turner being tackled while wearing one of the mouthguards. and this is the data from it. on our graph here, we can see the linear acceleration, which is measured as g—force. and that corresponds to the y axis, which is this direction, through your head. so, it's a negative peak, so, we know that the... the linear acceleration is to the left, so we know that you must have been hit to the right... right of his head. the collision was measured at a force of around 25g they haven't yet put a figure on when concussion occurs. sort of anywhere sort fo north of 706 is usually that's when we start to get a bit worried that there might be a concussion there. but, at the minute, we don't really know exactly where that figure is, that value is. it'sjust about monitoring it and trying to get an understanding from what players are going through. concussion in sport and its long—term effects have become a big issue but mackenzie admits it's not something he's currently thinking
8:21 am
about. i think, long term, yeah, . probably it's good to know. but, you know, when i'm playing and stuff, - i don't really think about that. i just think about playing and doing myjob. - it's a view echoed by england and leeds full—back caitlin beevers who's been playing the game since she was six but she's fascinated by how the information gathered can transform the game. i'm interested in anything factual, scientific, and the fact that we can look at our data and it can actually be brought back to training and how we can save us from hitting those type of impacts. rugby league hopes to roll out the preferred mouthguard to all levels of the game, later this year. it's early days in the study, but as more data is collected, so the understanding of what each player's brain is being put through in both matches and training, will grow. tanya arnold, bbc news, leeds.
8:22 am
fascinating facts from that report. professor ben jones is leading the study with leeds beckett university. hejoins us here in salford — and the leeds rhino winger tom briscoe is in leeds. good morning, tom, good to have you with us. shall we start with this study, a lot of it was explained in that report, some of the things that really struck me, firstly, just the noise of when you are slammed into on the pitch! some of the numbers, seven tg, that force. i was getting confused because you think of, like, sg, the confused because you think of, like, 5g, the force of taking off on the spaceship —— 7g. explain the physical impact it has. the important _ physical impact it has. the important part _ physical impact it has. the important part is - physical impact it has. the important part is we - physical impact it has. tie: important part is we monitor physical impact it has. tue: important part is we monitor the frequency as well as the magnitude. we are still learning about the magnitude of collisions. high magnitude of collisions. high magnitude of collisions. high magnitude of collisions, when you get into 70 g higher, it could be a concussive incidence but we are equally interested in the lower
8:23 am
magnitude that players are exposed to. ., , ., magnitude that players are exposed to. ., ,., , , ., magnitude that players are exposed to. ., , , ., ., to. there are some studies at tom, ou can to. there are some studies at tom, you can tell— to. there are some studies at tom, you can tell me _ to. there are some studies at tom, you can tell me this, _ to. there are some studies at tom, you can tell me this, some - to. there are some studies at tom, you can tell me this, some studies| you can tell me this, some studies suggest professional rugby players could be exposed to 11,000 contact events per season. tom, they are busy not all going to be at 70g but does that sound realistic? —— they are obviously not. is that your experience? it are obviously not. is that your exoerience?— are obviously not. is that your exerience? , , experience? it sounds scary if you ut it in experience? it sounds scary if you put it in numbers _ experience? it sounds scary if you put it in numbers like _ experience? it sounds scary if you put it in numbers like that. - experience? it sounds scary if you put it in numbers like that. i - experience? it sounds scary if you put it in numbers like that. i thinkj put it in numbers like that. i think them _ put it in numbers like that. i think them it_ put it in numbers like that. i think the... it kinda passes you by. you don't _ the... it kinda passes you by. you don't realise — the... it kinda passes you by. you don't realise how many contacts you might— don't realise how many contacts you might be _ don't realise how many contacts you might be involved in. and when you .et might be involved in. and when you get the _ might be involved in. and when you get the figures put in front of you, it's pretty— get the figures put in front of you, it's pretty scary, like i say. and want _ it's pretty scary, like i say. and want to— it's pretty scary, like i say. and want to probably consider for the future _ want to probably consider for the future. ., .., want to probably consider for the future. ., .. ., ,~' ., future. tom, can i ask, we are looking at— future. tom, can i ask, we are looking at some _ future. tom, can i ask, we are looking at some of _ future. tom, can i ask, we are looking at some of the - future. tom, can i ask, we are looking at some of the images future. tom, can i ask, we are i looking at some of the images as future. tom, can i ask, we are - looking at some of the images as you are talking, of some of the pets, these moments of collision. i think people grasp, sometimes —— of the hits. that could be supporters thinking great, that's a great tackle, or whatever. thinking great, that's a great tackle, orwhatever. but when thinking great, that's a great tackle, or whatever. but when you are hit like that, do you know instinctively, do alarm bells ring,
8:24 am
as you recoil from instinctively, do alarm bells ring, as you recoilfrom one instinctively, do alarm bells ring, as you recoil from one of those collisions, thinking, "i don't know what this is doing to me". fist collisions, thinking, "i don't know what this is doing to me".- what this is doing to me". at the moment in _ what this is doing to me". at the moment in time, _ what this is doing to me". at the moment in time, you _ what this is doing to me". at the moment in time, you are - what this is doing to me". at the l moment in time, you are properly what this is doing to me". at the - moment in time, you are properly not thinking _ moment in time, you are properly not thinking about that. lots of them look worse than how they feel —— you are not— look worse than how they feel —— you are not probably thinking. it is more. — are not probably thinking. it is more. like _ are not probably thinking. it is more, like i say, the physicality of what _ more, like i say, the physicality of what it is doing to your body without you even knowing. and i think— without you even knowing. and i think that's what's been great, to .et think that's what's been great, to get these — think that's what's been great, to get these mouth guards and to provide — get these mouth guards and to provide that information and data. i suppose _ provide that information and data. i suppose to — provide that information and data. i suppose to safeguard against anything like that in the future. tomi _ anything like that in the future. tom, when the data comes through, and it shows the impact it's having on you, i mean, you said, when i gave those numbers before, you just don't think about it and it sounds quite scary. do you think it's going to change the way the players approach the game and approach the physicality of the game?— physicality of the game? um... i think it will _ physicality of the game? um... i think it will change _ physicality of the game? um... i think it will change more - physicality of the game? um... i think it will change more the - think it will change more the training _ think it will change more the training and the day—to—day situation _
8:25 am
training and the day—to—day situation. i think in a game situation _ situation. i think in a game situation when you are live and everything's on the line, it's all or nothing. _ everything's on the line, it's all or nothing, isn't it, with the game? you've _ or nothing, isn't it, with the game? you've got— or nothing, isn't it, with the game? you've got to — or nothing, isn't it, with the game? you've got to put your body in the same _ you've got to put your body in the same positions, regardless of... of the data _ same positions, regardless of... of the data that's being collected. like i_ the data that's being collected. like i say, _ the data that's being collected. like i say, during the training days at the _ like i say, during the training days at the contact sessions that do have — at the contact sessions that do have it's _ at the contact sessions that do have, it's probably looking more at that as _ have, it's probably looking more at that as a _ have, it's probably looking more at that as a way to minimise the contacts _ that as a way to minimise the contacts— that as a way to minimise the contacts. ., , ., i. ., ., contacts. professor, do you want to ick u- contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on — contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on some — contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on some of— contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on some of this _ contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on some of this for - contacts. professor, do you want to pick up on some of this for us? - contacts. professor, do you want to | pick up on some of this for us? they sport themselves are now, some people say far too late taking it seriously, which is presumably part of why the reason you are doing it. they've changed the rules, haven't they, so that direct contact with they, so that direct contact with the head is outside of the rules? you can get penalised for it. so, what more can be done in a contact sport to protect the players? notwithstanding more information is good, but there is a principle here, which is at some point you're going to have one person slamming into another. they've already outlawed
8:26 am
hitting directly certain parts that are most worrying in connection to concussion but what can be done? t concussion but what can be done? i think the important part is to understand the mode that players are exposed to and in areas that we don't understand. i think we shouldn't forget that rugby league is a physical contact sport. it's also skilful. a good tackle is a dominant tackle, where the tackle is in control, they place their head in a safe position, and they look after the ball carrier. an accidental head collision is poor tackle technique. it is not deliberate. therefore, it is notjust about it is not deliberate. therefore, it is not just about two it is not deliberate. therefore, it is notjust about two players running into each other, we've got to recognise the skill component. we've got to understand, from a game perspective, what is a safe and effective tackle, which is being in control of the ball carrier, and dominantly but also safely. and also looking at how we can support coaches and clubs to actually train that tackle safely. it would be naive to say "don't do any tackle
8:27 am
training in the week, because there is a risk you might bang your head" and put them on a pitch for 80 minutes in front of crowds and expect them to do that safely. {line expect them to do that safely. one ofthe expect them to do that safely. one of the points _ expect them to do that safely. one of the points you _ expect them to do that safely. one of the points you make and tom, you can pick up on this for us, just how often you are required not only on a match day but in training, to go through these rituals. there is evidence from elsewhere, including america, around the number of concussions that happen in training. i think they said it is some 20% of all concussions take place in training. presumably, you are required on a wednesday, on a thursday, to do that work? that in itself is a risk.— itself is a risk. potentially, like ou sa . itself is a risk. potentially, like you say- 20% _ itself is a risk. potentially, like you say- 20% of— itself is a risk. potentially, like you say. 20% of the _ itself is a risk. potentially, like. you say. 20% of the concussions happening — you say. 20% of the concussions happening in training. for us personally at leeds, i think we do two wrestle sessions where there is an increased amount of contact during — an increased amount of contact during them sessions. but then, yeah. _ during them sessions. but then, yeah. it's — during them sessions. but then, yeah, it's daily. we obviously trade with people that like ben said, it is about—
8:28 am
with people that like ben said, it is about a — with people that like ben said, it is about a skill component, you've .ot is about a skill component, you've got to— is about a skill component, you've got to train— is about a skill component, you've got to train that. there is potential for collisions and contact and that— potential for collisions and contact and that is — potential for collisions and contact and that is what ben is trying to .et and that is what ben is trying to get out — and that is what ben is trying to get out. that you just don't know how many— get out. that you just don't know how many contacts or where the most amount— how many contacts or where the most amount of— how many contacts or where the most amount of contact is going to be. obviously. — amount of contact is going to be. obviously, during games will be the highest _ obviously, during games will be the highest numbers because that is when you are _ highest numbers because that is when you are being 100%. but it is about the amount— you are being 100%. but it is about the amount of little contacts and knowing — the amount of little contacts and knowing whether that's doing any lasting _ knowing whether that's doing any lasting damage, as well. when knowing whether that's doing any lasting damage, as well.- knowing whether that's doing any lasting damage, as well. when is the data due? we _ lasting damage, as well. when is the data due? we finished _ lasting damage, as well. when is the data due? we finished the _ lasting damage, as well. when is the data due? we finished the study - lasting damage, as well. when is the data due? we finished the study at i data due? we finished the study at the moment _ data due? we finished the study at the moment that _ data due? we finished the study at the moment that will _ data due? we finished the study at the moment that will be _ data due? we finished the study at the moment that will be published | data due? we finished the study at l the moment that will be published in the moment that will be published in the next few weeks.— the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. the next few weeks. tom, a quick word- when _ the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. when you _ the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. when you are _ the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. when you are on _ the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. when you are on the - the next few weeks. tom, a quick word. when you are on the pitch i the next few weeks. tom, a quick i word. when you are on the pitch now or in training, if someone is careless, is it called out much more often, now? and is it much more to boo to be careless? and the excuse of, "it is the passion of the game, we want to win, we want to win for the team. has the attitude changed? —— it is much more taboo. yes.
8:29 am
the team. has the attitude changed? -- it is much more taboo.— -- it is much more taboo. yes. you don't see — -- it is much more taboo. yes. you don't see many _ -- it is much more taboo. yes. you don't see many players _ -- it is much more taboo. yes. you don't see many players taken - -- it is much more taboo. yes. you don't see many players taken off i -- it is much more taboo. yes. you | don't see many players taken off the ball getting knocked out in those situations. and in training it is kind _ situations. and in training it is kind of— situations. and in training it is kind of less apparent during training _ kind of less apparent during training. it was never a big thing, people _ training. it was never a big thing, people being concussed in training, from nry— people being concussed in training, from my personal experiences. there's— from my personal experiences. there's been very few in the contact areas _ there's been very few in the contact areas. having done 15 seasons, now. i might— areas. having done 15 seasons, now. i might have — areas. having done 15 seasons, now. i might have seen about one or two in training — i might have seen about one or two intraining i— i might have seen about one or two in training. i think in training it is pretty— in training. i think in training it is pretty minimal, anyway. but i think— is pretty minimal, anyway. but i think the — is pretty minimal, anyway. but i think the big ones have been in games. — think the big ones have been in games, like you say, with the rule changes— games, like you say, with the rule changes and the strictness of how they are _ changes and the strictness of how they are policing up.— changes and the strictness of how they are policing up. tom, good to talk to you- _ they are policing up. tom, good to talk to you. tom _ they are policing up. tom, good to talk to you. tom briscoe _ they are policing up. tom, good to talk to you. tom briscoe with i they are policing up. tom, good to| talk to you. tom briscoe with leeds rhinos. stay safe and good luck with the training and the matches. and professor ben james from leeds the training and the matches. and professor benjames from leeds back at university, good to see you.
8:30 am
thank you. it is 8:29am. more sport and news coming up injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time now is 8:30am. the coastguard is celebrating a major anniversary today. it was founded exactly 200 years ago. luxmy gopal can tell us more. she's on crosby beach. you have got in the water. stay safe, but you are going to be telling us what's going on there. tt
8:31 am
i do get into trouble here in the water, i am i do get into trouble here in the water, iam in i do get into trouble here in the water, i am in the best place for it because i'm surrounded by members of the coast guard crew. good morning from crosby beach on the merseyside coastline. you might be able to see behind me in the distance some figures, the famous antony gormley statues, and in the foreground a couple of other figures, someone who looks like they are in distress but don't worry because that is part of a demonstration we will be showing you in a moment to illustrate some of the fundamental skills the coast guard uses in its mission to help save people's lives in search and rescue to keep people safe at sea and at the coast. today it is of course the 200th anniversary of the organisation, and there are going to be various things to celebrate and mark that today including in the seas around the four nations. coastguards later will be casting throw lines as a symbolic gesture to represent the past and present role
8:32 am
of the coastguard. here is a little look now at the service and its history. search and rescue. for 200 years, the coastguard has been searching, rescuing and saving lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people who've really been at a really low point, and just make that situation at the time a little bit better for them to bear, and then long—term it means somebody goes home who maybe wouldn't have done. originally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty's coastguard was formally established on the 15th of january, 1822. newsreel: there's a certain amount i of mystery about the coastguard - l who he is and what he does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at sea ever since. this is coastguard control. as illustrated in this video from 1972. ahoy there, coastguard here! we'll be down with you in a few minutes. hang on! when we started, it was horseback patrols, looking for smugglers
8:33 am
and people like that. that's where the coast and the guard bit comes from. it's changed hugely. we still rely massively on our volunteers, as we have done for almost the entirety of the 200—year history of the organisation. the coastguard now has 3,500 volunteers across 310 rescue teams, in addition to ten helicopter bases. the way the coastguard saves lives at sea has changed almost beyond recognition since its creation 200 years ago, with a new updated radio network and with new technology such as drones and unmanned vehicles playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new technology, you've got to look to improve. you can't sit still and think, "we're doing the best we can." there's always improvements to be made, so we have to look at technology. so we're looking at fibre communications, improving ourfleet to bring in electric vehicles, drone technology and how that can assist in searches,
8:34 am
and speed up finding people that are in difficulty. so really, we've just got to be open to change and embrace it and look to improve at any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone birthday, 200 throw lines are being cast into the seas around the four nations today, as a symbol of the coastguard's life—saving role, past and present, on our shores and at sea. luxmy gopal, bbc news. the tide has been coming in really quickly this morning and it won't be long before our cameraman is underwater so we had better crack on. callum nicholl is the area commanderjoining us now. if you could start first of all by talking us through the demonstration we have behind us, just to give a little display as to what is a basic life—saving skills the coast guard does. life-saving skills the coast guard does. ~ ., , ., life-saving skills the coast guard does. . ., , ., ., life-saving skills the coast guard does. ., ., ., , does. we have gary and our casualty disla int does. we have gary and our casualty displaying a — does. we have gary and our casualty displaying a very _ does. we have gary and our casualty displaying a very low— does. we have gary and our casualty displaying a very low impact... i displaying a very low impact... sorry, low—tech but high impact rescue technique that we will use.
8:35 am
the throw lines being used to pull our casualty back to shore gives a really effective way of rescuing somebody in difficulty. bud really effective way of rescuing somebody in difficulty. and the role ofthe somebody in difficulty. and the role of the coastguard _ somebody in difficulty. and the role of the coastguard has _ somebody in difficulty. and the role of the coastguard has changed i somebody in difficulty. and the role of the coastguard has changed and l of the coastguard has changed and expanded over the years because it is notjust... i say notjust but thatis is notjust... i say notjust but that is beyond saving people's lives, it is involvement in national emergencies and in international waters. tell me about the role. hate waters. tell me about the role. we have a waters. tell me about the role. - have a number of operation rooms around the country that do the monitoring of distress and emergency calls, they will take 999 calls from members of the public, but also as you say internationally at sea, emergency beacons which are monitored, passing out maritime safety information to the ships you can see behind us as well. and from that, we have grown as a rescue service, with mud rescue, rope
8:36 am
rescue and water capabilities. ihtnd rescue and water capabilities. and how does it _ rescue and water capabilities. and how does it feel being part of an organisation that is into two centuries of existence? that organisation that is into two centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal _ centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal agency _ centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal agency to - centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal agency to be i centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal agency to be a i centuries of existence? that is a phenomenal agency to be a part| centuries of existence? that is a i phenomenal agency to be a part of, and the service, the way it has grown has been an incredible experience, even in the time i have beenin experience, even in the time i have been in them which is a tenth of that at the moment. tell]! been in them which is a tenth of that at the moment.— been in them which is a tenth of that at the moment. tell us briefly about this symbolic _ that at the moment. tell us briefly about this symbolic casting - that at the moment. tell us briefly about this symbolic casting of i that at the moment. tell us briefly about this symbolic casting of the l about this symbolic casting of the throw lines happening later this morning. throw lines happening later this mornint. �* ., , throw lines happening later this mornint. �* .. , ., morning. around the country, of the teams we have. _ morning. around the country, of the teams we have, around _ morning. around the country, of the teams we have, around 350 - morning. around the country, of the teams we have, around 350 teams, | morning. around the country, of the i teams we have, around 350 teams, we have 200 that will be throwing throw lines. as i say, low—tech, high—impact technique that really symbolises the very basics of what we do as a service.— we do as a service. absolutely. thank you. _ we do as a service. absolutely. thank you, and _ we do as a service. absolutely. thank you, and we _ we do as a service. absolutely. thank you, and we had - we do as a service. absolutely. thank you, and we had better. we do as a service. absolutely. i thank you, and we had better get you to dry land thank you, and we had better get you to dry [and very soon. there will be that casting of the throw lines happening in the seas around the uk at 11 o'clock this morning as a symbol of the life—saving service
8:37 am
that the coastguard has been providing for the past 200 years. looks —— luxmy, thank you very much. let's return now to the ongoing saga of the world number one men's tennis player novak djokovic, who is fighting a deportation order from australia. this is his car arriving because he has been detained once again, arriving in the detention hotel where he will be for the next 2a hours or so. the security there is pretty tight, you can see a few protesters as well. he is awaiting a final court hearing that will take place tomorrow to determine whether he can stay. if he can stay, he can compete in the australian open which starts on monday. the hearing takes place tonight.
8:38 am
joining us now is the former australian foreign minister, alexander downer. good to have you with us, where are you out on this? i'm looking at some of the comments you have made in the last couple of days. what is your opinion of how novak djokovic and his team have approached entering australia to approach in —— to compete in the australian open? hate]!!! compete in the australian open? well the have compete in the australian open? well they have made _ compete in the australian open? -tt they have made a meal of it. last year novak djokovic was consistent with the rules, able to play in the australian open and won it. this year he is still unvaccinated and has decided to circumvent the rules ljy has decided to circumvent the rules by not doing the quarantine and wanting an exemption from the quarantine. he doesn't qualify for an exemption from the quarantine so he has been challenging that over and over again.— and over again. could i pick up on that? i and over again. could i pick up on that? i thought _ and over again. could i pick up on that? i thought one _ and over again. could i pick up on that? i thought one of— and over again. could i pick up on
8:39 am
that? i thought one of the - and over again. could i pick up on that? i thought one of the rules l that? i thought one of the rules was... if you had had covid in a recent period of time, which is what was put on his form, that you would be exempt because of antibodies etc? that doesn't grant you an exemption from quarantine and the australian government told... in the form of the health minister, wrote to tennis australia last year telling them that would not generate an exemption. so how the tennis australia or djokovic's team came to the conclusion it would give them an exemption, nobody knows. but the conclusion it would give them an exemption, nobody knows.— exemption, nobody knows. but then there is more _ exemption, nobody knows. but then there is more confusion, _ exemption, nobody knows. but then there is more confusion, because i there is more confusion, because when the court overturned his first detention, that was because of the procedures that had been deployed when he was detained, not because he hadn't fulfilled the exemption. yes.
8:40 am
hadn't fulfilled the exemption. yes, exactl . hadn't fulfilled the exemption. yes, exactly- he — hadn't fulfilled the exemption. yes, exactly- he was _ hadn't fulfilled the exemption. yes, exactly. he was released _ hadn't fulfilled the exemption. me: exactly. he was released because the border force people hadn't accorded him naturaljustice. when you look at the case, the border force people didn't accord him naturaljustice so thejudge was right didn't accord him naturaljustice so the judge was right to release didn't accord him naturaljustice so thejudge was right to release him from detention, but that didn't solve this problem with the visa because in the end he still hadn't accorded with the rules. i'm sorry to say this, whether we like the rules are not, and i think the australian rules have often been quite draconian, but they apply to everyone, notjust some people. if you are a great tennis player, that doesn't mean you can serve them bent —— you can circumvent the rules ordinary people abide by. it is not reasonable. lt ordinary people abide by. it is not reasonable-— ordinary people abide by. it is not reasonable. . . reasonable. it is interesting, there are a lot of — reasonable. it is interesting, there are a lot of divided _ reasonable. it is interesting, there are a lot of divided opinions - reasonable. it is interesting, there are a lot of divided opinions about| are a lot of divided opinions about novak djokovic personally and we will leave them to the side because they don't matter. the words of the
8:41 am
firstjudge, when it was first overturned, were to the australian authorities, "what more could this man have done?" he laid it down pretty clearly that the responsibility lay with the australian government and those people who followed in your footsteps who are running the operation now, they have messed up massively no matter what you think of the situation. they could have stopped... why was he ever allowed to enter australia? the australian government somehow didn't know he was going to be playing in the australian open and didn't check that he had the requisite forms and had done things correctly? why wasn't that done before he even tried to come?— wasn't that done before he even tried to come? there are thousands of --eole tried to come? there are thousands of people who _ tried to come? there are thousands of people who want _ tried to come? there are thousands of people who want to _ tried to come? there are thousands of people who want to come - tried to come? there are thousands of people who want to come to i of people who want to come to australia... of people who want to come to australia. . .— of people who want to come to australia... but he did come to australia- _ australia... but he did come to australia. none _ australia. .. but he did come to australia. none of— australia... but he did come to australia. none of them - australia... but he did come to australia. none of them are i australia... but he did come to i australia. none of them are accorded secial australia. none of them are accorded special privileges _ australia. none of them are accorded special privileges but _ australia. none of them are accorded special privileges but they _ australia. none of them are accorded special privileges but they are - australia. none of them are accorded special privileges but they are told i special privileges but they are told if they come to australia they have to be vaccinated. in certain
8:42 am
circumstances, if they are not vaccinated, they have to go into quarantine for two weeks. so the fact he could come to australia wasn't the problem, the problem was that he refused to go into quarantine for two weeks. he wanted an exemption from the quarantine. so he got to australia, that is ok, but it is then time for him to go into quarantine. that is when he wanted the exemption. quarantine. that is when he wanted the exemption-— the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion _ the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion over _ the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion over this _ the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion over this because i the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion over this because as l the exemption. there is quite a bit of confusion over this because as i | of confusion over this because as i understand it, and you seem to be saying something slightly different, the reason he and his team said they had an official form agreeing his medical exemption allowed him to enter australia is because he did have that form.— have that form. there is no confusion _ have that form. there is no confusion on _ have that form. there is no confusion on the _ have that form. there is no confusion on the part i have that form. there is no confusion on the part of. have that form. there is no | confusion on the part of the australian government because the australian government because the australian government because the australian government decides who comes to australia just as the british government decides who comes
8:43 am
into britain. that form was not from the australian government, it was from tennis australia. tennis australia isn't the authorising authority obviously that runs the borders, and the fact is tennis australia had been told at the end of november that the fact he has had or said to have had covid doesn't exempt him from quarantine. i mean this is all caused by the fact that novak djokovic refuses to get vaccinated when just about everybody else get vaccinated, and having done that, the australian government would still let him in provided he did the two weeks quarantine, refuses to do that as well. i mean, how privileged is this guy? what privilege should we accord to him that we don't accord to somebody with a dying father? l
8:44 am
that we don't accord to somebody with a dying father?— that we don't accord to somebody with a dying father? i know you said it is the australian _ with a dying father? i know you said it is the australian government i with a dying father? i know you said it is the australian government who | it is the australian government who decides who comes to australia, but it isn't, it will be a cart, it will be a judge and it may be that that still happens because it may go either way. still happens because it may go eitherway. if still happens because it may go either way. if that were to go in his favour and he were allowed to stay in australia and play as the world number one, the number one seedin world number one, the number one seed in a massive sporting event in australia, just cast your eye over that prospect because it could happen. that prospect because it could ha en. .., that prospect because it could hat-en. , ., �* that prospect because it could haen. , ., �* .." happen. ok, so the courts don't make the law, happen. ok, so the courts don't make the law. they — happen. ok, so the courts don't make the law, they interpret _ happen. ok, so the courts don't make the law, they interpret and _ the law, they interpret and administer the law, that is the job of the court so we will see what the judge decides but we would assume thejudge will uphold the judge decides but we would assume the judge will uphold the decision of the australian government, but they might not. there might be again some technical reason why he doesn't, in which case djokovic could play in the australian open. what would the reaction be? most people in australia think it is bloody unfair because they think
8:45 am
first of all djokovic should have been vaccinated. ok, so he has some objection to vaccination, he should have gone into quarantine. he won't do that either. what sort of privilege does this guy want? lt is privilege does this guy want? it is interestin: privilege does this guy want? it is interesting you say a lot of people are upset, there is also a hell of a lot of people who want him to play. we have seen pictures of protests outside the rod laver arena supporting novak djokovic, they want to see him play and compete. there's also the fact that if you look at the situation in australia at this moment in time, there is a lot of pressure on the government in terms of lack of testing kits, daily death rates, and this could be a welcome distraction. l rates, and this could be a welcome distraction-— distraction. i don't think they would look — distraction. i don't think they would look at _ distraction. i don't think they would look at it _ distraction. i don't think they would look at it like - distraction. i don't think they would look at it like that. it's just everybody is struggling with the covid issue, australia is no different and australia has been very draconian in the way they have dealt with it. i suppose the australian government makes the
8:46 am
point that proportionally it has had many fewer deaths from covid than for example the uk or european countries and the united states, and they have a story to tell but of course it has not been perfect as it hasn't anywhere. it is not a distraction just to uphold the law. this is the thing, of course there are people of serbian origin or whatever, and i can understand all of those things, but the law is not made just on the basis of or administered on the basis of emotion. law has to be strictly adhered to and there isn't one law for a tennis star and another for ordinary people, not in australia and by the way not in the uk, not since the magna carta. it is worth remembering that.— since the magna carta. it is worth remembering that. alexander downer, ou tot u- remembering that. alexander downer, you got up this — remembering that. alexander downer, you got up this morning _ remembering that. alexander downer, you got up this morning to _ remembering that. alexander downer, you got up this morning to talk - remembering that. alexander downer, you got up this morning to talk to i you got up this morning to talk to us on bbc breakfast, thank you for
8:47 am
your time with us. take care. mike isjoining us on the sofa now, you probably heard that. yes. mike is joining us on the sofa now, you probably heard that.— you probably heard that. yes, it is very interesting. _ you probably heard that. yes, it is very interesting. there _ you probably heard that. yes, it is very interesting. there will- you probably heard that. yes, it is very interesting. there will be i very interesting. there will be three judges, very interesting. there will be threejudges, not one very interesting. there will be three judges, not one this time, in the appeal hearing. other tennis players have had their comments. rafael nadal has said the show goes on with or without novak djokovic, it will still be great. rafael nadal has said no player in the history of the tournament is more important than the tournament itself, and also says on a personal note, "i really respect novak djokovic but i don't agree with a lot that has happened in the last couple of weeks." salsa in the last couple of weeks." also there will be _ in the last couple of weeks." also there will be objection from a lot of players that this is distracting and the focus should be on their brilliance and hard work. lt and the focus should be on their brilliance and hard work.- brilliance and hard work. it will have an effect _ brilliance and hard work. it will have an effect on _ brilliance and hard work. it will have an effect on the - brilliance and hard work. it will have an effect on the top i brilliance and hard work. it will have an effect on the top of i brilliance and hard work. it will| have an effect on the top of the order in terms of the matches and the schedule. talking of preparation, one player, let's not
8:48 am
let this player under the radar who's had a really good build—up, andy murray. l’m who's had a really good build-up, andy murray-— andy murray. i'm liking this icture. andy murray. i'm liking this picture- the _ andy murray. i'm liking this picture. the murray - andy murray. i'm liking this picture. the murray roar. it| andy murray. i'm liking this l picture. the murray roar. it is back! it's andy murray's first final on the atp tour since 2019, and a win would push him back into the world's top one hundred. he's up against the russian top seed aslan karatsev in the sydney classic, he's been playing like he's 25, not 31t, moving so freely with his metal hip. they are due on court shortly so we will be keeping an eye on that one. also keeping an eye on cricket... england's batters are up against it once again in the final ashes test after that brilliant start in hobart yesterday. they let australia off the hook, earlier bowler nathan lyon taking them past the 300 mark. england's reply was just ten
8:49 am
balls old when rory burns was run out for a duck on his recall to the side — opening partner zak crawley creating some indecision. you can't do that! australia captain pat cummins has taken three wickets so far — most importantly that of his counterpartjoe root, who went lbw for 34. england were five down with just 88 runs on the board, when ben stokes was caught for four. they've since lost ollie pope. they are recovering over tea perhaps, maybe a couple more will help. england now 124—6. it was another late, late show for brighton in their premier league game against fierce rivals crystal palace. palace had gone ahead through connor gallagher, but there's been a 90th minute goal in the last three encounters between these two sides and this time it was an own goal that meant the match finished 1—1. we're waiting to hear whether tomorrow's north london derby will go ahead after arsenal asked for the match at tottenham to be postponed. arsenal say they don't
8:50 am
have enough players due to covid, injuries, and players away at the africa cup of nations. the premier league board will consider the request today. there have been 20 premier league games postponed this season already season because of covid. one match that is definately on this lunchtime ss the clash of the titans — manchester city against chelsea. already there's been a difference of opinion between the two managers. chelsea are ten points behind city, and pep guardiola took exception to thomas tuchel�*s suggestion that city have been lucky not to have been as heavily impacted by covid as other teams. the biggest difference so far in the season, as i am concerned, is that they dealt better with injuries, and they dealt better with the covid situation. maybe it's unlucky, maybe they do it better or whatever, but they have less injuries from key players, less days out, less weeks where they miss them. they were — they did not suffer from covid as we did.
8:51 am
are you saying that here _ in manchester we are the smartest, that covid, that omicron doesn't like to come here to visit us? i we had a lot of cases and a lot of injuries. i so in the last four, - five, six or seven games, there are four or five players i from the academy on the bench. we are in the same situation as all other clubs. _ england fly—half marcus smith kicked a last—gasp penalty to give harlequins a dramatic victory over cardiff in rugby union's european champions cup. he'd already inspired a quins' fightback and the scores were level at 33—all in added time when smith struck... that was the last action of the game — it made it 36—33 and secured their place in the last 16. they're top of their pool above munster, who won at castres. a brilliant game. drama on a friday night. sporting classic. thank you. nine minutes to
8:52 am
nine, good morning. jamaican athletes have [it up many summer olympics but — for obvious reasons — the caribbean island does not feature heavily in the winter games. benjamin alexander is hoping to change that. he's about to become jamaica's first ever representative in downhill skiing at the winter olympics, which start in beijing next month. let's take a look at him in action. upbeat rock music plays
8:53 am
that is what you need on a saturday morning. good music, brilliant scheme. —— brilliant skiing. benjaminjoins us now from zurich in switzerland, and we can also say hello to dudley stokes, who was part of jamaica's bobsleigh team for the 1988 winter games, which inspired the film cool runnings. a story that so many people will be familiar with. a story that so many people will be familiarwith. good a story that so many people will be familiar with. good morning to you.
8:54 am
benjamin, first of all, amazing pictures on the slopes there and it is been one of the first times i have been genuinely enthused about the winter olympics coming up which you will be involved in. that the winter olympics coming up which you will be involved in.— you will be involved in. that is what it is _ you will be involved in. that is what it is all _ you will be involved in. that is what it is all about, _ you will be involved in. that is what it is all about, inspiring l you will be involved in. that is i what it is all about, inspiring more people to take up the sport of skiing. i'm happy you feel that way. it is a dangerous business, skiing. you started when you are 32, which is quite late to start skiing. yes. is quite late to start skiing. yes, all of my competitors _ is quite late to start skiing. is: all of my competitors probably started at the age of two and probably started race training from the age of 506. my six year anniversary of skiing welkom op next month right after the winter olympics, and i was 32 years old when i started in 2016. lhla when i started in 2016. no disrespect. _ when i started in 2016. no disrespect, but ijust want to disrespect, but i just want to check, you are presumably the best skier injamaica. how does it work with qualifying times? do you have to be as good as everybody else or
8:55 am
because you are the best injamaica does that mean you get a place in the olympics?— does that mean you get a place in the olympics? yes, so i'm the best reaistered the olympics? yes, so i'm the best registered jamaican _ the olympics? yes, so i'm the best registered jamaican skier _ the olympics? yes, so i'm the best registered jamaican skier in - the olympics? yes, so i'm the best registered jamaican skier in the i registered jamaican skier in the database. the international olympic committee wants there to be diversity, wants as many nations as possible to be represented in as many disciplines as possible so they set about mb criteria athlete which is someone who demonstrates a level of professionalism and someone who will be safe in the sport. for clarity, i'm not competing with the guys that have been doing this for 25 years and have millions of euros put into their athletic ability and their training. this is about participation and the olympics is always about the pinnacle of any sport and the human interest side of things, and i really hope i will inspire more jamaicans to get on skis and eventually get somewhere with the sport for our country. lstalheh with the sport for our country. when ou talk with the sport for our country. when you talk about _ with the sport for our country. when you talk about human _ with the sport for our country. when you talk about human interest i with the sport for our country. when you talk about human interest and passion for the sport, and you have
8:56 am
someone like charlie saying he is for the first time enthused about the winter olympics, who better to get on board to get that message out than dudley stokes? good morning to you. pick up the story of how you got in touch with benjamin and you are on board this project. yes. got in touch with benjamin and you are on board this project.— are on board this pro'ect. yes, as someone are on board this pro'ect. yes, as soeonem who h are on board this project. yes, as someone who almost _ are on board this project. yes, as someone who almost died - are on board this project. yes, as someone who almost died in i are on board this project. yes, as| someone who almost died in front are on board this project. yes, as i someone who almost died in front of a million _ someone who almost died in front of a million eyeballs... she someone who almost died in front of a million eyeballs. . .— someone who almost died in front of a million eyeballs..._ i l a million eyeballs... she laughs. i identify with — a million eyeballs... she laughs. i identify with everything _ a million eyeballs... she laughs. i identify with everything benjamin . identify with everything benjamin has said — identify with everything benjamin has said. we have never met face—to—face and one day hopefully we will. _ face—to—face and one day hopefully we will, but benjamin reached out to me on— we will, but benjamin reached out to me on social— we will, but benjamin reached out to me on social media and really hounded _ me on social media and really hounded me. and kept at it until i paid him _ hounded me. and kept at it until i paid him some attention. i discovered what he was doing was unorthodox. it was really well—planned, well—thought—out, and well— planned, well—thought—out, and he was _
8:57 am
well— planned, well—thought—out, and he was a _ well—planned, well—thought—out, and he was a high functioning individuals, and so i decided to get on-board _ individuals, and so i decided to get on—board with him, to work with him and to— on—board with him, to work with him and to try— on—board with him, to work with him and to try help him as best i could with the _ and to try help him as best i could with the experience he had. he had been _ with the experience he had. he had been inspired in his youth by adventures, no but it has been great for me _ adventures, no but it has been great for me just _ adventures, no but it has been great for me just listening to him, watching _ for me just listening to him, watching him progress over the years — watching him progress over the years. and congratulations to him now at— years. and congratulations to him now at this — years. and congratulations to him now at this point, well done. what nu tets now at this point, well done. what nu nets of now at this point, well done. what nuggets of wisdom _ now at this point, well done. what nuggets of wisdom from _ now at this point, well done. “iii"isglt nuggets of wisdom from your experience have you been giving him? you know, just kind of enjoy the experience. you know, just kind of en'oy the exponenoefi you know, just kind of en'oy the experience— you know, just kind of en'oy the xpenencefi you know, just kind of en'oy the exerience. ., ., �* . experience. no, don't crash in the ol mic experience. no, don't crash in the olympic games. _ experience. no, don't crash in the olympic games, that _ experience. no, don't crash in the olympic games, that was - experience. no, don't crash in the olympic games, that was my i experience. no, don't crash in the | olympic games, that was my first! experience. no, don't crash in the i olympic games, that was my first! it is not _ olympic games, that was my first! it is not all— olympic games, that was my first! it is not all it— olympic games, that was my first! it is not all it is— olympic games, that was my first! it is not all it is cracked up to be. as you — is not all it is cracked up to be. as you are _ is not all it is cracked up to be. as you are talking, we are showing it, dudley, because we have got to. the thing is you have to respect
8:58 am
this sport — the thing is you have to respect this sport. you have to get to a level— this sport. you have to get to a level of— this sport. you have to get to a level of competence. you have to put out your— level of competence. you have to put out your best effort respecting yourself. — out your best effort respecting yourself, and the other athletes who are competing, and then it is a tough — are competing, and then it is a tough journey are competing, and then it is a toughjourney any time are competing, and then it is a tough journey any time but especially in this pandemic the last two years. — especially in this pandemic the last two years, and trying to qualify has been _ two years, and trying to qualify has been quite — two years, and trying to qualify has been quite an adventure all over the globe _ been quite an adventure all over the globe actually. and it has been fun for me _ globe actually. and it has been fun for me really to watch. as globe actually. and it has been fun for me really to watch.— globe actually. and it has been fun for me really to watch. as you were finishin: for me really to watch. as you were finishing your _ for me really to watch. as you were finishing your comments, _ for me really to watch. as you were finishing your comments, we i for me really to watch. as you were finishing your comments, we are i for me really to watch. as you were | finishing your comments, we are all slightly had our heads in our hands because we saw that crash of yours broadcasting and thinking, what must that have been like? oh boy! its that have been like? oh boy! its like a lot of stuff, 2000 feet and one lifetime. it was an experience,
8:59 am
you shouldn't have too many like that in _ you shouldn't have too many like that in your — you shouldn't have too many like that in your life but i encourage everybody to get somewhere near to that experience at least once. it that experience at least once. thought for you. i'm going to have to say eddie the eagle to you because that is part of our love of the winter olympics in the uk that he went out there and did their thing. i don't know how you feel about that because we love that. he went out and did itjust like you are, maybe not as good as the others. dangerous sport. you know the story. others. dangerous sport. you know thesto , , the story. absolutely. i prefer the comparisons _ the story. absolutely. i prefer the comparisons to _ the story. absolutely. i prefer the comparisons to cool _ the story. absolutely. i prefer the comparisons to cool runnings, i the story. absolutely. i prefer the | comparisons to cool runnings, but this is part of the olympics. interesting people that come up with crazy ideas and throw everything at it, as dudley said, fighting against the qualification criteria over these last two years, particularly during the pandemic has been incredibly complicated and draining,
9:00 am
and ifeel so relieved to have gotten over the finishing line. if you want to compare me to eddie, i'm happy. you want to compare me to eddie, i'm ha - . �* you want to compare me to eddie, i'm ha . _ �* ., ., you want to compare me to eddie, i'm ha.�* ., you want to compare me to eddie, i'm happy. i'm going to compare you to 'ust happy. i'm going to compare you to just somebody _ happy. i'm going to compare you to just somebody who _ happy. i'm going to compare you to just somebody who is _ happy. i'm going to compare you to just somebody who is brilliant, - happy. i'm going to compare you to just somebody who is brilliant, who has done it later in life, you are obviously of a standard that is excellent, and you have an adventure coming up. so good luck, enjoy it obviously. you have some of the best people on board with dudley. dudley, thank you so much for the memories and laughter and shock. obviously we physically recoiled when we saw that crash again. it doesn't lose its impact. benjamin, none of that for you, just good times ahead. thank you. thank you. it is 8:29am. more sport and news coming up injust a moment. what an interesting story. we will watch out for benjamin. headlines are coming up. see you shortly.
9:01 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "wine time friday's". more details emerge about lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being bombarded with emails from angry constituents. detained again. novak djokovic waits to hear whether his latest appeal against deportation from australia is succesful. it is happy 200th birthday to her majesty's coastguard. the to her majesty's coastguard. life—saving service rel hugely the life—saving service relies hugely on volunteers like these guys. have more from them later. another batting collapse from
9:02 am
england in the ashes. a sixth wicket of ottie _ england in the ashes. a sixth wicket of ollie pope with just 124 england in the ashes. a sixth wicket of ollie pope withjust124 runs england in the ashes. a sixth wicket of ollie pope with just 124 runs on the board — and it's a frosty and foggy start to saturday for many of us. - the good news is, it. should be a bright day. good morning. it's saturday the 15th of january. there are more allegations of parties in downing street during the pandemic, with newspaper reports detailing how staff at number ten held regular drinks on friday evenings while restrictions were in force. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral. some conservative mps have told bbc news they've been inundated with emails from angry constituents. here's our political correspondent, lone wells. it is the expectation that more and more will come out. the fear of one brexiteer tory mp, who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors
9:03 am
during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast." another said their email inbox was "horrendous." one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election. "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week that he attended drinks in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don't think it's acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties. on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's funeral, leading foreign secretary
9:04 am
liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue grey has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this inquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster that the police should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act. causing widespread public outrage, because the primary objective of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. lone wells, bbc news.
9:05 am
our political correspondent, nick eardley, joins us now. good morning. often after a difficult week and we can safely say that, conservative mps in this case go back to their constituencies, don't they, and ask questions? and they test the waters a bit and maybe speak to the cameras. what are you hearing from your calls and those who have spoken to? that hearing from your calls and those who have spoken to?— hearing from your calls and those who have spoken to? that it's not nood, who have spoken to? that it's not good. charlie. _ who have spoken to? that it's not good, charlie, is— who have spoken to? that it's not good, charlie, is the _ who have spoken to? that it's not good, charlie, is the simple - who have spoken to? that it's not i good, charlie, is the simple answer. one former cabinet minister was saying, late last night, that the story we were covering yesterday about that party being held at the same... the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral, that that had gone down badly and made the situation worse. the reception being terrible. there are some brexiteers, natural allies of borisjohnson, the ones who would have been banging the drum for him a couple of years ago, they are saying too that they are getting a lot of complaints about what's gone on. one told me last
9:06 am
night that they think it's now a question of when and not if the prime minister has to leave office. that doesn't mean that borisjohnson is definitely going to go in the coming days. the process is quite complicated. it really does feel to me that the mood is hardening, rather than getting easier over this weekend. borisjohnson's allies, the cabinet, will be making calls, trying to shore up his position. there is a suggestion in the newspapers this morning that it is even called operation big dog although nobody will go into details from downing street this morning. in the last hour, we have had an on the record comment from tobias ellwood, the tory mp, he is a chair of one of the tory mp, he is a chair of one of the select committees in parliament and a former minister. someone who knows how the place works. he is telling the prime minister he has to lead or stand down. and the problem for borisjohnson will be if more
9:07 am
people start saying similar things and conclude that borisjohnson isn't in a place where he can lead his party out of this mess. nick, thank you very much for that. at around 9:30am, we'll be speaking to andrew bridgen — one of the conservative mps who has written a letter of no—confidence in the prime minister. we have spoken to him briefly and we will speak to him again. we will catch up with his thoughts at 9:30am. let's talk to you about novak djokovic. novak djokovic has been detained again in melbourne ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in australia to defend his open title. the tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, is in melbourne. good to see you. where are we at, now? he is in detention right now and we are waiting for another court ruling and then... ? find and we are waiting for another court ruling and then... ?_ ruling and then... ? and then it is decided whether _ ruling and then... ? and then it is decided whether or _ ruling and then... ? and then it is decided whether or not _ ruling and then... ? and then it is decided whether or not he - ruling and then... ? and then it is decided whether or not he stays l ruling and then... ? and then it is| decided whether or not he stays to defend his title or he gets
9:08 am
deported. it is interesting that you should say where are we now because we are literallyjust outside the immigration detention hotel where he was brought the first time his visa was brought the first time his visa was revoked. and he is back, we understand, again, now that his visa has been revoked for a second time. earlier today, has been revoked for a second time. earliertoday, he has been revoked for a second time. earlier today, he was at his lawyer's office. it was a procedural hearing today, where we heard the plan for what happens on sunday. essentially, both sides present their argument to a full bench of threejudges. we've also their argument to a full bench of three judges. we've also learned in the past hour or so the legal team for novak djokovic essentially are going to challenge the decision by the immigration minister. he based that on, in his view, the fact that an unvaccinated athlete being here, of novak djokovic's ilk, could provoke anti—vaccination sentiment. they say this is irrational. they say this is invalid. and by doing so, by deporting him, he could provoke the thing he is trying to
9:09 am
avoid. the difference is that the timeframe is really tight. there is still quite a bit of uncertainty but you can be sure of one thing. this is not how novak djokovic wanted to spend the two days before the australian open.— spend the two days before the australian open. thank you very much. australian open. thank you very much- the _ australian open. thank you very much. the situation _ australian open. thank you very much. the situation in _ australian open. thank you very i much. the situation in melbourne, this morning. our balkans correspondent guy de launey is in belgrade. guy, what's been the reaction there? there is no way you can underestimate and i know this from reading about his status in serbia, he is a superhero, novak djokovic, in serbia. and, right now, as we speak, as we havejust in serbia. and, right now, as we speak, as we have just heard, in serbia. and, right now, as we speak, as we havejust heard, held in detention in australia. it’s speak, as we havejust heard, held in detention in australia.— in detention in australia. it's not auoin in detention in australia. it's not going down _ in detention in australia. it's not going down very _ in detention in australia. it's not going down very well _ in detention in australia. it's not going down very well at - in detention in australia. it's not going down very well at all, i going down very well at all, charlie, to be fair. i think outrage is the word of the day. president aleksandar vucic asking why do you harass him as well as his family and a nation that is free and proud. not just an attack on novak djokovic himself but on serbia and serbians. the serbian tennis federation saying
9:10 am
this is unacceptable and contradicts the sacred olympic principles, which are well—known. i must admit, i don't know quite which are limbic principles they are but they are obviously taken very seriously and they are being contradicted and people are upset —— which are olympic principles. one thing i should point out in this, which people should take into account and might have some legal significance — the australian authorities have cast novak djokovic as a bad influence is not a good human being. everybody in serbia will tell you what a good human being he is, notjust a great sports person, notjust somebody who is gracious in victory and defeat but someone who is an enormous philanthropist and gives a lot of his time and money to people who are a lot less fortunate than himself. to see him being cast as the villain of the peace in australia really doesn't sit right with the people of serbia. , , lawyers for the woman accusing prince andrew of sexual assault want to take statements from two people in britain as part of her civil lawsuit against him.
9:11 am
virginia giuffre claims the duke sexually assaulted her when she was 17. he strongly denies the claims. his accuser is seeking witness accounts from his former assistant — robert olney — and a woman who claims to have seen the royal in a london nightclub in 2001. thousands of people have attended vigils across ireland, both the republic and the north, in memory of the murdered primary school teacher, ashling murphy. the 23—year—old was attacked while she was jogging by a canal in county offaly on wednesday afternoon. a man who was arrested over her death has been released without charge. covid restrictions in wales will start to ease from today, with the number of people allowed to gather for outdoor events increasing from 50 to 500. that means parkruns and smaller sporting fixtures are back on from today. nightclubs will be allowed to open from january 28th and the welsh government is hoping to lift all restrictions by february 10th.
9:12 am
it's 9:11am. iam not i am not sure what you have got planned but the weather might be crucial to you. here's tomasz with a look at this morning's weather. it is looking a little bit foggy right now. it will hang around for another couple of hours in some areas. frost, as well. but the good news is that, for most of us, it should be a decent day and bright enough if you are looking out for a nice walk today, for example. high pressure dominating the weather across the uk as it is indeed across much of europe. very similar weather across many parts of the continent. weather fronts are gathering towards the west of our neighbourhood. it spells a bit of rain tonight. and into tomorrow. not much, just a bit. this is the fog through the morning. it is starting to clear, now. in some spots, 50—100 metres. really
9:13 am
quite dense. by lunchtime, most of that dense fog will have dispersed. some sunshine for northern and eastern scotland, today, the lake district not doing bad, at all. for many of us, there will be clouds in the sky, we will call it sunny spells rather than clear blue skies. temperatures 7 degrees in glasgow today, 3 or 5 degrees near cold spots with the mist and fog. tonight, notice this weather front sweeping in from the north. that means a bit of rain for northern ireland and scotland, too. the windwind off the ocean. milder conditions. more of a breeze moving through. —— the wind is coming off the ocean. it will prevent any widespread fog from forming on early sunday. they were the fund will be crossing northern england and into wales on sunday morning. —— the weather front will be. rain for newcastle, sheffield and perhaps liverpool and maybe some spots of
9:14 am
rain in aberystwyth. eventually, the weather front will dry out by the time it reaches the south of the country. a bit of cloud. and north of that, the day will be mostly sunny for places like newcastle and belfast. high pressure still in charge of the weather on monday as there is a weather front behind it is not doing much, just a bit of cloud in the atlantic. it will be a fine day on monday. we are right in the middle of that high, light winds, settled conditions, mostly sunny by day. overnight on monday into tuesday, we will probably have more fog. this is the outlook for the week ahead. temperatures will probably be a degree also above the average for the time of the year in most areas. and you can see from the icons that they weather generally looks fine for most major towns and cities. looks fine for most ma'or towns and cities. ., �* , looks fine for most ma'or towns and cities. . �* , ., ., ., ._ cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you. _ cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you. you — cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you, you too. _ cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you, you too. it _ cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you, you too. it is - cities. that's it, have a great day. thank you, you too. it is 9:14am. cities. that's it, have a great day. i thank you, you too. it is 9:14am on a saturday morning.
9:15 am
which means it's time to take stock of the latest covid developments — and answer your questions — with the help of professor linda bauld and dr chris smith. you need a doctor and a professor! good morning. public health expert and doctor chris smith, virologist and doctor chris smith, virologist and familiar to people who watch regularly. how are you? quite a bit to talk about, this morning. let's start with one of the big changes in terms of people's lives and how the pandemic has been handled and whether you go back to work and your lifestyle. chris, do you want to start with this about the self isolation period for people who test positive for covid—19 being cut for five full days in england from monday. it is a significant change. talk us monday. it is a significant change. talk us through monday. it is a significant change. talk us through the monday. it is a significant change. talk us through the science monday. it is a significant change. talk us through the science behind it, first of all. the talk us through the science behind it. first of all-— it, first of all. the starting point for this, it, first of all. the starting point for this. of— it, first of all. the starting point for this, of course, _ it, first of all. the starting point for this, of course, was - it, first of all. the starting point for this, of course, was a i it, first of all. the starting point| for this, of course, was a 10-day for this, of course, was a 10—day period of isolation, which was changed in the last part of last year. the rationale behind ten days
9:16 am
is that we know how long people are infected for. and, therefore, how long they are infectious for, on average. we know that that changes with time. you don'tjust suddenly flick a switch and become uninfected. there is a period where people are most infectious in that period drops away or rather the infectivity drops away over time. by setting the bar at ten days initially, it meant the vast majority of people had cleared the infection by the time you said, "ok, you can now head back to work or back out to carry on your life as normal". but the problem is that that did mean that the vast majority of people were actually being inconvenienced for much longer than they would like to, because the number of people who remained infectious in the latter part of that ten day window was actually quite small, compared to the majority of people who had cleared the infection. and in the face of very large numbers of cases with omicron, because it was spreading so much, we were in danger of the pill being much worse than the ill. we
9:17 am
were robbing industries, important sectors, of the economy, the health care sector, educational sector of staff and that was undermining our ability to deliver the service. ministers initially said let's drop this down to day six at day seven with two sequential negative natural flow tests. by that time, our data suggests that about one third of people will still be infectious. but two thirds white. if we can find two thirds who are not and five tests to reassure ourselves they have, they can safely return. other countries were a bit more ambitious and they said, "we will go for five days". that translates into even more people being able to get back to work even sooner and it is an acute problem. according to the office of national statistics, 3% of the uk workforce was off work in the last week or so. moving it down to five days, reinforced by testing, does not come with an appreciable increase in risk. we are not going to cause many more cases to slip
9:18 am
through the net than we would at day six and seven, but we do, on the other hand, get more people back to work sooner. and that is really important in critical industries like the education sector, the hospitality sector, if it is operating! things like health care. what this means, of course, is that the messaging becomes very important, doesn't it? and you are once again requiring people to do the right thing at the right time, even more need for people to do those two tests two days in a row in order that they can stick to that five days? order that they can stick to that five da s? ., �* , order that they can stick to that five days?— five days? that's right, charlie. yes, absolutely. _ five days? that's right, charlie. yes, absolutely. sorry, - five days? that's right, charlie. yes, absolutely. sorry, chris, l five days? that's right, charlie. i yes, absolutely. sorry, chris, that was for linda. linda, please pick up on that. hit) was for linda. linda, please pick up on that. ., , .,, was for linda. linda, please pick up on that. ., , ., , ., ., on that. no problem at all. i will 'ust add on that. no problem at all. i will just add to _ on that. no problem at all. i will just add to what _ on that. no problem at all. i will just add to what chris _ on that. no problem at all. i will just add to what chris has i on that. no problem at all. i will just add to what chris hasjust i just add to what chris has just said — just add to what chris has just said it — just add to what chris has just said it is _ just add to what chris has just said. it is really important that people — said. it is really important that people follow the advice very carefully. and do the correct thing. the actuat— carefully. and do the correct thing. the actual formal period hasn't changed — the actual formal period hasn't changed in terms of it is still ten days— changed in terms of it is still ten days without the testing or if you are stitt— days without the testing or if you are still testing positive. let's 'ust are still testing positive. let's just run— are still testing positive. let's just run through this in terms of what _ just run through this in terms of what people will need to do from monday —
9:19 am
what people will need to do from monday. the changes that are being introduced _ monday. the changes that are being introduced in england from monday roughly— introduced in england from monday roughly aligned with scotland anyway because _ roughly aligned with scotland anyway because there is a difference in terms — because there is a difference in terms of— because there is a difference in terms of day one at day zero in the beginning — terms of day one at day zero in the beginning. we are going into that detail— beginning. we are going into that detail now. the most important thing is to do— detail now. the most important thing is to do the _ detail now. the most important thing is to do the test. if you want to release — is to do the test. if you want to release isolation early prior to the ten days— release isolation early prior to the ten days you need to have two consecutive negative tests. and what the data _ consecutive negative tests. and what the data shows, as chris says, around — the data shows, as chris says, around day _ the data shows, as chris says, around day five at day six, you are still going — around day five at day six, you are still going to have about potentially one third of people who might— potentially one third of people who might be _ potentially one third of people who might be infectious. if you do the two consecutive tests on day five and day — two consecutive tests on day five and day six, according to the uk health _ and day six, according to the uk health security agency, that drops to around — health security agency, that drops to around 7%. you are not reducing the risk— to around 7%. you are not reducing the risk to— to around 7%. you are not reducing the risk to zero but it is significantly reduced. if you continue _ significantly reduced. if you continue to test positive, you should — continue to test positive, you should complete that 10—day isolation period and even if on day ten you _ isolation period and even if on day ten you still have, for example, a high _ ten you still have, for example, a high fever. — ten you still have, for example, a high fever, you may want to isolate for longer — high fever, you may want to isolate for longer. but the important thing now, _ for longer. but the important thing now. the _ for longer. but the important thing now, the change, is the testing. finally. — now, the change, is the testing. finally, people are being asked to report— finally, people are being asked to report their tests, now, which is
9:20 am
something — report their tests, now, which is something not everybody has been used to— something not everybody has been used to doing. particularly, obviously, they are wanting to release — obviously, they are wanting to release that are self isolation earty — release that are self isolation early or— release that are self isolation early or if— release that are self isolation early or if they are now using taterat— early or if they are now using lateral flows instead of pcrs and .et lateral flows instead of pcrs and get a _ lateral flows instead of pcrs and get a positive result. these are changes— get a positive result. these are changes in_ get a positive result. these are changes in behaviour. it is still very— changes in behaviour. it is still very complicated. people should take a good _ very complicated. people should take a good look at the guidance and see how it _ a good look at the guidance and see how it fits— a good look at the guidance and see how it fits with their circumstances. ., ., ., ., circumstances. linda, good morning, aood circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning — circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning to _ circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning to you _ circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning to you both, _ circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning to you both, linda i circumstances. linda, good morning, good morning to you both, linda and | good morning to you both, linda and chris. you know, over the past however many months, a couple of years, we have been doing this, our view was always asking questions and you just answered one that sarah had sent in. she was asking what do you do if you test positive, still test positive on day five and six, continue the isolation until day ten? thanks, linda, you made that really clear. another question, as well. chris, how about this? lucy is asking, she said she had covid at christmas and that she was told to wait 28 days before getting her booster. she is asking if she should wait a bit longer.
9:21 am
booster. she is asking if she should wait a bit loner. . wait a bit longer. the current guidance _ wait a bit longer. the current guidance is — wait a bit longer. the current guidance is to _ wait a bit longer. the current guidance is to wait _ wait a bit longer. the current guidance is to wait 28 - wait a bit longer. the current guidance is to wait 28 days. i wait a bit longer. the current i guidance is to wait 28 days. there is probably two reasons why we ask people to wait a bit. number one, is, as we havejust people to wait a bit. number one, is, as we have just been describing, when you catch the infection, you are infectious, obviously, and you are infectious, obviously, and you are infectious, obviously, and you are infectious for a period of time. what we don't want is people who are potentially infectious going off and getting vaccines, because they may infect other people in the process. obviously, you should be isolating anyway but beyond that period, better to wait. the other reason for waiting is that when you've had an infection, your immune system needs time to build the response that you are making to that infection and also for you to get better. it is much better to wait until you are recovered and then you will probably make a much better immune response if you are not fighting on multiple fronts at once. that is the rationale for waiting 28 days. but, really, it is probably a good idea to go and get vaccinated at that point onwards if you have had the infection, because you will boost the immunity you will have made, having had the infection. you will
9:22 am
be supercharged with immunity, which means your immunity will last a lot longer compared to somebody who just has the infection orjust gets vaccinated. has the infection or 'ust gets vaccinatedi has the infection or 'ust gets vaccinated. ., ., , ., ., has the infection or 'ust gets vaccinated. ., ., ., ., vaccinated. linda, do you want to 'ust cast vaccinated. linda, do you want to just cast exoert — vaccinated. linda, do you want to just cast expert health _ vaccinated. linda, do you want to just cast expert health public i just cast expert health public health eye over the latest covert figures. people are still in the habit of listening, we get the deli statistics. friday figures, 99,652 new cases —— daily statistics. deaths within 28 days of positive tests 270. there are other figures. what is the picture you are seeing? i know hospital admissions are key, what is the picture you see when you hear those numbers? the what is the picture you see when you hear those numbers?— hear those numbers? the picture at the moment — hear those numbers? the picture at the moment is _ hear those numbers? the picture at the moment is that _ hear those numbers? the picture at the moment is that we _ hear those numbers? the picture at the moment is that we are - the moment is that we are stabilising. there are early signs, charlie. _ stabilising. there are early signs, charlie, that we are beginning to see a _ charlie, that we are beginning to see a downturn of the omicron wave and we _ see a downturn of the omicron wave and we are _ see a downturn of the omicron wave and we are also starting to see that in some _ and we are also starting to see that in some other countries. in the past, _ in some other countries. in the past, we — in some other countries. in the past, we have talked about south africa _ past, we have talked about south africa going through the omicron wave _ africa going through the omicron wave and — africa going through the omicron wave and coming down again. those indicators, _ wave and coming down again. those indicators, the one we are least confident— indicators, the one we are least confident about in recent weeks is
9:23 am
the cases — confident about in recent weeks is the cases. there are two points to that _ the cases. there are two points to that. firstly. — the cases. there are two points to that. firstly, disruption over christmas— that. firstly, disruption over christmas in terms of people testing or not— christmas in terms of people testing or not testing and reporting of the data _ or not testing and reporting of the data. secondly, the changes in terms of the _ data. secondly, the changes in terms of the requirement for confirmatory pcr after— of the requirement for confirmatory pcr after a — of the requirement for confirmatory pcr after a positive lateral flow, which _ pcr after a positive lateral flow, which has — pcr after a positive lateral flow, which has now been dispensed with, except— which has now been dispensed with, except if— which has now been dispensed with, except if you have symptoms or you are older _ except if you have symptoms or you are older or— except if you have symptoms or you are older or more vulnerable, still seek— are older or more vulnerable, still seek a _ are older or more vulnerable, still seek a pcr — are older or more vulnerable, still seek a pcr. but the cases, if we look— seek a pcr. but the cases, if we took at _ seek a pcr. but the cases, if we look at them, going down by over 20% _ look at them, going down by over 20%. yesterday was the last day... first _ 20%. yesterday was the last day... first day _ 20%. yesterday was the last day... first day for — 20%. yesterday was the last day... first day for a while we have had less than— first day for a while we have had less than 100,000 cases. things seem to be moving _ less than 100,000 cases. things seem to be moving in the right direction. in terms— to be moving in the right direction. in terms of— to be moving in the right direction. in terms of hospitals, we are seeing a tiny— in terms of hospitals, we are seeing a tiny reduction in uk wide. some regions _ a tiny reduction in uk wide. some regions suddenly starting to go downwards. others are still very hi-h downwards. others are still very high and — downwards. others are still very high and i— downwards. others are still very high and i think we have to let that settte _ high and i think we have to let that settle down before we really have an accurate _ settle down before we really have an accurate picture. sadly, we have seen _ accurate picture. sadly, we have seen an— accurate picture. sadly, we have seen an increase in deaths days and recent— seen an increase in deaths days and recent week— seen an increase in deaths days and recent week or so. the reason is the
9:24 am
tagging _ recent week or so. the reason is the lagging indicator. iwould hope recent week or so. the reason is the lagging indicator. i would hope they will continue to decline. lastly, you heard — will continue to decline. lastly, you heard chris in particular being really— you heard chris in particular being really very— you heard chris in particular being really very optimistic and me optimistic but perhaps a bit more cautious — optimistic but perhaps a bit more cautious. we have more data this week— cautious. we have more data this week that — cautious. we have more data this week that suggests more optimism. let's hope. — week that suggests more optimism. let's hope, as we continue that trajectory— let's hope, as we continue that trajectory will be consistent and we can feel we've got through what's been _ can feel we've got through what's been a _ can feel we've got through what's been a really tough period.- been a really tough period. chris, where are you — been a really tough period. chris, where are you at? _ been a really tough period. chris, where are you at? we've - been a really tough period. chris, where are you at? we've spoken | been a really tough period. (ct 3 where are you at? we've spoken about the pandemic for so long. we've spoken about an epidemic. and we've spoken about an epidemic. and we've spoken about an epidemic. and we've spoken about endemic. where are we going, now? spoken about endemic. where are we going. now?— going, now? apart from the fact that we are staring _ going, now? apart from the fact that we are staring blue _ going, now? apart from the fact that we are staring blue monday - going, now? apart from the fact that we are staring blue monday in i going, now? apart from the fact that we are staring blue monday in the i we are staring blue monday in the face on the 17th of january, according to a very important mathematical formula, according to a very important mathematicalformula, it is apparently the day when most people feel most miserable in the entire year, ifeel very feel most miserable in the entire year, i feel very optimistic going forward. building on what linda just said, the other very important metric to pay attention to is how many people who do go into hospital end up going to intensive care. that is a very sensitive measure of how severe the coronavirus infections are because when you've got very
9:25 am
large numbers of cases in the country, just by chance a significant number of people being admitted to hospital, because you have got lots of virus circulating probably will be going to hospital and have covid but not the cause of going to hospital, they caught it as they went into hospital. some will catch it in hospital but some will have them anyway but it is what takes them to hospital. a significant number of those detections are those cases, people who have covid asymptomatically. the number of people who are going into intensive care on mechanical ventilation vet is actually dropping. it has remained flat. that could be because omicron has not had a chance to bite yet —— and on the other it may be that we are following the trajectory of south africa. —— has not a had a to bite yet and on the other hand. much fewer translation of hospital cases into intensive care basis. let's hope that carries on and this gives me great cause for optimism because i think we are getting to a point where, thanks to vaccination, we are
9:26 am
at 96% of the country now have antibodies against the coronavirus, thanks to vaccination and infection, reinforcing our amenity, we are getting to a point where the population have sufficient immunity that we can fend off the infection when we get it much better than we could previously. so, we don't see that a strong connection of cases turning into consequences. irate that a strong connection of cases turning into consequences. we have s - oken turning into consequences. we have spoken about _ turning into consequences. we have spoken about omicron _ turning into consequences. we have spoken about omicron and - turning into consequences. we have spoken about omicron and in i turning into consequences. we have spoken about omicron and in some| spoken about omicron and in some ways, this is a bizarre thing to say, omicron has offered some reassurance in terms of the levels of sickness and severity of sickness. how well prepared are we, chris, in terms of vaccination and technology for another strain? iadieu. technology for another strain? well, i'm kind reassured _ technology for another strain? well, i'm kind reassured by _ technology for another strain? well, i'm kind reassured by the _ technology for another strain? -m i'm kind reassured by the fact that we have fended off variants since the original coronavirus emerged from wuhan using vaccines that were built and informed by that original virus. in other words, the vaccines continue to work and give you underlying immunity against severe disease. they don't completely prevent infection and transmission
9:27 am
and we knew that would probably be the case. they stop people becoming severely unwell. we are already in good shape. researchers are now beginning to work on what they are dubbing covid vaccine 2.0. this is an update to the existing vaccines that will capture the variance we do know about. but even more tantalising is the possibility of creating a vaccine that will protect us against a variant plume at the don't even exist yet and that may sound pie in the sky but there was another study this week by researchers at imperial college. they were looking at the question, why is it that people can live in a household alongside people who have coronavirus and they don't catch the infection. what is special about them? it turns out those individuals have a repertoire of white blood cells made by infections with other coronaviruses that target bits of the coronavirus that don't change. these are called conserved regions and they don't change between all the different family members of coronavirus. you can get protection
9:28 am
about one coronavirus and being infected and having a immune responses from other viruses. in theory, we could make what we call a pan coronavirus vaccine. one that can basically target all coronaviruses, those that exist at the moment and even those that don't exist yet. that would mean we would be able to protect people going forward into the future against the entire family of coronaviruses and all the variance might that thrown at us. ., , ., all the variance might that thrown atus. ., , ., , all the variance might that thrown atus. , ., , at us. lots of people have this in their heads- _ at us. lots of people have this in their heads. -- _ at us. lots of people have this in their heads. -- all— at us. lots of people have this in their heads. -- all the _ at us. lots of people have this in their heads. -- all the variants. l their heads. -- all the variants. this could _ their heads. -- all the variants. this could apply _ their heads. -- all the variants. this could apply to _ their heads. -- all the variants. this could apply to many i their heads. -- all the variants. | this could apply to many people their heads. -- all the variants. i this could apply to many people who have had their boosterjab some time ago. have had their booster 'ab some time aio, ., �* , ., have had their booster 'ab some time ato. ., f ., have had their booster 'ab some time ago. that's a good question. i still aet ago. that's a good question. i still get questions _ ago. that's a good question. i still get questions from _ ago. that's a good question. i still get questions from people - ago. that's a good question. i still get questions from people about | get questions from people about that _ get questions from people about that. they are now used to this repeat— that. they are now used to this repeat vaccination that the country has engaged with. the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation looked at these data in
9:29 am
relation _ immunisation looked at these data in relation to— immunisation looked at these data in relation to the protection from vaccines, _ relation to the protection from vaccines, particularly against hospitalisation. and whether they need _ hospitalisation. and whether they need to— hospitalisation. and whether they need to do what isabel has already been doing, which is of a booster to everyone _ been doing, which is of a booster to everyone over the age of 60. they have _ everyone over the age of 60. they have decided we don't need to do that for— have decided we don't need to do that for the moment. the main reason for that— that for the moment. the main reason for that is— that for the moment. the main reason for that is when they look at the reduction — for that is when they look at the reduction and risk of going into hospital. — reduction and risk of going into hospital, including for the over 65s as chris _ hospital, including for the over 65s as chris was discussing in general, the protection seems to have holding up the protection seems to have holding up pretty— the protection seems to have holding up pretty well. around two weeks after _ up pretty well. around two weeks after your— up pretty well. around two weeks after your booster, your protection and reduction of risk going into hospital— and reduction of risk going into hospital is— and reduction of risk going into hospital is about 89%. even after three _ hospital is about 89%. even after three months with the data they looked _ three months with the data they looked at, that only drops to around 83%~ _ looked at, that only drops to around 83%~ in_ looked at, that only drops to around 83%. in fact, the uk health security agency— 83%. in fact, the uk health security agency variant briefing that comes out regularly is up—to—date from yesterday— out regularly is up—to—date from yesterday and those figures are still holding up. at the moment, for sylvia, _ still holding up. at the moment, for sylvia, she — still holding up. at the moment, for sylvia, she has not been recommended a booster _ sylvia, she has not been recommended a booster i_ sylvia, she has not been recommended a booster. iwould sylvia, she has not been recommended a booster. i would say, though, sylvia, she has not been recommended a booster. iwould say, though, it is probably— a booster. iwould say, though, it is probably likely we will see some waning _ is probably likely we will see some waning in— is probably likely we will see some waning in the future. at people who are older— waning in the future. at people who are older are probably going to be called _ are older are probably going to be called forward again. but we just don't _ called forward again. but we just don't know when that will be. at the
9:30 am
moment, _ don't know when that will be. at the moment, be — don't know when that will be. at the moment, be reassured that vaccines are working. — moment, be reassured that vaccines are working, they are holding up. finally, _ are working, they are holding up. finally, one — are working, they are holding up. finally, one a slight concern for me is that— finally, one a slight concern for me is that we _ finally, one a slight concern for me is that we have seen quite a big drop— is that we have seen quite a big drop off— is that we have seen quite a big drop off in _ is that we have seen quite a big drop off in the booster uptake for people _ drop off in the booster uptake for people who have just become eligible or didn't _ people who have just become eligible or didn't quite get around to it. we really— or didn't quite get around to it. we really need — or didn't quite get around to it. we really need to remind people that the boosters are still there. they can get— the boosters are still there. they can get them and they work really welt _ can get them and they work really well. ., , can get them and they work really well. . , ., ., ., , well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both- — well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both. what _ well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both. what are _ well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both. what are you _ well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both. what are you having i well. linda, chris, one-word answer from both. what are you having for. from both. what are you having for dinner tonight? from both. what are you having for dinnertonight? ! from both. what are you having for dinner tonight?— dinner tonight? i don't know. we have had the _ dinner tonight? i don't know. we have had the same _ dinner tonight? i don't know. we have had the same vegetarian i dinner tonight? i don't know. we i have had the same vegetarian chile four nights — have had the same vegetarian chile four nights in a row. we might be onto— four nights in a row. we might be onto salmon tonight.— four nights in a row. we might be onto salmon tonight. nice! chris? it's my birthday — onto salmon tonight. nice! chris? it's my birthday tomorrow, i onto salmon tonight. nice! chris? i it's my birthday tomorrow, birthday cake is going to be on the menu! just that? happy birthday? thank you ve much. just that? happy birthday? thank you very much- happy _ just that? happy birthday? thank you very much. happy birthday _ just that? happy birthday? thank you very much. happy birthday e. - just that? happy birthday? thank you very much. happy birthday e. he i just that? happy birthday? thank you very much. happy birthday e. he is. very much. happy birthday e. he is ounier very much. happy birthday e. he is younger than _ very much. happy birthday e. he is younger than me! _ i asked that as an avenue into... i feel sorry for linda's household having to eat vegetarian chili four
9:31 am
days on the chart. matt wouldn't have that, would you? for days on the trot, the same meal? hat have that, would you? for days on the trot, the same meal?- the trot, the same meal? not a chance. the trot, the same meal? not a chance- i _ the trot, the same meal? not a chance. i struggle _ the trot, the same meal? not a chance. i struggle with - the trot, the same meal? not a chance. i struggle with doing i the trot, the same meal? not a chance. i struggle with doing it| the trot, the same meal? not a i chance. i struggle with doing it two nights in a row. happy new year by the way. nights in a row. happy new year by the wa . ., , , nights in a row. happy new year by thewa. ., , the way. happy new year! did you have a good _ the way. happy new year! did you have a good one? _ the way. happy new year! did you have a good one? quite _ the way. happy new year! did you have a good one? quite quiet. i the way. happy new year! did you| have a good one? quite quiet. lots of bank holidays, _ have a good one? quite quiet. lots of bank holidays, i _ have a good one? quite quiet. lots of bank holidays, i didn't _ have a good one? quite quiet. lots of bank holidays, i didn't know i have a good one? quite quiet. lots| of bank holidays, i didn't know when to put the rubbish bins out. it is to put the rubbish bins out. it is an annual— to put the rubbish bins out. it is an annual problem. everyone gets confused, they miss it and then they have loads of stuff.— have loads of stuff. when was it in the end you _ have loads of stuff. when was it in the end you put — have loads of stuff. when was it in the end you put the _ have loads of stuff. when was it in the end you put the bins _ have loads of stuff. when was it in the end you put the bins out? it i have loads of stuff. when was it in i the end you put the bins out? it was about three — the end you put the bins out? it was about three days _ the end you put the bins out? it was about three days later _ the end you put the bins out? it was about three days later in _ the end you put the bins out? it was about three days later in the - the end you put the bins out? it was about three days later in the end, i about three days later in the end, charlie. it threw me! these things worry me now i'm old. anyway, shall we move on? today's special guest music royalty, elvis costello. good morning, thanks forjoining us. it morning, thanks forjoining us. it is good to be here. we _
9:32 am
morning, thanks forjoining us. it is good to be here. we are i morning, thanks forjoining us. it is good to be here. we are going| morning, thanks forjoining us. it i is good to be here. we are going to talk about your _ is good to be here. we are going to talk about your 32nd _ is good to be here. we are going to talk about your 32nd album - is good to be here. we are going to talk about your 32nd album in i is good to be here. we are going to talk about your 32nd album in just i is good to be here. we are going to | talk about your 32nd album in just a bit, the boy named if. what is your idea of food heaven? it bit, the boy named if. what is your idea of food heaven?— idea of food heaven? it has got to be blind scouse. _ idea of food heaven? it has got to be blind scouse. we _ idea of food heaven? it has got to be blind scouse. we will - be blind scouse. we will explain later _ be blind scouse. we will explain later. so — be blind scouse. we will explain later, ., be blind scouse. we will explain later. ., ., ., , ., , ., later. so a vegetarian versions of traditional scouse? _ later. so a vegetarian versions of traditional scouse? i— later. so a vegetarian versions of traditional scouse? i think- later. so a vegetarian versions of traditional scouse? i think so. i later. so a vegetarian versions of traditional scouse? i think so. to be honest _ traditional scouse? i think so. to be honest it _ traditional scouse? i think so. to be honest it was _ traditional scouse? i think so. to be honest it was developed, i traditional scouse? i think so. to be honest it was developed, in i traditional scouse? i think so. to i be honest it was developed, in my grandad's — be honest it was developed, in my grandad's day, _ be honest it was developed, in my grandad's day, if— be honest it was developed, in my grandad's day, if you _ be honest it was developed, in my grandad's day, if you didn't - be honest it was developed, in my grandad's day, if you didn't have i grandad's day, if you didn't have mutton, — grandad's day, if you didn't have mutton, it — grandad's day, if you didn't have mutton, it wasn't _ grandad's day, if you didn't have mutton, it wasn't necessarily- grandad's day, if you didn't have mutton, it wasn't necessarily a i mutton, it wasn't necessarily a health— mutton, it wasn't necessarily a health choice. _ mutton, it wasn't necessarily a health choice. but _ mutton, it wasn't necessarily a health choice. but thinking i mutton, it wasn't necessarily a i health choice. but thinking about it, health choice. but thinking about it. now— health choice. but thinking about it. now not — health choice. but thinking about it, now not everyone _ health choice. but thinking about it, now not everyone wants - health choice. but thinking about| it, now not everyone wants meat. health choice. but thinking about i it, now not everyone wants meat. it it, now not everyone wants meat. couldn't have come at a better it, now not everyone wants meat.- couldn't have come at a better time. you can have the ballet on the bottom — you can have the ballet on the bottom and _ you can have the ballet on the bottom and the _ you can have the ballet on the bottom and the pickled - you can have the ballet on the i bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top. _ bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top. it— bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top. it is— bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top, it is delicious. _ bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top, it is delicious. what- bottom and the pickled cabbage on the top, it is delicious. what are i the top, it is delicious. what are you holding _ the top, it is delicious. what are you holding back— the top, it is delicious. what are you holding back for? _ the top, it is delicious. what are you holding back for? find- the top, it is delicious. what are you holding back for?— the top, it is delicious. what are you holding back for? and what about hell? i could — you holding back for? and what about hell? i could have _ you holding back for? and what about hell? i could have picked _ you holding back for? and what about hell? i could have picked lots - you holding back for? and what about hell? i could have picked lots of i hell? i could have picked lots of thins hell? i could have picked lots of things but _ hell? i could have picked lots of things but i _ hell? i could have picked lots of things but i have _ hell? i could have picked lots of things but i have a _ hell? i could have picked lots of things but i have a -- _
9:33 am
hell? i could have picked lots of things but i have a -- and i hell? i could have picked lots of i things but i have a -- and aversion things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon _ things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon curd. _ things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon curd, i— things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon curd, i think— things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon curd, i think because i things but i have a —— and aversion to lemon curd, i think because it. to lemon curd, i think because it was originally _ to lemon curd, i think because it was originally called _ to lemon curd, i think because it was originally called lemon i to lemon curd, i think because it. was originally called lemon cheese. yummy! _ was originally called lemon cheese. yummy! l— was originally called lemon cheese. yumm ! ., was originally called lemon cheese. yumm ! . , ., was originally called lemon cheese. yumm! . , ., ,.,, yummy! i have these old shoes i found, yummy! i have these old shoes i found. they _ yummy! i have these old shoes i found, they really _ yummy! i have these old shoes i found, they really smell - yummy! i have these old shoes i found, they really smell of i yummy! i have these old shoes i | found, they really smell of lemon cheese _ found, they really smell of lemon cheese it — found, they really smell of lemon cheese it is— found, they really smell of lemon cheese. it is like _ found, they really smell of lemon cheese. it is like one _ found, they really smell of lemon cheese. it is like one of— found, they really smell of lemon cheese. it is like one of those i found, they really smell of lemon| cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves— cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that _ cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that i _ cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that i never— cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that i never got - cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that i never got to i cheese. it is like one of those odd preserves that i never got to grips with _ preserves that i never got to grips with maybe — preserves that i never got to grips with maybe it— preserves that i never got to grips with. maybe it was _ preserves that i never got to grips with. maybe it was incorporated i preserves that i never got to grips i with. maybe it was incorporated into some _ with. maybe it was incorporated into some school— with. maybe it was incorporated into some school dinners _ with. maybe it was incorporated into some school dinners and _ with. maybe it was incorporated into some school dinners and it - some school dinners and it frightened _ some school dinners and it frightened me _ some school dinners and it frightened me then. - some school dinners and it frightened me then. iinfe- some school dinners and it frightened me then. some school dinners and it friihtened me then. ~ . ., ., frightened me then. we have a mix of indulience frightened me then. we have a mix of indulgence and _ frightened me then. we have a mix of indulgence and help _ frightened me then. we have a mix of indulgence and help today _ frightened me then. we have a mix of indulgence and help today with i indulgence and help today with freddie and anna, i will let you guess which is which! freddie, what decadence have you got for us? curried mayonnaise and lobster rolls with pickled cucumber and black pepper— with pickled cucumber and black pepper and garlic butter shoestring fries _ pepper and garlic butter shoestring fries. ., , ., ., . fries. how will you balance freddie's _ fries. how will you balance freddie's phil? _ fries. how will you balance freddie's phil? with - fries. how will you balance freddie's phil? with a i fries. how will you balance | freddie's phil? with a quick chickea freddie's phil? with a quick chickpea and _ freddie's phil? with a quick chickpea and her _ freddie's phil? with a quick chickpea and her a - freddie's phil? with a quick chickpea and her a quick- freddie's phil? with a quick| chickpea and her a quick one freddie's phil? with a quick- chickpea and her a quick one pot dinner but lots of punchy flavours in there. , ., ., , in there. helen is at home helping us out with — in there. helen is at home helping us out with dry _ in there. helen is at home helping
9:34 am
us out with dry january, _ in there. helen is at home helping us out with dry january, how- in there. helen is at home helping us out with dry january, how are i us out with dry january, how are you? us out with dry january, how are ou? ., , us out with dry january, how are ou? . , ., , _ ., you? really well, happy new year, aood to you? really well, happy new year, good to see — you? really well, happy new year, good to see you- — you? really well, happy new year, good to see you. look— you? really well, happy new year, good to see you. look at _ you? really well, happy new year, good to see you. look at you i you? really well, happy new year, good to see you. look at you with i good to see you. look at you with our new good to see you. look at you with your new haircut, _ good to see you. look at you with your new haircut, very _ good to see you. look at you with your new haircut, very nice. i good to see you. look at you with i your new haircut, very nice. thanks for noticing! _ your new haircut, very nice. thanks for noticing! i'm _ your new haircut, very nice. thanks for noticing! i'm good _ your new haircut, very nice. thanks for noticing! i'm good like - your new haircut, very nice. thanks for noticing! i'm good like that. i for noticing! i'm good like that. see ou for noticing! i'm good like that. see you at _ for noticing! i'm good like that. see you at ten _ for noticing! i'm good like that. see you at ten o'clock. - for noticing! i'm good like that. see you at ten o'clock. i'm i for noticing! i'm good like that. i see you at ten o'clock. i'm loving the vibe in _ see you at ten o'clock. i'm loving the vibe in your— see you at ten o'clock. i'm loving the vibe in your studio. _ the vibe in your studio. and i wouldn't call freddie's stuffed filthy, it sounds fantastic. it is filthy. stuffed filthy, it sounds fantastic. it is filth . ., stuffed filthy, it sounds fantastic. it is filth . . , ., ., ., it is filthy. that is a whole other conversation. _ it is filthy. that is a whole other conversation. it _ it is filthy. that is a whole other conversation. it is _ it is filthy. that is a whole other conversation. it is almost i it is filthy. that is a whole other conversation. it is almost like i it is filthy. that is a whole other. conversation. it is almost like you know him- — conversation. it is almost like you know him. matthew, _ conversation. it is almost like you know him. matthew, have - conversation. it is almost like you know him. matthew, have a i conversation. it is almost like you know him. matthew, have a good| conversation. it is almost like you i know him. matthew, have a good show, see ou know him. matthew, have a good show, see you later- — know him. matthew, have a good show, see you later- it — know him. matthew, have a good show, see you later. it is _ know him. matthew, have a good show, see you later. it is 9.34 _ know him. matthew, have a good show, see you later. it is 9.34 on _ see you later. it is 9.34 on saturday — see you later. it is 9.34 on saturday morning. - after a torrid week in westminster, many conservative mps are now back in their constituencies where they'll be finding out what voters think of the parties held at downing street during the pandemic. penistone and stocksbridge in south yorkshire was a safe labour seat which turned blue at the last election.
9:35 am
our correspondent spencer stokes went there to assess the mood. a steel town that turned blue at the last election, just over two years ago stocksbridge elected a conservative mp. steelworker craig backed the conservatives last time, but the downing street parties has left him wondering whether he should switch sides. this seems to be one thing after another and so we need a bit more solid... if they're going to stay... if they're going to stay, they need to get a new leader. would you back them again? um, yes, but onlyjust. in neighbouring peniston, jordan turner has vivid memories of those sunny days in spring 2020. worrying about his business. a man distinctly aware of the rules. if we went out and had a party ourselves, we'd get fined 200 quid each. if we kept doing it, it'd be 1,000. so obviously he's having a party with 100 people and i think he's just out of order, and we're all struggling, struggling to make money — especially self—employed, as well.
9:36 am
if we don't work, we don't get paid. no party atmosphere on a cold winter's day at penistone market. the christmas decorations are still up and amongst some shoppers, the spirit of festive forgiveness lives on into january. well, he should have invited me t'party. i and i don't think there's anybody that's got a big enough pair- of whatever to take his job - at t'minute, with covid and brexit. and i think he's doing a fine job. i do forgive him and we do all make mistakes. so, that's it. it's blown up out of all proportion. i'm prepared to give boris johnson and his colleagues the benefit of the doubt. the chance of borisjohnson winning a 2019—style 80—seat majority currently seems a distant prospect. a prime minister snookered by his own actions. that's not the unanimous view in penistone and stocksbridge. let's talk about some of those
9:37 am
issues. the conservative mp andrew bridgen has already submitted a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. hejoins us now from leicestershire. very good morning to you. i don't know if you can hear those comments a moment to from some of those voters, people. a couple of thoughts. people make mistakes, we all make mistakes, said one, in connection with borisjohnson, and give the prime minister the benefit of a doubt, said another. you are not in that position. m0. of a doubt, said another. you are not in that position.— not in that position. no, that is because it _ not in that position. no, that is because it is — not in that position. no, that is because it is not _ not in that position. no, that is because it is not one _ not in that position. no, that is because it is not one isolated l because it is not one isolated incident. what we are seeing with these continued revelations coming out about what has been going on at number ten is a pattern of behaviour, and ultimately the buck stops with borisjohnson. what i have seen is, well, to me it looks like borisjohnson and those in his inner circle can do what they want and the rest of us have to do what we are told. that is not acceptable to me, it is not acceptable for my
9:38 am
constituents or i believe most people in the country, and what it certainly isn't is levelling up in my book. figs certainly isn't is levelling up in m book. a ~' ., certainly isn't is levelling up in m book. a ~ ., ., my book. as you will know, we often seak my book. as you will know, we often s - eak to my book. as you will know, we often speak to government _ my book. as you will know, we often speak to government ministers - my book. as you will know, we often speak to government ministers and i my book. as you will know, we often l speak to government ministers and we have done this week as well. when we speak to them, they have but a very clear line out, which is, let's wait for what sue gray says. why don't you wait for what sue gray says? and why do you think they are saying that and you are prepared to call it now? i that and you are prepared to call it now? ., �* ., , ., ,, now? i don't need to see what sue gra sa s now? i don't need to see what sue gray says to _ now? i don't need to see what sue gray says to know _ now? i don't need to see what sue gray says to know that _ now? i don't need to see what sue gray says to know that for - now? i don't need to see what sue gray says to know that for me - now? i don't need to see what sue | gray says to know that for me boris johnson has lost the moral authority to lead the country. out of the contract between leaders and those being led is that you don't ask the people who you are leading to make sacrifices that you are not willing to bear yourself, and clearly that has not been the case, so that makes the prime minister, he has no more moral authority to lead. if there is another emergency where he has to
9:39 am
call on the public to make sacrifices, he doesn't have that authority. that makes his position in my book as prime minister completely untenable. find in my book as prime minister completely untenable. and when you see those members _ completely untenable. and when you see those members of— completely untenable. and when you see those members of his _ completely untenable. and when you see those members of his cabinet. see those members of his cabinet rallying round at this point, does your criticism apply to them too? because you will know very well, many of them have been vociferous in their praise of the prime minister, at precisely the point when you say he has lost his moral authority. i think at this stage it is probably misplaced loyalty. some people have criticised me for not being loyal now to the prime minister but loyalty has to run in both directions from the bottom to the top but also from the top to the bottom, and i think that has sadly been lacking. you bottom, and i think that has sadly been lacking-— bottom, and i think that has sadly been lackina. ., ., ., ., been lacking. you are one of the few mps are speaking — been lacking. you are one of the few mps are speaking out _ been lacking. you are one of the few mps are speaking out so _ been lacking. you are one of the few mps are speaking out so openly - been lacking. you are one of the few mps are speaking out so openly at l mps are speaking out so openly at this stage, you will be well aware of that. what are you prepared to share with me? you talk to your fellow conservative mps are how as
9:40 am
you are —— are minded as you are to change their leader? can you give me numbers? i change their leader? can you give me numbers? . ., ., ., numbers? i am not willing to do that, charlie, _ numbers? i am not willing to do that, charlie, it— numbers? i am not willing to do that, charlie, it wouldn't - numbers? i am not willing to do that, charlie, it wouldn't be - numbers? i am not willing to do i that, charlie, it wouldn't be right. i speak for myself. it is up to all conservative mps to look to their conscience and to the interests of their constituents, and to make what they believe is the right choice. i can't make that choice for them and i wouldn't aim to do that. what i can tell you is my letter of no confidence went in some time ago and the problem is i think these revelations will continue to run. it makes it impossible for boris johnson to function as prime minister and it is stopping the government functioning. what will he do, every wednesday apologise for the latest elevations? —— revelations? that is untenable. i
9:41 am
want to ask your reaction to the suggestion of the friday wine nights. those that know, you tell me, maybe you knew this existed pre—pandemic and it has just carried on regardless. were you aware of this kind of culture existing within downing street? or has this all come as a surprise to you? it downing street? or has this all come as a surprise to you?— as a surprise to you? it has all come as _ as a surprise to you? it has all come as a _ as a surprise to you? it has all come as a surprise _ as a surprise to you? it has all come as a surprise to - as a surprise to you? it has all come as a surprise to me, - as a surprise to you? it has allj come as a surprise to me, and as a surprise to you? it has all. come as a surprise to me, and it doesn't matter quite honestly whether the prime minister was present or not present. ultimately he is responsible for what goes on in the government, responsible for the culture in number ten and what we are seeing is a culture where there is one rule for them and the rest of us do as we are told, and thatis rest of us do as we are told, and that is not acceptable. i'm not sure any apology will put that right. andrew bridgen, thank you for joining us on saturday morning.
9:42 am
we are going to bring you up—to—date with what is happening with the world number one men's tennis player, whether he gets to defend his title, good morning. yes. player, whether he gets to defend his title, good morning.— his title, good morning. yes, that heanna his title, good morning. yes, that hearing starting _ his title, good morning. yes, that hearing starting with _ his title, good morning. yes, that hearing starting with three - his title, good morning. yes, that hearing starting with three judgesj hearing starting with three judges involved this time. for the second saturday night running, novak djokovic is spending it in a hotel. so it will be the day before the start of the australian open tennis that we will find out whether the top seed, novak djokovic, will be part of it. after training this week, the unvaccinated tennis star has now been detained again in australia ahead of the latest court appeal. and this time it rests with those threejudges, not one. just like last weekend, the serbian faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time with the government labelling the star a threat to public health. his lawyers are appealing against what they called an "irrational judgment".
9:43 am
andy murray is warming up by playing right now in his first final on the atp tour since 2019, and a win would push him back into the world's top one hundred. he's up against the russian top seed aslan karatsev in the sydney classic, and it's a real step up for murray, because his serve was broken in the very first game. he's making an great game of it though — murray trails 4—3 in the opening set. england's batters are up against it once again in the final ashes test as they try to avoid a four nil series defeat.
9:44 am
their great start in this final test in hobart yesterday seemed rather in vain, as they let australia off the hook earlier on day two, bowler nathan lyon taking them past the 300 mark. england's reply was just ten balls old when rory burns was run out for a duck on his recall to the side — opening partner zak crawley, creating some indecision. australia captain pat cummins has taken three wickets so far — most importantly that of his counterpartjoe root, who went lbw for 34. and england were five down with just 88 runs on the board, when ben stokes was caught for four. they've since lost ollie pope and sam billings — england now 180—7. crystal palace manager patrick vieira said goalkeeperjack butland was to thank for the point they took away from brighton last night. he made several key saves including this from pascal gross's penalty kick in the first half. brighton were the better side throughout, but it was palace who went ahead through conor gallagher before a late own goal from joachim andersen capped off an eventful encounter. i—i, it finished.
9:45 am
a history of late goals in this fixture actually, and there it was again. judd trump said he was feeding off the atmosphere the crowd is creating at alexandra palace, where he's through to the semi—finals of the masters snooker. he thrashed kyren wilson 6—1, to set up a meeting with barry hawkins. there are 2,000 spectators in the arena and trump says there's a different energy this year, and it feels like everyone wants to let their hair down and see live sport again... come on, baby, yeah! it's incredible. it's why i play the game. just look at it, it's absolutely unbelievable. and the reception mark williams and john higgins had yesterday and today... i can't wait to play out here again. great energy. it does remind me of delia smith. let's be having you! but they are feeding off each other, judd trump and the crowd. i but they are feeding off each other, judd trump and the crowd.- but they are feeding off each other, judd trump and the crowd. i love it. you will embrace _ judd trump and the crowd. i love it. you will embrace the _ judd trump and the crowd. i love it. you will embrace the gentlemen - judd trump and the crowd. i love it. you will embrace the gentlemen we j you will embrace the gentlemen we are going _ you will embrace the gentlemen we are going to see now. |
9:46 am
you will embrace the gentlemen we are going to see now.— are going to see now. i have been followin: are going to see now. i have been following the _ are going to see now. i have been following the story, _ are going to see now. i have been following the story, it _ are going to see now. i have been following the story, it is _ are going to see now. i have been following the story, it is superb. l are going to see now. i have been following the story, it is superb. i | following the story, it is superb. i did the piece with charles, 94—year—old sprinter who took me on a track somewhere in london. let’s a track somewhere in london. let's do --roer a track somewhere in london. let's do proper introductions. _ tony bowman is still running — and jumping, and throwing — at the age of 86. he's just won the european masters sprint champion of the year and he's got more medals in his sights. olivia richwald went to meet him. at the age of 86, tony bowman refuses to slow down. in fact, he trains every other day to get quicker, compete longer, and win more sporting accolades. i do the hurdles, the short and the long hurdles, i do the 100 metres. i do a decathlon, pentathlon, heptathlon, highjump, long jump, triple jump. pole vault, no, i don't do the pole vault any more. but he did until the age of 70, when he cleared two metres.
9:47 am
tony holds two hurdling world records and numerous british athletic records, and hasjust received another european accolade — masters sprint of the year, a title he won over every other european athlete over the age of 35. well, i'm hoping to do a pentathlon in a week's time, and a heptathlon in two weeks' time. you just can't give up competing, can you, tony? i just absolutely love it. the adrenaline rush is unbelievable. i mean, when that guy says, "get to your marks," there's nothing like getting down there. and then, if you do well, the exhilaration afterwards is wonderful. he plays hockey too, and before the pandemic represented great britain in an over—80s tournament. i'm hoping to get in the over—80s team again, but now i'm 86, i don't know whether i'll make the team or not because those youngsters of 80 might be a bit quicker! he puts his sporting longevity down to good genes,
9:48 am
a healthy lifestyle, and his sport—loving parents. i've been to five olympics to watch as well. i love watching the olympics. my dad took me to my first olympics in 1948, when it was at wembley. we just went for one day. that really inspired me, i think. despite two heart attacks and heart failure three times, he still has goals he's yet to complete. and what's your ambition? my ambition is to run the 100 metres when i'm 100, and live to 120. well, i think if anyone can achieve that, tony, you certainly can! good luck! olivia richwald, bbc news. i told you he was a bundle of energy, didn't i? keep going, tony. perhaps that has inspired you to get out. i think there will be glimmers of sunshine in the coming days. we had a frosty start, didn't we, that
9:49 am
is fine but if someone can wrap up warm and get in the fresh air, there is potential today, isn't there? absolutely. basically the weather you can see on the picture behind me. some blue sky and cloud. it is chilly out there, still frosty in some areas and the fog lingers. it will clear, probably by around i! will clear, probably by around 11 o'clock, mid day in some areas, perhaps lingering into the afternoon with some of that mistiness but on the whole we are in for a fine day today. at this time of year, we can get rain and gates and all sorts of things. enjoy that sunshine if you can. temperature is around six or 7 degrees on average for most major towns and cities. tonight, a weather front moves into northern ireland with some rain, that won't last very long. the air is coming directly off the ocean so milder conditions for
9:50 am
all of us tonight, i don't think it will be particularly frosty at all and there won't be much fog forming by tomorrow morning. you see this weather front, by tomorrow morning. you see this weatherfront, a bit of rain by tomorrow morning. you see this weather front, a bit of rain for liverpool, sheffield, into hull, and by the time the weather front reaches the south, it should dry out. enjoy it. reaches the south, it should dry out- enjoy it— reaches the south, it should dry out. enjoy it. out. en'oy it. back to you. thanks so out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much. — out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much. enjoy — out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much, enjoy the _ out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much, enjoy the rest _ out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much, enjoy the rest of- out. enjoy it. back to you. thanks so much, enjoy the rest of your . so much, enjoy the rest of your weekend tomasz. the coastguard service is 200 years old this weekend. luxmy gopal isjoining the celebrations at crosby on merseyside this morning. i know you have been spending some time with the teams there. they are one of those organisations that largely goes unnoticed until people need them, and then we do. absolutely, charlie, and it is an organisation that has been very needed over the past two centuries of its life—saving service. so 200
9:51 am
years ago today is when her majesty's coastguard was formally established, and throughout its history it has relied heavily on volunteers, with 3500 making up the team. five of them arejoining us today. we will speak first to gary. briefly, can you tell us what your role involves? i briefly, can you tell us what your role involves?— role involves? i am the station officer and _ role involves? i am the station officer and i'm _ role involves? i am the station officer and i'm responsible - role involves? i am the station officer and i'm responsible for| role involves? i am the station i officer and i'm responsible for all the equipment and training of the team _ the equipment and training of the team and — the equipment and training of the team. and we are a specialist mud rescue _ team. and we are a specialist mud rescue team. we inject water into the mud — rescue team. we inject water into the mud to— rescue team. we inject water into the mud to release people's feet when _ the mud to release people's feet when they get stuck in the mud. and the when they get stuck in the mud. the changes when they get stuck in the mud. jifuc the changes with when they get stuck in the mud. fific the changes with technology advancing over the years, the unmanned vehicles and drones and all sorts, isn't there?— sorts, isn't there? yes, and even this is an — sorts, isn't there? yes, and even this is an advancement. - sorts, isn't there? yes, and even. this is an advancement. previously it was— this is an advancement. previously it was bits — this is an advancement. previously it was bits of plywood and rope, and now we _ it was bits of plywood and rope, and now we go _ it was bits of plywood and rope, and now we go out with the specialist sled and —
9:52 am
now we go out with the specialist sled and the lances to put water into the — sled and the lances to put water into the mud to release people and .et into the mud to release people and get them _ into the mud to release people and get them out of the water hopefully. lots of— get them out of the water hopefully. lots of innovations to improve the way people are helped when they are in distress. ali, you joined about a year ago. why did you decide to become a volunteer? i year ago. why did you decide to become a volunteer?— year ago. why did you decide to become a volunteer? i grew up on the coast last year — become a volunteer? i grew up on the coast last year i _ become a volunteer? i grew up on the coast last year i decided _ become a volunteer? i grew up on the coast last year i decided to _ become a volunteer? i grew up on the coast last year i decided to pluck - coast last year i decided to pluck up coast last year i decided to pluck up the _ coast last year i decided to pluck up the courage and apply, and i made up up the courage and apply, and i made up i have _ up the courage and apply, and i made up i have i_ up the courage and apply, and i made up i have. i love the guys and they are fantastic, they have taken me under— are fantastic, they have taken me under their— are fantastic, they have taken me under their wing.— are fantastic, they have taken me under their wing. how have you found it? i have loved _ under their wing. how have you found it? i have loved it. _ under their wing. how have you found it? i have loved it. it— under their wing. how have you found it? i have loved it. it sounds - under their wing. how have you found it? i have loved it. it sounds corny - it? i have loved it. it sounds corny but they are _ it? i have loved it. it sounds corny but they are like _ it? i have loved it. it sounds corny but they are like my _ it? i have loved it. it sounds corny but they are like my second - it? i have loved it. it sounds cornyj but they are like my second family atready— but they are like my second family already so— but they are like my second family already so i love working with them. let's speak— already so i love working with them. let's speak to one of your second family members then. linda, how does it feel to be part of an organisation that is celebrating a milestone of 200 years? i am really roud. milestone of 200 years? i am really proud- 200 — milestone of 200 years? i am really proud- 200 years — milestone of 200 years? i am really proud. 200 years from _ milestone of 200 years? i am really proud. 200 years from start - milestone of 200 years? i am really proud. 200 years from start to - proud. 200 years from start to finish — proud. 200 years from start to finish it— proud. 200 years from start to finish. it started _ proud. 200 years from start to finish. it started off— proud. 200 years from start to finish. it started off with - proud. 200 years from start to i finish. it started off with muskets and now— finish. it started off with muskets and now it — finish. it started off with muskets and now it is _ finish. it started off with muskets
9:53 am
and now it is rescue _ finish. it started off with muskets and now it is rescue equipment. finish. it started off with muskets i and now it is rescue equipment and we are _ and now it is rescue equipment and we are rescuing _ and now it is rescue equipment and we are rescuing people _ and now it is rescue equipment and we are rescuing people as- and now it is rescue equipment and we are rescuing people as opposed | and now it is rescue equipment and l we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting _ we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting the — we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting the coast. _ we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting the coast. it— we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting the coast. it is— we are rescuing people as opposed to protecting the coast. it is like - protecting the coast. it is like being — protecting the coast. it is like being part _ protecting the coast. it is like being part of— protecting the coast. it is like being part of one _ protecting the coast. it is like being part of one massive - protecting the coast. it is like - being part of one massive family. we keep an _ being part of one massive family. we keep an eye — being part of one massive family. we keep an eye on— being part of one massive family. we keep an eye on the— being part of one massive family. we keep an eye on the public, _ being part of one massive family. we keep an eye on the public, we - being part of one massive family. we keep an eye on the public, we get- keep an eye on the public, we get them _ keep an eye on the public, we get them out — keep an eye on the public, we get them out of— keep an eye on the public, we get them out of sticky— keep an eye on the public, we get them out of sticky situations, - keep an eye on the public, we get them out of sticky situations, but| them out of sticky situations, but we keep— them out of sticky situations, but we keep an — them out of sticky situations, but we keep an eye— them out of sticky situations, but we keep an eye on— them out of sticky situations, but we keep an eye on each- them out of sticky situations, but we keep an eye on each other. them out of sticky situations, but we keep an eye on each other asi them out of sticky situations, but| we keep an eye on each other as a family _ we keep an eye on each other as a famil . ., ~' ,, we keep an eye on each other as a famil . ., ~ i. ., ., ., ., family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast. _ family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast, in _ family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast, in fact _ family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast, in fact in _ family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast, in fact in just - family. thank you, all. later on and off the coast, in fact in just over - off the coast, in fact in just over an hour, off the coast here and elsewhere on the coastline of the four nations, throw lines will be cast into the sea, 200 of them at 11 o'clock this morning to symbolise the life—saving services two centuries of existence and looking ahead to its future.— ahead to its future. luxmy, thank ou ve ahead to its future. luxmy, thank you very much- — ahead to its future. luxmy, thank you very much. the _ ahead to its future. luxmy, thank you very much. the crews - ahead to its future. luxmy, thank you very much. the crews that. ahead to its future. luxmy, thank you very much. the crews that do j you very much. the crews that do that are so valuable. thank you. the time is 9.53. a treat for you at the end of our programme this saturday. ladies and gentlemen, elvis is in the building. ok, not the real elvis
9:54 am
but officially the next best thing. emilio santoro, from weston—super—mare, hasjust been crowned europe's greatest elvis impersonator and he's only 19. take a look. # who cares for fame # and fortune # they're only passing things # but the touch of your lips on mine makes me feel like a king # and i'll be here in sunshine or in shadow # oh, danny boy
9:55 am
that is soothing, isn't it? good morning, congratulations! how did it feel? it morning, congratulations! how did it feel? ., , morning, congratulations! how did it feel? ., morning, congratulations! how did it feel? . , . . morning, congratulations! how did it feel? . , ., ., feel? it was a dream come true. beina feel? it was a dream come true. being such _ feel? it was a dream come true. being such a _ feel? it was a dream come true. being such a massive _ feel? it was a dream come true. being such a massive elvis - feel? it was a dream come true. being such a massive elvis fan i feel? it was a dream come true. | being such a massive elvis fan to feel? it was a dream come true. - being such a massive elvis fan to be paying _ being such a massive elvis fan to be paying tribute to the man himself is an honoun — paying tribute to the man himself is an honour. ., , ., paying tribute to the man himself is an honour. ., i. , .., ., an honour. how did you become an elvis fan? my _ an honour. how did you become an elvis fan? my mum _ an honour. how did you become an elvis fan? my mum got _ an honour. how did you become an elvis fan? my mum got me - an honour. how did you become an elvis fan? my mum got me into - an honour. how did you become an | elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age — elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age of _ elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age of four— elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age of four years _ elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age of four years old - elvis fan? my mum got me into elvis from the age of four years old and i l from the age of four years old and i remember— from the age of four years old and i remember when from the age of four years old and i rememberwhen i was from the age of four years old and i remember when i was asking my mum for elvis _ remember when i was asking my mum for elvisjumpsuits for remember when i was asking my mum for elvis jumpsuits for christmas, and she _ for elvis jumpsuits for christmas, and she said, you will have to write to santa _ and she said, you will have to write to santa. that is it there.— to santa. that is it there. where did she get _ to santa. that is it there. where did she get it — to santa. that is it there. where did she get it from? _ to santa. that is it there. where did she get it from? i _ to santa. that is it there. where did she get it from? i was - to santa. that is it there. where did she get it from? i was good| to santa. that is it there. where - did she get it from? i was good that ear, so did she get it from? i was good that year. so santo _ did she get it from? i was good that year, so santo got _ did she get it from? i was good that year, so santo got it _ did she get it from? i was good that year, so santo got it for _ did she get it from? i was good that year, so santo got it for me. - did she get it from? i was good that year, so santo got it for me. who i year, so santo got it for me. who made them? _ year, so santo got it for me. who made them? the _ year, so santo got it for me. who made them? the elves. - year, so santo got it for me. who made them? the elves. so - year, so santo got it for me. who made them? the elves. so you i year, so santo got it for me. who i made them? the elves. so you were doinu elvis made them? the elves. so you were doing elvis numbers _ made them? the elves. so you were doing elvis numbers even _ made them? the elves. so you were doing elvis numbers even then? - made them? the elves. so you were| doing elvis numbers even then? yes, like i said, from _ doing elvis numbers even then? yes, like i said, from the _ doing elvis numbers even then? yes, like i said, from the age _ doing elvis numbers even then? yes, like i said, from the age of four i was a _ like i said, from the age of four i was a massive elvis fan. when
9:56 am
everybody— was a massive elvis fan. when everybody was dancing to pop songs at the _ everybody was dancing to pop songs at the time, i was always doing elvis _ at the time, i was always doing elvis at — at the time, i was always doing elvis at the talent shows from a young _ elvis at the talent shows from a young age. since the age of 13, i have _ young age. since the age of13, i have really— young age. since the age of 13, i have really wanted to do it as a career~ — have really wanted to do it as a career. ., ., , ., ., ~ ., ., career. emilio, i was looking at how the 'udue career. emilio, i was looking at how they judge the _ career. emilio, i was looking at how they judge the winner. _ career. emilio, i was looking at how theyjudge the winner. you - career. emilio, i was looking at how theyjudge the winner. you will - career. emilio, i was looking at how| theyjudge the winner. you will know this inside out butjust so people get an idea. it is broken down, so you arejudged on get an idea. it is broken down, so you are judged on vocals, get an idea. it is broken down, so you arejudged on vocals, that get an idea. it is broken down, so you are judged on vocals, that is 40% of the total score. you have appearance, the ability to create a look and style that well represents elvis, so does that mean you don't have to look like him? if elvis, so does that mean you don't have to look like him?— have to look like him? if you do it in a respectful — have to look like him? if you do it in a respectfulway, _ have to look like him? if you do it in a respectful way, because - have to look like him? if you do it in a respectful way, because you | in a respectful way, because you cannot— in a respectful way, because you cannot help how your face looks or your height, but if you look neat and tidy— your height, but if you look neat and tidy and you have the correct outfit _ and tidy and you have the correct outfit so — and tidy and you have the correct outfit. ., and tidy and you have the correct outfit, ., , and tidy and you have the correct outfit. ., , :: , and tidy and you have the correct outfit, ., , i: , ,, ., outfit. so that is 20%. stage presence. — outfit. so that is 20%. stage presence, the _ outfit. so that is 20%. stage presence, the ability - outfit. so that is 20%. stage presence, the ability to - outfit. so that is 20%. stage i presence, the ability to create charisma elvis created, that has got to be the toughest.— to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known — to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known for _ to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known for the _ to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known for the shaking - to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known for the shaking of- to be the toughest. that's it. elvis was known for the shaking of his l was known for the shaking of his le-s was known for the shaking of his legs and — was known for the shaking of his legs and getting the crowd going. that needs confidence as well, where
9:57 am
do you draw upon that? it is definitely — do you draw upon that? it is definitely not _ do you draw upon that? it is definitely not from - do you draw upon that? it is definitely not from my - do you draw upon that? it is definitely not from my dad, he definitely not from my dad, he definitely wouldn't get on the stage. — definitely wouldn't get on the stage, but my mum i think has always wanted _ stage, but my mum i think has always wanted to— stage, but my mum i think has always wanted to be on the stage. she has definitely— wanted to be on the stage. she has definitely been a force behind me, pushing _ definitely been a force behind me, pushing me on the stage at first when _ pushing me on the stage at first when i _ pushing me on the stage at first when i was nervous but she knew i wanted _ when i was nervous but she knew i wanted to — when i was nervous but she knew i wanted to be on the stage. luckily i had that— wanted to be on the stage. luckily i had that backbone so now i am fulfilling — had that backbone so now i am fulfilling my dreams. if had that backbone so now i am fulfilling my dreams.— had that backbone so now i am fulfilling my dreams. if you have a bbc breakfast _ fulfilling my dreams. if you have a bbc breakfast saturday _ fulfilling my dreams. if you have a bbc breakfast saturday morning l bbc breakfast saturday morning audience who will hear what you do now. you will make your way over to the other side. we will let you do that and we will do our official goodbye. that's all from breakfast today. we're back tomorrow at six with all your news and sport. on monday, by the way, we have another elvis in the studio. elvis costello will be here. but now it's time for a little less conversation and a little more action. here's emilio santoro — aka the king of rock'n'roll, elvis presley, singing us out.
9:58 am
# love me tender, love me sweet # love me tender, love me sweet # never— # love me tender, love me sweet # never let— # love me tender, love me sweet # never let me go # _ # never let me go # you _ # never let me go # you have made my life complete # you have made my life complete # and _ # you have made my life complete # and i— # you have made my life complete # and i love you so # _ # and i love you so # love _ # and i love you so # love me tender, love me true # love me tender, love me true # all_ # love me tender, love me true # all my— # love me tender, love me true # all my dreams fulfilled # all my dreams fulfilled # for— # all my dreams fulfilled # for my darling, i love you # for my darling, i love you # and — # for my darling, i love you # and i— # for my darling, i love you # and i always will # _ # and i always will # love me tender, love me long
9:59 am
# love me tender, love me long # take _ # love me tender, love me long # take me — # love me tender, love me long # take me to your heart # take me to your heart # for— # take me to your heart # for its _ # take me to your heart # for it's there that i belong # for it's there that i belong # and — # for it's there that i belong # and we _ # for it's there that i belong # and we will never part #.
10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. novak djokovic has been detained in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country. more details emerge about further lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being inundated with complaints from angry constituents. borisjohnson boris johnson and borisjohnson and those in his inner circle can do what they want and the rest of us have to do as we're told. that's not acceptable to me. that's not acceptable for my constituents or i believe most people in the country. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people
10:01 am
based in the uk to give evidence in her civil case.

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on