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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  January 14, 2022 8:45pm-9:00pm GMT

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the more people who are vaccinated, the harder it is for the virus to be transmitted. surely you should be encouraging that, no? well, yes, of course. i agree with people getting vaccinated, i am not an antivaxer, but it is freedom of choice. to me, if you don't want to get vaccinated, you don't want to put chemicals into your body, that has to be your choice. health experts say that getting vaccinated significantly reduces the chance of getting and spreading the virus. my concern would be that people would interpret this sign and not be encouraged to go to get vaccinated — as a result of it. and i think we have to remember that, in the uk, there is no law for the majority of people to get vaccinated, but it is important to remember, if you do not want to be vaccinated, it has a much far—reaching effect on society, other than just whether you are welcomed into your local pub.
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since speaking to anthony, the bbc has learned that the sign was made by a group promoting anti—vaccination messages. the chef says he did not know that and has stressed he is not anti—vaccination. he says he'll continue to keep up a sign to show his support for equality, but will take away any reference to the group. david lumb, bbc news. i'm back with the papers, but for now it is time for a new swatch. has the bbc�*s coverage of those downing street party allegations been a witchhunt that is played unfairly on the audience's motions? and we delve into the archive to look at some opening titles from news bulletins in years gone by. the
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latest in a string of allegations of lockdown parties at downing street has led to a free braille atmosphere in westminster over the past few days and, one can imagine, a bit of a frenzy in newsrooms around the country too. although this week's reports have made many years angry, others have accused bbc of getting overexcited by the story.— overexcited by the story. surely there are far— overexcited by the story. surely there are far more _ overexcited by the story. surely there are far more important i overexcited by the story. surely i there are far more important news items that the bbc should be looking at, such as housing the afghan refugees or even what vladimir putin is doing, rather than whether or not there was a socially distant to get together in the garden for those who are working extremely hard together in 2020 at a very stressful time, and were invited to use a beautiful space to chat with each other and support each other. i am sure that nurses and doctors also met in staff rooms that were not nearly as luxurious as the number ten
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according to on unwind, but none of this has been covered by the press. please can the bbc stop this witch hunt and report on the stories that are relevant and impact us now. some ofthe are relevant and impact us now. some of the coverage _ are relevant and impact us now. some of the coverage took _ are relevant and impact us now. some of the coverage took us _ are relevant and impact us now. some of the coverage took us away - are relevant and impact us now. some of the coverage took us away from westminster, to hearfrom families of those bereaved by covid—19. here is mark easton. the of those bereaved by covid-19. here is mark easton.— is mark easton. the day of the downin: is mark easton. the day of the downing street _ is mark easton. the day of the downing street party, - is mark easton. the day of the downing street party, nobody| downing street party, nobody attended the funeral of 75—year—old. lockdown met her daughter was never able to say goodbye. there was just able to say goodbye. there was just a coffin. how do you feel about the prime minister having a party? i prime minister having a party? i really hate him. i'm sorry to say that— really hate him. i'm sorry to say that because my mum wouldn't want to say that _ that because my mum wouldn't want to say that but _ that because my mum wouldn't want to say that. but isjust that because my mum wouldn't want to say that. but is just a that because my mum wouldn't want to say that. but isjust a disgrace. grace _ say that. but isjust a disgrace. grace if— say that. but isjust a disgrace. grace if their weight was watching that and contacted us to say "you invited bereaved families to talk about the hypocrisy of the prime minister's actions. i am not impressed with what he allegedly did
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adult... similar interviews continued over the next couple of days, with this one on thursday, coming after borisjohnson had apologised in the house of commons for attending the drinks event in may, 2020. the for attending the drinks event in may. 2020-— for attending the drinks event in ma , 2020. . . , :: may, 2020. the funeral was the 20th of ma . it may, 2020. the funeral was the 20th of may- it was — may, 2020. the funeral was the 20th of may. it was very _ may, 2020. the funeral was the 20th of may. it was very difficult _ may, 2020. the funeral was the 20th of may. it was very difficult for - of may. it was very difficult for us. pretty emotional to not be able to celebrate his life. so to hear the news that there was a law passed that be all about it too, and on the day that we buried my father there was a party in downing street and that the prime minister was there, itjust that the prime minister was there, it just leaves such a that the prime minister was there, itjust leaves such a bitter taste. donald walker had this reaction.
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we asked to interview somebody from the bbc, but nobody was available. instead, we were given this statement. that mention of the word impartiality raises one of the trickiest and most hotly debated conceptin trickiest and most hotly debated concept in broadcast news. what exactly is impartiality, and how should the bbc and apply it to its
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journalism? tim davie has made answering those questions a top priority for the news division, setting up a series of rolling external investigations into the output. on tuesday, we got some insight into his thinking, and also that of the bbc�*s director of editorial policy, when they spoke to the house of lords communication committee. mrjordan said, the bbc did not subscribe to a council culture, adding this. it is culture, adding this. it is absolutely _ culture, adding this. it is absolutely critical - culture, adding this. it is absolutely critical to - culture, adding this. it is absolutely critical to the | culture, adding this. it 3 absolutely critical to the bbc that we represent all points of view, give them due weight. flat authors are not going to get as much space as people who believe that the earth is round. but very occasionally it might be appropriate to interview a flat earth, and if a lot of people believed in flat earth we would have to address it more than we do at the present time. it is very important that people in our audience think that people in our audience think that their viewpoints are being
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expressed, challenged and heard and seen on our output. hot expressed, challenged and heard and seen on our output.— seen on our output. not everyone aareed seen on our output. not everyone agreed with — seen on our output. not everyone agreed with that _ seen on our output. not everyone agreed with that approach, - seen on our output. not everyone agreed with that approach, with i seen on our output. not everyone i agreed with that approach, with lora phillips writing... sam freedman agreed. and the journalist was clear in his views. but the bbc editor and former guest on this programme tweeted this about the example raised by david jordan.
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david jordan was not available to expand on the comments he made this week, but a spokesperson give us the statement. subtitles on television were originally introduced for the hard of hearing and provide a valuable service for those audiences, but
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their use is now much more widespread with four out of 518 to 25—year—olds watching with captions some or all of the time. a sign of tv being viewed on smartphones. the accuracy of words appearing on screen is more important than ever, particularly on live programmes such as news. when things go wrong, it can be very wrong and the results can be very wrong and the results can be very wrong and the results can be ludicrous. but for viewers who are partially or totally deaf it is no joke. who are partially or totally deaf it is nojoke. sue davies recorded a video for us recently. i is no joke. sue davies recorded a video for us recently.— video for us recently. i watch the news with _ video for us recently. i watch the news with my — video for us recently. i watch the news with my brother _ video for us recently. i watch the news with my brother who - video for us recently. i watch the news with my brother who is - news with my brother who is profoundly deaf, and ifind i often interpret a lot of what is being said because the words that come up... this week, ifound that said because the words that come up... this week, i found that poland had become pollen, that 25—year—old
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became 25 euros. examples like that. titles are supposed to help deaf people, people with hearing impairment understand what is going on. and when you have got confusing things like that you get stuck thinking about it and you can't move on. so how does it get measured? who looks at it? who decides that the standard is good enough? does an bod standard is good enough? does anybody do _ standard is good enough? does anybody do that. _ standard is good enough? does anybody do that. well, - standard is good enough? does anybody do that. well, we - standard is good enough? does anybody do that. well, we asked the department responsible at the bbc how subtitles are generated and why mistakes are made, and they told
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finally, this year marks the centenary of the bbc, and the corporation has announced some of the ways in which it is going to mark that anniversary on air. michael wrote to us with the suggestion. well, we will see if any bosses watching take up that brilliant idea, but in the meantime we have had a rummage in the archives to give a taste of what he is proposing.
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sir anthony eden has been appointed prime _ sir anthony eden has been appointed prime ministen — sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister. here _ sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister. here is— sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister. here is the _ sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister. here is the news. . sir anthony eden has been appointed prime minister. here is the news. a. prime minister. here is the news. a thought— prime minister. here is the news. a thought is_ prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on— prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on the _ prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on the way, _ prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on the way, but - prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on the way, but it - prime minister. here is the news. a thought is on the way, but it is - thought is on the way, but it is frost— thought is on the way, but it is frost tonight _ thought is on the way, but it is frost tonight in _ thought is on the way, but it is frost tonight in many - thought is on the way, but it is frost tonight in many parts. . the middlesex hospital, and crowds gathering _ the middlesex hospital, and crowds gathering to — the middlesex hospital, and crowds gathering to see _ the middlesex hospital, and crowds gathering to see sir— the middlesex hospital, and crowds gathering to see sir winston - gathering to see sir winston churchitt— gathering to see sir winston churchill leave _ gathering to see sir winston churchill leave in _ gathering to see sir winston churchill leave in a - gathering to see sir winston churchill leave in a few - gathering to see sir winston - churchill leave in a few minutes. i quite churchill leave in a few minutes. quite fancy one of those for churchill leave in a few minutes.“ quite fancy one of those for some new news watch titles. thank you for all of your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions
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about what you see, read or hear on bbc news, on tv, radio, online and on social media, e—mail us or you can find us on twitter. you can call us. and do have a look at our website. that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good evening. we have had some lingering mist and fog. we have already seen some of that fog forming across parts of the midlands, into lincolnshire, east anglia. these are the area seeing the most dense and widespread fog. and temperatures for most of us ate few degrees either side of freezing as we head on into saturday morning. some pockets of frost, a fairly chilly start to the day.
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increasingly some of this low cloud will break up. just a few splashes of rain for the western isles, far north and mainland scotland. only 5 degrees on saturday close to the east coast. 11 celsius the top temperature in plymouth on saturday. and then a great change into sunday, but we could see 80 splashes of rain moving south on a weakening cold front. most places once again drive. double figures in the south. goodbye. this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. (oov)novak djokovic is set to be detained —— novak djokovic is set to be detained —— after the government cancels his visa for a second time. andy murray says the row is bad for the sport. it just seems like itjust seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now. not great
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for quite a long time now. not great for the tennis, not great

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