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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 14, 2022 8:00pm-8:45pm GMT

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in the cabinet office in december 2020 — for the then head of the government's covid task force. kate josephs has tonight apologised. novak djokovic faces being detained and deported, after his australian visa, is cancelled again. his next hearing starts in just an hour's time. washington and kyiv accuse russia trying to carry out balls sabotage operation for a pretext of an invasion against ukraine. balls sabotage operation for a pretext of an ukraine. and a heroes welcome, for polar preet. challenging stereotypes, after her solo expedition, across antarctica. good evening. downing street has apologised
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to buckingham palace, after it emerged two parties were held at no.10, the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last april. a spokesman for borisjohnson, said it was deeply regrettable, that the events took place at a time of national mourning. covid rules had meant indoor mixing was banned, but reports suggest there was drinking and dancing at the parties, until the early hours. the prime minister didn't attend either gathering, but the latest disclosures have amplified calls, for him to resign. with the very latest, here's our political correspondent, ben wright. it was a moment of national mourning, flags flying at half—mast in honour of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. but inside number 10, on the evening of the 16th of april last year, two parties took place. there was drink and music at a time covid restrictions on indoor mixing in england were in place...
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..restrictions the queen followed at the funeral of her husband the following day. when i heard about this, i was, of course, very, very concerned. and i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. earlier this week, the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. according to the daily telegraph, downing street staff were sent to a nearby shop with a suitcase to buy more booze. number 10 has not denied any of this. boris johnson himself was not there. itjoins the list of events being investigated by sue gray, a senior civil servant. as well as the two parties on the same night in april last year, back in december 2020, we know of several gatherings — both in downing street and government departments — including one on the 18th of december, about which the prime minister said this. i have been repeatedly assured
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since these allegations emerged that there was no party and that no covid rules were broken. the list goes on, with events in november 2020 being looked at. there was a gathering in the number 10 garden on 15 may 2020 and a bring—your—own—bottle event on the 20th, which borisjohnson has apologised for attending. today's chastened apology to the queen is the latest twist in a saga that has engulfed number 10. as new revelations have dripped out, downing street has appealed for patience, saying all the facts will be known when sue gray publishes her report. but many tory mps are livid about the prime minister's handling of all of this and the apparent culture inside number 10. a handful of conservative have written letters to the parliamentary party, asking for a confidence vote in boris johnson. we've delivered brexit, he's got us through the pandemic, but now his leadership�*s in question. he needs to step aside.
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sutton coldfield is a true blue seat in the west midlands. but last night, its conservative association voted unanimously to withdraw its support from mr johnson. the constituency�*s mp is a former cabinet minister. are you asking for his resignation? i'm not. i'm not normally a letter writer, but i'm waiting to see what sue gray reports. it is of immense concern, and i'm very conscious that in the local community, in royal sutton coldfield, people are aghast at what's been going on. here and across the country, tory mps will be sounding out their local parties and voters. i think it's disgusting. they're like a rudderless ship, really. i think it's a vendetta - that the media have got. 0pposition parties are now calling on the prime minister to quit. the prime minister allowed this to happen in number 10, not once, not twice, but on multiple occasions. the culture was, it's one rule for everybody else and one rule for us. for a prime minister under intense pressure, much hangs on an inquiry that
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could lay bare whether those responsible for setting lockdown rules repeatedly broke them. well, earlier, ben also had an update on another apology from a former cabinet office boss — about another party held in december, 2020. sue gray's ever expanding report has prompted one former official to get ahead of what she concludes. this afternoon, the previous leader of the government's covid task force apologised for hosting drinks in the cabinet office in december 2020. katejosephs, who is now the chief executive of sheffield city council, says the event involved people who were already at work that day and she was truly sorry for taking part. and we have heard a lot of regrets this week from cabinet ministers, too. politically, though, borisjohnson remains in treacherous territory. 0ne conservative mp told me that his colleagues were heading back to their constituencies this weekend to face a wall
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of fury from their voters. another, that the latest revelations were toxic and potentially fatal. however, i think the majority of tory mps are remaining quietly loyalfor the moment, waiting for sue gray's report to come out. and borisjohnson certainly hopes that it could yet dig him out of trouble. will be getting the views of two conservative voters to see how this trip, drip, drip of bad headlights is affecting him and of the government. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. i should more use of newspaper early coverage what's appearing on social media sites for those babies would suggest more revolutions are in the offing. you'll find out about that 1030 and 1130 this evening in the papers. a communist for the daily mirror and the daily article. always
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a lively debate especially with those two. to stay with us on bbc dues. to stay with us on bbc dues. the australian government, has agreed to delay the deportation of novak djokovic, after cancelling his he gets a court hearing in the next hour or so to challenge saying the latest visa cancellation has been on the ground of health in good order. 0ur correspondent, shaimaa khalil, has the latest, reports from melbourne... this is nine news, live from sydney. just moments ago, the immigration minister has cancelled novak djokovic's visa... it's a story that made headlines here in australia and around the world. for days, novak djokovic has been on the courts training, and now the government has finally announced its decision. the tennis star's visa has been cancelled again, and for the second time, he faces deportation from australia. in his statement, the country's immigration minister alex hawke said...
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the prime minister scott morrison said the sacrifices australians made throughout the pandemic should be protected. mr morrison's government has faced heavy criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into australia in the first place while the country struggled with a spike in covid—19 case numbers. they made a pretty mess of it, they did, but now i think they corrected it. it is unfortunate if novak won't be playing in the tournament. it's a pretty big loss. yeah, i think if everybody else has to follow the rules, why can't he? and obviously, he thought he was above it all. the australian open is only a couple of days away, and there are now huge doubts over whether novak djokovic will be able to compete. but even if he did secure his freedom, a chaotic and stalled preparation will only get worse with him spending the weekend
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between a detention hotel and his lawyer's office. andy murray says the controversy has been bad for the sport. itjust seems like it has dragged on for quite a long time now. yeah, not great for tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak djokovic. his former coach, the multiple grand slam winner boris becker, said this story has become about more than just sport. he is only a tennis player. we are alljust sportsmen, we are not politicians. if we are used in a political way, then we don't have a chance. the world number one is still fighting to defend his title here. whether or not he will be able to play, the australian open will take place under the shadow of a controversy that has gone way beyond tennis. let's speak to the barrister and senior counsel greg barns,
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head of digital sports or news corporation australia. she's melbourne and she has in been sitting on the court hearing. has it got under way we still waiting for it to begin? irate got under way we still waiting for it to begin?— it to begin? we are still waiting. 50 court was _ it to begin? we are still waiting. so court was in _ it to begin? we are still waiting. so court was in session - it to begin? we are still waiting. so court was in session until - it to begin? we are still waiting. l so court was in session until about 11pm local time last night, friday night. the following process is we are expecting the vector collection to meet with his lawyers this morning. he will go —— djokovic. he will go for an interview and our understanding as of last night is he will then be taken by officers potentially back the detention hotel. the court haven't released his future whereabouts for fear of a media circus. his future whereabouts for fear of a media circu— media circus. yeah, that said, the circus is already in _ media circus. yeah, that said, the circus is already in town. - media circus. yeah, that said, the circus is already in town. it's - media circus. yeah, that said, the circus is already in town. it's an i circus is already in town. it's an extraordinary one which is really overshadowing... normally would be talking about prospects for the australian open ended be lots of good sports coverage. it's all about the politics, all about the status
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of not at djokovic. just the lawyers meeting immigration officers, is that normal?— meeting immigration officers, is that normal? ., that normal? no, he will meet with the officer and _ that normal? no, he will meet with the officer and meet _ that normal? no, he will meet with the officer and meet with _ that normal? no, he will meet with | the officer and meet with lawyers... so the immigration officer has made a decision on his visa. does everybody who's visa it cancelled get the chance to meet immigration offers afterwards? my understanding is that when you've _ offers afterwards? my understanding is that when you've had _ offers afterwards? my understanding is that when you've had your - offers afterwards? my understanding is that when you've had your visa - is that when you've had your visa cancelled you are subject to further interview when you have launched an appeal which djokovic has. bi; interview when you have launched an appeal which djokovic has.— appeal which d'okovic has. by the immigration — appeal which djokovic has. by the immigration minister, _ appeal which djokovic has. by the immigration minister, that - appeal which djokovic has. by the j immigration minister, that seems extraordinary. ida. immigration minister, that seems extraordinary-— extraordinary. no, it will be at the... extraordinary. no, it will be at the--- you _ extraordinary. no, it will be at the... you gets _ extraordinary. no, it will be at the... you gets another - extraordinary. no, it will be at - the. .. you gets another interview. the... you gets another interview. the court could _ the... you gets another interview. the court could yet _ the... you gets another interview. the court could yet say _ the... you gets another interview. the court could yet say that - the... you gets another interview. the court could yet say that this i the court could yet say that this procedure has been flawed and stepping, could they? presumably they can't overturn the substance of they can't overturn the substance of the decision. ida. they can't overturn the substance of the decision-— the decision. no, the “udge last niaht, the decision. no, the “udge last night, judge h the decision. no, the “udge last night, judge keuy _ the decision. no, thejudge last night, judge kelly who - the decision. no, thejudge last night, judge kelly who actuallyl the decision. no, the judge last - night, judge kelly who actually sort of saw mandate hearings which djokovic one said he didn't have the power to overrule anything from alex
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hoch. we are back in court, back in federal court this time on sunday australia time. so federal court this time on sunday australia time.— australia time. so he still hoping to late australia time. so he still hoping to plate next _ australia time. so he still hoping to plate next week _ australia time. so he still hoping to plate next week or _ australia time. so he still hoping to plate next week or he - australia time. so he still hoping to plate next week or he could i australia time. so he still hoping - to plate next week or he could be on a plane out sunday night. essentially, yes. ithink a plane out sunday night. essentially, yes. i think by sunday night we will know if he will be on court on monday or leaving the federal court and getting a flight. i know you're a passionate interest in sport professionally, you don't spend a lot of time covering court cases was that what is your assessment of how it's come down in australia? i assessment of how it's come down in australia? ~ �* , , ., australia? i think it's been an absolute absolute _ australia? i think it's been an absolute absolute shambles. | australia? i think it's been an i absolute absolute shambles. at australia? i think it's been an - absolute absolute shambles. at the candy bar really hit the nail ned that he didn't need to come to this. i think this could be wrapped up in a far more dignified way. i don't think anyone's coming out looking particularly good. i think djokovic instigated a furious amount of backlash with his initial post and i think the federal government over here as well as state government
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have both jumped on here as well as state government have bothjumped on an opportunity to flex their muscle. i do think we look rather ridiculous.— to flex their muscle. i do think we look rather ridiculous. thank you so much for that. _ look rather ridiculous. thank you so much for that. good _ look rather ridiculous. thank you so much for that. good to _ look rather ridiculous. thank you so much for that. good to speak - look rather ridiculous. thank you so l much for that. good to speak to you. we may speak again, who knows? it's talk to the spokesman for the australia lawyers alliance. and well experienced in dealing with cases. to what extent is any visa application and rejection? i5 cases. to what extent is any visa application and rejection?- application and re'ection? is not that difficult — application and rejection? is not that difficult because _ application and rejection? is not that difficult because it's - application and rejection? is not that difficult because it's not. that difficult because it's not often that a minister exercises this thing that his personal power on these grounds. there are many visa revocation cases particularly on the grounds of character. hear what you haveis grounds of character. hear what you have is a decision made in very rapid time by a minister dealing with a question of what some people would say is a political question, whether or not the government wants
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to exercise he said, he settles in flexing its muscle on laws. it’s to exercise he said, he settles in flexing its muscle on laws. it's an unusual case. _ flexing its muscle on laws. it's an unusual case. you _ flexing its muscle on laws. it's an unusual case. you not _ flexing its muscle on laws. it's an unusual case. you not a - flexing its muscle on laws. it's an unusual case. you not a politician for that i don't ask this as a political question but it does occur to me that we are perilously close to me that we are perilously close to the start of the federal election campaign. do you think this is playing at all into the politics that this case has become politcised? that this case has become politcised ?_ that this case has become olitcised? �* ., ., ., , politcised? i've got no doubt. in fact, the thing _ politcised? i've got no doubt. in fact, the thing about _ politcised? i've got no doubt. in | fact, the thing about immigration policy in australia and the way it interacts with the law, it's been political for many years. i've done many cases where people were, new zealand and it's become a sore point with people being deported. this is a political decision. the political power which is a godlike power that the minister can exercise it personally on very broad grounds. can be used for political purpose
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was up again, not party political but that's what you get on discretion. in but that's what you get on discretion.— but that's what you get on discretion. ., , , �* , ., discretion. in that sense it's not 'ust his discretion. in that sense it's not just his current _ discretion. in that sense it's not just his current government. i just his current government. presumably there is a case of previous labour governments as well. look, i think since 2001 when the government started this border protection policy in australia has become an obsession on both sides. and it's put up a bit by the media. it's on political ground and of course the law has been changed by successive governments in australia to be made more complicated for persons using the migration act but also given these broad discretionary powers which essentially try to force the courts. the powers which essentially try to force the courts.— force the courts. the “udges obvioustyfi force the courts. the “udges obvioustytryfi force the courts. the “udges obviously try to h force the courts. the judges obviously try to introduce i force the courts. the judges i obviously try to introduce some structure to a router doing that rather chaotic process was up his original decision last weekend there dessert revocation should not stand, they should reconsider the process.
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presumably that's all he can do, it's procedural for presumably that's all he can do, it's proceduralfor him, it's not for him to substitute his judgment but that of the politician. 0n djokovic aside, is there an argument they are still that they can realistically make about how he's being treated?— being treated? they can. for example. — being treated? they can. for example. the _ being treated? they can. for example, the government i being treated? they can. for example, the government is| being treated? they can. for - example, the government is saying there is a risk of public health, it's in the public interest to deal with that in this way. they can argue that that's in a rational approach. in fact acting for djokovic last night made that point that to make essentially what this minister is saying is that we don't want you here because it might stir up want you here because it might stir up anti—factors put up might say that the government is —— for the mib rational, it might be said to be taken into account of consideration. certainly they've got an arguable case. . ,
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certainly they've got an arguable case. ., , , ., 4' ., certainly they've got an arguable case. ., , , ., ~ ., ., case. finally, we should know we are told sunday — case. finally, we should know we are told sunday at _ case. finally, we should know we are told sunday at some _ case. finally, we should know we are told sunday at some point. _ case. finally, we should know we are told sunday at some point. is - case. finally, we should know we are told sunday at some point. is there l told sunday at some point. is there any appeal, anything else he can now do if the court goes against him? well, the difficulties god is if he wants to play in the tournament committee launched another appeal that will go well into next week. yes, it can. but it means he's running into logistical problems in terms of playing in the australian open. i terms of playing in the australian 0 en. , , , , terms of playing in the australian 0 en. , , _ ., ., terms of playing in the australian oen. ,, _ ., ., ., open. i guess he might by of had of the whole business. _ open. i guess he might by of had of the whole business. true. - open. i guess he might by of had of the whole business. true. i'm - open. i guess he might by of had of the whole business. true. i'm sure | the whole business. true. i'm sure a lot of people would've done by now. thank you so much greg barnes. washington and kyiv have accused russia of preparing to carry out false sabotage operations to create a pretext for an invasion of ukraine. the pentagon said moscow had sent a group of trained operatives into eastern ukraine who could carry out acts of sabotage against russia's own proxy forces there. ukraine's defence ministry said russia was plotting to stage similar operations in neighbouring moldova. the kremlin has denied the reports.
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but speaking at a news conference, 0ur washington correspondent barbara plett usher reports. well, the statement is that the americans have said that they have intelligence that the russians are preparing a pretext for innovation, and this involves, as you said, they have pre—positioned operatives to carry out sabotage attacks against russian proxy forces in eastern ukraine, which they would then blame on the ukrainians. the americans also say the russians have stepped up disinformation campaigns in state and social media. again, framing ukraine as a potential aggressor. they have not put a timeline on this, but the white house has said they believe that if the president of russia decides to go ahead with an invasion, they still believe he has not made a final decision. if he does, this would happen between mid—january
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and mid—february. so quite specific information, which is rather unusual for this kind of intelligence — to go public in such a specific way. it seems that they are very much trying to show a deterrence to possible action. the russians have said they don't plan to invade, but clearly the americans are not taking them at face value. the pentagon's spokesperson, john kirby, said that what they want to do was get this information out there so that the world would have some idea of how this could potentially play out. and if it did happen this way, they would know what was going on. so basically pre—empt any russian claims of ukrainian aggression. and the administration has also said many times that this is a familiar playbook, these are the type of tactics that the russians used when they invaded premier in 2014. the welsh government has set out plans to end covid restrictions, over the next two weeks. from tomorrow, the number of people who can attend outdoor events will rise from 50 to 500,
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and from next friday, there'll be no limits on the size of crowds, and outdoor hospitality can take place. then at the end of the month, most restrictions will be removed for indoor venues and activities, and the rule of six will go. however the first minister, mark drakeford, says that while infections are falling, there's no room for complacency. 0ur wales correspondent, tomos morgon, has more. piece by piece, wales is building its way back to normality once again. the closure of night clubs forced heidi's to delay its grand opening, forcing the business to move their focus elsewhere. we planned to open injanuary. obviously, the restrictions came in. we had to move our investment into england, where businesses were trading, and get some income and revenue generated. now you will not be open in time for when the restrictions easing? we will not be open in time, but we want to make sure it is perfect for when it does arrive. from the 28th, the night—time and hospitality industry will be able to fully operate without any restrictions in wales once again.
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and from next week, capacity crowds will be welcome inside stadiums, just in time for the six nations. the location of the principality stadium is fairly unique in cardiff, because literallyjust a stone's throw away are the welsh capital's main bars, clubs and restaurants. and from the 28th of january, they will all be able to operate without any measures in place. the six nations brings in so much revenue, it can hold some businesses for the rest of the year. today's announcement is a much—needed boost after a difficult period. critics say this latest round of restrictions wasn't necessary. the first minister suggested that, without them, 0micron could have been far worse. i don't think the model was wrong in essence, because the model showed what has happened in practice, the sharp rise and now a rapid decline. as hospitality rebuilds for another reopening, they'll be hoping it's
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for the last time. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff. new figures suggest the uk economy climbed above above its pre pandemic level for the first time in november, shortly before 0micron struck. the office for national statistics said gross domestic product that's the total number of goods and services produced by the economy, increased by 0.9%. the construction sector grew strongly during the month, with the services sector also benefiting. downing street has expressed deep concern, that a suspected chinese agent, was able to target mps, in an attempt to make british policy more favourable to beijing. china has denied the claims, and accused the government of being "too obsessed with james bond movies." 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera has more. an agent for the chinese state in the heart of westminster. that's the claim that sparked a row between the uk and china. christine lee was a well—known figure, a lawyer seen here encouraging people from the chinese community to engage in politics.
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your vote is your voice! she had contact across the spectrum, providing hundreds of thousands of pounds of funding and meeting top politicians. but yesterday, m15 issued this rare alert, warning she was trying to covertly interfere in british political life on behalf of the chinese communist party. today, china hit back, denying the claims. its foreign ministry spokesperson said perhaps some individuals have watched too many 007 movies, leading to unnecessary mental associations. the warning is a sign that tensions over china and its covert activities are growing. just two months ago, the head of m16 said china was now his top priority. china's state news agency responded to that speech with its own spoof of mi6's fictional spy,
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with a chinese james pond mocking british intelligence. but one former diplomat says the uk does need to be on guard for china seeking influence. by putting in that sort of money, it gets eyes and ears in parliament, it gets to influence, it hopes, various policy decisions. it might be about our critical national infrastructure. this latest warning has caused alarm in westminster, and it's unlikely to be the last. gordon corera, bbc news. vigils are being held across the island of ireland, in memory of murdered teacher, ashling murphy. the 23—year—old was attacked on the banks of the grand canal in county 0ffaly, on wednesday. the national women's council of ireland, says events have been planned at dozens of locations, and the taoiseach, micheal martin, says ireland is united in solidarity and revulsion, at the killing. the woman who's accused the duke of york of sexually abusing her has
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welcomed a us judge's decision to allow her legal case to continue. virginia giuffre says her goal is to show that the rich and powerful aren't above the law. prince andrew strongly denies the allegations against him. buckingham palace announced yesterday that the duke's military titles and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen. 0ur correspondent neda tawfik joins me form washington. prince andrew's team says this is a marathon and not a sprint. while that may be the case at this stage of the race, virginia giuffre's lawyers have the duke of york exactly where they want him. he has basically run out of legal manoeuvres and he will have to fight this case as a private citizen, having been stripped of his royal titles. he will defend himself against these allegations, which he has consistently denied. he is determined to do so. for her part, virginia giuffre said she is excited and happy for the chance to expose the truth.
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her team is preparing for a trial and they are not ruling out the possibility of settlement talks, but they say it has to be one that is not purely financial. we do expect that her team may soon ask the new yorkjudge to send a letter on their behalf to the british courts requesting their assistance in gathering evidence. including names of people she may want to depose overseas. a 32—year—old british army officer who says she's challenging the stereotype of polar explorers has returned to her home in the uk, after walking solo across antarctica. captain preet chandi trekked 700 miles in a0 days, and says she's already planning her next expedition. 0ur correspondent frankie mccamley has that story. cheering arriving into heathrow, captain preet chandi reunited with her bridesmaid—to—be
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and fiance, who proposed a week before she left for the south pole. i'm so, so glad to be back in the uk. it's so great to have an audience here, like, have a few friends here, have my partner here and people from the military as well. polar preet, as she has become known, finished a 700—mile trek to the south pole in a0 days, seven hours and three minutes, almost a week ahead of schedule, enduring temperatures as low as —50 degrees and wind speeds of up to 60 mph, while pulling a 90 kilograms sled containing her kit. and what's next? i know you've just landed, but you already have plans in the pipeline, don't you, for other things? pretty much from monday i think i'll be in the gym again training. my aim is to do a full crossing, so, solo unsupported again. it will be a little bit longer, probably a little bit tougher. the 32—year—old will also begin a tour of the uk to share her experience
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as she plans her wedding. preet�*s story of grit and determination has travelled across the world, getting international coverage. her goal is to try to inspire as many people as possible from all different backgrounds to take on challenges they never knew they were capable of. preet says she will continue to smash glass ceilings and change the image of the arctic explorer. frankie mccamley, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. good evening. it's been another dry, settled day across much of the uk. we have had some lingering mist and fog as well, and that's going to be reforming through the course of tonight. in fact, we've already seen some of that fog forming across parts of the midlands, into the welsh marches, lincolnshire, east anglia as well. these are the areas seeing the most dense and widespread fog, but elsewhere the odd misty and murky patch as well. and temperatures for most of us
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a few degrees either side of freezing as we head on into saturday morning. so some pockets of frost around, a fairly chilly start to the day, some sunshine around and, increasingly, some of this low cloud will tend to break up through the course of the day. most places, again, looking dry. just a few splashes of rain for the western isles and perhaps the far north of mainland scotland as well. temperatures on saturday only around five degrees close to the east coast, but turning a bit milder in the southwest — 11 celsius the top temperature in plymouth on saturday. and then no great change into sunday, but we could see a few splashes of rain moving south on a weakening cold front. but most places once again dry, temperatures in double figures in the south. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines... downing street apologises to buckingham palace, after two parties were held at number 10 the night before the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. when i heard about this i was of course very, very concerned. i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. further revelations this evening: another leaving event took place in the cabinet office in december 2020 for the then—head of the government's covid taskforce. kate josephs has tonight apologised. novak djokovic faces being detained and deported, after his australian visa, is cancelled again — his next court hearing starts in an hour's time.
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let's get more on that downing street apology to the queen, after it emerged that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral, in breach of coronavirus restrictions. a spokesman for the prime minister described the events as "deeply regrettable" at a time of national mourning. an investigation into the downing street parties is ongoing, being carried out by the senior civil servant, sue gray, and the report is due to be delivered next week. well, robert shrimsley — who's the uk chief political commentator at the ft — says the idea that her report buys the government time is a mistake. i don't think the pressure is easing at all. i think the prime minister hoped with his apology on wednesday and the attempt to push everything back to the sue gray report, that this would simmer down for a few days. but obviously the latest revelations about the party on the eve of prince philip's funeral have made that much more difficult. but i think what we can see is the government's defence strategy. in a sense, sue gray is a key part of this.
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because the more they can make this about the legalities and a report into those legalities which sets out the facts, the more they can then say, "right, we've responded to this problem. i'm cleaning out downing street." and so on, and so on. and push a reckoning with his own mps back for weeks and months, beyond the local elections, who knows? the issue is whether conservative mps feel this isn't about the absolute spirit and letter of every regulation but about the big picture of a consistent breaking of the spirit and letter of the laws, and the hypocrisy and the amorality. and i think what's going to be very interesting in the early days of the next week, when conservative mps get back from having spent time with their constituency parties and their constituents, is what kind of mood they're in after that. i was very struck by a number of things in the article. but if i may quote you, "it was arrogant, witless and lacking in basic decency. no mp should need an inquiry to know where they stand on this." do you think conservatives are seeing this as an inquiry
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to tell them what to think about this, or really as a kind of way of holding the line until they've decided what they want to do about boris johnson's future? yeah, if you're a conservative mp, in the end, your fundamental judgment is, "is this man going to help me save my seat in the next election or is he going to cost me the next election?" that's the keyjudgment, and that's what's going to decide his future. nothing else. it's going to be do they think he's going to be an electoral asset or an electoral drag? and increasingly they are coming around to the view that he may well be an electoral drag. but they don't actually have to make this decision today. so the great temptation if you're a conservative mp, if they're nervous of striking, is just wait and see. give it a week, give it two weeks. see if the temperature goes out of it a bit, see how the local elections go, see if it's bad, and so on and so on. and also, they're not quite clear who they want to succeed him and who would be better. there isn't an absolute clear—cut favourite. so the temptation among conservative
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mps is to find ways of delaying a reckoning until they can see it's absolutely unavoidable. i suppose the difficulty — twofold really, isn't it? the prime minister is clearly wounded by all of this, and there are those that would suggest that because of the rebellion before christmas that his authority even in his own party is really not what it was a year ago, or even maybe six months ago. therefore, to leave him in place, a weakened political leader, might not be in the national interest, still less in the party's interest. the other side of it might be, i suppose, election now if you're about to have a difficult set of local elections? leave him there, let him take the rap for that, and then let a new leader start with a fresh sheet of paper. yeah, there are absolutely the kind of judgment yeah, there are absolutely the kind ofjudgment they are yeah, there are absolutely the kind of judgment they are having yeah, there are absolutely the kind ofjudgment they are having to wrestle with. and also, by the way, the possibility that conservative mps might quite like the prime minister to be a bit weaker and have to listen to them a bit more, and their concerns. so it is not all bad for them if his authority is diminished and they gain from that. but this is the key point, you don't
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have to make this call now if you are a conservative mp, unless you are a conservative mp, unless you are deeply morally offended by this. if you are deeply morally offended by this then clearly you know what to do. the other point, tory leadership elections, you only get one shot every 12 months. until you trigger an election, if he wins he cannot be challenged again. then we are moving into general election territory. the other point is, when you take your shot at the prime minister, you don't want to miss. they are going to want to make sure that they have the numbers. that is why this was like a more borne out process. there is no question, i think, that conservative mps are beginning to think that he is a drag on the party and is going to pull them back rather than push them forward. with me to discuss the latest revelations — and the feeling among tories about what's been going — is jason behanna, former deputy chair of the beaconsfield conservative association and also, i'm joined by anna mcgovern, who is the social media manager for the young
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conservatives network. thank you both forjoining us. not least forgiving of some of your time on a friday evening. anna, can i ask you first of all what you have made now we come to the end of the week of the various revelations. what in practice that had on you? i of the various revelations. what in practice that had on you?- practice that had on you? i think it has been really _ practice that had on you? i think it has been really shocking, - practice that had on you? i think it| has been really shocking, actually. almost _ has been really shocking, actually. almost every day we have seen new revelations — almost every day we have seen new revelations come out in terms of partygate — revelations come out in terms of partygate and the breaking of lockdown restrictions by the government, which i think is actually— government, which i think is actually really shocking. as a conservative myself, it is actually really— conservative myself, it is actually really hard — conservative myself, it is actually really hard to see myself supporting the party— really hard to see myself supporting the party when they are making these restrictions, they are making these ruies— restrictions, they are making these rules that _ restrictions, they are making these rules that they expect us to follow, but then— rules that they expect us to follow, but then they are actually not following them themselves. i think the news _ following them themselves. i think the news today, we had the covid—19 task force _ the news today, we had the covid—19 task force having a party while we
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were _ task force having a party while we were all— task force having a party while we were all locked down in our homes, i think— were all locked down in our homes, i think it's _ were all locked down in our homes, i think it's really disgraceful when they are — think it's really disgraceful when they are the ones making the rules. so i they are the ones making the rules. 50 i think— they are the ones making the rules. so i think the whole thing is really hypocritical. so i think the whole thing is really hypocritical-— so i think the whole thing is really h ocritical. ., ., hypocritical. jason, how does a look to ou?| hypocritical. jason, how does a look to you? ithink— hypocritical. jason, how does a look to you? i think there's _ hypocritical. jason, how does a look to you? i think there's a _ hypocritical. jason, how does a look to you? i think there's a couple - hypocritical. jason, how does a look to you? i think there's a couple of l to you? i think there's a couple of facets that _ to you? i think there's a couple of facets that we _ to you? i think there's a couple of facets that we need _ to you? i think there's a couple of facets that we need to _ to you? i think there's a couple of facets that we need to focus - to you? i think there's a couple of facets that we need to focus on. | facets that we need to focus on. one, the language around parties is obviously very emotive, especially when there was such a great loss about the way through a united kingdom when it comes to covid. and i think that that language needs to be tempered in terms of what actually went on. we are only going to know that after tuesday, hopefully. i'm not putting any pressure on sue at all. i think for the better part of what has happened, there is palpable anger among the grassroots. but i think people don't necessarily understand what the prime minister's going through. he has taken a massive burden upon his shoulders, he has
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carried every one of those deaths personally. it has been really tough and i cannot imagine, as a father, as somebody who has loads of relatives and friends, if i lost any of them, i would be devastated. but at the same time, what kind of weight does he carry on his shoulders? do we not carrying that at all? ., ., ., ., ., ., at all? you thought that ought to at least wei . h at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in _ at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in the _ at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in the mix? _ at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in the mix? i _ at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in the mix? i think- at all? you thought that ought to at least weigh in the mix? i think it i least weigh in the mix? i think it should. least weigh in the mix? i think it should- also. — least weigh in the mix? i think it should. also, when _ least weigh in the mix? i think it should. also, when you - least weigh in the mix? i think it should. also, when you add - least weigh in the mix? i think it should. also, when you add in l least weigh in the mix? i think it i should. also, when you add in that nobody is really talking about what i call the hypocritical left, who is not actually adding in any of their parties that allegedly have gone on as well. there has been very little in the media about their keir starmer, angela rayner, and all of their alleged parties. i starmer, angela rayner, and all of their alleged parties.— their alleged parties. i don't know their alleged parties. i don't know the details of _ their alleged parties. i don't know the details of theirs. _ their alleged parties. i don't know the details of theirs. if _ their alleged parties. i don't know the details of theirs. if you - their alleged parties. i don't know the details of theirs. if you don't i the details of theirs. if you don't mind, we will park that, because i don't feel knowledgeable enough to be able to police that in terms of the discussion. you have made the
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point, it is perfectly reasonable to perhaps say. i suppose the counterargument that might be, if you make the rules and you break them, but i take the point you are making. anna, what aboutjason's point, that actually we making. anna, what about jason's point, that actually we want to feel a little bit of sympathy for boris johnson. not all of these events even involved him.— johnson. not all of these events even involved him. yeah, but it is under his government. _ even involved him. yeah, but it is under his government. and - even involved him. yeah, but it is under his government. and to - even involved him. yeah, but it is under his government. and to be| under his government. and to be fair, _ under his government. and to be fair, we _ under his government. and to be fair, we have all struggled through the lockdown restrictions. all of us, i_ the lockdown restrictions. all of us, ithink— the lockdown restrictions. all of us, i think we all do recognise the weight— us, i think we all do recognise the weight that he carries on his shoulders as we are navigating through— shoulders as we are navigating through a _ shoulders as we are navigating through a very unprecedented period of our— through a very unprecedented period of our times. because we have never seen _ of our times. because we have never seen anything like this before. sol think— seen anything like this before. sol think no— seen anything like this before. sol think no one is diminishing that. but what — think no one is diminishing that. but what it— think no one is diminishing that. but what it comes down to is the fact that — but what it comes down to is the fact that they make these rules and expected _ fact that they make these rules and expected all of us to follow these restrictions that they put in place, and the _ restrictions that they put in place, and the thing is, it's notjust about— and the thing is, it's notjust about him. to be fair, we have had
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so many— about him. to be fair, we have had so many restrictions put upon us and we have _ so many restrictions put upon us and we have also— so many restrictions put upon us and we have also suffered many losses as well. we have also suffered many losses as welt and _ we have also suffered many losses as welt and i_ we have also suffered many losses as well. and i think the impact on that with young — well. and i think the impact on that with young people is going to be really— with young people is going to be really significant. we are looking at the _ really significant. we are looking at the cost of living in the future. it is at the cost of living in the future. it is going — at the cost of living in the future. it is going to be really significant impact _ it is going to be really significant impact on — it is going to be really significant impact on them as well. yes, i think we do _ impact on them as well. yes, i think we do all— impact on them as well. yes, i think we do all understand, looking at boris, _ we do all understand, looking at boris, he — we do all understand, looking at boris, he has had a really big pandemic— boris, he has had a really big pandemic to deal with, and no one is saying _ pandemic to deal with, and no one is saying this _ pandemic to deal with, and no one is saying this is — pandemic to deal with, and no one is saying this is easy. but at the same time, _ saying this is easy. but at the same time, everyone has suffered. sol can understand the anger from people when they— can understand the anger from people when they are seeing these lockdown parties _ when they are seeing these lockdown parties happening while we are all locked _ parties happening while we are all locked down in our homes and actually— locked down in our homes and actually abiding by the restrictions. | actually abiding by the restrictions.— actually abiding by the restrictions. ~ , . , restrictions. i think it is really disgraceful. _ restrictions. i think it is really disgraceful. jason, _ restrictions. i think it is really disgraceful. jason, if- restrictions. i think it is really disgraceful. jason, if you're i restrictions. i think it is really i disgraceful. jason, if you're not already, and you may well be, because i know yours is a very active conservatives association, but you will definitely be knocking on doors in the not too distant future. jason, from your point of view, are you not at all worried
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that you will not on a door and the door will be opened by a junior doctor or a paramedic or a nurse, who could say to you "i've lived under those pressures, we didn't spend any of our time partying socially because we knew what the rules said." and will struggle to understand how that is not understood by some at least in number ten. understood by some at least in number ten-— understood by some at least in number ten. understood by some at least in numberten. . , ~' number ten. absolutely. i think it has been a _ number ten. absolutely. i think it has been a big — number ten. absolutely. i think it has been a big divide. _ number ten. absolutely. i think it has been a big divide. almost - number ten. absolutely. i think it has been a big divide. almost as| has been a big divide. almost as divisive as brexit had. people on the one side who just want to depose the one side who just want to depose the top because they are angry and they want to lash out and find somebody who is responsible. somebody is to blame, let's find somebody. but i think, when you look at it pragmatically, knocking on the doors as i have for many, many years, supporting the party, we are going to get adverse, flavour of the day projection from anybody.
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whatever is hyped up in the media is going to come through when you look on their door and when you deal with it pragmatically and say to people, look, we do understand how you have been treated, we do understand how you feel you have been treated. i have many friends and colleagues in the nhs and some of them have been absolutely livid at what has been going on. i must say, myself, i'm a bit disappointed at this constant drip, drip, drip. it is like a bit of torture, constantly dripping. another party, another gathering. jason, i'm sorry to interrupt. we are running out of time. it hasn't shaken your confidence and boris johnson? ., �* , , johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007- — johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007- i _ johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. | think— johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. i think he _ johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. i think he is _ johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. i think he is a - johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. i think he is a man - johnson? no, i've believed in boris since 2007. i think he is a man of l since 2007. i think he is a man of vision, i think he has the vision the united kingdom, and i think we need a good team around him. tbtmna. need a good team around him. anna, our need a good team around him. anna, your view? —
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need a good team around him. anna, your view? i— need a good team around him. anna, your view? i think _ need a good team around him. anna, your view? i think a _ need a good team around him. anna, your view? i think a lot _ need a good team around him. anna, your view? i think a lot of _ need a good team around him. anna, your view? i think a lot of people - your view? i think a lot of people have _ your view? i think a lot of people have lost a — your view? i think a lot of people have lost a lot of respect for him, and i_ have lost a lot of respect for him, and i won't — have lost a lot of respect for him, and i won't be surprised... know, i don't _ and i won't be surprised... know, i don't respect — and i won't be surprised... know, i don't respect him as a prime minister _ don't respect him as a prime minister. . ~ don't respect him as a prime minister-— don't respect him as a prime minister. ., ,, , ., ., ., ., don't respect him as a prime minister. ., ., ., ., minister. thank you again for your time. we could _ minister. thank you again for your time. we could have _ minister. thank you again for your time. we could have talked - minister. thank you again for your time. we could have talked for. minister. thank you again for your time. we could have talked for a l minister. thank you again for your i time. we could have talked for a lot longer, but i'm gratefulfor you summarising your views are so clearly. i hope you have a good weekend, parties are no parties. take care. celebrity chef antony worrall—thompson has caused some controversy — after putting a sign inside his pub welcoming people who are unvaccinated. the chef — who owns the greyhound in rotherfield peppard in 0xfordshire — says he isn't against vaccines — he has been vaccinated — but says he is also pro—choice. but as david lumb reports. in a sleepy village in south 0xfordshire... ..this sign has caused a stir.
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the pub belongs to the tv chef, anthony worrall—thompson. i am not sure about unvaccinated. what are signals that are sending out to people who are not going to bother. absolutely not a problem. i am fully vaccinated, but i think it is people's own opinion if they don't want to be vaccinated. obviously the pub is entitled to make its own decisions. about who is allowed in there. well, it doesn't bother me, but i wouldn't go in there. some others told us off—camera that they will not be returning to the poster comes down. the sign was not made or requested by the pub. it's been up for about six weeks. i'm doing it because i don't want to discriminate against anyone. at the end of the day, we have done our time, we have done two years of this, lockdowns and various things, and precautions and i think it is time to move on. do think it is a bit irresponsible? i don't think it is irresponsible at all. you know, you have the freedom of choice to get vaccinated, freedom
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of choice if you want to come to the greyhound.

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