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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 14, 2022 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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further revelations this evening — another leaving event took place in the cabinet office in december 2020, for the then head of the government's covid task force. kate josephs has tonight apologised. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are being held across ireland for the 23—year—old murdered while outjogging. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks, after a drop in omicron cases. phone rings and coming up, there's another scream in your cinemas. find out what mark kermode thinks about the fifth in the movie franchise, and the week's other big releases, in the film review at 5.45pm.
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good evening. welcome to the bbc news at 5pm. i am jane hill. downing street has apologised to buckingham palace after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral. a spokesman for borisjohnson said it was deeply regrettable that the events took place at a time of national mourning. covid rules at the time banned indoor mixing, but reports suggest there was drinking and dancing until the early hours. the prime minister wasn't at the parties, but the latest disclosures, which the daily telegraph reported, have fuelled more calls for his resignation. and in the last hour, a former director general of the government's covid task force
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has issued her own apology for a cabinet office drinks party in december 2020. we'll have more on that shortly. our first report is from our political correspondent nick eardley. the 17th of april last year. one of the defining pictures of the pandemic. the queen sitting alone at the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. the night before, in here, staff held leaving dos, despite people being banned from social mixing indoors. according to the daily telegraph, there was music and dancing. someone was sent to a local shop with a suitcase to stock up on alcohol. downing street hasn't denied the specific claims. when i heard about this, i was, of course, very, very concerned, and i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. earlier this week, the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made.
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obviously, if you're a rule—maker, you can't be a rule—breaker, of course that is correct, but we need to let this investigation run. this morning, downing street apologised to buckingham palace. the prime minister's spokesman said it was deeply regrettable that this had taken place at a time of national mourning ahead of prince philip's funeral. one of the events was a leaving do for this man, james slack, borisjohnson�*s former communications chief. he said in a statement this morning... allegations of parties or gatherings which broke the rules now span almost a year, from may 2020 to april 2021,
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and that's led to suggestions that these were not isolated incidents but part of a cultural problem in borisjohnson�*s downing street. the prime minister hasn't been seen in public since wednesday, and although he didn't attend the events which emerged today, many of his mps are angry that he did attend drinks during lockdown in 2020. five have now called for him to quit. part of the key elements of leadership is that you don't ask people you're asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you're not willing to bear yourself, and clearly that has not been the case. the fact is they have been having parties throughout because, in the end, they thought that the laws that they were putting together were not laws that applied to them. the revelations about what went on here keep coming,
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piling even more pressure on downing street's most senior occupant. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. let's get a bit more on that apology, issued in the past hour from the former director general of the government's covid task force for holding leaving drinks in the cabinet office in december 2020. katejosephs, who is now the chief executive of sheffield city council, confirmed the event is one of those being investigated by the senior civil servant sue gray. lets state her statement in the last hour. it says... —— lets see her statements... she goes on to say... joining me now is liz roberts, the political reporter
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for bbc radio sheffield. liz, evening to you. this is another fast—moving story. what do we know at this stage? the fast-moving story. what do we know at this stage?— at this stage? the background to this is that _ at this stage? the background to this is that kate _ at this stage? the background to this is that kate josephs - at this stage? the background to this is that kate josephs joined i this is that katejosephs joined sheffield city council in early 2021, and we knew that she had come from the cabinet office. in fact it was probably one of the selling point for her recruitment, was that she had been heading up this ferment covid—19 task force —— government. so far, so good for katejosephs in sheffield, until this afternoon, when she put out the statements that you havejust when she put out the statements that you have just read, when she put out the statements that you havejust read, saying when she put out the statements that you have just read, saying that she did indeed have drinks with colleagues on the 17th of december as part of her leaving do, if you like, and as i said, she is unreservedly sorry for that, but beyond that, we don't know much more about the event itself. she has put
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out this statement, she is not giving any interviews. we have also asked of her and the council whether they can confirm this is the same event that we already were aware of that happened in the cabinet office on that day, and that is yet to be confirmed as well. or if this was indeed another event on top of the one that we have already been told about. �* ., , ., one that we have already been told about. ., , ., about. and any local reaction so far, liz? we _ about. and any local reaction so far, liz? we have _ about. and any local reaction so far, liz? we have had _ about. and any local reaction so far, liz? we have had a - about. and any local reaction so i far, liz? we have had a statement from the liver _ far, liz? we have had a statement from the liver directly _ far, liz? we have had a statement from the liver directly to _ far, liz? we have had a statement from the liver directly to her - far, liz? we have had a statement from the liver directly to her of. from the liver directly to her of the city council, terry fox —— the labour leader of the city council. he said he has spoken to kate josephs today and she has face—to—face apologise to him as well. however, he has expressed his deep disappointed. he says people will feel angry the rightly angry, and let down. and that everything sheffield has been through in the pandemic, this is news that they
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would not want to receive. however, he does say that in the last year, kate has been an asset to the city and she is working tirelessly for the people in the city, and our residents will understandably have questions and concerns and says, we await the findings of the investigation, and that's the only official comments so far, but there has been quite a lot of traction on social media from people saying, her position is untenable, she should stand down, other people making comments, saying, on this date, that you are enjoying yourself, i had the job of arranging my wife's funeral with a maximum of 30 people, so i think lots of people in sheffield extremely disappointed and wanting some answers as quickly as possible. liz, thank you very much, the latest air from liz, thank you very much, the latest airfrom liz roberts, my colleague from bbc sheffield. in a moment, i am going to talk tojonathan powell, am going to talk tojonathan powell, a man with enormous experience at
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the workings of number 10. let's hear more reactions. the pensions minister, guy opperman, says the culture inside number 10 needs to change — he has been speaking to the bbc�*s politics north. listen, he needs to change his ways, the need to get better people around him and never tended to be run a very, very different way for some as you know, there hundred people who work in the building, the large building that is number 10, and it is quite clear there was a culture there that is not acceptable, which i suspect that ...came came from the top, didn't it? sue gray — came from the top, didn't it? sue gray will— came from the top, didn't it? sue gray will make _ came from the top, didn't it? sue gray will make that - sue gray will make that determination in her inquiry. pensions minister guy opperman. joining me now is labour's former chief of staff, jonathan powell. he was the first chief of staff or tony blair. thank you for your time tonight. whatever we call all of these, the rings, events, parties, leaving dues, were there this many
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social gatherings in your time at number 10?— social gatherings in your time at number10? ., ., , number10? no, to be honest. there were not. number10? no, to be honest. there were not- i — number10? no, to be honest. there were not- i was _ number10? no, to be honest. there were not. i was in _ number10? no, to be honest. there were not. i was in number— number10? no, to be honest. there were not. i was in number10 - number10? no, to be honest. there were not. i was in number10 for- were not. i was in number 10 for a decade, but if i toss out the number of staff parties, i think they managed to get through that number in a year that we did in a decade. as the drip has continued, as we have heard about more and more events, gatherings, through covid, during a pandemic, what has gone through your mind about the culture inside that workplace? i through your mind about the culture inside that workplace?— as the interviewer was put into the pensions minister, the culture is set but prime minister. i did not set but prime minister. i did not set the culture as chief of staff, it was tony blair. borisjohnson is is possible for these parties. the fact that he did not attend all of them, he attended some of them, is neither here nor there. he was
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expecting the rest of us to obey the rules, so he is the want to enter and for this in the end. you rules, so he is the want to enter and for this in the end.— rules, so he is the want to enter and for this in the end. you say he attended some, _ and for this in the end. you say he attended some, not _ and for this in the end. you say he attended some, not others. - and for this in the end. you say he i attended some, not others. could it be that some events get organised and carry out without the prime ministers knowing? try minister is not there all the time the sub that is possible, isn't it was prime minister is not there all the time. it prime minister is not there all the time. , ., . , prime minister is not there all the time. , ., ., , , ,., time. it is not a big place. it is a very tiny — time. it is not a big place. it is a very tiny town — time. it is not a big place. it is a very tiny town house, _ time. it is not a big place. it is a very tiny town house, in - time. it is not a big place. it is a very tiny town house, in the - time. it is not a big place. it is a i very tiny town house, in the middle of london, of course borisjohnson was not aware every party and did not take down invitations to every party, but this culture, and given how many there were, he cannot have not noticed. he was clearly responsible. trying to pretend the one he went to was a work in vent, when it was in the garden, with tables of drinks and food, is clearly ridiculous. the thing that worries me is number 10 is spending
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sue gray's report in advance, they are saying these are going to clear him of terminology or misbehavior. that is untrue. sue gray will not be able to do that. she is not a judge. what she is doing, she is a very good civil servant, but what she is doing is looking at the facts. what she can report on is what happened, then echoes tojohnson, who is the only person, as prime minister, who can decide if someone has broken the ministerial code —— then it goes to borisjohnson. that is clearly on except of all. i would urge people to ignore the spin coming out of number 10, to to ignore the spin coming out of number10, to wait to ignore the spin coming out of number 10, to wait to see it, to look at the facts, to measure the facts against what the rules were at the time, and then they make the conclusion. the only people who can judge this of the british public and tory mps, and they have to make a decision — do they want to be tied permanently to what boris johnson did when they go into the may local elections or are they going to do some thing about it? they are the
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jurors and they have to make a decision. fist jurors and they have to make a decision. �* ., jurors and they have to make a decision. �* . ., . , , ., decision. at a time of crisis, and i think we can _ decision. at a time of crisis, and i think we can call _ decision. at a time of crisis, and i think we can call certainly - decision. at a time of crisis, and i think we can call certainly the - think we can call certainly the start of the pandemic a crisis, is there any doubt that people there, staff at all levels, will have been working extremely hard, pressurised situation, very long hours, might want to let off a bit of steam at the end the day with their work colleagues? is there any justification for that, during such an intense period of working? i am s nthetic an intense period of working? i am synthetic two _ an intense period of working? i am synthetic two people _ an intense period of working? i —n synthetic two people working very hard during the covid crisis, and particularly people in hospitals and the medical profession, who were working hard. —— to pathetic the people. but they were not allowed to go and host people in their gardens after two shifts, so i don't have any centipede. we had many crises in my time, and we did not party then. jonathan powell, many thanks for your time. jonathan powell, who as he says worked in a very senior
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level within number 10 for ten years. let's turn to australia. the country's immigration minister has cancelled novak djokovic's visa for a second time, just three days before the world men's tennis number one is due to defend his australian open title in melbourne. the minister, alex hawke, said he'd made the decision on the grounds of "health and good order", as the row continues about djokovic's right to remain in the country unvaccinated. his lawyers are now trying to stop him being deported. we'll have more from serbia in a moment, and i'llspeak to the former australian foreign minister alexander downer, but first shaimaa khalil has the latest from melbourne. twice today, novak djokovic was on the court training. and a few hours later, the government finally announced its decision. the tennis star's visa has been cancelled again, and for the second time he faces deportation from australia. in his statement, the country's immigration minister, alex hawke, said...
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the prime minister, scott morrison, said the decision followed careful consideration. mr morrison's government has faced heavy criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into australia in the first place, while the country struggled with a spike in covid—19 case numbers. i think it was a mess up that they did, but now i think they have corrected the way. it's unfortunate that novak won't be playing the tournament, it's a pretty big loss. yeah, i think if everyone else has to follow the rules, why can't he? obviously he thought he was above it all. novak djokovic has been included in the draw for the tournament as the top seed. he was due to play fellow serbian miomir kecmanovic. now his case is in court again.
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the australian open is only a few days ago, novak djokovic was told he does not have to go into detention yet. on saturday, he will speak to border officials about what happens next. only then will we get a better idea about whether he has any chance of competing in the grand slam. tennis star andy murray said the controversy has been bad for the sport. this just seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now, and not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. yeah, and obviously a lot of people have criticised the government here as well, so, yeah, it's not been good. viktor troicki, serbia's current australian davis cup captain and one of djokovic's closest friend, says he was shocked and surprised by the decision. i'm still hoping, let's say, that he can compete. i think he has two more days to make
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an appeal and to get the decision overruled. his former coach, multiple grand slam winner boris becker, said djokovic is being used a political pawn. he's only a tennis player, we're not politicians. - if we're used in a political way, then we don't have a chance. l the world number one is still fighting to defend his title here. whether or not he'll be able to play, the australian open will take place under the shadow of a controversy that has gone way beyond tennis. that was our correspondent in melbourne. let's assess the mood in the serbian capital belgrade. our correspondent guy de launey is there. you have been following this throughout. give assistance of what is being said. throughout. give assistance of what is being said-— is being said. indeed, jane. it has not on is being said. indeed, jane. it has got on the — is being said. indeed, jane. it has got on the feisty _ is being said. indeed, jane. it has got on the feisty side _ is being said. indeed, jane. it has got on the feisty side again. - is being said. indeed, jane. it has got on the feisty side again. we l is being said. indeed, jane. it has i got on the feisty side again. we saw some feisty risk from these urban authorities, then a little bit more
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conciliatory once novak djokovic was released from his quarantine hotel. now we have had this ministerial intervention in australia. once again, the authorities in serbia swinging behind novak djokovic, very strong support, and also some very strong support, and also some very strong criticism of australia's government. mr djokovic did nothing wrong. he did nothing malevolent. he broke no law. he came to australia in good faith to compete in a tournament, to play tennis, which he is really best at. but unfortunately, without his intention, without his wrongdoings, he was involved in some kind of a political game, which the sole aim — the way we see it — is for the australian government to make a show of muscle. and that is something that we cannot find to be acceptable. and further on, after the australian court decided to annul the annulment of novak djokovic's visa,
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we have seen the australian government once again starting with proceedings, trying to deport mr djokovic. and this is further proof for us that this is just another political game that novak djokovic has been involved with, without his wrongdoings. and i have to say, that view goes right to the very top of the corridors of power in serbia. the president also getting in on the act, saying he was surprised by the judgment, the ministerial intervention, in australia and that everybody in serbia would fight for novak djokovic, so it is quite interesting, jane was the people in power in serbia have said all along they don't want this to damage relations between serbia and australia, they don't want to be seen to be interfering in a judicial process, but they have clearly taken the opinion that novak djokovic is a living embodiment of serbia, and as such they have to be seen to be
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standing right behind him. and in that, they are probably with probably the majority of public opinion here in serbia. when you speak people on the streets of belgrade, whether it is friends or people we meet in the course of our reporting of reporting of all of them say, yes, novak might have made some mistakes along the way here, maybe he should've got vaccinated, but really he did not do anything wrong, he did everything i surely asked of him, and yet now they appointment to whatever entry much is calling a political game it's not the kind of game novak djokovic is usually the best of winning. everybody here wants to see them back out on the court again, jane. we will see. fascinating. thanks for now, guy de launey following that for us in belgrade. i'm joined now by alexander downer, a former australian minister for foreign affairs. good to talk to you. when this was described as being a decision made on the grounds of health and good order, i am on the grounds of health and good order, iam really on the grounds of health and good order, i am really interested what you think the good order bit of that
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is all about. you think the good order bit of that is all about-— you think the good order bit of that is all about. . ., ., ., ., is all about. health and good order, i mean, is all about. health and good order, i mean. the — is all about. health and good order, i mean. the law— is all about. health and good order, i mean, the law in _ is all about. health and good order, i mean, the law in australia - is all about. health and good order, i mean, the law in australia, - i mean, the law in australia, whether people like it or not, is that you can come into australia if you are vaccinated. if you are unvaccinated, you have to spend two weeks in hotel quarantine. that is the law, so it is as simple as that. thejudgment by the the law, so it is as simple as that. the judgment by the medical authorities in australia is that people who are unvaccinated are of a higher risk to the community through the spread of covid, and that's what this is all about. novak djokovic wants to come into australia without doing the two weeks of quarantine, though he did do it last year, and he is unvaccinated. that is his choice. we did not decide he should be unvaccinated, he is unvaccinated, he is meant to spend two weeks in quarantine, he wants an exemption from that, he claimed an exemption on the basis that he had already had
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covid. falsely filled an application form, by the way, to come to australia. and the australian government explained in november last year that the fact you have had covid does not grant you an exemption from the two weeks quarantine, they had been told this over and over again, and quarantine, they had been told this overand overagain, and i quarantine, they had been told this over and over again, and i don't know what is so hard. people need to understand here. if novak djokovic wants, and the serbian government on his behalf, once a special privilege for him. that is not how it can truly australia works. all people in australia are equal before the law. that's really interesting, your last point there, because you and i spoke about this on saturday very near the beginning of all of this. here we are, it is friday night, the australian open starts on monday also is there any sense — i take on board everything you said about the rules — in which the australian
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government has had this drag on too long simply from a pr perspective? are we not reaching a point where this does not look good for anyone now? . ., ., this does not look good for anyone now? . . ., , this does not look good for anyone now? .. ., , ., this does not look good for anyone now? ., , ., _ this does not look good for anyone now? .. ., , ., _ ., now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannotjust — now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannot just change _ now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannotjust change the _ now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannotjust change the law— now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannotjust change the law for- now? life cannot be done by pr. you cannotjust change the law for pr - cannotjust change the law for pr purposes. from a pr point of view, it would be better if novak djokovic got vaccinated, or if he did not get vaccinated, spend two weeks and quarantine like he did last year for some that might have generated better pr. he did what he did, then he appeared to the court, and then he added a win in court over a procedural issue, and then the australian government does... they gave him time to assemble documents and so on. that time has been granted. now he apparently wants to appeal the latest decision, so in the interest of naturaljustice, we
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will have to allow some time for that, and that's what he wants to do as well, but the fact is the australian government's position has always been incredibly simple. these are the rules for coming to australia. he has not abided by the rules. he has tried to get changes made, through different procedures, and that all takes time, and i don't know, it is not good pr — it isjust as it is. you cannot changejust for pr. as it is. you cannot change 'ust for pr. , ., , , as it is. you cannot change 'ust for pr. _ , ., as it is. you cannot change 'ust for pr. , ., , , ., pr. his lawyers, novak d'okovic's la er pr. his lawyers, novak d'okovic's lawyer has — pr. his lawyers, novak d'okovic's lawyer has been h pr. his lawyers, novak d'okovic's lawyer has been saying _ pr. his lawyers, novak djokovic's lawyer has been saying that - pr. his lawyers, novak djokovic's lawyer has been saying that the i lawyer has been saying that the immigration minister's decision was based not on the validity of the exemption but on the potential for exciting anti—vaxxers sentiment. has that played into this decision, do you think? i that played into this decision, do ou think? ., , that played into this decision, do ou think? . , ., , ., you think? i am sure it has not. i have not spoken _ you think? i am sure it has not. i have not spoken to _ you think? i am sure it has not. i have not spoken to the _ you think? i am sure it has not. i have not spoken to the minister, you think? i am sure it has not. i - have not spoken to the minister, but i would be sure it has not. i don't
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think the fact he would give any exemption, the australian public would abandon going and getting their booster vaccination, which is what they are up to at the moment, to deal with omicron. i do not think it will have any effect, but i tell you what it would do if the australian government made a special case of novak djokovic. it would anger people, because people would think, and i think rightly so, that it is not fair to give a tennis star and exemption but not to grant exemptions to people who for example have dying members of their family and they want to come into australia to be with those members of their family for their last hours, and they are not able to do so, because they are not able to do so, because they are not vaccinated, and have to go into quarantine and so on. so you cannot make a special rule, a special privilege for somebody was a tennis player that you were not for an average punter, orfor that
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matterfor an average punter, orfor that matter for australian citizen. delete interesting to hear your perspective —— really interesting. that is alexander downer, former australian foreign minister. the australian foreign minister. the australian open, as we say, begins on monday. the time is coming up to 27 past five p:m.. vigils are being held across the island of ireland in memory of a woman who was murdered while out running on wednesday. 23—year—old ashling murphy, who was a primary school teacher, was attacked along the banks of the grand canal in tullamore in county offaly. a ao—year—old man who was arrested has been released by police. they say he is no longer a suspect. let's talk to sarah benson, ceo of women's aid ireland.
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know you have just been at one of the many vigils that are being held tonight. what are people saying? what is the mood?— tonight. what are people saying? what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and aolories what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and apologies to — what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and apologies to your— what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and apologies to your viewers _ what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and apologies to your viewers of _ what is the mood? thanks, yeah, and apologies to your viewers of the - apologies to your viewers of the hotel directly adjacent to our national parliament, where the dublin —based vigil has just been held, kindly let me pop in to do this interview, so it is all a bit rough and ready. there are thousand people just dispersing now and dozens and dozens of vigils all across the country, similarly paying tribute to and in solidarity with the family of ashling murphy, who was killed in broad daylight, while jogging. was killed in broad daylight, while jogging, as you say, in of well lit, very well—known common area, and so the feeling at the vigil was one of immense sadness but also a lot of distress and men and women alike, but really particularly women in this country, feeling just that
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sense of, this is everywoman's worst nightmare come true, and there is a huge amount of discussion here which is very, very reminiscent of that discussion, the public outpouring online and social media which happen in the uk in the aftermath of sarah everard's murder, and there is huge similarities, really, in how the feelings are coming out here. there's that sense that this should never have happened, but also a broader conversation really happening around how is it that it gets to the point where a man can feel entitled to brutally attacked and take the life of a woman in broad daylight? very, very similar, i think, to the sarah everard case in the uk. i think, to the sarah everard case in the uk-— in the uk. indeed, absolutely, and the death of— in the uk. indeed, absolutely, and the death of sabina _ in the uk. indeed, absolutely, and the death of sabina nessa - in the uk. indeed, absolutely, and the death of sabina nessa as - in the uk. indeed, absolutely, and the death of sabina nessa as welll the death of sabina nessa as well and, regrettably, so many other more women, and i regret that there is not time to name all of those who have lost their lives in the last year. again, though, the question
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goes back to the question we asked in the light of the death of sabina nessa and sarah everard, the killings. the onus, again, can end “p killings. the onus, again, can end up being on the women, the women to protect themselves — how can women behave differently, what can they do differently to look after their personal safety? differently to look after their personalsafety? i differently to look after their personal safety? i wonder how we turn around that conversation to talk about what men can do, because i'm sure they were met at these vigils too. i'm sure they were met at these vigils too-— i'm sure they were met at these virilstoo. , , , ., vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there was actually _ vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there was actually a _ vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there was actually a large _ vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there was actually a large number - vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there was actually a large number of - vigils too. absolutely, yeah. there | was actually a large number of men as well as women, certainly, at the one ijust as well as women, certainly, at the one i just attended as well as women, certainly, at the one ijust attended here at as well as women, certainly, at the one i just attended here at the parliament, and quite right, women in ireland maintained the record of women who have lost their lives to violence and sadly with ashling, we had to add another into that list. you quite rightly named the women in the uk, sarah everard isjust one example, in the same way that here we have hundreds of women in the
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last number of years who have died through violence. the majority at the hands of some of the day no, but certainly at the head of a stranger, and as we know, this case has not been resolved, there is not somebody currently in custody, so we don't know what the circumstances are, but that conversation has been an immediate kind of coming out by ourselves, our colleagues in the women's sector, to say that this cannot be a matter of going into those tired old discussions about how women can keep ourselves safe, the personal alarms and everybody reminding about welded places. this happened at apm, it was daylight in a very public area, so if it can happen there, it is a nonsense to be talking about how women can keep themselves safe. neither is it appropriate to look at location, because a darkened alley, even at 3am does not magically incite somebody to act in a violent way. we
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have been really clear in our discussions in the last couple of days, saying the conversation has to focus, full centre, on perpetrators and it has to focus on that long spectrum of violence against women and girls which can start very, very young, with casual sexism, which is excused with, casual groupings, in nightclubs, up to intimate partner abuse, coercive control and any more acute forms of sexual and physical violence, and somebody does not arrive at a point where they will perpetrate those very serious acts of violence without a culminating process, and as a society, we have been very, very clear in saying that, really, it is society and particularly we are saying men as allies have to work here to peer, father to son, to call out that behaviour and to model a more positive masculinity that really, really says that it is not ok, that
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it does not to be normalised, the unconscious sexism that is unfortunately very prevalent. it is time to put a spotlight on that, because that is how we prevent these things happening in the future. sarah benson, thank you for your time this evening, sarah benson reflecting on the murder of a young woman. ashling murphy, just 23 years old, who was killed on wednesday while out running. we willjust pause here tonight on bbc news. much more coming up in the next half an hour, of course. we will pause right now, though, take a look at the weather prospects across the country. here is sarah keith—lucas. hello. we started off today with frost and fog around for many of us and that's going to be returning again tonight. but before the sun sets, a bit of late brightness around for many of us — a lot of dry and settled weather out there at the moment. as we head through the evening hours, temperatures are going to drop quite quickly, so around about two or three degrees
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quite widely for england and wales into the evening hours. and for scotland and northern ireland, a little bit breezier and milder here. a few splashes of rain across the far north of scotland, but most places dry through tonight. again, some mist and some fog patches — quite dense fog patches for central and eastern england, parts of wales as well. but temperatures getting down a few degrees below freezing where we have got those clearer skies. so a chilly start to the day with those pockets of frost and some dense fog patches that will be quite slow to clear, but they will eventually clear from england and wales. a little bit more sunshine for scotland compared to what we have got out there today. temperatures only about five degrees in the east but up into double figures across the southwest. and then things are looking mostly dry unsettled as we head through the second half of the weekend too. bye— bye. this is bbc news. the headlines: downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at no. 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year
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the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. we have an inquiry taking place and we are very clear that there were a real mistakes made. the are very clear that there were a real mistakes made.— are very clear that there were a real mistakes made. the head of the government — real mistakes made. the head of the government covid-19 _ real mistakes made. the head of the government covid-19 task _ real mistakes made. the head of the government covid-19 task force. .. i the former head of the cabinet office covid task force — katejosephs — apologies for holding a leaving drinks in whitehall when london was in tier 3 restrictions. this latest party will be part of sue gray's investigation. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks — after a drop in omicron cases. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are being held across ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging.
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and coming up: there's another scream in your cinemas — find out what mark kermode thinks about the fifth in the movie franchise, and the week's other big releases, in the film review at 5:45. the tennis world is continuing to react to the news today that novak djokovic has had his visa cancelled for the second time ahead of the australian open which starts on monday. the 20 time grand slam champion, who's hoping to break the record there — will be back in court in melbourne to appeal the decision. australia's immigration minister alex hawke says it was made on �*health and good order grounds.�* andy murray described the saga as "not great for tennis." while boris becker, who's coached the serbian, said it was a "political game". here's our tennis correspondent russell fuller. for a judge has been pointing out to djokovic's legal team during this hearing that the grounds for appeal against the ministers personnel
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decision are much narrower than the grounds they had when they successfully challenged the initial cancellation of the visa on monday. so the odds were against djokovic and that would mean after all this drama he does not even get to step on court and nobody comes out of it well. well that story means the cricket is hardly getting a look—in down under... not that england will mind too much after — what turned out to be — a very disappointing opening day to the final ashes test in tasmania. after a brilliant start, they somehow allowed australia to make 241 for six at the close of play in hobart. our correspondent joe wilson reports. england have never lost a test match in tasmania. this is their first test match in tasmania. they recognised the team, five changes including olly robinson rejoicing. next dropped by the diving probably unknown. england captain chose to
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both first and very helpful conditions and joe root himself and steve smith was out. australia 12th for three. was this the same ashes? yes it was. he made his way to 1m. yes it was. he made his way to air. that is what he wanted. where was he going? still old at the stones and the batter flattered himself. going? still old at the stones and the batterflattered himself. the floodlights revealed a new threat. how travis sparkled. olly robinson now was not fit up the ball. stewart was trying. in 101 rapid runs travis transformed the whole mood, australia where we born in the match. when cameron put his frame to the cause, england and started to look exhausted. 241—6. england were
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hanging on when the rain came and that about covers it. one game in the premier league tonight — as crystal palace travel to brighton in the so—called m23 derby. there'll be no game at burnley tomorrow though — as their match against leicester has been postponed — with burnley suffering with covid and injuries. one game in the wsl has also gone, everton have postponed their match at chelsea for the same reason. snooker and world number two judd trump is a step closer to his second masters title. he eased into the semi finals at alexandra palace after thrashing fellow englishman kyren wilson 6—1 in their quarterfinal. trump will now face either mark selby or barry hawkins in the final four — they play tonight. so a straight forward win for trump — and a victory he definitely seemed to enjoy, have a listen to this moment from his post match interview... come on baby! yeah! it's incredible. it's why paper game. it's absolutely
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unbelievable and the reception take it yesterday and today i can't wait to go out there again. that's it from me for now. karthi gnanasegeram will have a full round up in sportsday at 6.30 more on coronavirus, and the welsh government has announced that restrictions on large events and businesses, brought in to tackle the omicron variant, will be scrapped over the next two weeks — although the first minister mark drakeford said that while the situation was improving, caution was still needed. there could be some difficult days and weeks still ahead as we continue to respond to the coronavirus crisis. but today's evidence is that we are able to move further and faster into those brighter days that we help lie ahead for us all. let's hear now the latest from wales, from our correspondent tomos morgan.
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the first minister mark drakeford has outlined the road map out of alert level to back to alert level zero here in wales. by next weekend there will be no restrictions on outdoor activities and from the 28th all hospitality and indoor restrictions will come to an end which means they will be back at alert level zero. they will be no social distancing requirements and no need for six hospitality and no need for a people to work from home and there will still be guidance for people to do so when they can. this is a huge boost for the economy and south wales and in cardiff. the stadium the home of the six nations wales team do to host the first game on the 12th of february against scotland. such a big boost because this city is in the centre of cardiffjust ten, 20 metres away, bars and restaurants will be able to welcome people and be full as well
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here in night clubs can be open on the 28th having lost out over the festive period and lost out the last six nations it will be a huge head for the economy here in south wales and cardiff. the first minister has coming to some criticism over whether or not this is a u—turn by the welsh government and they did not need to put these restrictions in place and he defended them and said they were necessary and had they not been put in place that figures will be far higher here. of course the figures have shown that “p course the figures have shown that up until the 6th of january there was an increase of people getting on the point here but for the second day and a row the number going into hospital with the virus has increased. the office for national statistics said gross domestic product, that the total number of goods and services produced by the economy increased by 0.9%. the construction
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sector grew strongly during that month and the services sector also benefited. downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at no. 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year the former head of the cabinet office covid taskforce — katejosephs — apologies for holding a leaving drinks in whitehall when london was in tier 3 restrictions. this latest party will be part of sue gray's investigation. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. we will be taking a closer look at what has been another dramatic day in court after the visa was
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cancelled for a second time. the first grand slam starts on monday but djokovic will have to wait for his appeal to be heard before he can bid for a 21st major title. we will have means from day one and meet the man tasked with representing great britain at the winter olympics. that is all on sports day at 6:30 p:m.. now it is time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? you can say happy new year. this is the first show we have done together. we have a canonjury prize
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winner. this cream franchises back with scream and scream five but it's just called scream. and the feature documentary debut of power. there is a aood documentary debut of power. there is a good mixture- _ documentary debut of power. there is a good mixture. kick— documentary debut of power. there is a good mixture. kick us _ documentary debut of power. there is a good mixture. kick us off. _ a good mixture. kick us off. memorial — a good mixture. kick us off. memorial day _ a good mixture. kick us off. memorial day is _ a good mixture. kick us off. memorial day is the - a good mixture. kick us off. memorial day is the new . a good mixture. kick us off. l memorial day is the new film a good mixture. kick us off. - memorial day is the new film will be really wonderfulfamily. swinton sound engineer to say can you make a really wonderful family. swinton who really wonderfulfamily. swinton copy of the sound for m swinton really wonderful family. swinton who really wonderfulfamily. swinton who is great in almost everything is who is great in almost everything is a botanist and she is in bogota a botanist and she is in bogota where her sister is in hospital. if where her sister is in hospital. if her visiting her sister and talking her visiting her sister and talking to her sister and her partner. she to her sister and her partner. she is walking in the middle of the is walking in the middle of the night by a sound. a strange booming night by a sound. a strange booming sound and she thinks there be sound and she thinks there be building work going on next—door and building work going on next—door and she starts hearing the sound ever she starts hearing the sound ever she starts hearing the sound ever she starts hearing the sound ever she is and it's a really peculiar she is and it's a really peculiar sound and she becomes obsessed with sound and she becomes obsessed with the idea that nobody else appears to the idea that nobody else appears to be able to hear it. so she goes to a be able to hear it. so she goes to a sound engineer to say can you make a sound engineer to say can you make a
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copy of the sound for me to copy of the sound for me to describe it? here is a clip.

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