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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 14, 2022 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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and, you know, we are very clear that there were real mistakes made. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancels his visa for a second time. andy murray says the row is bad for the sport. thisjust seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now. and, yeah, not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks — after a drop in omicron cases. after azeem rafiq's emotional testimony — a report by mps recommends starving cricket of taxpayers' money until it tackles "deep—seated" racism in the sport. remembering racism in the sport. ashling murphy. they just remembering ashling murphy. they just are held across the republic of
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are. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. downing street has apologised to buckingham palace following revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral. a spokesman for borisjohnson has said it was deeply regrettable that the events took place at a time of national mourning. covid rules at the time banned indoor mixing — but reports suggest there was drinking and dancing until the early hours. a member of staff was sent out to a nearby shop with an empty suitcase, to fill it with supplies of alcohol. the prime minister wasn't at the parties, but the latest disclosures, which the daily telegraph reported, have amplified calls for his resignation.
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here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. the 17th of april last year. one of the defining pictures of the pandemic. the queen sitting alone at the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. the night before, in here, staff held leaving dos, despite people being banned from social mixing indoors. according to the daily telegraph, there was music and dancing. someone was sent to a local shop with a suitcase to stock up on alcohol. downing street hasn't denied the specific claims. when i heard about this i was, of course, very, very concerned, and i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. earlier this week, the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. obviously, if you are a rule maker you can't be a rule breaker,
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of course that is correct, but we need to let this investigation run. this morning, downing street apologised to buckingham palace. the prime minister's spokesman said it was deeply regrettable that this had taken place at a time of national mourning ahead of prince philip's funeral. one of the events was a leaving do for this man, james slack, borisjohnson�*s former communications chief. he said in a statement this morning... allegations of parties or gatherings which broke the rules now span almost a year, from may 2020, to april 2021, and that's led to suggestions that these were not isolated incidents but part of a cultural problem in borisjohnson�*s downing street.
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the prime minister hasn't been seen in public since wednesday and although he didn't attend the events which emerged today, many of his mps are angry that he did attend drinks during lockdown in 2020. five have now called for him to quit. part of the key elements of leadership is you don't ask people you're asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you're not willing to bear yourself, and clearly that has not been the case. the fact is they've been having parties throughout because in the end they thought that the laws that they were putting together were not laws that applied to them. the revelations about what went on here keep coming, piling even more pressure on downing street's most senior occupant. and our political correspondent, helen catt, canjoin me now.
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is this ratcheting up the pressure on the prime minister? it certainly isn't auoin on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to _ on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to help, _ on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to help, is _ on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to help, is it? - on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to help, is it? and - on the prime minister? it certainly isn't going to help, is it? and the. isn't going to help, is it? and the details _ isn't going to help, is it? and the details of— isn't going to help, is it? and the details of this and the timing of this in— details of this and the timing of this in particular. even though this was not _ this in particular. even though this was not an— this in particular. even though this was not an event the prime minister was not an event the prime minister was at. _ was not an event the prime minister was at. his— was not an event the prime minister was at, his spokesman earlier was asked _ was at, his spokesman earlier was asked if— was at, his spokesman earlier was asked if he — was at, his spokesman earlier was asked if he was invited, did he know about— asked if he was invited, did he know about these — asked if he was invited, did he know about these effects before he went away to _ about these effects before he went away to chequers that weekend, he said he _ away to chequers that weekend, he said he didn't. despite that, the timing _ said he didn't. despite that, the timing of— said he didn't. despite that, the timing of these and some of the detail, _ timing of these and some of the detail, that it was on the evening before _ detail, that it was on the evening before prince philip's funeral, as you heard, — before prince philip's funeral, as you heard, the queen morning alone, that these _ you heard, the queen morning alone, that these happened then, was certainly— that these happened then, was certainly the timing of that was very difficult for downing street, and some — very difficult for downing street, and some of the detail that emerged in these _ and some of the detail that emerged in these reports. the idea that a staff— in these reports. the idea that a staff member was sent out to a suitcase — staff member was sent out to a suitcase to a nearby shop to fill up on atcohok — suitcase to a nearby shop to fill up on alcohol. these are not helpful detaiis _ on alcohol. these are not helpful details for — on alcohol. these are not helpful details for downing street in any way _ details for downing street in any way and — details for downing street in any way. and it certainly does come at the constant drip, drip of allegations, it's all adding to this momentum behind this. the other
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thing _ momentum behind this. the other thing to— momentum behind this. the other thing to remember, of course, is conservative mps where our day to and over— conservative mps where our day to and over the weekend? they are back in their— and over the weekend? they are back in their constituencies. they will be hearing — in their constituencies. they will be hearing first—hand from their members — be hearing first—hand from their members and their constituents what they think— members and their constituents what they think of these. and that could have a _ they think of these. and that could have a huge bearing on what happens on the _ have a huge bearing on what happens on the comeback next week. defenders ofthe on the comeback next week. defenders of the prime — on the comeback next week. defenders of the prime minister _ on the comeback next week. defenders of the prime minister keep _ on the comeback next week. defenders of the prime minister keep saying - of the prime minister keep saying you have to wait for the sue gray report, which could be next week, we are told. and some of the papers are claiming they have got leaks already from that report. we claiming they have got leaks already from that report.— from that report. we don't know exactly when — from that report. we don't know exactly when we _ from that report. we don't know exactly when we are _ from that report. we don't know exactly when we are going - from that report. we don't know exactly when we are going to - from that report. we don't know| exactly when we are going to get this report. we do understand that sue gray's— this report. we do understand that sue gray's investigation will be looking — sue gray's investigation will be looking at these parties on april 16 as well _ looking at these parties on april 16 as well as — looking at these parties on april 16 as well. as we understand it, work is still— as well. as we understand it, work is still happening on that. it is thought— is still happening on that. it is thought we might get it back in the next week— thought we might get it back in the next week or so. of course, it is looking — next week or so. of course, it is looking at— next week or so. of course, it is looking at a _ next week or so. of course, it is looking at a whole range of allegations, spanning from may 2020, which was _
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allegations, spanning from may 2020, which was that garden party event that boris— which was that garden party event that borisjohnson said he went to to thank— that borisjohnson said he went to to thank staff, through to christmas party— to thank staff, through to christmas party in _ to thank staff, through to christmas party in december 2020, and now these _ party in december 2020, and now these on — party in december 2020, and now these on april the 6th, 2021. so there _ these on april the 6th, 2021. so there is— these on april the 6th, 2021. so there is an — these on april the 6th, 2021. so there is an enormous amount of information that sue gray is going to be _ information that sue gray is going to be looking at. that report we are hoping _ to be looking at. that report we are hoping to— to be looking at. that report we are hoping to get back in the next week or so _ hoping to get back in the next week or so. . ~' hoping to get back in the next week or so. . ~ i. hoping to get back in the next week or so. . ~ y hoping to get back in the next week orso. . ~ , . joining me now is peter cardwell, a former conservative adviser. let's discuss this a bit more. home secretary, northern ireland secretary. peter, you are a man with considerable experience of working and advising government ministers. what do you make of what has been going on in downing street? as we werejust going on in downing street? as we were just discussing there, there seems to be almost more revelations by the day. it’s seems to be almost more revelations btheda. �*, ., by the day. it's horrendous, it looks bad, — by the day. it's horrendous, it looks bad, it _ by the day. it's horrendous, it looks bad, it is _ by the day. it's horrendous, it looks bad, it is bad. _ by the day. it's horrendous, it looks bad, it is bad. people i by the day. it's horrendous, it l looks bad, it is bad. people feel very betrayed by this. you can think of no worse metaphor than somebody
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wheeling drink into downing street with a suitcase as prince philip's funeral was being prepared. the optics and timing of this, the drip, drip, drip of so many different scandals, for the past two and a half months, it's really terrible for borisjohnson. and there are many people within downing street who i'm sure didn't attend these parties, didn't take part in this culture, but there are many who did. i'm sure sue gray's report will expose that, in that, and tell us what she thinks should happen in terms of disciplinary procedures. but i think a lot of people are very clear, a massive shake—up of personnel and culture within downing street is needed to restore integrity. integrity, as someone once said, is what you do in private when no one is watching. you once said, is what you do in private when no one is watching.— when no one is watching. you have used that word, _ when no one is watching. you have used that word, culture, _ when no one is watching. you have used that word, culture, a - when no one is watching. you have used that word, culture, a couple l when no one is watching. you have | used that word, culture, a couple of times. is that what you think was going on in number ten? a kind of
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culture that the rules were for other people, but not for staff in downing street. that is why they seem to be having quite a lot of drinking, quite a lot of different parties? drinking, quite a lot of different arties? , ., ., parties? there is nothing wrong with drinkin: , parties? there is nothing wrong with drinking. parties. — parties? there is nothing wrong with drinking, parties, having— parties? there is nothing wrong with drinking, parties, having a _ parties? there is nothing wrong with drinking, parties, having a drink - parties? there is nothing wrong with drinking, parties, having a drink at l drinking, parties, having a drink at the end of the week, as i often did when i was in government. this friday afternoon and evenings were dominic cummings would bark instructions at us. there's nothing wrong with that. what is wrong with thatis wrong with that. what is wrong with that is that they broke the rules. what's wrong with that is that the people in the building where the rules were made were wrecking the rules were made were wrecking the rules and they were showing contempt to the public. i look back at my diary to what i was doing around the time of the 20th of may, 2020, and i had a funeral of a great odd that was held on the 21st, just 2a hours after that party. there were 15 of us at that funeral. we weren't allowed to touch the coffin or carry
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the coffin, which is done in northern ireland quite a lot. without a sermon, a eulogy. that is just one example, a very minor example, of something in my life. many people in the country will have similar stories. a scandal like this, you can genuinely say what the 0wen paterson scandal was really about. who knew what david cameron was writing in those texts. but people understand this one which is what it makes so politically dangerous. there were rows, most people about them as much as they could, and then there were a group of people at the downing street who did not abate those roles. does of people at the downing street who did not abate those roles.— did not abate those roles. does that u-rou did not abate those roles. does that a-rou of did not abate those roles. does that groun of peeple _ did not abate those roles. does that groun of peeple at _ did not abate those roles. does that group of people at the _ did not abate those roles. does that group of people at the top _ did not abate those roles. does that group of people at the top of- group of people at the top of government include the prime minister? because surely, downing street, numberten minister? because surely, downing street, number ten is quite a small building. it is impossible to have that culture you have been describing, of rule breaking and drinking and partying, without the prior minister knowing about it? he:
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has admitted that he was at the may party. i think his apology was not enough. matt hancock apologised very clearly for what he was doing, the rule breaking he was doing with his lover, that didn't save his career. but it looks like borisjohnson will survive in the short—term, at least until sue gray's report comes out. do you think you should resign? i think he will survive probably until the local elections in may. boris johnson is never someone to be underestimated. he has survived many scandals and upsets and sackings, he was sacked twice a day less and a politician, he is someone with a lot of resilience. but change is needed in terms of the culture in downing street, that is absolutely clear. those people were under a lot of pressure and were working very hard, i don't think people would say to
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them that they shouldn't switch off at the end of the day, but drinking in breach of the roses the serious problem here. in breach of the roses the serious problem here-— in breach of the roses the serious problem here. in breach of the roses the serious roblem here. :, ., ,, :, ,, : problem here. good to talk to you. a former special _ problem here. good to talk to you. a former special adviser _ problem here. good to talk to you. a former special adviser in _ problem here. good to talk to you. a former special adviser in various - former special adviser in various government departments. thank you. australia's immigration minister has cancelled novak djokovic's visa for a second time, just three days before the world men's tennis number one is due to defend his australian open title in melbourne. the minister alex hawke said he'd made the decision on the grounds of "health and good order" — as the row continues about djokovic's right to remain in the country unvaccinated. his lawyers are now trying to stop him being deported. shaimaa khalil has the latest from melbourne. twice today, novak djokovic was on the court training. and a few hours later, the government finally announced its decision. the tennis star's visa has been cancelled again, and for the second time he faces
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deportation from australia. in his statement, the country's immigration minister, alex hawke, said, "today, i exercise my power to cancel the visa held by mr novak djokovic on health and good order grounds... the prime minister, scott morrison, said the decision followed careful consideration. mr morrison's government has faced heavy criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into australia in the first place, while the country struggled with a spike in covid—19 case numbers. i think it was a mess up they did, but now i think they have corrected the way. it's unfortunate that novak won't be playing the tournament, it's a pretty big loss. yeah, i think if everyone else has to follow the rules, why can't he? obviously he thought
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he was above it all. novak djokovic has been included in the draw for the tournament as the top seed. he was due to play a fellow serbian, miomir kecmanovic. now his case is in court again. novak djokovic was told he doesn't have to go into tension yet. on saturday, he will speak to border officials about what happens next. only then will we get a better idea about whether he has any chance of competing in the grand slam. tennis star andy murray says the controversy has been bad for the sport. this just seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now, and not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. yeah, obviously a lot of people have criticised obviously the government here as well, so, yeah, it's not been good. the current australian davis cup captain and one of djokovic's closest friend says he was shocked and surprised by the decision.
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i'm still hoping he can compete. he has two more days to make an appeal and to get the decision overruled. his former coach, multiple grand slam winner boris becker, said djokovic is being used a political pawn. he's only a tennis player, we're not politicians. - if we're used in a political way then we don't have a chance. i the world number one is still fighting to defend his title here. whether or not he'll be able to play, the australian open will take place under the shadow of a controversy that has gone way beyond tennis. a look at our latest bbc news headlines... downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at no. 10 the night before the duke
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of edinburgh's funeral last year. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. the welsh government has announced that restrictions on large events and businesses, brought in to tackle the 0micron variant, will be scrapped over the next two weeks — although the first minister mark drakeford said that while the situation was improving, caution was still needed. there could be some difficult days and weeks still ahead as we continue to respond to the coronavirus crisis. but today's evidence is that we are able to move further and faster into their brighter days that we hope lie ahead for us all. let's hear now the latest from wales, from our correspondent tomos morgan.
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this lunchtime, the first minister mark drakeford has outlined the right man out of alert level to back to another level zero here in wales. by to another level zero here in wales. by next weekend, there will be no restrictions on outdoor activities, and from the 28th all hospitality and from the 28th all hospitality and indoor restrictions will come to and indoor restrictions will come to an end, which means wellesley back at alert level zero. there will be no social distancing requirements, no social distancing requirements, no rule of six in hospitality, no need legally for people to work from home. there can still be guidance for people to do so when they can. this is a boost for the economy in south wales and cardiff. this stadium, home of the six nations wales team, due to host against scotland. this stadium is right in the centre of cardiff, just ten or 20 metres away there are bars and restaurants they will now be able to welcome people and be full. nightclubs can also reopen on the 28th, having lost out over the
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festive period and the last six nations, this will be huge for the economy here in south wales and cardiff. the first minister has come under criticism over whether or not this is actually a u—turn by the welsh government. have they accepted that they did not need to put these restrictions in place. he has said they were necessary. had they not be put in place, the figures would be far higher here. today, the 0ns figures showed that there was an increase of people getting 0micron here in wales, howeverfor the second day in a wrote the number going into hospital with the virus has decreased. let's talk a bit more about those 0ns figures now. what should be be reading into these
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latest figures? everyone wanting to know if 0micron has leaked are not. probably not quite peaked yet. but there are certainly some hopeful signs. we are still seeing... they did rise by a little bit less in the week to the 6th of january. that is not the case in the latest figures. similar pictures in scotland, wales and england. they are still rising there. within england, you are seeing a pattern of rises in some places, particularly in the north of england, and london, which is always led the way in the 0micron wave has started to come down. perhaps we have seen a peak in london. but these figures are still really reflect christmas mixing patterns, we still have to come back and see how that feeds through once everyone is back at work. and you can see, if you look at the uk picture over all,
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that comes together. we are still seeing rises across the uk. but if you squeeze your eyes and look very closely, you see that hopeful sign that maybe the slope is getting less steep in the most recent weeks. that is the hopeful picture that we might start coming to a peak. case numbers are still extraordinarily _ start coming to a peak. case numbers are still extraordinarily high, - start coming to a peak. case numbers are still extraordinarily high, and - are still extraordinarily high, and death numbers are very high as well, and yet there is this optimism. is that partly and yet there is this optimism. is that partly because and yet there is this optimism. is that partly because hospitalisation figures are, according to people in the nhs and ministers, actually relatively good, or not as bad as they could have been? i relatively good, or not as bad as they could have been?— they could have been? i think absolutely. — they could have been? i think absolutely, and _ they could have been? i think absolutely, and there - they could have been? i think absolutely, and there are - they could have been? i think. absolutely, and there are some really interesting questions to ask about hospitalisation figures. despite seeing rising and rising numbers of infections in recent weeks, you would expect to see rising numbers of people going into hospital to be after, but that is
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not the case as you can see in the chart we are showing at the moment. the number of people going into hospitals is actually flat. that could reflect the effect of the booster campaign, more people getting protected. it could be the fact that we are switching from a delta academic to a 0micron pandemic. delta was a more severe form of the virus. there are reasons to be hopeful. the big rises in infections we are seeing may not translate into terrible numbers of people going into hospital. and we are also seeing, when you get into the detail of those figures, increasing numbers of people are going into hospital with coronavirus rather than necessarily because of coronavirus. it's still putting pressure, it is still not a great time to be on the nhs at the moment, but it is a very different picture, and a lot more hopeful than we thought before christmas. robert
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kuf, our head _ thought before christmas. robert kuf, our head of— thought before christmas. robert kuf, our head of statistics. - —— robert cuff. public funding for cricket should be limited unless there's progress on eradicating "deep—seated racism" — according to a group of mps. the digital, culture, media and sport committee has made the recommendation in a report following testimony by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who described english cricket as "institutionally racist". the england and wales cricket board currently receives over £2 million year from sport england. here's laura scott with more. eradicating racism from cricket will be a long and difficult road. that's the conclusion of mps who said they're convinced discrimination is endemic in the sport. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they issued a stark warning to the england and wales cricket board. i'd like to see public money withheld from cricket if the measures that the ecb come up with in terms of trying to ensure that racism,
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the scourge of racism, is removed from the game. if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee praised the former yorkshire player, azeem rafiq, for his courage in lifting the lid on cricket's problems. his powerful and personal testimony led to his old club imploding, and a crisis engulfing the sport. today, he welcomed the parliamentary report. i'm really encouraged by how seriously the committee has taken the issue of racism, which clearly, cricket, as a game, has ignored for a very long time. but some of the other things that went on behind the scenes, i think were outrageous and something that really showed me and still continues to show me that the game, as a whole, doesn't really get it. it's still in denial. meanwhile, the new chairman of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the county has begun in earnest. we've had incredible change. i've literally taken the club
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and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at our processes, our procedures, our leadership, governance, engaging with people, our pathways — no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress. another evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb, which receives £2.2 million a yearfrom sport england, welcomed the recommendations in the report, and said... as cricket continues to address its uncomfortable past, the scrutiny on its attempts to create a more inclusive future has never been so intense. laura scott, bbc news. vigils will be held across the island of ireland in memory of a woman who was murdered while outjogging. 23—year—old ashling murphy
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was killed on wednesday, along the banks of the grand canal in tullamore, county 0ffaly. the director of the national women's council of ireland, 0rla o'connor, said for too long, women have been living restricted lives due to fear of violence. it's not ok that women have to limit their lives in this way. and we're also seeing, and i think it is important, from men, recognising. and, you know, ithink this is a moment of recognising the privilege that men have. so, men are talking about the fact that they don't think about these issues that women are thinking about constantly in terms of going for a run in the evening, going out walking your dog in the evening and wondering who's behind you, who'sjust made a comment as they are walking by and how that really makes you feel threatened. these are not feelings, these are not things that men have to think about. and we need to really change this because this is not ok. and this culture that that creates is what leads to these horrendous murders of women.
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let's talk to one of the organisers of this afternoon's vigil in belfast. emma gallen is an activist from northern ireland. first of all, tell us about the vigil. first of all, tell us about the viuil. �* , :, vigil. i've been involved in activism _ vigil. i've been involved in activism in _ vigil. i've been involved in activism in belfast - vigil. i've been involved in activism in belfast for - vigil. i've been involved in activism in belfast for a i vigil. i've been involved in i activism in belfast for a few vigil. i've been involved in activism in belfast for a few ears activism in belfast for a few years now, _ activism in belfast for a few years now. and — activism in belfast for a few years now, and we have a group chat, and when _ now, and we have a group chat, and when the _ now, and we have a group chat, and when the news broke about ashling murphy— when the news broke about ashling murphy being killed, we alljust were _ murphy being killed, we alljust were so— murphy being killed, we alljust were so sad and so angry. we wanted to do— were so sad and so angry. we wanted to do something in solidarity. and we could — to do something in solidarity. and we could see that they were popping up we could see that they were popping up across— we could see that they were popping up across ireland. "let's get this organised. — up across ireland. "let's get this organised, let's get the word out that we _ organised, let's get the word out that we are doing this here." we all briefly— that we are doing this here." we all briefly hesitated, "do we do this here _ briefly hesitated, "do we do this here with — briefly hesitated, "do we do this here with the rising covid
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continuing?" but we all thought we had to _ continuing?" but we all thought we had to. because people are still scared — had to. because people are still scared to — had to. because people are still scared to go out. one of the great ironies _ scared to go out. one of the great ironies of— scared to go out. one of the great ironies of organising a vigil like this is— ironies of organising a vigil like this is that people fear for getting there _ this is that people fear for getting there and — this is that people fear for getting there and getting home. it's got to beat daylight. people are anxious about _ beat daylight. people are anxious about how to get in on how to get out, _ about how to get in on how to get out, especially if they will be travelling alone. and because of that, _ travelling alone. and because of that, because that there is still there. — that, because that there is still there, that is why we felt we had to organise _ there, that is why we felt we had to organise something. and there, that is why we felt we had to organise something.— there, that is why we felt we had to organise something. and there's fear is that ou organise something. and there's fear is that you have _ organise something. and there's fear is that you have been _ organise something. and there's fear is that you have been speaking - is that you have been speaking about, they seem to echo the fears that many women talked about after the death of sarah everard? it’s that many women talked about after the death of sarah everard?- the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same. — the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same, and _ the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same, and we _ the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same, and we try _ the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same, and we try to - the death of sarah everard? it's the exact same, and we try to organise| exact same, and we try to organise things— exact same, and we try to organise things after— exact same, and we try to organise things after that as well. it's always— things after that as well. it's alwaysjust a case of things after that as well. it's always just a case of going, things after that as well. it's alwaysjust a case of going, what can change? there are conversations that happen — can change? there are conversations that happen with some men, and i think— that happen with some men, and i think people are slowly coming along
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more~ _ think people are slowly coming along more in _ think people are slowly coming along more in my— think people are slowly coming along more. in my social media, i've seen more _ more. in my social media, i've seen more men _ more. in my social media, i've seen more men posting about this one than they did _ more men posting about this one than they did maybe three or four years a-o. they did maybe three or four years ago but— they did maybe three or four years ago. but it's nothing new. there are things— ago. but it's nothing new. there are things that — ago. but it's nothing new. there are things that people can be doing in order— things that people can be doing in order to _ things that people can be doing in order to call out the sexism that they see — order to call out the sexism that they see. as or that said in the video— they see. as or that said in the video there, trying to actually address— video there, trying to actually address the culture that allows this year _ address the culture that allows this year but— address the culture that allows this year. but we still have to face this every _ year. but we still have to face this every day — year. but we still have to face this every day. it feels like groundhog day where — every day. it feels like groundhog day where it is another day, another woman, _ day where it is another day, another woman, and — day where it is another day, another woman, and you just hope it will isn't _ woman, and you just hope it will isn't you~ — woman, and you just hope it will isn't you~ lt— woman, and you 'ust hope it will isn't ou. , :, woman, and you 'ust hope it will isn't ou. , . ., , , isn't you. it is an absolutely heartbreaking _ isn't you. it is an absolutely heartbreaking story, - isn't you. it is an absolutely heartbreaking story, isn't . isn't you. it is an absolutelyl heartbreaking story, isn't it? isn't you. it is an absolutely - heartbreaking story, isn't it? and there are going to be vigils held across the ireland of ireland today? i'm organising the one in belfast. we are _ i'm organising the one in belfast. we are hopeful we can maybe get some irish we are hopeful we can maybe get some irish music— we are hopeful we can maybe get some irish music being played, because ashling _ irish music being played, because ashling murphy was a player herself. there _ ashling murphy was a player herself. there are _ ashling murphy was a player herself. there are once happening across towns _ there are once happening across towns and — there are once happening across
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towns and cities. again, it is one of those — towns and cities. again, it is one of those ones where people are trying _ of those ones where people are trying to— of those ones where people are trying to make them more local because — trying to make them more local because people don't want to be travelling further afield. sometimes if there _ travelling further afield. sometimes if there is _ travelling further afield. sometimes if there is cause for a vigil, there might— if there is cause for a vigil, there might be — if there is cause for a vigil, there might be one happening atjust the bil might be one happening atjust the big cities — might be one happening atjust the big cities. but this is really hitting _ big cities. but this is really hitting home that people don't want to travel, _ hitting home that people don't want to travel, i— hitting home that people don't want to travel, i don't want to travel after— to travel, i don't want to travel after dark _ to travel, i don't want to travel after dark. it's happening in towns and cities — after dark. it's happening in towns and cities across ireland. in northern— and cities across ireland. in northern ireland, i know of once happening. northern ireland, i know of once happening-— happening. and yours, it is four o'clock this _ happening. and yours, it is four o'clock this afternoon? - happening. and yours, it is four o'clock this afternoon? in - happening. and yours, it is four. o'clock this afternoon? in belfast city hall? o'clock this afternoon? in belfast ci hall? , :, ., city hall? yes. for a vigil in itelfast- _ city hall? yes. for a vigil in belfast. and _ city hall? yes. for a vigil in belfast. and there - city hall? yes. for a vigil in belfast. and there will- city hall? yes. for a vigil in belfast. and there will be i city hall? yes. for a vigil in - belfast. and there will be also... it is something we are aiming to be shared _ it is something we are aiming to be shared with— it is something we are aiming to be shared with a hashtag.—
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now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. we started off today with frost and fog around for many of us and that's going to be returning again tonight. but before the sun sets, a bit of late brightness around for many of us, a lot of dry, unsettled weather out there at the moment. as we head through the evening hours temperatures are going to drop quite quickly, so around about two or three degrees quite widely for england and wales into the evening hours. and for scotland and northern ireland, a little bit breezier and milder here. a few splashes of rain across the far north of scotland, but most places dry through tonight. again, some mist and some fog patches are quite dense fog patches for central and eastern england, parts of wales as well. but temperatures getting down a few degrees below freezing where we have got those clearer skies. so a chilly start to the day with those pockets of frost and some dense fog patches that will be quite slow to clear but they will eventually clear for england and wales. a little bit more sunshine for scotland compared to what we have got out there today.
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temperature is only about 5 degrees in the east but up into double figures across the southwest. and then things are looking mostly dry unsettled as we head through the second half of the weekend too. bye— bye. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines — downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over the next two weeks — after a drop in 0micron cases. bring aisling murphy, vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old who was murdered while outjogging.
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——remembering ashling murphy. sport now — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. it isa it is a fast—moving story, isn't it? yes. good afternoon. novak djokovic is weighing up his legal options after having his visa cancelled for a second time in australia. his lawyer, says the government's reason for trying to deport him is for potentially �*exciting anti—vax sentiment�*. the australian open starts on monday he is the reigning champion, but over the past few days, it's emerged that there was an error in his original application to enter the country and the world number one, who hasn't been vaccinated, has also admitted to breaking covid rules in serbia before christmas. the immigration minister alex hawke cancelled djokovic's visa this morning �*on health and good order grounds on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so.�* here's our tennis correspondent russell fuller.
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what we know is that djokovic is a free man tonight. he will have to report to the offices of border force in melbourne at eight o'clock tomorrow morning our time at which point he will almost certainly be detained. that will allow him to spend the morning with his lawyers with border force official somewhere else in the building and then he will have to return to an asylum hotel where he spent four nights, culminating in last weekend's hearing. at that stage to healing will perhaps take place on the sunday. this has not been confirmed but the plan is to get everything done by sunday so novak djokovic and the australian open know where they stand. russell fuller there. the ashes have already been lost but england are desparate to sign off on a high in australia. it's the final test in hobart and though they won the toss and made a brilliant start taking three very early wickets,
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autralia's batsman rallied to reach 2&1—6 by the close. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. england have never lost a test match in tasmania. 0k. this is their first test match in tasmania. but recognise the team? five changes including 0llie robinson, recalled and rejoicing. warner caught by zak crawley for 0. next, marnus labuschagne dropped by the diving crawley on 0. ah! england's captain chose to bowl first in very helpful conditions and joe root himself caught usman khawaja. then steve smith was out for none. edged and gone. australia 12—3. hang on, was is this the same ashes? well, yes, it was. marnus labuschagne bashed and thrashed his way to 44, that's what hobart wanted. whatjoe root feared. where was labuschagne going? wow! stuart broad bowled at the stumps and the batterflattened himself. but the floodlights revealed a new threat, how travis head sparkled. 0llie robinson now wasn't fit enough
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to bowl, stuart broad was trying. but in 101 rapid runs, travis head transformed the whole mood, australia were reborn in the match. when cameron green put his mighty frame to the cause... deliciously played by green. ..england started to look exhausted. still mark wood charged in, and when green aimed for six, he was caught, 241—6, england were hanging on when the rain came. thatjust about covers it. joe wilson, bbc news. football line now. burnley�*s match against leicester in the premier league tomorrow has been postponed. burnley don't have enough players to fulfil the fixture — the minimum is 13 senior outfield players and a goalkeeper — they have a number of covid issues and injuries in the squad. it's quarterfinals day in the masters snooker at alexandra palace. the world number two, judd trump, is playing fellow englishman kyren
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wilson in the afternoon session. it's the first to six frames and trump has just taken a 3—1 lead into the mid session interval. the winner will take on either mark selby or barry hawkins who play their quarterfinal this evening. you can follow this on bbc two or the bbc sport website. that matches this afternoon. that's all the sport for now. cheers, see you then, thanks very much. the woman who has accused the duke of york of sexually abusing her has welcomed a us judge's decision to allow her legal case to continue. virginia giuffre says her goal is to show that the rich and powerful aren't above the law. it comes as buckingham palace announced that prince andrew's military titles and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen and he will now face the civil case in the us as a private citizen. prince andrew strongly denies the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent, sarah campbell, is outside windsor castle. indeed.
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i think the developments over the last 2a hours have really shown that. it was here yesterday, we understood, by mutual consent, that that agreement was made that prince andrew would return his military affiliations, his royal patronages, back to the queen and they will be redistributed permanently amongst other members of the royal family. he will no longer be styled his royal highness, his birthright, and will defend the case against him in the us as a private citizen. it was a pretty blunt, short statement that was released by buckingham palace just after five o'clock yesterday evening and was as close to the queen could come to basically saying to prince andrew, "you are on your own." meanwhile, his accuser, virginia giuffre, took to social media this morning. she told twitter that she was pleased withjudge kaplan's ruling that allows her case with prince andrew to go forward, and she put forward that line, she said her goal has always been to show that the rich and the powerful are not above the law and must be held accountable. now, prince andrew has always denied the allegations against him
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and a source close to him yesterday said that this case is a marathon, not a sprint, and the duke will continue to defend himself. no doubt it would have been a very difficult day for him yesterday to agree to give up those military affiliations. he is, of course, a military man himself, with 22 years service with the royal navy, and no doubt it would have been a difficult decision for the rest of the family, most especially the queen, to come to the realisation that this might be the best way to protect the reputation of the monarchy. new figures suggest the uk economy climbed above above its pre—pandemic level for the first time in november, shortly before 0micron struck. the office for national statistics said gross domestic product — that's the total number of goods and services produced by the economy, increased by 0.9%. the construction sector grew strongly during the month, with the services sector also benefiting.
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the alleged killer of 19—year—old harry dunn has had a court hearing postponsed, to enable "ongoing discussions" with the crown prosecution service to continue. us national anne sacoolas had been due to appear at westminster magistrates' court on tuesday. she is accused of causing death by dangerous driving following a fatal road crash outside us military base raf croughton in northamptonshire in august 2019. nurseries in england that are being forced to close or reduce their opening hours because of staff shortages caused by covid, say they've been forgotten by the government. the department for education says it has given extensive guidance and "significant financial support" to providers during the pandemic. but the industry says it's too little and it's too late. here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley who needs some ice? the penguins. it's the morning session at this nursery.
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what is your favourite thing about nursery? my car. i'm usually in the playground. ilike painting. do you like my shoes? yeah! forjen and lottie, it's a busy morning getting to nursery and then work and it's all the more stressful when covid could disrupt the whole day. i might get a phone call in the morning to say, "we've not got enough staff, we're going to have to shut", you know, because they've got staff isolating. so it is a massive concern obviously for me ringing work and then it's notjust nursery, it's me being in work as well. jane deals with the day—to—day running of the nursery and it's becoming increasingly difficult when staff are off with covid. we've shut more rooms, the preschool has been shut a couple of times and the room downstairs, the toddler room downstairs has also been shut a couple of times. at the moment, we're really in crisis, we may have to start looking at prioritising places for some of the children. young children don't have to be tested or isolate
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if their parents have covid. no—one knows if they're bringing it into the nursery. so we've got families that we know that the parents have covid, they've tested positive. but these children are in the nurseries. we should have a position whereby if children are living with parents that have covid—19, that there is an isolation period because when they come back into nursery, whilst they may not be, if you like, ill themselves, they do pass on the infection to our staff and we are already in crisis so the last thing we want is more staff to go off with covid. we have 25% of our staff not in today. i nina isjuggling staffing and finances. she started this business when she was 21 and now owns eight nurseries. i've grown my business over the last 20 years. | singing. my passion is still there but mentally, i think. it'sjust exhausting. when you have to make a phone call, tell me what goes through your mind? i initially, the feeling is dread.
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because i think i'm going to let all those families down, the children, what- are they going to do? then obviously the impact is then the staff worry, i it's financial worry. i've still got to keep everything going. i the parents obviously don't pay if we close, | so then i've still got all my bills to pay and that is a massive, i you know, concern. you are saying you cannot take any more children? the government has relaxed the rules on how many children staff are allowed to look after. here, concerned that bigger groups means more responsibility on staff who are already stretched. for many nurseries and childminders, there are too many obstacles to overcome. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in stockport. let's bring you more on the australian visa row with novak djokovic.
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theit has fuelled the vaccination debate in serbia, where less than half of the country's population are fully vaccinated. so where does all this leaves the serbian government's vaccination campaign? from belgrade, our balkans correspondent guy de launey reports. this time last year serbia was leading the european race to vaccinate its people against coronavirus. while other countries were struggling for supplies, serbians could choose from four different covid jabs, but now the campaign's gone from plain sailing to being stuck in the doldrums. translation: we would vaccinate 5,000 or 6,000 people a day - at the belgrade fair. then it dropped to 2,000 during the summer, and in recent weeks the number has fallen drastically to 300 doses per day. all that means that only around half of serbians are fullyjabbed, and that's why the vaccine hesitant stance of novak djokovic isn't as controversial here as it is in australia. still, serbians who are getting jabbed are hoping the sporting icon will come round to their way of thinking. translation: when there - was a davis cup game in serbia he was bringing tennis players for vaccination here, so i believe some day he will get that vaccine. translation: what's going l on in the background is politics more than anything else.
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but for health he should get his vaccine. it's honourable. and that's because serbia is once again in the middle of a surge of covid cases. life has been going on more or less as normal here in belgrade, with very few restrictions. that's despite serbia setting a series of daily records for the number of new coronavirus cases. now, it would really help if more people got vaccinated. the lack of take—up has been a real headache for the government. and that administration is led by a prime minister who says she is proud to have been the first european leader to receive the vaccination. i can't say that i understand people who don't want to get vaccinated, but in a democracy you have to respect everyone's views and decisions. i cannot agree with novak, but it's up to novak to talk about his choices. it's not up to up to me to discuss, defend or attack them. so it's all gone downhill as far as serbia's vaccination campaign is concerned.
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perhaps it would help with novak djokovic had a change of heart. but if his experience in australia doesn't make him reconsider, probably nothing will. guy de launey, bbc news, belgrade. the headlines on bbc news — downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks — after a drop in 0micron cases. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. there's been a cyber attack across government websites in ukraine. the pages of the ministry of foreign affairs, the ministry of education and several others were taken down for a while.
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the ukranian government says most affected resources have already been restored and others will be available soon. ukraine says no personal data was leaked during cyber attack but the government has opened an investigation. 0ur diplomatic correspondent paul adams has more on this cyber attack from kyiv. it seems to have been pretty extensive, as you say, a number of government affected, including the foreign ministry and we understand, some embassies. energy, education, sport, it seems to have happened across really wide swathes of the government overnight. but you sense from the statement this morning, at least what we are being told publicly, that the situation was brought under control relatively quickly. when it appeared on several government websites, when you accessed them, you could see this message which warned ukrainians that their personal data had been hacked, that it had been stolen and it told them to be very afraid.
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but the government is saying that the various affected websites have either been restored or have been temporarily taken down while they are fixed. and they said no personal data has been accessed. it is early days, we do not know the full extent of it but at the moment, the government is giving the impression, at least, that it has this under control. there is no doubt that everyone here is going to be assuming that this is the work of the russians, it comes at a time of heightened tension with russia and in the past, as recently as early this month, officials here were saying that they had thwarted as many as 50 or 60 attacks, emanating from russian—sponsored hackers in the month of december. last year, the government said it had dealt with around a thousand attacks and again pointed the finger at hackers that are supported
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and sponsored by russia's fsb security service so there is a history of this. it will be the assumption particularly at this particular moment, but at the moment, they are not saying who they think did it. paul adams reporting from the ukraine. the issue of her remains are looked after in mortuaries and funeral homes is the subject of a public inquiry. a family in northern ireland says they've been kept in the dark for 15 years about how their mother's body sustained more than 30 broken bones. maureen mcginley died in londonderry, and her children have decided to renew their campaign to find out what happened. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page reports. maureen mcginley was a great—grandmother, popular in her community and known for her hospitality. she died 15 years ago this month from pneumonia at the age of 78.
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two months later, mrs mcginley�*s gp asked to see her family because he'd received the results of a postmortem. what he said then, "i'm not sure how to tell youse this", and he said she had 3a broken bones. it is so hard to realise that this has happened. to such a small, wee pensioner that never done anybody any harm. we didn't know what to believe or who to believe or where to go for answers or where do we ask for answers. where we were going, we weren't getting no answers. mrs mcginley died here at altnagelvin hospital in londonderry. the fractures happened sometime between her death and when her body arrived for a postmortem in belfast 70 miles away. but that is the only fact which is known for sure. the mcginley family want to know the whole truth. we started off as campaigners, there was eight of us,
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we have lost a brother, we have lost a sister. they know now what happened to mum because mum has told them. but we do not know. and that is all we need to know, is somebody to tell us. health officials, the police, and the coroner all investigated but none were able to reach definitive conclusions. the family recorded every step in their long campaign. it's all there. to let them see how much we fought. they eventually took the case to the public service watchdog, the northern ireland ombudsman. the bbc has seen his report from 2017, the full details have not been made public before. the ombudsman said the hospital's record—keeping had been inadequate, he raised serious concern that inaccurate information was given about cctv. the ombudsman said it was impossible to understand why the trust did not
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adequately investigate. the western health trust has repeated its sincerest apologies to the family for the distress experienced as a result of the its failure to investigate, it also says it has fully accepted the ombudsman's findings. maureen mcginley�*s sons and daughters say they won't stop asking questions. we just want closure now, we just want to know- what happened to her. let her rest in peace, . she is not resting either because she is not getting a chance to rest. - the family believe this story is about accountability and transparency. which, they say, should be at the heart of the health service anywhere. chris page, bbc news. in 201a in 2014 a devastating storm struck the south devon coast destroying a stretch of railway and cutting cornwall and most of devon off from the rest of the country for several
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weeks. you might remember these astonishing pictures of the railway track in dawlish dangling in midair after the seawall was hit by an 80 mph wind and washed away. i remember it well because i was there reporting on it. in 2019 work started on construction of a new sea wall to protect the railway and local community. here isjohn local community. here is john maguire. a hairline crack appeared, and then throughout the day, itjust kept opening up and just kept opening up and the cracksjust got — kept getting bigger and bigger. you were standing onjust, like, moving land when we were trying to move the fences because the fences were there and the crack was appearing and we were open at the time. didn't quite know what to do. and people were coming in. we couldn't afford to close, so we were just ferociously trying to fence it off as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to anyone.
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for the past 18 years, cara strom has woken up every morning wondering whether her home and her business, the blue anchor pub, would still be standing. at high tide, you could feel the waves inside, so you could feel not... the building wouldn't shake, but you would definitely be able to feel when it was hitting. recently installed huge boulders, rock armour, as it's known, should reduce the wave power and prevent the cliffs on this stretch of the west somerset coastline from collapsing. i've said they'll fish me out of the bristol channel if they have to. i'm not giving up, and i'm really glad that i didn't give up. i never thought of giving up. not once _ obviously, there are days, aren't there, when you think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing's ever going to be done. i'm going to fall in the sea. i'm going to have nothing. but i've neverthought, "oh, you know, it's not worth... it's not worth carrying on." luckily. winter's the most anxious time for those at risk from coastal erosion. here at sandy bay in east devon, a huge section of land fell away last week, with holiday caravans just metres away. but landslips can occur all year round. last spring, what was said to be the biggest in 60 years
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saw a major collapse on dorset�*sjurassic coastline. 0ur foreshores are constantly changing. to understand what forces are at play in reshaping them, researchers from the university of plymouth study the cliffs, dunes and sands at perranporth on the north cornwall coast. this is ourfavourite beach. we've come here already for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and a severe winter storm can shift up to one million cubic metres of sand out to sea before summer tides bring it back again. the beach isn'tjust popular with visitors, but it's essential to protect the town. the amount of sand that's on the beach determines how easily the town gets flooded. so if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you're lowering the beach surface, if you then get a storm, the town is more likely to flood because people don't really realise that beaches and dunes are natural forms of coastal defence.
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and the wider the beaches and the higher the beaches, the better protection the beach provides against flooding. and built on these shifting sands is the watering hole pub. the owners here are channelling king canute and holding back natural forces. the way this has been built and the raft it's on is pretty full on. it's how much money do you want to spend on it and how much is it worth to us to do that? and i think for us, yeah, it's a very valuable, valuable thing as it's our livelihoods and it's with the, you know, it's a 42—year—old family business. so it's... so, yeah, it means quite a lot for us to to maintain it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are a balance between risk to people or property and cost. man vs sea is an expensive business and often, despite design, engineering and deep pockets, it's the sea that wins the power struggle.
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john maguire. such a beautiful part of the country. the british army officer, captain preet chandi, made headlines across the world after completing an expedition to the south pole — and today she arrived home. it's believed she's the first woman of colour to ski solo and unsupported across the antarctic. captain preet endured temperatures as low as minus 50, and wind speeds of up to 60 miles per hour, while pulling a 90 kilogram sled. after arriving back at heathrow, she told the bbc there'll be another trip. this was actually phase one of two, so pretty much from monday i think i'll be in the gym again, training. my aim is to do a full crossing solo, unsupported again. it will be a little bit longer, probably a little bit tougher. something that seemed probably almost impossible at the start but the more you do, the more you realise you're capable of, and after this one it seems more achievable. so, yeah, that's the next step.
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well done her, camped in preet chandi. —— captain. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. we have got a reasonably dry, settled spell of weather with us at the moment. that is going to be sticking around for the next few days. certainly some problems with mist and fog, which in a few places are lingering, but also some blue sky breaking through. really, for the rest of today, things are looking mainly dry, and we will see plenty of sunshine, particularly further south across england and wales where high pressure is well and truly in charge of our weather. with light winds, too, we are also seeing a few problems with air quality. some high levels of pollution, particularly around the london area at the moment. we have had several days of that high pressure trapping those pollutants with very light winds to disperse them, too. but that will tend to improve as we head through tomorrow. so, a bit of brightness as we end the day. once the sun sets, though, temperatures are going to drop quite quickly. so by six o'clock this evening, down to around about two degrees for much of england and wales. a little bit milder for scotland
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and northern ireland where we have got more cloud, more of a breeze. some spots of light, drizzly rain across the far north of scotland, but most places dry through this evening and tonight. once again, we will see some mist and fog patches reforming, particularly across parts of england and wales. temperatures will get down below freezing, so another cold, frosty night for some of us. some pockets of fairly sharp frost across parts of northern england, for instance, under those clearer skies. now, for some places, that mist and fog, particularly towards the east, will be quite slow to clear through the day tomorrow. but for most places we are looking at another dry day, some sunshine around for parts of northern england, wales, scotland, as well, and later in the day that mist and low cloud will tend to break up further south. so temperatures close to the east only about 5 degrees or so tomorrow, but turning a little bit milder, just about pushing into double figures from the west. now, as we head through saturday night and on into sunday, a little bit of a change as we see quite a weak weather front, a cold front pushing its way down from the north. that will bring initially a bit of rain to scotland and northern ireland overnight.
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during sunday, that willjust push its way across central parts of england and wales, but tending to peter out as it does so. one or two showers to the south of that, as well, but by the afternoon most places in the clearer skies. there will be some sunshine returning from the north and temperatures between about 7—11 on sunday. once that cold front gets out of the way, fizzles out as we move on into monday, high pressure once again is building its way in from the west. so lots of dry, settled weather, really, through much of the week ahead. perhaps a few showers around here and there in the north and west on tuesday, and temperatures fairly typical for this time of year. bye— bye. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. we have the enquiry
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taking place by sue gray. and, you know, we are very clear that there were real mistakes made. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. andy murray says the row is bad for the sport. thisjust seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now. and, yeah, not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over the next two weeks — after a drop in 0micron cases. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, who was murdered while outjogging. and we look at the top 10 highest content creators on youtube, with one earning up to £40 million last year.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. downing street has apologised to buckingham palace after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral. a spokesman for borisjohnson has said it was deeply regrettable that the events took place at a time of national mourning. covid rules at the time banned indoor mixing — but reports suggest there was drinking and dancing until the early hours. and a member of staff was sent out to a nearby shop with an empty suitcase, to fill it with supplies of alcohol. the prime minister wasn't at the parties, but the latest disclosures, which the daily telegraph reported, have amplified calls for his resignation.
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here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. the 17th of april last year. one of the defining pictures of the pandemic. the queen sitting alone at the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. the night before, in here, staff held leaving dos, despite people being banned from social mixing indoors. according to the daily telegraph, there was music and dancing. someone was sent to a local shop with a suitcase to stock up on alcohol. downing street hasn't denied the specific claims. when i heard about this i was, of course, very, very concerned, and i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. earlier this week, the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. obviously, if you—re a rule—maker
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you can't be a rule—breaker, of course that is correct, but we need to let this investigation run. this morning, downing street apologised to buckingham palace. the prime minister's spokesman said it was deeply regrettable that this had taken place at a time of national mourning ahead of prince philip's funeral. one of the events was a leaving do for this man, james slack, borisjohnson's former communications chief. he said in a statement this morning... allegations of parties or gatherings which broke the rules now span almost a year, from may 2020, to april 2021, and that's led to suggestions that these were not isolated incidents but part of a cultural problem in borisjohnson's downing street.
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the prime minister hasn't been seen in public since wednesday and although he didn't attend the events which emerged today, many of his mps are angry that he did attend drinks during lockdown in 2020. five have now called for him to quit. part of the key elements of leadership is that you don't ask people you're asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you're not willing to bear yourself, and clearly that has not been the case. the fact is they've been having parties throughout because in the end they thought that the laws that they were putting together were not laws that applied to them. the revelations about what went on here keep coming, piling even more pressure on downing street's most senior occupant. let's talk to conservative mp sir roger gale, who has submitted a letter of no confidence
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in mrjohnson to the 1922 committee of backbench mps. we heard from the foreign secretary, saying the prime minster has apologised, we should move on. shore apologised, we should move on. are ou read apologised, we should move on. site you ready to apologised, we should move on. fif'e you ready to move on? as far apologised, we should move on. fie you ready to move on? as far as apologised, we should move on. file you ready to move on? as far as this particular issue is concerned, i think it is absolutely right that the prime minister has offered an apology to her majesty. the prime minister said that this shouldn't have taken place at this time. the answer to this is that it shouldn't have taken place at all. it was wildly insensitive and probably unlawful as well. but the prime minister has apologised. that was the right thing to do. we minister has apologised. that was the right thing to do.— minister has apologised. that was the right thing to do. we have heard a stream of — the right thing to do. we have heard a stream of these _ the right thing to do. we have heard a stream of these revelations - the right thing to do. we have heard a stream of these revelations now, | a stream of these revelations now, almost a new one every day. and we were talking to a former conservative government special adviser who said he believes there was a culture in downing street, a culture of partying and drinking and so on. if there was such a culture,
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the prime minister must have known about it. i the prime minister must have known about it. :, :, , the prime minister must have known about it. . . , , about it. i fear that i must be the case. about it. i fear that i must be the case- you — about it. i fear that i must be the case- you can — about it. i fear that i must be the case. you can understand - about it. i fear that i must be the case. you can understand that i about it. i fear that i must be the - case. you can understand that people working under great pressure in an office like downing street might well want to let their hair down at the end of the day and have a drink. but then other people, this has been pointed out over and over again, particularly doctors, nurses, ancillary staff in the health service in hospitals, with people dying around them have also been working under duress and very, very hard. but they haven't gone away and started partying at the end of the day. it cannot be one rule for one group of people and another rule for everybody else. bud group of people and another rule for everybody else-— everybody else. and some of the details. everybody else. and some of the details- you _ everybody else. and some of the details. you sort _ everybody else. and some of the details. you sort of— everybody else. and some of the details. you sort of think, - everybody else. and some of the details. you sort of think, even l everybody else. and some of the j details. you sort of think, even if it were not for covid, would be appropriate for a member of downing street stopped to take out an empty suitcase and to fill it with supplies of alcohol to bring back for a party in number ten at any
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time, let alone a time of covid restrictions?— time, let alone a time of covid restrictions? . , :, ., :, restrictions? the answer to that of course is no. _ restrictions? the answer to that of course is no. it— restrictions? the answer to that of course is no, it is— restrictions? the answer to that of course is no, it is inappropriate. i course is no, it is inappropriate. and i think there may be one or two red faces in the diplomatic protection force, because presumably that suitcase had to come in through security, through the front door of downing street, unless it went through the back door. i don't know. as i said in the introduction, you have written a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. so have several other mp5. what is your latest reading of where he stands within the party? we know after his apology had prime ministers question, he turned to the commons tea room is apparently trying to shore up support. what do you make of his position? i shore up support. what do you make of his position?— of his position? i suspect, from what i've heard, _ of his position? i suspect, from what i've heard, that _ of his position? i suspect, from what i've heard, that a - of his position? i suspect, from what i've heard, that a lot - of his position? i suspect, from what i've heard, that a lot of i what i've heard, that a lot of conservative members of parliament are now back in their constituencies are now back in their constituencies are going back to their constituencies over the weekend, are going to have a fairly bumpy ride.
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and i think a lot of constituency associations are going to express enormous anger at the manner in which this has been handled. and we know that more than one association, i think, has already expressed, as an association, no confidence in the prime minister. as far as where we are at with letters to sir graham brady, graham is the custodian of those letters. and he will make an announcement as and when and if, and it is a big if, the target figure of 54 letters, i think, it is a big if, the target figure of 54 letters, ithink, is reached. if that figure is reached and only if it is, and by implication there will have to be a leadership contest. of course, the outcome of that is by no means certain. i put my letter in a year ago after the barnard castle event, because i felt that that demonstrated a lack ofjudgment that
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didn't sit comfortably with the prime minister of the united kingdom. prime minister of the united kinudom. , ., ,, prime minister of the united kinudom. , . ,, ., prime minister of the united kinudom. , . ,, :, :, , kingdom. there is an issue not only with the parties, _ kingdom. there is an issue not only with the parties, but _ kingdom. there is an issue not only with the parties, but also _ kingdom. there is an issue not only with the parties, but also with - with the parties, but also with honesty and openness, isn't there? because the prime minister missing in the house of commons not very long ago that all guidance was followed at all times. and that he had been assured there were no events that didn't follow the guidance. it events that didn't follow the uuidance. , events that didn't follow the guidance-— events that didn't follow the uuidance. , , . guidance. it is absolutely correct that, on the _ guidance. it is absolutely correct that, on the 8th _ guidance. it is absolutely correct that, on the 8th of _ guidance. it is absolutely correct that, on the 8th of december, i guidance. it is absolutely correct i that, on the 8th of december, from the dispatch box, the prime ministers said in terms that as far as he was aware, on the information he had been given, there were no parties in downing street. but we now know that he attended at least one of those parties. not the ones recently but certainly he attended one. so he misled the house, and that in itself is a very serious offence. :, ,. that in itself is a very serious offence. :, :, :, :, that in itself is a very serious offence. :, :, ., ,, that in itself is a very serious offence. :, :, . ,, :, offence. roger gale, good to talk to ou aaain offence. roger gale, good to talk to you again on — offence. roger gale, good to talk to you again on bbc — offence. roger gale, good to talk to you again on bbc news. _ offence. roger gale, good to talk to
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you again on bbc news. thank- offence. roger gale, good to talk to you again on bbc news. thank you | you again on bbc news. thank you very much for your time. australia's immigration minister has cancelled novak djokovic's visa for a second time, just three days before the world men's tennis number one is due to defend his australian open title in melbourne. the minister alex hawke said he'd made the decision on the grounds of "health and good order" — as the row continues about djokovic's right to remain in the country unvaccinated. his lawyers are now trying to stop him being deported. shaimaa khalil has the latest from melbourne. twice today, novak djokovic was on the court training. and a few hours later, the government finally announced its decision. the tennis star's visa has been cancelled again, and for the second time he faces deportation from australia. in his statement, the country's immigration minister, alex hawke, said...
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the prime minister, scott morrison, said the decision followed careful consideration. mr morrison's government has faced heavy criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into australia in the first place, while the country struggled with a spike in covid—19 case numbers. i think it was a mess up they did, but now i think they have corrected the way. it's unfortunate that novak won't be playing the tournament, it's a pretty big loss. yeah, i think if everyone else has to follow the rules, why can't he? obviously he thought he was above it all. novak djokovic has been included in the draw for the tournament as the top seed. he was due to play a fellow serbian, miomir kecmanovic. now his case is in court again.
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0n on saturday, he will speak to border officials about what happens next. 0nly officials about what happens next. only then will be get a better idea about whether he has any chance of competing in the grand slam. tennis star andy murray said the controversy has been bad for the sport. this just seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now, and not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. yeah, and obviously a lot of people have criticised the government here as well, so, yeah, it's not been good. the current australian davis cup captain and one of djokovic's closest friend says he was shocked and surprised by the decision. i'm still hoping, let's say, that he can compete. he has two more days to make an appeal and to get the decision overruled. his former coach, multiple
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grand slam winner boris becker, said djokovic is being used a political pawn. he's only a tennis player, we're not politicians. - if we're used in a political way then we don't have a chance. i the world number one is still fighting to defend his title here. whether or not he'll be able to play, the australian open will take place under the shadow of a controversy that has gone way beyond tennis. and shaimaa gave us an update a short while ago. the clock is ticking but the speed at which the story has gone at such a dizzying rate. right after the government's decision, shortly after they announced that they were going to cancel the visa we have had an emergency court hearing here and interesting lines have been coming out of this. i think one of the key developments is that novak djokovic's legal team expressed their understanding of why
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the government has made that decision. they said that the immigration minister alex hawke believed letting sentiments, and the lawyers argued that this was patently irrational. we also have a little bit of clarity on the procedure, at least. we know that novak djokovic is not going to spend a night in detention tonight, but he will be detained tomorrow. he will be allowed to spend time at his lawyer's office at some point in the day. he will meet immigration officers as well. and then we know that this case is now going to a federal court, to a higher court. all of that with the australian open happening on monday. and instead of training on the court he's going to be between his lawyer's office and a hotel detention. shaimaa khalil reporting there for us from australia. the headlines on bbc news... downing street apologises
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to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. public funding for cricket should be limited unless there's progress on eradicating "deep—seated racism" — according to a group of mps. the digital, culture, media and sport committee has made the recommendation in a report following testimony by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who described english cricket as "institutionally racist". the england and wales cricket board currently receives over £2 million a yearfrom sport england. here's laura scott with more. eradicating racism from cricket
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will be a long and difficult road. that's the conclusion of mps who said they're convinced discrimination is endemic in the sport. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they issued a stark warning to the england and wales cricket board. i'd like to see public money withheld from cricket if the measures that the ecb come up with in terms of trying to ensure that racism, the scourge of racism, is removed from the game. if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee praised the former yorkshire player, azeem rafiq, for his courage in lifting the lid on cricket's problems. his powerful and personal testimony led to his old club imploding, and a crisis engulfing the sport. today, he welcomed the parliamentary report. i'm really encouraged by how seriously the committee has taken the issue of racism, which clearly, cricket, as a game, has ignored for a very long time.
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but some of the other things that went on behind the scenes, i think were outrageous and something that really showed me and still continues to show me that the game, as a whole, doesn't really get it. it's still in denial. meanwhile, the new chairman of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the county has begun in earnest. we've had incredible change. i've literally taken the club and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at our processes, our procedures, our leadership, our governance, engaging with people, our pathways — no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress. another evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb, which receives £2.2 million a yearfrom sport england, welcomed the recommendations in the report, and said... as cricket continues
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to address its uncomfortable past, the scrutiny on its attempts to create a more inclusive future has never been so intense. laura scott, bbc news. joining me now is the apprentice runner up and founder of run 0ut racism, bushra shaikh. she set up the organisation in the aftermath of the racism experienced by ex professional cricketer, azeem rafiq. the suggestion that public funding should be tied to whether there is progress in fighting racism in cricket? m, , progress in fighting racism in cricket? ~:,, , ., cricket? most definitely. reading the re ort cricket? most definitely. reading the report today, _ cricket? most definitely. reading the report today, as _ cricket? most definitely. reading the report today, as with - cricket? most definitely. reading the report today, as with many, l cricket? most definitely. reading the report today, as with many, i welcome — the report today, as with many, i welcome this. as a whole, and with azeem _ welcome this. as a whole, and with azeem rafiq, this is definitely progress. i don't know whether it is the ultimate step for the main step, but it— the ultimate step for the main step, but it is— the ultimate step for the main step, but it is definitely progress. the fact that — but it is definitely progress. the fact that the sporting industry
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itself— fact that the sporting industry itself gets to £2 million of funding, that is a huge chunk of money — funding, that is a huge chunk of money. and i think that is a very good _ money. and i think that is a very good position. but i still have my own concerns, as many others do, which _ own concerns, as many others do, which is _ own concerns, as many others do, which is that — own concerns, as many others do, which is that if this is linked to politics. — which is that if this is linked to politics. to _ which is that if this is linked to politics, to a political party, and potentially a party that has a systemic racism, where in the fact they have — systemic racism, where in the fact they have referred to muslim women as postboxes, is this change is really— as postboxes, is this change is really going to happen this quickly? do you _ really going to happen this quickly? do you think change is happening now? the parliamentary committee commended lord patel, who now runs yorkshire county cricket club. he says he has given the club a really good shake up and turned it upside down, and he clearly seems to be making progress. do you think enough progress is being made at yorkshire, and in cricket and the rest of the country? i and in cricket and the rest of the count ? ~ , , and in cricket and the rest of the count ? ~' , , ., country? i think it is definitely a aood country? i think it is definitely a good start- _ country? i think it is definitely a good start. the _ country? i think it is definitely a good start. the positive - country? i think it is definitely a | good start. the positive dialogue that we _ good start. the positive dialogue that we should be hearing. and i
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definitely— that we should be hearing. and i definitely think it is going to be a slow burner. but we have started the ball rolling _ slow burner. but we have started the ball rolling so this is potential that i— ball rolling so this is potential that i see, and if we keep it going we will— that i see, and if we keep it going we will see — that i see, and if we keep it going we will see changes soon.- we will see changes soon. azeem rafi . 's we will see changes soon. azeem rafiq's testimony _ we will see changes soon. azeem rafiq's testimony to _ we will see changes soon. azeem rafiq's testimony to those - we will see changes soon. azeem rafiq's testimony to those mps i we will see changes soon. azeem l rafiq's testimony to those mps was incredibly powerful, wasn't it? and extraordinary, actually. but it makes you wonder, we are focusing on cricket, but what about racism in other sports and walks of life as well? football, notably. and others. it's enough being done in those? ida. it's enough being done in those? no, definitely not. this is one case that— definitely not. this is one case that has— definitely not. this is one case that has come forward. we are going to be _ that has come forward. we are going to be hearing... as we have done, lots more — to be hearing... as we have done, lots more stories. i think the main thing _ lots more stories. i think the main thing to— lots more stories. i think the main thing to focus on is that we don't want _ thing to focus on is that we don't want there — thing to focus on is that we don't want there to be apprehension from any race _ want there to be apprehension from any race or— want there to be apprehension from any race or community tojoin want there to be apprehension from any race or community to join the sporting — any race or community to join the sporting industry, and this is a lot of what _ sporting industry, and this is a lot of what the — sporting industry, and this is a lot of what the campaign is actually doing _ of what the campaign is actually doing. we are hearing so many stories— doing. we are hearing so many stories about people being reluctant
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tojoin— stories about people being reluctant tojoin the _ stories about people being reluctant tojoin the sporting industries. just tell— tojoin the sporting industries. just tell us a little bit more about your campaign. what else are you trying to push to make progress, to make change? the trying to push to make progress, to make change?— trying to push to make progress, to make change? the idea between run racism out. — make change? the idea between run racism out, the _ make change? the idea between run racism out, the campaign, _ make change? the idea between run racism out, the campaign, was - make change? the idea between run racism out, the campaign, was to i make change? the idea between runl racism out, the campaign, was to get people _ racism out, the campaign, was to get people on— racism out, the campaign, was to get people on board, figure out a way that we _ people on board, figure out a way that we could infiltrate the system to say— that we could infiltrate the system to say have you got the right people in place? _ to say have you got the right people in place? if— to say have you got the right people in place? if you are going to have to give _ in place? if you are going to have to give a — in place? if you are going to have to give a quarterly report, who are these _ to give a quarterly report, who are these people that are making sure these people that are making sure the right— these people that are making sure the right work is being done? and we want to— the right work is being done? and we want to hear— the right work is being done? and we want to hear the stories from everyone _ want to hear the stories from everyone else, because less meat don't _ everyone else, because less meat don't know what the entire programme is —— don't know what the entire programme is -- problem — don't know what the entire programme is —— problem is, we won't be able to resolve — is —— problem is, we won't be able to resolve it — is -- problem is, we won't be able to resolve it— to resolve it. good to talk to you, and aood to resolve it. good to talk to you, and good luck _ to resolve it. good to talk to you, and good luck with _ to resolve it. good to talk to you, and good luck with your _ to resolve it. good to talk to you, | and good luck with your campaign. londoners have been warned to avoid strenuous physical activity because of "very high" levels of pollution in the capital today. an intense area of high pressure is covering much of western europe, and toxic emissions are hanging
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around with it, rather than being blown away. 0ur weather forecaster, sarah keith—lucas, is with me. it sounds quite alarming. as we were 'ust it sounds quite alarming. as we were just hearing — it sounds quite alarming. as we were just hearing there, it's notjust here _ just hearing there, it's notjust here in— just hearing there, it's notjust here in london. paris has got very high _ here in london. paris has got very high levels — here in london. paris has got very high levels of pollution at the moment— high levels of pollution at the moment as well. it is really down to an area _ moment as well. it is really down to an area of— moment as well. it is really down to an area of high pressure that is stubborn — an area of high pressure that is stubborn and won't clear away. that is leading _ stubborn and won't clear away. that is leading to — stubborn and won't clear away. that is leading to the stagnant air that is leading to the stagnant air that is hanging — is leading to the stagnant air that is hanging around. what we see is very light — is hanging around. what we see is very light winds, so nothing to disperse — very light winds, so nothing to disperse those pollutants. this picture — disperse those pollutants. this picture was taken from a weather watcher— picture was taken from a weather watcher in— picture was taken from a weather watcher in greenwich. you can see that layer— watcher in greenwich. you can see that layer of— watcher in greenwich. you can see that layer of hay is just sitting above — that layer of hay is just sitting above london, the top of the shard sticking _ above london, the top of the shard sticking out — above london, the top of the shard sticking out the top. as a descending air moves towards the ground, _ descending air moves towards the ground, it — descending air moves towards the ground, it warms up. that creates something — ground, it warms up. that creates something called a temperature inversion — something called a temperature inversion. an area of lower air on top of— inversion. an area of lower air on top of the — inversion. an area of lower air on top of the colder air which acts as a lid _ top of the colder air which acts as a lid the — top of the colder air which acts as a lid. the pollution cannot disperse, they have got nowhere to
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lo, disperse, they have got nowhere to go. they— disperse, they have got nowhere to go, they are trapped in that cold and dense — go, they are trapped in that cold and dense air. particularly affecting parts of london as well, but other— affecting parts of london as well, but other urban areas in the south have _ but other urban areas in the south have similar— but other urban areas in the south have similar problems as well. things— have similar problems as well. things will improve a little bit over— things will improve a little bit over the — things will improve a little bit over the next few days, but we could see this _ over the next few days, but we could see this problem returning later on in the _ see this problem returning later on in the month as well. on see this problem returning later on in the month as well.— see this problem returning later on in the month as well. on the face of it, it in the month as well. on the face of it. it looks — in the month as well. on the face of it. it looks like _ in the month as well. on the face of it, it looks like a _ in the month as well. on the face of it, it looks like a beautiful— in the month as well. on the face of it, it looks like a beautiful day. - it, it looks like a beautiful day. it quite worrying.— it, it looks like a beautiful day. it quite worrying. how unusual is this? it is fairl it quite worrying. how unusual is this? it is fairl unusual. it quite worrying. how unusual is this? it is fairl unusual. here it quite worrying. how unusual is this? it is fairl unusual. here in this? it is fairly unusual. here in london — this? it is fairly unusual. here in london over— this? it is fairly unusual. here in london over the past five years or so, london over the past five years or so. air— london over the past five years or so, air pollution has dramatically improved — so, air pollution has dramatically improved. and that is down to the ultra _ improved. and that is down to the ultra low— improved. and that is down to the ultra low emissions zone, covid restrictions have had a effect as well _ restrictions have had a effect as well it— restrictions have had a effect as well it can _ restrictions have had a effect as well. it can generally happen several— well. it can generally happen several times in a winter, even if you have — several times in a winter, even if you have got relatively low background air pollution, it really does _ background air pollution, it really does trap— background air pollution, it really does trap them. so that can happen a few times _ does trap them. so that can happen a few times each winter. and does trap them. so that can happen a few times each winter.— few times each winter. and what is the advice to _ few times each winter. and what is the advice to people _ few times each winter. and what is the advice to people who _ few times each winter. and what is the advice to people who are - few times each winter. and what is the advice to people who are out i few times each winter. and what is j the advice to people who are out in it? who are perhaps worried, having listened to you now. what should they be doing or not to be doing?
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there is full advice on the defra website — there is full advice on the defra website if_ there is full advice on the defra website. if you are in an area with a forecast — website. if you are in an area with a forecast of — website. if you are in an area with a forecast of high level of air pollution, adults and children with lun- pollution, adults and children with lung and _ pollution, adults and children with lung and heart problems should reduce — lung and heart problems should reduce their strenuous outdoor activities. _ reduce their strenuous outdoor activities, and any elderly people as well. — activities, and any elderly people as well, particularly if they have symptoms, should reduce outdoor activity _ symptoms, should reduce outdoor activity. people with asthma may have _ activity. people with asthma may have to _ activity. people with asthma may have to use their inhalers more regularly— have to use their inhalers more regularly as well, and for the general— regularly as well, and for the general public, if you start to have symptoms — general public, if you start to have symptoms such as a cough or sore eyes. _ symptoms such as a cough or sore eyes. you — symptoms such as a cough or sore eyes, you may want to come indoors and continue — eyes, you may want to come indoors and continue your activity indoors. thank— and continue your activity indoors. thank you — and continue your activity indoors. thank you very much. the welsh government has announced that restrictions on large events and businesses, brought in to tackle the 0micron variant, will be scrapped over the next two weeks — although the first minister mark drakeford said that while the situation was improving, caution was still needed. there could be some difficult days and weeks still ahead as we continue to respond to the coronavirus crisis.
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but today's evidence is that we are able to move further and faster into their brighter days that we hope lie ahead for us all. the first minister of wales there. let's hear now the latest from wales, from our correspondent tomos morgan. this lunchtime, the first minister mark drakeford has outlined the road map out of alert level 2 back to alert level zero here in wales. by next weekend, there will be no restrictions on outdoor activities, and from the 28th all hospitality and indoor restrictions will come to an end, which means wales will back at alert level zero. there will be no social distancing requirements, no need for rules of six in hospitality, no need legally for people to work from home, although there will still be guidance for people to do so when they can. this is a huge boost, really, for the economy in south wales and in cardiff. this stadium, the principality stadium, home of the six nations
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wales team, due to host their first game on the 12th of february against scotland. such a big boost because this stadium is right in the centre of cardiff — just 10—20 metres away, there are bars and restaurants which will now be able to welcome people and to be full as well. nightclubs can also reopen on the 28th. having lost out over the festive period and having lost out on the last six nations, this will be huge for the economy here in south wales and cardiff. the first minister has come under some criticism over whether or not this is actually a u—turn by the welsh government. have they accepted, actually, they did not need to put these restrictions in place? he has defended them, though. he has said they were necessary, and had they not be put in place, the figures would be far higher here. of course, today the 0ns figures showed that up until the 6th of january there was still an increase of people getting 0micron here in wales, however for the second day in a row here the number going into hospital with the virus has decreased.
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vigils will be held across the island of ireland in memory of a woman who was murdered while outjogging. 23—year—old ashling murphy was killed on wednesday, along the banks of the grand canal in tulla—more county 0ffaly. the director of the national women's council of ireland, 0rla o'connor, said for too long, women have been living restricted lives due to fear of violence. i think this is a moment of recognising the privilege that men have. men don't think about these issues that met the micro women are thinking about constantly, in terms of going for a run in the evening, going out walking your dog in the evening, and wondering who is behind you, who hasjust made a comment as they are walking by, and how that really makes you feel threatened.
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these are not feelings, these are not things that men have to think about, and we need to really change this, because this is not ok. and this, because this is not ok. and this culture that that creates is what leads to these horrendous murders of women. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. we would just hearing from her about theirs pollution levels in london. hello. we started off today with frost and fog around for many of us and that's going to be returning again tonight. but before the sun sets, a bit of late brightness around for many of us — a lot of dry and settled weather out there at the moment. as we head through the evening hours, temperatures are going to drop quite quickly, so around about two or three degrees quite widely for england and wales into the evening hours. and for scotland and northern
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ireland, a little bit breezier and milder here. a few splashes of rain across the far north of scotland, but most places dry through tonight. again, some mist and some fog patches — quite dense fog patches for central and eastern england, parts of wales as well. but temperatures getting down a few degrees below freezing where we have got those clearer skies. so a chilly start to the day with those pockets of frost and some dense fog patches that will be quite slow to clear but they will eventually clear from england and wales. a little bit more sunshine for scotland compared to what we have got out there today. temperature is only about five degrees in the east but up into double figures across the southwest. and then things are looking mostly dry unsettled as we head through the second half of the weekend too. bye— bye. hello this is bbc news. the headlines — downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year.
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a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks — after a drop in 0micron cases. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. and we look at the top—ten highest content creators on youtube — with one earning up to £40 million last year. sport, and for a full round—up, here's the bbc sport centre. 0lly foster has the sport. olly foster has the sport. we are talkin: olly foster has the sport. we are talking about _ olly foster has the sport. we are talking about novak— olly foster has the sport. we are talking about novak djokovic, - olly foster has the sport. we are talking about novak djokovic, it i olly foster has the sport. we are | talking about novak djokovic, it is almost like one of his long lasting matches. it is. good afternoon. novak djokovic is heading back to a melbourne court room after having his visa cancelled for a second time. his lawyer, says the australian government's reason for trying to deport him is for potentially
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�*exciting anti—vax sentiment�*. the australian open starts on monday and he is the reigning champion, but over the past few days, it�*s emerged that there was an error in his original application to enter the country and the world number one, who hasn�*t been vaccinated, has also admitted to breaking covid rules in serbia before christmas. the immigration minister alex hawke cancelled djokovic�*s visa this morning �*on health and good order grounds on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so.�* here�*s our tennis correspondent russell fuller what we know is that djokovic is a free man tonight. he will have to report to the offices of border force in melbourne at eight o�*clock tomorrow morning our time at which point he will almost certainly be detained. that will allow him to spend the morning with his lawyers with border force official somewhere else in the building and then he will have to return to an asylum hotel where he spent four nights, culminating in last weekend�*s hearing. at that stage to healing will perhaps take place on the sunday.
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this has not been confirmed but the plan is to get everything done by sunday so novak djokovic and the australian open know where they stand. well, andy murray has described the situation as �*not great for the australian open, not great for novak". his comments came after he reached the final of the sydney tennis classic — he�*ll face aslan karatsez, that will be murray�*s first tour final since 2019. two more brits will be in the australian open main draw, harriet dart and liam broady both made it through qualifying dart will face the 7th seed iga swiatek in the opening round while liam broady play�*s home favourite nick kyrgios. from melbourne to hobart, where england�*s cricketers are desperate to sign off on a high
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from the ashes series. joe root�*s side won the toss in the final test and made a brilliant start taking three very early wickets, autralia�*s batsman rallied to reach 241—6 by the close. here�*s our sports correspondentjoe wilson. england have never lost a test match in tasmania. 0k. this is their first test match in tasmania. but recognise the team? five changes including 0llie robinson, recalled and rejoicing. warner caught by zak crawley for 0. next, marnus labuschagne dropped by the diving crawley on 0. ah! england�*s captain chose to bowl first in very helpful conditions and joe root himself caught usman khawaja. then steve smith was out for none. edged, gone. australia 12—3. hang on, was is this the same ashes? well, yes, it was. marnus labuschagne bashed and thrashed his way to 44, that�*s what hobart wanted. whatjoe root feared. where was labuschagne going? wow! stuart broad bowled at the stumps and the batterflattened himself. but the floodlights revealed a new threat,
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how travis head sparkled. 0llie robinson now wasn�*t fit enough to bowl, stuart broad was trying. but in 101 rapid runs, travis head transformed the whole mood, australia were reborn in the match. when cameron green put his mighty frame to the cause... deliciously played by green. ..england started to look exhausted. still mark wood charged in, and when green aimed for six, he was caught, 241—6, england were hanging on when the rain came. thatjust about covers it. joe wilson, bbc news. the last of the quarter—finals are taking place today at snooker�*s masters tournament at ally pally — with 2019 championjudd trump in action at the moment. he�*s up against fellow englishman kyren wilson. looks like wilson is at the table at
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the moment, i recognise his hand. judd trump is awaiting his turn. these are live pictures from alexandra palace. he is leading 5—1. the winner will take on mark selby or barry hawkins who play their quarterfinal this evening. the semis are tomorrow and the final on sunday. that looks like a good watch which is on at the moment. i will pass on to lizzie greenwood—hughes for the next hour and beyond. you recognise his hand? that�*s good knowledge. when you are a snooker aficionado. do you play as well? i do play. are you good? i�*m terrific! and modest! thanks very much indeed. more babies are being taken to hospital with covid during the current 0micron wave — but they are still not developing serious illness. doctors say the findings are incredibly encouraging and that
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covid remains a very low risk for children. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa is here with me. i suppose when we talk about covid we tend to feature on the older members of the population we know can be very vulnerable in hospital, less focus on very young children, but this is encouraging news, isn�*t it? it but this is encouraging news, isn't it? , , ., , but this is encouraging news, isn't it? , , it? it is. it is early data released b sage, it? it is. it is early data released by sage. the — it? it is. it is early data released by sage, the government - it? it is. it is early data released by sage, the government a - it? it is. it is early data released - by sage, the government a scientific advisory group and it looked at the admissions of 50 children who had been admitted to hospital for covid since mid december and they found that a larger proportion were among the underfives, particularly the under fives, particularly children the underfives, particularly children under one, than they had seenin children under one, than they had seen in previous waves. most were coming in for seen in previous waves. most were coming infora seen in previous waves. most were coming in for a fever, some also for a cough, but they were suffering from milder illness, so there was less need for oxygen, less likely to be admitted to icu, and they were staying in hospitalfor about two days on average. health experts say it is really encouraging for parents
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and shows the risk of covid to children is still really low and even babies with medical conditions were not becoming very sick with the virus. this is the time of the year when the nhs expects to see more children in hospital suffering from respiratory viruses and the message is that paediatric units are still open and there is still space and if parents have concerns they should still continue to seek help, if they are worried that their child has a fever, if they are not feeling well, and if they are struggling to breathe. ., , ., and if they are struggling to breathe. . , ., , breathe. there was a rise in the number of _ breathe. there was a rise in the number of cases _ breathe. there was a rise in the number of cases amongst - breathe. there was a rise in the number of cases amongst very l breathe. there was a rise in the - number of cases amongst very young children, that�*s because 0micron is much more easily transmissible, is that right? much more easily transmissible, is that ritht? . , , . . much more easily transmissible, is that ritht? :, , , :, : , that right? yeah, its prevalence is at record levels, _ that right? yeah, its prevalence is at record levels, distal _ that right? yeah, its prevalence is at record levels, distal really - at record levels, distal really high, so there is a higher chance of children and babies getting the virus. also the under fives, and particularly babies, other groups that are the least likely to have immunity the virus. but also the health experts said that gps and the
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nhs 11! health experts said that gps and the nhs111 service were more likely to send children to hospital as a precaution. this is still early data. more analysis is needed about 0micron and the impact on children. health experts say it really enforces the message that women should get vaccinated to protect themselves and their babies, the doctors say that they will continue to monitor this will stop but at the moment of the signs are really encouraging. moment of the signs are really encouraging-— encouraging. good to see you, katharine _ encouraging. good to see you, katharine da _ encouraging. good to see you, katharine da costa, _ encouraging. good to see you, katharine da costa, health - katharine da costa, health correspondent. the woman who has accused the duke of york of sexually abusing her has welcomed a us judge�*s decision to allow her legal case to continue. virginia giuffre says her goal is to show that the rich and powerful aren�*t above the law. it comes as buckingham palace announced that prince andrew�*s military titles and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen and he will now face the civil case in the us as a private citizen. prince andrew strongly denies the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent, sarah campbell, is outside windsor castle.
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indeed. i think the developments over the last 24 hours have really shown that. it was here yesterday, we understood, by mutual consent, that that agreement was made that prince andrew would return his military affiliations, his royal patronages, back to the queen and they will be redistributed permanently amongst other members of the royal family. he will no longer be styled his royal highness, his birthright, and will defend the case against him in the us as a private citizen. it was a pretty blunt, short statement that was released by buckingham palace just after five o�*clock yesterday evening and was as close to the queen could come to basically saying to prince andrew, "you are on your own." meanwhile, his accuser, virginia giuffre, took to social media this morning. she told twitter that she was pleased withjudge kaplan�*s ruling that allows her case with prince andrew to go forward, and she put forward that line, she said her goal has always been to show that the rich and the powerful are not
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above the law and must be held accountable. now, prince andrew has always denied the allegations against him and a source close to him yesterday said that this case is a marathon, not a sprint, and the duke will continue to defend himself. no doubt it would have been a very difficult day for him yesterday to agree to give up those military affiliations. he is, of course, a military man himself, with 22 years service with the royal navy, and no doubt it would have been a difficult decision for the rest of the family, most especially the queen, to come to the realisation that this might be the best way to protect the reputation of the monarchy. sarah campbell reporting from windsor castle. nurseries in england that are being forced to close or reduce their opening hours because of staff shortages caused by covid, say they�*ve been forgotten by the government. the department for education says it
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has given extensive guidance and "significant financial support" to providers during the pandemic. but the industry says it�*s too little too late. here�*s our education correspondent, elaine dunkley who needs some ice? the penguins. it�*s the morning session at this nursery. what is your favourite thing about nursery? my car. i'm usually in the playground. ilike painting. do you like my shoes? yeah! forjen and lottie, it�*s a busy morning getting to nursery and then work and it�*s all the more stressful when covid could disrupt the whole day. i might get a phone call in the morning to say, "we�*ve not got enough staff, we�*re going to have to shut", you know, because they�*ve got staff isolating. so it is a massive concern obviously for me ringing work and then it�*s notjust nursery, it�*s me being in work as well. jane deals with the day—to—day running of the nursery and it�*s becoming increasingly difficult when staff are off with covid. we've shut more rooms, the preschool has been shut a couple of times and the room downstairs,
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the toddler room downstairs has also been shut a couple of times. at the moment, we're really in crisis, we may have to start looking at prioritising places for some of the children. young children don�*t have to be tested or isolate if their parents have covid. no—one knows if they�*re bringing it into the nursery. so we've got families that we know that the parents have covid, they've tested positive. but these children are in the nurseries. we should have a position whereby if children are living with parents that have covid—19, that there is an isolation period because when they come back into nursery, whilst they may not be, if you like, ill themselves, they do pass on the infection to our staff and we are already in crisis so the last thing we want is more staff to go off with covid. we have 25% of our staff not in today. i nina isjuggling staffing and finances. she started this business when she was 21 and now owns eight nurseries. i've grown my business over the last 20 years. | singing.
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my passion is still there but mentally, i think. it'sjust exhausting. when you have to make a phone call, tell me what goes through your mind? i initially, the feeling is dreadi because i think i'm going to let all those families down, the children, what- are they going to do? then obviously the impact is then the staff worry, i it's financial worry. i've still got to keep everything going. i the parents obviously don't pay if we close, | so then i've still got all my bills to pay and that is a massive, i you know, concern. you are saying you cannot take any more children? the government has relaxed the rules on how many children staff are allowed to look after. here, concern that bigger groups means more responsibility on staff who are already stretched. for many nurseries and childminders, there are too many obstacles to overcome. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in stockport. a british army officer, captain preet chandi,
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made headlines across the world after completing an expedition to the south pole — and today she arrived home. it�*s believed she�*s the first woman of colour to ski solo and unsupported across the antarctic. captain preet endured temperatures as low as minus 50, and wind speeds of up to 60 miles per hour, while pulling a 90—kilogram sled. after arriving back at heathrow, she told the bbc there�*ll be another trip. this was actually phase one of two, so pretty much from monday i think i�*ll be in the gym again, training.
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my aim is to do a full crossing solo, unsupported again. it will be a little bit longer, probably a little bit tougher. something that seemed probably almost impossible at the start but the more you do, the more you realise you�*re capable of, and after this one it seems more achievable. so, yeah, that�*s the next step. good luck to her. the issue of how people�*s remains are looked after in hospitals, mortuaries and funeral homes is the subject of a national public inquiry. a family in northern ireland says they�*ve been kept in the dark for 15 years about how their mother�*s body sustained more than 30 broken bones. maureen mcginley died in londonderry, and her children have decided to renew their campaign to find out what happened. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page reports. maureen mcginley was a great—grandmother, popular in her community and known for her hospitality. she died 15 years ago this month from pneumonia at the age of 78. two months later, mrs mcginley�*s gp asked to see her family because he�*d received the results of a postmortem. what he said then, "i�*m not sure how to tell youse this", and he said she had 34 broken bones. it is so hard to realise that this has happened. to such a small, wee pensioner that never done anybody any harm. we didn't know what to believe or who to believe or where to go for answers or where do
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we ask for answers. where we were going, we weren't getting no answers. mrs mcginley died here at altnagelvin hospital in londonderry. the fractures happened sometime between her death and when her body arrived for a postmortem in belfast 70 miles away. but that is the only fact which is known for sure. the mcginley family want to know the whole truth. we started off as campaigners, there was eight of us, we have lost a brother, we have lost a sister. they know now what happened to mum because mum has told them. but we do not know. and that is all we need to know, is somebody to tell us. health officials, the police, and the coroner all investigated but none were able to reach definitive conclusions. the family recorded every step in their long campaign.
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it�*s all there. to let them see how much we fought. they eventually took the case to the public service watchdog, the northern ireland ombudsman. the bbc has seen his report from 2017, the full details have not been made public before. the ombudsman said the hospital�*s record—keeping had been inadequate, he raised serious concern that inaccurate information was given about cctv. the ombudsman said it was impossible to understand why the trust did not adequately investigate. the western health trust has repeated its sincerest apologies to the family for the distress experienced as a result of the its failure to investigate, it also says it has fully accepted the ombudsman�*s findings. maureen mcginley�*s sons and daughters say they won�*t stop asking questions. we just want closure now, we just want to know- what happened to her. let her rest in peace, . she is not resting either because she is not getting a chance to rest. -
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the family believe this story is about accountability and transparency. which, they say, should be at the heart of the health service anywhere. chris page, bbc news. the australian visa row with novak djokovic has fuelled the vaccination debate in his native serbia, where less than half of the country�*s population are fully vaccinated. so where does all this leaves the serbian government�*s vaccination campaign? from belgrade, our balkans correspondent guy de launey reports this time last year serbia was leading the european race to vaccinate its people against coronavirus. while other countries were struggling for supplies, serbians could choose from four different covid jabs, but now the campaign�*s gone from plain sailing to being stuck in the doldrums. translation: we would vaccinate 5,000 or 6,000 people a day - at the belgrade fair. then it dropped to 2,000 during the summer, and in recent
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weeks the number has fallen drastically to 300 doses per day. all that means that only around half of serbians are fullyjabbed, and that�*s why the vaccine hesitant stance of novak djokovic isn�*t as controversial here as it is in australia. still, serbians who are getting jabbed are hoping the sporting icon will come round to their way of thinking. translation: when there - was a davis cup game in serbia he was bringing tennis players for vaccination here, so i believe some day he will get that vaccine. translation: what's going l on in the background is politics more than anything else. but for health he should get his vaccine. it's honourable. and that�*s because serbia is once again in the middle of a surge of covid cases. life has been going on more or less as normal here in belgrade, with very few restrictions. that�*s despite serbia setting a series of daily records for the number of new coronavirus cases. now, it would really help if more people got vaccinated. the lack of take—up has been a real headache for the government.
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and that administration is led by a prime minister who says she is proud to have been the first european leader to receive the vaccination. i can�*t say that i understand people who don�*t want to get vaccinated, but in a democracy you have to respect everyone�*s views and decisions. i cannot agree with novak, but it�*s up to novak to talk about his choices. it�*s really not up to up to me to discuss, defend or attack them. so it�*s all gone downhill as far as serbia�*s vaccination campaign is concerned. perhaps it would help if novak djokovic had a change of heart. but if his experience in australia doesn�*t make him reconsider, probably nothing will. guy de launey, bbc news, belgrade. google is spending a cool $1 billion buying and refurbishing its london
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headquarters — and expanding its office space across the uk — in a sign that working from home�*s not about to become the norm any time soon. google�*s uk boss says when government guidance allows it, he�*ll be asking most staff to spend three days a week in the office. but he told the bbc�*s business editor simon jack that hybrid working will be experimental over the next two years, as companies and employees try and find the right balance. we want to reinvigorate the work environment, we are making this commitment, we are buying these buildings, we�*re going to invest in reinvigorating the office and refurbishing it and we are keen to see everybody come back in and see a vibrant workspace again. we have committed to three days a week on average but we are also introducing other forms of flexibility so we�*re introducing four weeks of work from anywhere so you can choose four weeks over the course of the year and go and work from a location, you do not have to come into the office and we are also going to introduce some recharge days through the pandemic to make sure people are looking
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after their well—being. are you not worried you might be at a competitive disadvantage with companies who are actually requiring fewer days than that in the office? so i think we will have about 20% of roles over time that are fully remote so there are definitely opportunities for people to come and work with us but on a fully remote basis but for the vast majority of roles, it will be three days and again, it comes back to it we have surveyed our employees, we have talked to them about what they value and they want and collaboration keeps coming back, the opportunity to be in a room with their colleagues and collaborate and work on problems. it�*s something they really value. it seems at the moment we are in an employees�* market, staff shortages in many places, fierce war for talent, do you think the employees are in a situation where they are calling the shots at the moment? where does the balance of power lie? this is still an experiment, the next two years will be an experiment of equal measure,
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trying to find out what hybrid and flexible actually mean and i think it will differ from company to company and role to role. i think it will be a lot of trial and error over the next two years. it is true that at any one time fewer employees will be in the office all together. yes. and that has quite bad consequences, serious consequences for the businesses that serve areas like this, coffee shops, gyms, hairdressers, dry cleaners. it�*s inevitable they are going to suffer? i think what will happen is there will be an evolution so i think there�*s definitely going to be more people, we talk about our workforce and maybe as many as 20% of our roles will be remote. but that means there�*s 20% more people in local villages and local towns which will reinvigorate those. but 80% of our people are going to be coming into the office, we are going to be continuing to grow our footprint as we have talked about on the back of this investment. so i still think there will be lots of economic activity in the environments around our offices and it�*s something we are very
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focused on as well. a list of the top—ten highest paid content creators on youtube has been released. american mrbeast — real namejimmy donaldson — who specialises in big stunts is number one having earned nearly £40 million in 2021. let�*s talk about him and others in the top ten with our gaming correspondent. who is mrbeast? he has come out of nowhere, he was number two on the list last year but 10 billion views of his contact in 2021 edits the ad revenue from that content that has driven the earnings for him. so content that has driven the earnings for him. ~' content that has driven the earnings for him. ,, i. , for him. so like you said, big stunts. he's _ for him. so like you said, big stunts. he's done _ for him. so like you said, big stunts. he's done things - for him. so like you said, big stunts. he's done things like| stunts. he�*s done things like recreating squid game, the big netflix show we have seen on at the moment, and he�*s done things like play hide and seek in a giant sports stadium buried underground and
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stunts that take a lot of production value, lots of time and thought has gone into it that has driven him to be the number one earner on youtube, $54 million, nearly £40 million for him. important to say that lots of it comes from the ad revenue but also he has a franchise that makes burgers on the side and it is that combination of his popularity online with the business acumen that has led him to be number one. let�*s with the business acumen that has led him to be number one. let's run throu:h a led him to be number one. let's run through a coople — led him to be number one. let's run through a couple of— led him to be number one. let's run through a couple of the _ led him to be number one. let's run through a couple of the others - led him to be number one. let's run through a couple of the others in - through a couple of the others in the top ten, unspeakable. the he is a minecraft — the top ten, unspeakable. the he is a minecraft creator, _ the top ten, unspeakable. the he is a minecraft creator, who _ the top ten, unspeakable. the ie 3 a minecraft creator, who does lots of content about the video game minecraft that has driven his popularity and he is earning about £20 million last year. gaming creators are still quite popular in the top ten, but often what they are doing is using it as a jumping off point to go and make vlogs and things, so that�*s why unspeakable is in the top ten. things, so that's why unspeakable is in the top ten-— in the top ten. there is a lot of money to _ in the top ten. there is a lot of money to be — in the top ten. there is a lot of money to be made _ in the top ten. there is a lot of money to be made in - in the top ten. there is a lot of money to be made in this - in the top ten. there is a lot of- money to be made in this business,
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there? i wouldn�*t mind a £20 million a year. there? i wouldn't mind a £20 million a ear. ~ , . there? i wouldn't mind a £20 million a ear. ~ ,~ there? i wouldn't mind a £20 million a ear. , a year. why are you sitting here talkin: to a year. why are you sitting here talking to me? _ a year. why are you sitting here talking to me? lots _ a year. why are you sitting here talking to me? lots of - a year. why are you sitting here talking to me? lots of time - a year. why are you sitting here talking to me? lots of time has| a year. why are you sitting here - talking to me? lots of time has gone into making these videos. youtube used to be somewhere where people full they could throw any old content up there but it is changed, the higher the production values in these videos are mimicking to an extent what we see on more traditional television mediums like netflix and amazon prime. i suppose --eole at netflix and amazon prime. i suppose people at home _ netflix and amazon prime. i suppose people at home during _ netflix and amazon prime. i suppose people at home during the _ netflix and amazon prime. i suppose| people at home during the pandemic, does that help youtube? does that boost them and all of these big earners? ~ boost them and all of these big earners? ,, ., earners? think about it, the traditional _ earners? think about it, the traditional media _ earners? think about it, the traditional media struggled | earners? think about it, the i traditional media struggled at earners? think about it, the - traditional media struggled at times in the pandemic, movies were delayed, television production was stopped, video games were cancelled, whereas youtube, there are an estimated 2.3 billion users. the top ten list combined earned £219 million last year, and to give you a bit of context, that is up 40% on the year before so it shows they are doing very well in the pandemic, whereas perhaps traditional media has struggled a bit. d0 whereas perhaps traditional media has struggled a bit.— has struggled a bit. do you think these trends _ has struggled a bit. do you think these trends are _
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has struggled a bit. do you think these trends are going _ has struggled a bit. do you think these trends are going to - has struggled a bit. do you think. these trends are going to continue on these people will make more and more money?— more money? speaking to a few exerts more money? speaking to a few experts about — more money? speaking to a few experts about this _ more money? speaking to a few experts about this this _ more money? speaking to a few experts about this this morning, more money? speaking to a few - experts about this this morning, the top ten list is very white. we have just seen the ten—year—old toy reviewer who now makes educational content as well, who was number one for the last two years and he has been bumped down to seventh place in the list. fill! been bumped down to seventh place in the list. ., , been bumped down to seventh place in the list. . , ., the list. oh! our hearts are bleeding! _ the list. oh! our hearts are bleeding! shouldn't - the list. oh! our hearts are bleeding! shouldn't too - the list. oh! our hearts are i bleeding! shouldn't too much, because he — bleeding! shouldn't too much, because he still— bleeding! shouldn't too much, because he still owned - bleeding! shouldn't too much, because he still owned £20 i bleeding! shouldn't too much, i because he still owned £20 million last year. this list is quite white, quite american and very english language focused which youtube going forward looking to the future, they might to do not need to diversify to change it and keep the popularity going. it show is basically all of the list made money partly because of the ad revenue but because of their business acumen, having sponsorship deals, partnerships and marketing and merchandise around the content, notjust the content itself. content, not 'ust the content itself. . ,. . content, not 'ust the content itself. . ,: . ., ,, , ., content, not 'ust the content itself. . ,: . ., «i , ., , itself. fascinating. thank you very much indeed. _ itself. fascinating. thank you very much indeed, you _ itself. fascinating. thank you very much indeed, you have _ itself. fascinating. thank you very much indeed, you have unveiled i itself. fascinating. thank you very much indeed, you have unveiled aj much indeed, you have unveiled a whole new world!
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now it�*s time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. we started off today with frost and fog around for many of us and that�*s going to be returning again tonight. but before the sun sets, a bit of late brightness around for many of us, a lot of dry, unsettled weather out and settled weather out there at the moment. as we head through the evening hours temperatures are going to drop quite quickly, so around about two or three degrees quite widely for england and wales into the evening hours. and for scotland and northern ireland, a little bit breezier and milder here. a few splashes of rain across the far north of scotland, but most places dry through tonight. again, some mist and some fog patches are quite dense fog patches for central and eastern england, parts of wales as well. but temperatures getting down a few degrees below freezing where we have got those clearer skies. so a chilly start to the day with those pockets of frost and some dense fog patches that will be quite slow to clear but they will eventually clear for england and wales. a little bit more sunshine for scotland compared to what we have got out there today. temperature is only about 5 degrees in the east but up into double figures across the southwest.
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and then things are looking mostly dry unsettled as we head through the second half of the weekend too. bye— bye. hello, good afternoon. this is bbc news. i�*m ben brown. the headlines... downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral last year. the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. we have the enquiry taking place by sue gray.
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and, you know, we are very clear that there were real mistakes made. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks — after a drop in 0micron cases. in england, more babies are going to hospital with coronavirus during this latest 0micron wave — but doctors say the risk to their health remains very low. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. downing street has apologised to buckingham palace after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral. a spokesman for borisjohnson has said it was deeply regrettable that the events took place at a time of national mourning. covid rules at the time banned indoor mixing — but reports suggest there was drinking and dancing until the early hours. a member of staff was even sent out to a nearby shop with an empty suitcase, to fill it with supplies of alcohol. the prime minister wasn�*t at the parties, but the latest disclosures, which the daily telegraph reported, have amplified calls for his resignation. here�*s our political correspondent, nick eardley. the 17th of april last year. one of the defining pictures of the pandemic. the queen sitting alone at the funeral of the duke of edinburgh.
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the night before, in here, staff held leaving dos, despite people being banned from social mixing indoors. according to the daily telegraph, there was music and dancing. someone was sent to a local shop with a suitcase to stock up on alcohol. downing street hasn�*t denied the specific claims. when i heard about this i was, of course, very, very concerned, and i understand that people across the country are angry about what has happened. earlier this week, the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. obviously, if you're a rule—maker you can't be a rule—breaker, of course that is correct, but we need to let this investigation run. this morning, downing street apologised to buckingham palace. the prime minister�*s spokesman said it was deeply regrettable that this
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had taken place at a time of national mourning ahead of prince philip�*s funeral. one of the events was a leaving do for this man, james slack, borisjohnson�*s former communications chief. he said in a statement this morning... allegations of parties or gatherings which broke the rules now span almost a year, from may 2020, to april 2021, and that�*s led to suggestions that these were not isolated incidents but part of a cultural problem in borisjohnson�*s downing street. the prime minister hasn�*t been seen in public since wednesday, and although he didn�*t attend the events which emerged today, many of his mps are angry that he did attend drinks during lockdown in 2020. five have now called
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for him to quit. part of the key elements of leadership is that you don�*t ask people you�*re asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you�*re not willing to bear yourself, and clearly that has not been the case. the fact is they've been having parties throughout because in the end they thought that the laws that they were putting together were not laws that applied to them. the revelations about what went on here keep coming, piling even more pressure on downing street�*s most senior occupant. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. i want to bring you some breaking news on this, which is that the chief executive of sheffield city council, who was then working on the covid task force, has apologised for a gathering with colleagues or drinks at the cabinet office when she left on the 17th of december.
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this was one of the so—called christmas parties. as people know, " it goes on to say...
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so that is a statement from kate josephs there, who is chief executive of sheffield city council, who was then working on the covid task force. apologising for gathering with colleagues on the net for a drinks in the cabinet office just before christmas, 2020. the 17th of december. we have then had a statement from the council leader of sheffield council, terry fox, who has responded by saying this. kate�*s
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made a statement today. i have discussed this in person with kate on a one—to—one basis, and she has said sorry. to be honest, i need to express my deep disappointment. people will rightly feel angry and let down. i get that completely. after everything that sheffield has been through during the pandemic, this is the news we did not want to receive. 0ver this is the news we did not want to receive. over the last year, kate has been an asset to our city, she has been an asset to our city, she has worked tirelessly. 0ur residents will understandably have questions and concerns, and we await the findings of the investigation." we will bring you more on all of that as it comes into us. but let�*s talk about the wider situation there. the various parties and gatherings in downing street that have been reported in the last few weeks. let�*s talk to tom ashton stop i suppose one of the questions you want to try to answer is what is the feeling in the conservative party up and down the country at these
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various revelations. we heard about the parties that were held just before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral, where a suitcase were sent out from downing street to bring back a load of alcohol.— out from downing street to bring back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon- — back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for _ back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for my _ back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for my part _ back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for my part in - back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for my part in all i back a load of alcohol. well, good afternoon. for my part in all of i afternoon. for my part in all of this, we haven�*t learnt anything more with the revelations that we have had today that we didn�*t really already know. that effectively there was a culture operating among people who were working in government, who were working within number ten, that were working within number ten, that were playing incredibly fast and loose with the definition of workplace and work activities. i would imagine right up to, possibly even beyond, what�*s the letter of the law would say. and substantially the law would say. and substantially
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the unt what public opinion would ever regard as acceptable under the circumstances. if ever regard as acceptable under the circumstances.— circumstances. if there was such a culture, number— circumstances. if there was such a culture, number ten _ circumstances. if there was such a culture, number ten is _ circumstances. if there was such a culture, number ten is a _ circumstances. if there was such a culture, number ten is a pretty i culture, number ten is a pretty small place, the prime minister must have been fully aware of that culture? i have been fully aware of that culture? :, , . ., culture? i would very much imagine that he was — culture? i would very much imagine that he was not _ culture? i would very much imagine that he was not aware _ culture? i would very much imagine that he was not aware of— culture? i would very much imagine that he was not aware of it. - culture? i would very much imagine that he was not aware of it. given i that he was not aware of it. given how seriously the prime ministers taken covid and suffered from it himself quite seriously, i have every confidence that had the prime minister been aware that this culture was prevalent among the people that were working for him, then he would have clamped down on it without question. br; then he would have clamped down on it without question.— it without question. by his own admission. _ it without question. by his own admission, he _ it without question. by his own admission, he was _ it without question. by his own admission, he was at - it without question. by his own admission, he was at at - it without question. by his own admission, he was at at least i it without question. by his own i admission, he was at at least one of these parties. he has told us that and apologised for that. he went into the garden party in downing street in may of 2020. bud into the garden party in downing street in may of 2020.— into the garden party in downing street in may of 2020. and as part ofthat street in may of 2020. and as part of that apology _ street in may of 2020. and as part of that apology and _ street in may of 2020. and as part of that apology and explanation, i street in may of 2020. and as part| of that apology and explanation, he made clear that he was under the impression that he was going to
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thank staff for what they had been doing over the previous few weeks. he believed i think at the time that what he was doing was within the remit of what is effectively a workplace. clearly he has apologised for doing so. but in hindsight, it wasn�*t necessarily the best thing he could have done. but i do not believe that the prime minister was aware that, for instance, the evening before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral, that this kind of activity was taking place downing street. had he been aware, i am confident that he would have put a stop to it. the confident that he would have put a sto to it. . ., stop to it. the gathering that he was at, stop to it. the gathering that he was at. yes. _ stop to it. the gathering that he was at. yes. he _ stop to it. the gathering that he was at, yes, he says _ stop to it. the gathering that he was at, yes, he says he - stop to it. the gathering that he was at, yes, he says he went i stop to it. the gathering that he l was at, yes, he says he went out stop to it. the gathering that he i was at, yes, he says he went out to thank people, but they were drinks lined up and trestle tables. that sounds to everybody listening and watching you now like a party. where
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the line between _ watching you now like a party. where the line between what _ watching you now like a party. where the line between what is _ watching you now like a party. where the line between what is a _ watching you now like a party. where the line between what is a social i the line between what is a social event or what is a relaxed work event or what is a relaxed work event is perhaps blurred. but bring our own event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze — event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze is _ event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze is what _ event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze is what was - event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze is what was on i event is perhaps blurred. but bring your own booze is what was on the | your own booze is what was on the invite. i your own booze is what was on the invite. :, �* ,, :, invite. i don't know whether the remise invite. i don't know whether the premise even — invite. i don't know whether the premise even so _ invite. i don't know whether the premise even so that _ invite. i don't know whether the premise even so that invitation. until sue gray has completed her investigation, i think all we can do is speculate. shed heat but not necessarily light on the situation. people watching you now who have been shocked and angered by all of this will think that you are rather downplaying at all. i this will think that you are rather downplaying at all.— this will think that you are rather downplaying at all. i don't remotely think i am downplaying _ downplaying at all. i don't remotely think i am downplaying it, - downplaying at all. i don't remotely think i am downplaying it, but i i think i am downplaying it, but i think i am downplaying it, but i think it has to be borne within the context. the prime minister has apologised incredibly candidly to the house of commons. iie apologised incredibly candidly to the house of commons. he apologised when he was — the house of commons. he apologised when he was found _ the house of commons. he apologised when he was found out, _ the house of commons. he apologised when he was found out, when - the house of commons. he apologised when he was found out, when this i the house of commons. he apologised when he was found out, when this was| when he was found out, when this was revealed. but it happened in may of 2020, an awfully long time ago. he could have apologised at any time
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between then and now. he apologised when it was disclosed. i between then and now. he apologised when it was disclosed.— when it was disclosed. i mean, interestingly. _ when it was disclosed. i mean, interestingly, the _ when it was disclosed. i mean, interestingly, the person i when it was disclosed. i mean, interestingly, the person that i interestingly, the person that disclosed it could quite easily have disclosed it could quite easily have disclosed it could quite easily have disclosed it 18 months ago or raised it with the prime minister or flag it with the prime minister or flag it as an issue, rather than dropping it as an issue, rather than dropping it this week... it as an issue, rather than dropping it this week. . .— it this week... that's not my question- — it this week... that's not my question- my _ it this week... that's not my question. my question i it this week... that's not my question. my question is, i it this week... that's not my question. my question is, if| it this week... that's not my i question. my question is, if he felt so bad about it, why did he not apologise long ago? why did he wait until it was in the public domain? i think it is equally a serious question as to why this information is simply being dripped out on a seemingly daily basis to cause maximum damage to the prime minister, maximum damage to the government any circumstances. so he is the victim — government any circumstances. so he is the victim here, _ government any circumstances. so he is the victim here, is _ government any circumstances. so he is the victim here, is he? _ government any circumstances. so he is the victim here, is he? if— government any circumstances. so he is the victim here, is he? if the - is the victim here, is he? if the --eole is the victim here, is he? if the peeple that _ is the victim here, is he? if the peeple that is _ is the victim here, is he? if the people that is dripping - is the victim here, is he? if the people that is dripping this - is the victim here, is he? if the} people that is dripping this into the entry at the daily telegraph had any moral qualms about what was going on, then they should have raised it at the time, not waited until now to do so. 50.
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raised it at the time, not waited until now to do so.— raised it at the time, not waited until now to do so. so, all of this reall is until now to do so. so, all of this really is the _ until now to do so. so, all of this really is the fault _ until now to do so. so, all of this really is the fault of _ until now to do so. so, all of this really is the fault of the - until now to do so. so, all of this really is the fault of the people l really is the fault of the people who are making these revelations and publishing these revelations, not the prime minister? i publishing these revelations, not the prime minister?— publishing these revelations, not the prime minister? i think when we come to apportion — the prime minister? i think when we come to apportion blame _ the prime minister? i think when we come to apportion blame at - the prime minister? i think when we come to apportion blame at fault, i the prime minister? i think when we| come to apportion blame at fault, we need to wait for sue gray to complete her investigation so that we know precisely what happened over this extended period and who ultimately is accountable for it. and she has been appointed by of course the prime minister to run this investigation. i course the prime minister to run this investigation.— this investigation. i don't think an bod this investigation. i don't think anybody would _ this investigation. i don't think anybody would dispute, - this investigation. i don't think anybody would dispute, she i this investigation. i don't think anybody would dispute, she is| this investigation. i don't think. anybody would dispute, she is a civil servant of great integrity and experience, and none of the report that i've seen in any the newspapers would suggest that she would do anything other than herfor would suggest that she would do anything other than her for duty investigating what went on. that is her remit and i don't imagine anyone looking in on this will accept anything else. looking in on this will accept anything else-— looking in on this will accept an hinu else. ,, ., anything else. should the prime minister resign _ anything else. should the prime minister resign as _ anything else. should the prime minister resign as a _ anything else. should the prime minister resign as a several - minister resign as a several conservative mps have written to the
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1922 committee? saying that they have no longer confident in him. absolutely not. the prime minister has got some of the big calls absolutely right over the last couple of years. i remember a time in 2019 when we as conservatives would not have dreamt of winning an 80 seat majority. we would not have dared to dream that we would have got brexit finished in the way that we have. do got brexit finished in the way that we have. ,, ~ got brexit finished in the way that we have. ~' we have. do you think you will get an 80 seat — we have. do you think you will get an 80 seat majority _ we have. do you think you will get an 80 seat majority at _ we have. do you think you will get an 80 seat majority at the - we have. do you think you will get an 80 seat majority at the next. an 80 seat majority at the next election, given the levels of public anger? election, given the levels of public an . er? election, given the levels of public anuer? . ., , g; anger? the next election is 2-3 ears anger? the next election is 2-3 years away. _ anger? the next election is 2-3 years away. and _ anger? the next election is 2-3 years away, and people - anger? the next election is 2-3 years away, and people need . anger? the next election is 2-3| years away, and people need to reflect that had keir starmer been a minister in december we would have gone into much tougher lockdown measures this december than we have done, and there would be people out of work, businesses closed as a result. ml of work, businesses closed as a result. �* ., ~ , ., , result. all right, thank you very much indeed — result. all right, thank you very much indeed for _ result. all right, thank you very much indeed for being - result. all right, thank you very much indeed for being with - result. all right, thank you very much indeed for being with us. | result. all right, thank you very - much indeed for being with us. thank you your time. much indeed for being with us. thank you your time-—
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australia's immigration minister has cancelled novak djokovic�*s visa for a second time, just three days before the world men's tennis number one is due to defend his australian open title in melbourne. the minister alex hawke said he'd made the decision on the grounds of "health and good order" — as the row continues about djokovic�*s right to remain in the country unvaccinated. his lawyers are now trying to stop him being deported. shaimaa khalil has the latest from melbourne. twice today, novak djokovic was on the court training. and a few hours later, the government finally announced its decision. the tennis star's visa has been cancelled again, and for the second time he faces deportation from australia. in his statement, the country's immigration minister, alex hawke, said...
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the prime minister, scott morrison, said the decision followed careful consideration. mr morrison's government has faced heavy criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into australia in the first place, while the country struggled with a spike in covid—i9 case numbers. i think it was a mess up they did, but now i think they have corrected the way. it's unfortunate that novak won't be playing the tournament, it's a pretty big loss. yeah, i think if everyone else has to follow the rules, why can't he? obviously he thought he was above it all. novak djokovic has been included in the draw for the tournament as the top seed. he was due to play fellow serbian, miomir kecmanovic. now his case is in court again. the australian open is only a few days ago, novak djokovic was told he
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does not have to go into detention yet. on saturday, he will speak to border officials about what happens next. only then will be get a better idea about whether he has any chance of competing in the grand slam. tennis star andy murray said the controversy has been bad for the sport. this just seems like it's dragged on for quite a long time now, and not great for the tennis, not great for the australian open, not great for novak. yeah, and obviously a lot of people have criticised the government here as well, so, yeah, it's not been good.
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viktor troicki, the current australian davis cup captain and one of djokovic�*s closest friend says he was shocked and surprised by the decision. i'm still hoping, let's say, that he can compete. he has two more days to make an appeal and to get the decision overruled. his former coach, multiple grand slam winner boris becker, said djokovic is being used a political pawn. he's only a tennis player, we're not politicians. - if we're used in a political way then we don't have a chance. i the world number one is still fighting to defend his title here. whether or not he'll be able to play, the australian open will take place under the shadow of a controversy that has gone way beyond tennis. shaimaa khalil reporting there. the welsh government has announced that restrictions on large events and businesses, brought in to tackle the omicron variant, will be scrapped over the next two weeks — although the first minister mark drakeford said that while the situation was improving, caution was still needed. there could be some difficult days and weeks still ahead as we continue to respond to the coronavirus crisis. but today's evidence is that we are able to move further and faster into their brighter days
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that we hope lie ahead for us all. let's hear now the latest from wales, from our correspondent, tomos morgan. this lunchtime, the first minister mark drakeford has outlined the road map out of alert level 2 back to alert level zero here in wales. by next weekend, there will be no restrictions on outdoor activities, and from the 28th all hospitality and indoor restrictions will come to an end, which means wales will back at alert level zero. there will be no social distancing requirements, no need for rules of six in hospitality, no need legally for people to work from home — although there will still be guidance for people to do so when they can. this is a huge boost, really, for the economy in south wales and in cardiff. this stadium, the principality stadium, home of the six nations wales team, due to host their first game on the 12th of february against scotland. such a big boost because this stadium is right in the centre of cardiff —
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just 10—20 metres away, there are bars and restaurants which will now be able to welcome people and to be full as well. nightclubs can also reopen on the 28th. having lost out over the festive period and having lost out on the last six nations, this will be huge for the economy here in south wales and cardiff. the first minister has come under some criticism over whether or not this is actually a u—turn by the welsh government. have they accepted, actually, they didn't need to put these restrictions in place? he has defended them, though. he has said they were necessary, and had they not be put in place, the figures would be far higher here. of course, today the ons figures have shown that up until the 6th of january there was still an increase of people getting omicron here in wales, however for the second day in a row here the number going into hospital with the virus has decreased. more babies are being taken to hospital with covid during the current omicron wave — but they are still not developing serious illness. doctors say the findings
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are incredibly encouraging and that covid remains a very low risk for children. earlier our health correspondent, katharine da costa, said it was encouraging news. it is early data released by sage, the government's scientific advisory group and it looked at the admissions of 50 children who had been admitted to hospital for covid since mid—december and they found that a larger proportion were among the under fives, particularly children under one, than they had seen in previous waves. most were coming in for a fever, some also for a cough, but they were suffering from milder illness, so there was less need for oxygen, less likely to be admitted to icu, and they were staying in hospital for about two days on average. health experts say it's really encouraging for parents and shows the risk of covid to children is still very low — and even babies with medical conditions were not
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becoming very sick with the virus. this is the time of the year when the nhs expects to see more children in hospital suffering from respiratory viruses and the message is that paediatric units are still open there's still space, and if parents have concerns they should still continue to seek help, if they are worried that their child has a fever, if they're not feeding well, and if they are struggling to breathe. there was a rise in the number of cases amongst very young children, that's because omicron is much more easily transmissible, is that right? yeah, its prevalence is at record levels, it's still really high, so there's a higher chance of children and babies getting the virus. also the under fives, and particularly babies, other groups that are the least likely to have immunity the virus. but also the health experts said that gps and the nhs 111 service were more likely to send children to hospital as a precaution. this is still early data. more analysis is needed about
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omicron and the impact on children. but health experts say it really enforces the message that women should get vaccinated to protect themselves and their babies, and doctors say that they will continue to monitor this. but at the moment of the signs are really encouraging. new figures suggest the uk economy climbed above above its pre—pandemic level for the first time in november, shortly before omicron struck. the office for national statistics said gross domestic product — that's the total number of goods and services produced by the economy — increased by 0.9%. the construction sector grew strongly during the month, with the services sector also benefiting. the alleged killer of i9—year—old harry dunn has had a court hearing postponed, to enable "ongoing discussions" with the crown prosecution service to continue. us national anne sacoolas had been due to appear at westminster magistrates' court on tuesday. she is accused of causing death
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by dangerous driving after a fatal road crash outside us military base, raf croughton, in northamptonshire in august, 2019. let us take you back to that breaking news. the former head of the task force apologising for holding drinks in december 2020. december the 17th, 2020. this is a kate joseph, december the 17th, 2020. this is a katejoseph, who has confirmed the event is being investigated by the senior civil servant, sue gray. event is being investigated by the senior civilservant, sue gray. "i am truly sorry for this and the anger people feel as a result." it is just the latest revelation in the various parties and gatherings in and around downing street in government circles during the pandemic. let's go straight to our
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political correspondent, who can join us now. helen, this was on the 17th of december 2020. is this a new event that we didn't know about that is being investigated by sue gray? yeah, it is one that we didn't know about _ yeah, it is one that we didn't know about we — yeah, it is one that we didn't know about. we know that sue gray's remit is to look_ about. we know that sue gray's remit is to look at— about. we know that sue gray's remit is to look at any sort of gatherings that could — is to look at any sort of gatherings that could fall under the scope of this investigation is. we knew about one set— this investigation is. we knew about one set of— this investigation is. we knew about one set of drinks that were held in downing _ one set of drinks that were held in downing street at the cabinet office on the _ downing street at the cabinet office on the 17th of december. they were described _ on the 17th of december. they were described as a christmas event involving — described as a christmas event involving sir simon case, that is why he — involving sir simon case, that is why he is— involving sir simon case, that is why he is no longer leading this enquiry — why he is no longer leading this enquiry. but this was elsewhere in the cabinet office, this was kate joseph. — the cabinet office, this was kate joseph. she was about to leave the civil service — joseph. she was about to leave the civil service. she was going off, leaving — civil service. she was going off, leaving the civil service to become the chief _ leaving the civil service to become the chief executive of sheffield city council. she held leaving drinks — city council. she held leaving drinks in _ city council. she held leaving drinks in her office. she put out a statement — drinks in her office. she put out a statement this afternoon saying that you gathered with colleagues who are at work _ you gathered with colleagues who are at work that day in the cabinet office —
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at work that day in the cabinet office to — at work that day in the cabinet office to mark her leaving the civil service _ office to mark her leaving the civil service. she said, "i am truly sorry i did _ service. she said, "i am truly sorry i did this _ service. she said, "i am truly sorry i did this and — service. she said, "i am truly sorry i did this and for the anger people feel as _ i did this and for the anger people feel as a _ i did this and for the anger people feel as a result. sheffield has suffered _ feel as a result. sheffield has suffered greatly during this pandemic and i apologise unreservedly." in a sense, it is not a surprise — unreservedly." in a sense, it is not a surprise that we are starting to hear— a surprise that we are starting to hear about— a surprise that we are starting to hear about more of these things that are being _ hear about more of these things that are being investigated by sue gray before _ are being investigated by sue gray before she publishes her report. this is— before she publishes her report. this is another one of those events. but as— this is another one of those events. but as you _ this is another one of those events. but as you said, it is yet another that feeds — but as you said, it is yet another that feeds into this drip, drip, drip— that feeds into this drip, drip, drip of— that feeds into this drip, drip, drip of things that are being investigated. and sort of speaks to that wider— investigated. and sort of speaks to that wider culture about what was happening in downing street at the time _ happening in downing street at the time. �* . happening in downing street at the time. . ., , happening in downing street at the time. �* ., , ., ., time. and that is one of the questions — time. and that is one of the questions that _ time. and that is one of the questions that critics - time. and that is one of the questions that critics of - time. and that is one of the questions that critics of the | questions that critics of the government are pointing to, saying that this wasn't just a series government are pointing to, saying that this wasn'tjust a series of parties, this was a whole culture, that it was ok to drink i'd even played music at these gatherings, whatever you want to call them. what is the latest on how all of this is playing out politically and what boris johnson's playing out politically and what borisjohnson's position within the
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party? because a number of tory mps are very unhappy about it. thea;r are very unhappy about it. they absolutely _ are very unhappy about it. they absolutely are. _ are very unhappy about it. they absolutely are. and _ are very unhappy about it. they absolutely are. and if— are very unhappy about it. they absolutely are. and if you - are very unhappy about it. they absolutely are. and if you look at these _ absolutely are. and if you look at these events, you can't really describe _ these events, you can't really describe this as a series of one-offs _ describe this as a series of one—offs any more, because we know now of— one—offs any more, because we know now of events from 2020, the ones the prime _ now of events from 2020, the ones the prime minister was addressing in the prime minister was addressing in the comments earlier this week. this morning's— the comments earlier this week. this morning's revelations from the telegraph about these leaving parties — telegraph about these leaving parties held on april the 16th, 202t — parties held on april the 16th, 2021. that was a whole year later. and then — 2021. that was a whole year later. and then those original christmas event _ and then those original christmas event in _ and then those original christmas event in the middle of that in december 2020. event in the middle of that in december2020. so event in the middle of that in december 2020. so it starts to sort of build _ december 2020. so it starts to sort of build a _ december 2020. so it starts to sort of build a picture of not one off events, — of build a picture of not one off events, and that is what is leading people _ events, and that is what is leading people to — events, and that is what is leading people to question the culture in downing — people to question the culture in downing street. certainly, the opposition suggesting that it is a culture _ opposition suggesting that it is a culture that is set from the top. today. — culture that is set from the top. today. the _ culture that is set from the top. today, the big thing we have had is that numberten today, the big thing we have had is that number ten has apologised to buckingham palace for those leaving events _ buckingham palace for those leaving events which were held in april the
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16th, _ events which were held in april the 16th, because that was of course the evening _ 16th, because that was of course the evening before the funeral of prince philip _ evening before the funeral of prince philip. certainly a lot of questions being _ philip. certainly a lot of questions being asked about what the culture of downing street was, and for mps that we _ of downing street was, and for mps that we have spoken to over this week— that we have spoken to over this week they— that we have spoken to over this week they worry about how that reflects — week they worry about how that reflects on the party more widely, the conservative party, they worry about— the conservative party, they worry about this — the conservative party, they worry about this constant drip of new information, and certainly there are a lot of— information, and certainly there are a lot of people on the backbenches who are _ a lot of people on the backbenches who are pretty unhappy. there are those _ who are pretty unhappy. there are those, though, who are saying we have _ those, though, who are saying we have got _ those, though, who are saying we have got to — those, though, who are saying we have got to wait for this report to come _ have got to wait for this report to come out — have got to wait for this report to come out. "we want to find out what sue gray— come out. "we want to find out what sue gray finds before we make our judgment" — sue gray finds before we make our 'udrment." . , ., sue gray finds before we make our judgment-'— judgment." that is our political correspondent _ judgment." that is our political correspondent with _ judgment." that is our political correspondent with the - judgment." that is our political correspondent with the latest l judgment." that is our political - correspondent with the latest from westminster. and that is get the latest weather forecast for you as well. much of the rest of this month looking mostly dry and settled. high pressure not far away. still a few lingering fog patches that have been
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sticking around all day. temperatures dropping fairly quickly once the sun sets. extensive fog across much of england and wales. some clearer skies for north wales, scotland, too. temperatures will be a few degrees of either side of freezing. a few pockets of thrust and that dense fog around as well. we will see our quality improving a little bit in london over the next 24 little bit in london over the next 2a hours or so. temperatures are struggling at around 5 degrees close to the east coast. that mist and fog is tending to stick around for the course of the day. then largely dry and settled weather throughout the second half of the week. hello, this is bbc news.
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good afternoon to you. i'm ben brown. the headlines — downing street apologises to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. we have the inquiry taking place by sue gray. and, you know, we are very clear that there were real mistakes made. in the past few minutes, the former head of the cabinet office covid task force apologies for holding a leaving drinks in whitehall when london was in tier 3 restrictions. this latest party will be part of sue gray's investigation. a court in australia orders novak djokovic to be detained from tomorrow morning after the government cancelled his visa for a second time. the welsh government is to ease coronavirus restrictions over next two weeks —
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after a fall in omicron cases. in england, more babies are going to hospital with coronavirus during this latest omicron wave — but doctors say the risk to their health remains very low. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, who was murdered while she was outjogging. sport and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. lizzie has that for us. it is all happening down under, the djokovic story and the cricket. the ashes aren't getting a look in because it's all about djokovic, as you had in your headlines. he is in trouble again. the tennis world is continuing to react to the news today that novak djokovic has had his visa cancelled for the second time ahead of the australian open which starts on monday. the 20—time grand slam champion, who's hoping to break the record there — will be back in court in melbourne to appeal the decision. australia's immigration minister
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alex hawke says it was made on 'health and good order grounds.�* andy murray described the saga as "not great for tennis." while boris becker, who coached the serbian, said it was a "political game". here's our tennis correspondent russell fuller. what we know is that djokovic is a free man tonight. he will have to report to the offices of border force in melbourne at eight o'clock tomorrow morning our time at which point he will almost certainly be detained. that will allow him to spend the morning with his lawyers with border force official somewhere else in the building and then he will have to return to an asylum hotel where he spent four nights, culminating in last weekend's hearing. at that stage to healing will perhaps take place on the sunday. this has not been confirmed but the plan is to get everything done by sunday so novak djokovic and the australian open know where they stand. well, andy murray's comments came after he reached the final of the sydney tennis classic — his first tour final since 2019.
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he'll face aslan karatsev. and fellow britons harriet dart and liam broady have both made it to the main draw of the australia open — through qualifying. dart will face the seventh seed iga swiatek in the opening round while liam broady play�*s home favourite nick kyrgios. so, that djokovic story means the cricket is hardly getting a look in down under, and england won't mind too much after what turned out to be a very disappointing opening day to the final ashes test in tasmania. after winning the toss, england chose the perfect bowling conditions on the green hobart strip — and it paid off with three early wickets including ducks from david warner and steve smith off the bowling of ollie robinson. but after having australia 12—3 — things went down hill. marnus labuschagne was dropped on nought, robinson went off with a bad back and travis head — back from covid isolation — got his second century of the series. so here's the scorecard, australia
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will resume day 2 on 241—6. head making 101, labuschagne — 44 — out in the most bizarre way — worth a look on the bbc sport website — and cameron green was the other top scorer on 7a. for england's bowlers — two wickets each for robinson and broad, but not the best day for woakes and wood who were expensive forjust one wicket each. football now. just one game in the premier league tonight — the so called m23 derby as as brighton face crystal palace. leicester's game at burnley tomorrow though is off — with burnley struggling with covid and injuries. there's a huge game tomorrow though — a potential title decider really — as top side manchester city play second—placed chelsea who are ten points behind. chelsea's head coach thomas tuchel has suggested city have been lucky not to have been as heavily impacted by covid as other teams — but it's not a view pep guardiola agrees with. are you saying that here in manchester we are the smartest? that
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covid come omicron doesn't like to come here to visit us? we had a lot of cases and a lot of injuries, so we play in aston villa with 11 players in the first team, so the last four, five, six, seven games there are four or five players from there are four or five players from the academy on the bench, so we are in the same situation as all other clubs. snooker and world number two judd trump is a step closer to his second masters title. he eased into the semi—finals at alexandra palace after thrashing fellow englishman kyren wilson 6—1 in their quarter—final. trump will now face either mark selby or barry hawkins in the final four — they play tonight. that's all the sport for now. thank you, we will see you later. the woman who has accused the duke of york of sexually abusing her has welcomed a us judge's decision to allow her legal case to continue. virginia giuffre says her goal is to show that the rich and powerful aren't above the law.
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it comes as buckingham palace announced that prince andrew's military titles and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen and he will now face the civil case in the us as a private citizen. prince andrew strongly denies the allegations. our royal correspondent, sarah campbell, is outside windsor castle. indeed. i think the developments over the last 2a hours have really shown that. it was here yesterday, we understood, by mutual consent, that that agreement was made that prince andrew would return his military affiliations, his royal patronages, back to the queen and they will be redistributed permanently amongst other members of the royal family. he will no longer be styled his royal highness, his birthright, and will defend the case against him in the us as a private citizen. it was a pretty blunt, short statement that was released by buckingham palace just after five o'clock yesterday evening and was as close to the queen could come to basically saying to prince andrew, "you are on your own." meanwhile, his accuser,
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virginia giuffre, took to social media this morning. she told twitter that she was pleased withjudge kaplan's ruling that allows her case with prince andrew to go forward, and she put forward that line, she said her goal has always been to show that the rich and the powerful are not above the law and must be held accountable. now, prince andrew has always denied the allegations against him and a source close to him yesterday said that this case is a marathon, not a sprint, and the duke will continue to defend himself. no doubt it would have been a very difficult day for him yesterday to agree to give up those military affiliations. he is, of course, a military man himself, with 22 years service with the royal navy, and no doubt it would have been a difficult decision for the rest of the family, most especially the queen, to come to the realisation that this might be the best way to protect the reputation of the monarchy.
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sarah campbell. let's bring you these new pictures of prince charles. prince charles was meeting residents in north east scotland. the prince of wales refused to answer questions from journalists, when he was asked about prince andrew being stripped of his royal patronages. cani can i ask you on your brother's position prince andrew, how you feel? , . ., , position prince andrew, how you feel? , . .,, position prince andrew, how you feel? , . ., , so, feel? very nice to see you here. so, no answers — feel? very nice to see you here. so, no answers to _ feel? very nice to see you here. so, no answers to that _ feel? very nice to see you here. so, no answers to that question - feel? very nice to see you here. so, no answers to that question about . no answers to that question about prince andrew losing his various military titles and royal patronages. vigils will be held across the island of ireland in memory of a woman who was murdered while outjogging. 23—year—old ashling murphy was killed on wednesday, along the banks of the grand canal in tullamore, county 0ffaly. the director of the national women's council of ireland, 0rla o'connor, said for too long, women have been living restricted lives due to fear of violence.
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it's not ok that women have to limit their lives in this way. and we're also seeing, and i think it is important, from men, recognising. and, you know, ithink this is a moment of recognising the privilege that men have. so, men are talking about the fact that they don't think about these issues that women are thinking about constantly in terms of going for a run in the evening, going out walking your dog in the evening and wondering who's behind you, who'sjust made a comment as they are walking by and how that really makes you feel threatened. these are not feelings, these are not things that men have to think about. and we need to really change this because this is not ok. and this culture that that creates is what leads to these horrendous murders of women. 0 rla 0rla o'connor of the national
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women's council of ireland. public funding for cricket should be limited unless there's progress on eradicating "deep—seated racism" — according to a group of mps. the digital, culture, media and sport committee has made the recommendation in a report following testimony by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who described english cricket as "institutionally racist". the england and wales cricket board currently receives over £2 million a year from sport england. here's laura scott with more. eradicating racism from cricket will be a long and difficult road. that's the conclusion of mps who said they're convinced discrimination is endemic in the sport. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they issued a stark warning to the england and wales cricket board. i'd like to see public money withheld from cricket if the measures that the ecb come up with in terms of trying to ensure that racism, the scourge of racism, is removed from the game. if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be
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a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee praised the former yorkshire player, azeem rafiq, for his courage in lifting the lid on cricket's problems. his powerful and personal testimony led to his old club imploding, and a crisis engulfing the sport. today, he welcomed the parliamentary report. i'm really encouraged by how seriously the committee has taken the issue of racism, which clearly, cricket, as a game, has ignored for a very long time. but some of the other things that went on behind the scenes, i think were outrageous and something that really showed me and still continues to show me that the game, as a whole, doesn't really get it. it's still in denial. meanwhile, the new chairman of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the county has begun in earnest. we've had incredible change. i've literally taken the club and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at our processes, our procedures, our leadership, our governance, engaging with people,
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our pathways — no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress. another evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb, which receives £2.2 million a yearfrom sport england, welcomed the recommendations in the report, and said... "we agree that sharing regular public updates on our progress is important to rebuilding trust in our sport." as cricket continues to address its uncomfortable past, the scrutiny on its attempts to create a more inclusive future has never been so intense. laura scott, bbc news. nurseries in england that are being forced to close or reduce their opening hours because of staff shortages caused by covid, say they've been forgotten by the government. the department for education says it has given extensive guidance and "significant financial support" to providers during the pandemic. but the industry says it's too little too late.
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here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley who needs some ice? the penguins. it's the morning session at this nursery. what is your favourite thing about nursery? my car. i'm usually in the playground. ilike painting. do you like my shoes? yeah! forjen and lottie, it's a busy morning getting to nursery and then work and it's all the more stressful when covid could disrupt the whole day. i might get a phone call in the morning to say, "we've not got enough staff, we're going to have to shut", you know, because they've got staff isolating. so it is a massive concern obviously for me ringing work and then it's notjust nursery, it's me being in work as well. jane deals with the day—to—day running of the nursery and it's becoming increasingly difficult when staff are off with covid. we've shut more rooms, the preschool has been shut a couple the preschoo room has been shut a couple
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of times and the room downstairs, the toddler room downstairs has also been shut a couple of times. at the moment, we're really in crisis, we may have to start looking at prioritising places for some of the children. young children don't have to be tested or isolate if their parents have covid. no—one knows if they're bringing it into the nursery. so we've got families that we know that the parents have covid, they've tested positive. but these children are in the nurseries. we should have a position whereby if children are living with parents that have covid—19, that there is an isolation period because when they come back into nursery, whilst they may not be, if you like, ill themselves, they do pass on the infection to our staff and we are already in crisis so the last thing we want is more staff to go off with covid. we have 25% of our staff not in today. i nina isjuggling staffing and finances. she started this business when she was 21 and now owns eight nurseries. i've grown my business over the last 20 years. | singing.
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my passion is still there but mentally, i think. it'sjust exhausting. when you have to make a phone call, tell me what goes through your mind? i initially, the feeling is dread. because i think i'm going to let all those families down, the children, what- are they going to do? then obviously the impact is then the staff worry, i it's financial worry. i've still got to keep everything going. i the parents obviously don't pay if we close, | so then i've still got all my bills to pay and that is a massive, i you know, concern. you are saying you cannot take any more children? the government has relaxed the rules on how many children staff are allowed to look after. here, concern that bigger groups means more responsibility on staff who are already stretched. for many nurseries and childminders, there are too many obstacles to overcome. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in stockport. the headlines on bbc news —
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downing street's apologised to buckingham palace — after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. another of edinburgh's funeral last year. party at the heart government another party at the heart of government has been revealed. the former head of the cabinet office covid taskforce apologies for holding a leaving drinks in whitehall when london was in tier 3 restrictions. remembering ashling murphy — vigils are to be held across the island of ireland for the 23—year—old, murdered while outjogging. the issue of how people's remains are looked after in hospitals, mortuaries and funeral homes is the subject of a national public inquiry. a family in northern ireland says they've been kept in the dark for 15 years about how their mother's body sustained more than 30 broken bones. maureen mcginley died in londonderry, and her children have decided to renew their campaign
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to find out what happened. our ireland correspondent chris page reports. maureen mcginley was a great—grandmother, popular in her community and known for her hospitality. she died 15 years ago this month from pneumonia at the age of 78. two months later, mrs mcginley�*s gp asked to see her family because he'd received the results of a postmortem. what he said then, "i'm not sure how to tell youse this", and he said she had 3a broken bones. it is so hard to realise that this has happened. to such a small, wee pensioner that never done anybody any harm. we didn't know what to believe or who to believe or where to go for answers or where to ask for answers. where we were going, we weren't getting no answers.
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mrs mcginley died here at altnagelvin hospital in londonderry. the fractures happened sometime between her death and when her body arrived for a postmortem in belfast 70 miles away. but that is the only fact which is known for sure. the mcginley family want to know the whole truth. we started off as campaigners, there was eight of us, we have lost a brother, we have lost a sister. they know now what happened to mum because mum has told them. but we do not know. and that is all we need to know, is somebody to tell us. health officials, the police, and the coroner all investigated but none were able to reach definitive conclusions. the family recorded every step in their long campaign. it's all there. to let them see how much we fought. they eventually took the case to the public service watchdog, the northern ireland ombudsman. the bbc has seen his report from 2017, the full details have not
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been made public before. the ombudsman said the hospital's record—keeping had been inadequate, he raised serious concern that inaccurate information was given about cctv. the ombudsman said it was impossible to understand why the trust did not adequately investigate. the western health trust has repeated its sincerest apologies to the family for the distress experienced as a result of its failure to investigate, it also says it has fully accepted the ombudsman's findings. maureen mcginley�*s sons and daughters say they won't stop asking questions. we just want closure now, we just want to know- what happened to her. let her rest in peace, . she is not resting either because she is not getting a chance to rest. - the family believe this story is about accountability and transparency. which, they say, should be at the heart of the health service anywhere. chris page, bbc news.
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in 2014, a devastating storm struck the south devon coast, destroying a stretch of railway and cutting cornwall and most of devon off from the rest of the country for several weeks. you might remember these astonishing pictures of the tracks in dawlish, dangling in mid air after the sea wall was hit by 80mph winds and washed away. in 2019, work started on construction of a new sea wall to protect the railway and the local community, as john maguire reports. a hairline crack appeared and throughout the day had kept opening up throughout the day had kept opening up and _ throughout the day had kept opening up and kept opening up in the cracks kept getting bigger and bigger. you were standing on moving land when we were standing on moving land when we were trying _ were standing on moving land when we were trying to move the fence because — were trying to move the fence because the fence was there the crack— because the fence was there the crack was — because the fence was there the crack was appearing and we were open at the _ crack was appearing and we were open at the time _ crack was appearing and we were open at the time and i didn't know what to do— at the time and i didn't know what to do and — at the time and i didn't know what to do and people were coming in and we couldn't—
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to do and people were coming in and we couldn't afford to close so we were _ we couldn't afford to close so we were ferociously trying to fence it off it _ were ferociously trying to fence it off it was — were ferociously trying to fence it off it was moving so that it wasn't a danger— off it was moving so that it wasn't a danger to— off it was moving so that it wasn't a danger to anyone. for off it was moving so that it wasn't a danger to anyone.— off it was moving so that it wasn't a danger to anyone. for the past 18 ears a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years kylie — a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years kylie strom _ a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years kylie strom has _ a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years kylie strom has woken - a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years kylie strom has woken up - a danger to anyone. for the past 18 i years kylie strom has woken up every morning wondering whether her home and business, the blue anchor pub, would still be standing. that and business, the blue anchor pub, would still be standing.— would still be standing. at high tide ou would still be standing. at high tide you could _ would still be standing. at high tide you could feel _ would still be standing. at high tide you could feel the - would still be standing. at high tide you could feel the waves i tide you could feel the waves inside — tide you could feel the waves inside. the building wouldn't shake but you _ inside. the building wouldn't shake but you would definitely be able to feel when — but you would definitely be able to feel when it was hitting.— feel when it was hitting. recently installed huge _ feel when it was hitting. recently installed huge boulders, - feel when it was hitting. recently installed huge boulders, rock- installed huge boulders, rock armour, as it is known, should reduce the wave power and prevent cliffs on the stretch of the west somerset coastline from collapsing. i said they would fish me out of the bristol— i said they would fish me out of the bristol channel if they have to, i'm not giving — bristol channel if they have to, i'm not giving up and i'm really glad i didn't— not giving up and i'm really glad i didn't give — not giving up and i'm really glad i didn't give up. i never thought of giving _ didn't give up. i never thought of giving up. — didn't give up. i never thought of giving up, not once. obviously there are days, _ giving up, not once. obviously there are days, aren't there, when you think— are days, aren't there, when you think i'm— are days, aren't there, when you think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing _ think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing is _ think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing is ever going to be done, i'm going — nothing is ever going to be done, i'm going to fall into the sea and i'm going to fall into the sea and i'm going— i'm going to fall into the sea and i'm going to fall into the sea and i'm going to have nothing but i've never— i'm going to have nothing but i've never thought it is not worth carrying _ never thought it is not worth carrying on. luckily!-
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never thought it is not worth carrying on. luckily! winter is the most anxious _ carrying on. luckily! winter is the most anxious time _ carrying on. luckily! winter is the most anxious time for _ carrying on. luckily! winter is the most anxious time for those - carrying on. luckily! winter is the most anxious time for those at i carrying on. luckily! winter is the | most anxious time for those at risk from coastal erosion. here at sandy bay in east devon a huge section of land bay in east devon a huge section of [and fell away last week with holiday caravans just metres away. but landslips can occur all year round. last spring, what was said to be the biggest in 60 years saw a major collapse on dorset�*sjurassic coastline. our foreshores are constantly changing. to understand what forces are at play in reshaping them, researchers from the university of plymouth study the cliffs, dunes and sand on the north cornwall coast. this cliffs, dunes and sand on the north cornwall coast.— cornwall coast. this is our favourite _ cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach, - cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach, we - cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach, we have | cornwall coast. this is our- favourite beach, we have come here for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month. the for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month.— for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres _ beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long _ beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long and _ beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long and a _ beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long and a severe - 3.5 kilometres long and a severe winter storm can shift up to 1 million cubic metres of sand out to sea before summer tides bring it back again. the beach isn'tjust popular with visitors, but it is
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essential to protect the town. the amount of sand _ essential to protect the town. tue: amount of sand that is essential to protect the town. ti9 amount of sand that is on the beach determines how easily the town gets flooded. so if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you are lowering the beach surface, if you then get a storm the town is more likely to flood, because people don't really realise that beaches and dunes are naturalforms of coastal defence and the wide of the beachis coastal defence and the wide of the beach is at the higher the beach is the better protection provided against flooding. fight! the better protection provided against flooding.— the better protection provided against flooding. and built on the shiftin: against flooding. and built on the shifting sands _ against flooding. and built on the shifting sands is _ against flooding. and built on the shifting sands is the _ against flooding. and built on the shifting sands is the watering - against flooding. and built on the l shifting sands is the watering hole pub. the owners are channelling kink in it and holding back natural forces. :, in it and holding back natural forces. .y ., , in it and holding back natural forces. ., , , , forces. the way it has been built and the raft _ forces. the way it has been built and the raft it _ forces. the way it has been built and the raft it is _ forces. the way it has been built and the raft it is on _ forces. the way it has been built and the raft it is on it _ forces. the way it has been built and the raft it is on it is - forces. the way it has been built and the raft it is on it is pretty . and the raft it is on it is pretty full on. — and the raft it is on it is pretty full on. it— and the raft it is on it is pretty full on. it is— and the raft it is on it is pretty full on, it is how much money you want _ full on, it is how much money you want to— full on, it is how much money you want to spend on it and how much it is worth— want to spend on it and how much it is worth for— want to spend on it and how much it is worth for us to do that. for us it is— is worth for us to do that. for us it is a _ is worth for us to do that. for us it is a very— is worth for us to do that. for us it is a very valuable thing as it is our livelihoods and it is a 42—year—old family business. so it means— 42—year—old family business. so it means quite a lot for us to maintain it and _ means quite a lot for us to maintain it and keep — means quite a lot for us to maintain it and keep it here.— it and keep it here. decisions about what, if it and keep it here. decisions about what. if anything. _ it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to _
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it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do _ it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are - it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are a - what, if anything, to do are a balance between risk to people or property and cost. man versus sea is an expensive business, and often, despite design, engineering and deep pockets it is the sea that wins the power struggle. john maguire reporting. the british army officer, captain preet chandi, made headlines across the world after completing an expedition to the south pole — and today she arrived home. it's believed she's the first woman of colour to ski solo and unsupported across the antarctic. captain preet endured temperatures as low as minus 50, and wind speeds of up to 60mph, while pulling a 90—kilogram sled. after arriving back at heathrow, she told the bbc there'll be another trip. this was actually phase one of two, so pretty much from monday i think i'll be in the gym again, training. my aim is to do a full crossing solo, unsupported again. it will be a little bit longer, probably a little bit tougher. something that seemed probably almost impossible at the start
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but the more you do, the more you realise you're capable of, and after this one it seems more achievable. so, yeah, that's the next step. good luck to her. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. the weather isn't changing at the moment, we have high pressure driving stuff so it is giving largely dry of subtle conditions, not just largely dry of subtle conditions, notjust in the shorter term but in the longer term for much of the rest. it was a glorious sunset earlier and really threw this evening things will stay mostly dry but they will be mist and pockets of fog forming. we have had them in recent days and they will linger through this evening and overnight, all down to this high pressure which has also been bringing some fairly poor air quality across parts of london in particular. we have had a day on day build—up of pollutants with those light winds and temperature inversion trapping those pollutants in. but the good news is
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things will improve over the london region over the next 2a hours. into the evening hours temperatures are dropping quite quickly now the sun has set and we have clear skies across many areas through this evening and overnight but what we will see is fog forming again. it will see is fog forming again. it will be extensive across parts of england and wales, particularly for the likes of lincolnshire, east anglia, through the midlands, the welsh marches as well. temperatures for many of us getting a few degrees either side of freezing first thing saturday morning, so a chilly start, pockets of frost and some of those fog patches will be slow to click through the midlands, lincolnshire as a mike and east anglia. it is going to feel pretty chilly but most places should see things brightening up, and some sunny spells breaking through and it will list temperatures —— mike left temperatures —— mike left temperatures to around 5 degrees know the east coast but in plymouth around 11 celsius in the sunshine, so fairly dry and settled through saturday. overnight into sunday, just a subtle change because we see a cold front moving in from the
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north bringing breezy conditions for a time across parts of scotland. some outbreaks of patchy rain shifting south across england and wales on sunday but they will tend to fizzle out through the day. one or two showers in the south ahead of the main band of cloud and patchy light rain. either side of that, lots of dry weather on the sunday once again, some sunny spells and a touch warmer than recent days, about 7-11 . touch warmer than recent days, about 7—11 . into the new working week, once we lose the cold front from the south, it is high pressure again dominating our weather. here is the outlook through the course of next week, largely dry unsettled, perhaps a bit of rain in the north—west on tuesday, breezy for a time also but many places staying dry, fairly chilly particularly later in the week and we could see a return to the mist and overnight frost and fog too.
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today at five: downing street apologises to buckingham palace, after revelations that two parties were held at number 10 the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral last year. the prime minister did apologise for mistakes that have been made. we have the enquiry taking place by sue gray. and, you know, we are very clear that there were real mistakes made.

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