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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 14, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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morning, it's friday — welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are yuor headlines at 9 am. novak djokovic has had his australian visa cancelled... again. he's set to be deported. there was some hesitancy from victorians about him being let in, now that hesitancy has gone up exponentially and i think there is a lot of relief in victoria that as it stands right now, he's not playing in australian open. is it the right decision do you think? let me know. staff at downing street have been accused of holding two parties there, the night before the queen sat alone cos of covid restrictions to mourn her husband at his funeral. the woman who accsues prince andrew of seually assualting her when she was 17
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welcomes the court ruling that her civil case against him can go ahead. china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned an agent of the country had infiltrated westminster. a report recommends starving cricket of taxpayers�* money until it tackles �*deep—seated' racism in the sport. meanwhile, a strong start for england's cricketers in the final test — before another century by an australian batsman. good morning. the australian government has cancelled novak djokovic�*s visa for the second time, in a row over his right to remain in the country unvaccinated. the country's immigration minister said the decision was made in the public interest citing �*health and good order�* grounds. the 34—year—old serbian, who was scheduled to play
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in the australian open on monday, can still launch another legal challenge to try and stay. this is what happened in the run up to today�*s decision. last wednesday, djokovic�*s visa was cancelled as he arrived in melbourne. border officials said he hadn�*t met the entry requirements for australia. a few days later, his lawyers revealed he�*d been given a vaccine exemption to enter australia because he�*d previously tested positive. however, social media pictures showed him at public events in the days after that apparent diagnosis. on monday, his visa cancellation was overturned by a judge who criticised the australian government. but the final say was in the hands of the immigration minister — who�*s cancelled his visa in the past few hours. here�*s australian sports journalist shane mcinnes. i think public sentiment has certainly changed during the week. i think the fact that his statement
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recognised that the travel declaration that he submitted was in fact false, even though he blamed a support team member. the fact that when he was diagnosed with covid—i9 he still went out in belgrade, attended events and, of course, did that media interview, where he was 100% certain he had covid but still went ahead with the interview. i think that�*s where, if you look at the statement from the immigration minister, there is the concern about novak djokovic and public health and thus why the decision was reached today. the feeling around novak djokovic — ever since he got that exemption late last week, there were some hesitancy from victorians about him being let in. now that hesitancy has gone up exponentially and i think there is a lot of relief in victoria that, as it stands right now, he�*s not playing in the australian open. abul rizvi is the former deputy secretary for the australian department of immigration. he worked with the australian government when both major parties were in power. hejoins me live now from canberra.
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good morning from us here in the uk. what do you think of this decision? i must say i am surprised the government went down this path. i think it�*s a bit of a high wire act for the government. it seems tonight whilst the visa has been cancelled, or at least there�*s been an announcement that the visa has been cancelled, mr djokovic has not yet been taken into detention as australian law requires but there are reports that there will be an interview between mr djokovic and immigration officials tomorrow. right. the decision we are told by the immigration minister is on health and public order grounds, what on earth does that mean? weill. what on earth does that mean? well, the leual what on earth does that mean? well, the legal grounds _ what on earth does that mean? well, the legal grounds on _ what on earth does that mean? well, the legal grounds on which _ what on earth does that mean? -ii the legal grounds on which the visa has been cancelled talk about the public interest and that will be the test the minister is required to
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apply. i think public health and order grounds are the minister �*s own words rather than relevant to the legislation.— the legislation. what do you think that means? _ the legislation. what do you think that means? i _ the legislation. what do you think that means? i think— the legislation. what do you think that means? i think that - the legislation. what do you think that means? i think that means . that means? i think that means firstly, the minister has - that means? i think that means firstly, the minister has used i firstly, the minister has used his powers personally, the powers cannot be appealed to a tribunal but they can be appealed to the courts for judicial review. which means the courts will not look at the merits of the decision but rather will look at the legality of the decision, the reasonableness of the decision and the fairness of the decision. the second thing i suspect mr djokovic �*s lawyers will do tomorrow is to lodge a request with the federal court to allow mr djokovic to remain out of detention on a bridging visa with work rights. if the court was
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to agree to that then that would enable mr djokovic to play in the australian open on monday. 50 do enable mr djokovic to play in the australian open on monday. so do you think the australian _ australian open on monday. so do you think the australian government - australian open on monday. so do you think the australian government had . think the australian government had made the wrong decision here by cancelling this visa? i made the wrong decision here by cancelling this visa?— cancelling this visa? i think they have taken _ cancelling this visa? i think they have taken a — cancelling this visa? i think they have taken a highly _ cancelling this visa? i think they have taken a highly risky - cancelling this visa? i think they. have taken a highly risky decision in that there is a very real chance that the decision will be overturned again by the courts. there is a very real possibility of that. or that the courts will give an interim order that enables mr djokovic to play in the australian open at which case what the court decides afterwards becomes less relevant. 0k. afterwards becomes less relevant. ok. so do you think this is a decision taken on political grounds? certainly we saw that when mr djokovic announced on the 4th of january that he had received an exemption to come to australia for
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the australian open, there was a visceral response from the australian community. and my suspicion is that visceral response may well have coloured the government �*s decision making. may well have coloured the government 's decision making. thank ou for government 's decision making. thank you for talking — government 's decision making. thank you for talking to _ government 's decision making. thank you for talking to us. _ borisjohnson�*s former communications director, james slack, has apologised this morning for the "anger and hurt" caused by a leaving party that took place for him at downing street, the night before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral in april. the daily telegraph has reported that there was drinking and dancing at the event which would have been illegal under coronavirus rules in england at the time. the claims have not been denied by number ten. our political correspondent ione wells reports. a stark image of the queen — sat alone to mourn her husband, prince philip, at his funeral on 17th april last year. at the time, indoor mixing between different households was banned. but downing street staff have been
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accused of holding two leaving parties the evening before, one of which was for the director of communications at the time, james slack, now a deputy editor at the sun newspaper. today, the telegraph is reporting that around 30 people were present, drinking alcohol and dancing to music. a statement from downing street says... borisjohnson didn�*t attend either gathering, but the revelations have led to fresh criticism. labour�*s deputy leader angela rayner says... pressure is building too from the prime minister�*s own tory backbenchers. conservative mp andrew bridgen, who backed borisjohnson for leader, has become the latest tory mp to publicly say he submitted a letter of no confidence in the prime minister,
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calling his position untenable. he�*s the leader of our country and part of the key elements of leadership is that you don�*t ask people you�*re asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you�*re not willing to bear yourself. and clearly, that has not been the case. that then leaves the prime minister morally incapable of having the authority to lead the country. cabinet ministers, meanwhile, have been urging people to wait for the findings of civil servant sue gray�*s inquiry into multiple parties in government during coronavirus restrictions. the met police says it will also wait for the result of this before deciding whether to investigate if the inquiry unearths any potential criminal offences. ione wells, bbc news. let�*s talk to tony diver, political correspondent with the telegraph, who broke the story of the latest downing street party last night.
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tell us more about the events on the night of april the 16th last year and he was involved.— night of april the 16th last year and he was involved. there were two events going — and he was involved. there were two events going on _ and he was involved. there were two events going on at _ and he was involved. there were two events going on at the _ and he was involved. there were two events going on at the same - and he was involved. there were two events going on at the same time . and he was involved. there were two events going on at the same time in | events going on at the same time in downing street, we understand, both leaving do is for members of staff, one of those was james slack, as you just pointed out. the other one was one of borisjohnson �*s photographers. we have got some interesting detail about about exactly was going on at these gatherings. the one for the photographer, we know at one point went down into the downing street basement where staff danced and played music from a laptop which was balanced on a photocopier. we are also reporting to date those parties emerged into the downing street garden, where staff were staying out late and drinking and one member of staff we are told had a go on the swing of wilfrid johnson, the prime minister �*s son, and broke it. apparently someone was sent to the
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local co—op to bring back mine in a suitcase so they knew they should not have been doing it? that suitcase so they knew they should not have been doing it?— not have been doing it? that is riaht, we not have been doing it? that is right, we have _ not have been doing it? that is right, we have heard _ not have been doing it? that is right, we have heard about - not have been doing it? that is i right, we have heard about bring your own booze in these downing street parties, it sounds like this one someone was specifically dispatched to get a lot of alcohol in for everyone, we are told they went to the co—op on the strand, just a short walk from downing street along whitehall and they took a suitcase with them to do it. at a suitcase with them to do it. at the time indoor mixing with people from outside your household was banned in england. that from outside your household was banned in england.— from outside your household was banned in england. that is right, we were in step — banned in england. that is right, we were in step two _ banned in england. that is right, we were in step two of _ banned in england. that is right, we were in step two of the _ banned in england. that is right, we were in step two of the lockdown . were in step two of the lockdown road map, that had come in on the 12th of april, people might remember that date. on the 16th of april this to place, four days later, in the indoor social mixing was banned, outside people were restricted to the rule of six, we report today we think about 30 people were involved in total. , ., think about 30 people were involved in total. , . ., , , in total. this all happened the ni . ht in total. this all happened the night before — in total. this all happened the night before the _ in total. this all happened the night before the funeral- in total. this all happened the night before the funeral of- in total. this all happened the i night before the funeral of prince philip, the queen had to sit alone because of those same restrictions
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and the contrast between the head of state and what was going on in the house of the head of government could not be more stark? absolutely. we'd know those _ could not be more stark? absolutely. we'd know those plans _ could not be more stark? absolutely. we'd know those plans for _ could not be more stark? absolutely. we'd know those plans for prince - we�*d know those plans for prince philip �*s funeral, long drawn up while he was alive had to be changed at the last minute because of restrictions so under the original plans, his body would have travelled from central london to windsor to be laid in st george�*s chapel but they cancelled all of that because they did not want the public lining the streets to pay their respects, they were worried about virus transmission. in the ceremony were chapel in st george�*s chapel, the queen sat alone on a pew, two metres from the rest of her family, away from the rest of her family, away from herfamily, did not... she mourned her husband of 73 years. as you say, contrasting sharply with what we have been told was going on just hours before in number ten downing street.— just hours before in number ten downing street. what do downing street say about _ downing street. what do downing street say about your _ downing street. what do downing street say about your story? - downing street. what do downing . street say about your story? downing street say about your story? downing
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street do not — street say about your story? downing street do not deny _ street say about your story? downing street do not deny any _ street say about your story? downing street do not deny any of— street say about your story? downing street do not deny any of the - street do not deny any of the detail. they say there were events that happened on that evening, mr slack did give a speech to thank star that he had worked within his director of as communications in that time. we have not heard much more than that so far. this morning, damian hinds, the security minister has done a broadcast round in which he said he was shot by the suggestions in our story and he pointed to the sea grey inquiry into these parties and said we need to wait for the conclusions of that. what did a number of parties alleged to parties, work events, social do is, whatever we are calling them, what does that tell us about the culture in downing street? we think that will be a _ culture in downing street? we think that will be a key _ culture in downing street? we think that will be a key element _ culture in downing street? we think that will be a key element of- culture in downing street? we think that will be a key element of this i that will be a key element of this inquiry, we think sue gray �*s report will probably suggest the idea that members of downing street staff could have a boozy friday after a long week, that might have been a cultural issue in parts of government, that perhaps two people who were in the downing street
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bubble, going about their duties, during the pandemic, as everyone else worked from home and follow the rules, perhaps they felt as if they were in their own bubble, perhaps they felt the rules did not apply to them and i think those cultural issues will definitely come out. thank you for talking to us. let�*s hear what the government minister said this morning this is damian hinds. obviously if you are a real maker, you cannot be a rule breaker, of course that is correct but we need to let this investigation run, we need to hear what comes out of that and then there will be of course, rightly, a proper scrutiny in parliament and elsewhere of what comes out. let�*s return now to novak djokovic who could face deportation from australia after he had his visa cancelled. our correspondent, phil mercer has been
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following the story and he�*s in melbourne. can you tell us what the grounds are for the immigration minister cancelling his visa again? novak d'okovic cancelling his visa again? novak djokovic 's _ cancelling his visa again? novak djokovic 's visa _ cancelling his visa again? novak djokovic 's visa has _ cancelling his visa again? novak djokovic 's visa has been - cancelling his visa again? novakl djokovic 's visa has been revoked djokovic �*s visa has been revoked for a second time on health, good order and public interest grounds, as to what all of that means, we are not exactly sure. we did hear from the prime minister of australia, scott morrison, in the last hour or so and he says this decision has its roots in protecting australia �*s borders and public health. as it stands, if you are a foreign national wanting to travel into australia, you must be either double vaccinated or have a medical exemption. and the federal government here did not believe that novak djokovic �*s medical waiver was genuine. so that is why they have taken this extraordinary decision to again revoke his visa. we understand novak djokovic will not be taken
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into immigration detention tonight. but that he will have to go to an interview with the authorities tomorrow. so safe to say novak djokovic is down but he is not quite outjust djokovic is down but he is not quite out just yet, djokovic is down but he is not quite outjust yet, pending any legal challenge. outjust yet, pending any legal challenue. ~ ., outjust yet, pending any legal challenge-— outjust yet, pending any legal challenue. . . , , challenge. what generally has been the reaction — challenge. what generally has been the reaction of _ challenge. what generally has been the reaction of people _ challenge. what generally has been the reaction of people in _ challenge. what generally has been the reaction of people in australia l the reaction of people in australia to this news? it the reaction of people in australia to this news?— to this news? it is pretty hard to sum u- to this news? it is pretty hard to sum up the _ to this news? it is pretty hard to sum up the views _ to this news? it is pretty hard to sum up the views of— to this news? it is pretty hard to sum up the views of 25 - to this news? it is pretty hard to sum up the views of 25 million l sum up the views of 25 million people but i get the sense that many australians are very, very frustrated that novak djokovic has come into the country, many australians would believe that he has been circumventing the rules and regulations and you have to remember that all of this is taking place when australia is recording tens of thousands of new covid—i9 infections every single day. we have never been in this sort of territory before. and here we have a wealthy, privileged celebrity tennis player in the eyes of many australians,
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trying to rort the system, sneak in, not obeying the rules. there will be people who think novak djokovic is hard done by but i would say, most australians believe he has not acted fairly and should be forced to leave. ~ . ., ~ fairly and should be forced to leave. ~ . ., ,, , ., the headlines on bbc news... novak djokovic has had his australian visa cancelled... again. he�*s set to be deported staff are downing street had been accused of holding two parties there, the night before her majesty the queen sat alone because of restrictions to mourn her husband at his funeral. china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned an agent of the country had infiltrated westminster prince andrew�*s military titles
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and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen, meaning he will face a civil case against him as a private citizen. virginia giuffre, the woman who accuses the duke of sexually abusing her when she was a teenager, has said her goal was to show that the rich and powerful were "not above the law". the duke denies the accusations. let�*s talk to royal journalist emily andrews. thank you for talking to us. how do you respond to the fact that effectively prince andrew has been kicked out of the royal family? effectively prince andrew has been kicked out of the royalfamily? i kicked out of the royal family? i think it was an invidious position for the queen and senior members of the royalfamily, what do for the queen and senior members of the royal family, what do you for the queen and senior members of the royalfamily, what do you do with a problem like prince andrew? two years ago he gave that disastrous interview to bbc newsnight and after that, pretty much, i think that sealed his fate and at that point the queen, prince charles, prince william forced him in effect, and they did force him, to step back from public life, he was not going to do public duties and now with this civil case being
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filed by virginia giuffre, accusing prince andrew of sexual assault, she was 17 at the time, she says when she was forced to sleep with him, his association with convicted paedophilejeffrey epstein and now ghislaine maxwell been found guilty of sex trafficking, the wider public opinion in the queen was too much, prince andrew effectively had to go. and so we saw yesterday when the queen acts to protect the institution she does so quickly and ruthlessly. he institution she does so quickly and ruthlessl . , , . ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew, ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew. he _ ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew, he will— ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew, he will still— ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew, he will still be - ruthlessly. he will still be prince andrew, he will still be a - ruthlessly. he will still be prince i andrew, he will still be a member ruthlessly. he will still be prince - andrew, he will still be a member of the royalfamily. although fighting this case as a private citizen. as the queen said in that statement. does that mean we will not see him again in public? he will not be at the cenotaph, the trooping the colour, never on the buckingham palace balcony again for all of these platinumjubilee palace balcony again for all of these platinum jubilee celebrations. we make an important distinction between prince andrew the private citizen as he now is. prince andrew the duke of york. and prince andrew
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as son of the queen, beloved member of the family. the queen still loves her son, charles and edward still love their brother, there is a lot of family love and sympathy there however, this is the year of the platinum jubilee, a however, this is the year of the platinumjubilee, a huge dealfor the queen and the royal family, platinumjubilee, a huge dealfor the queen and the royalfamily, 70 years on the throne and this court case was the focus so we will not see andrew in public any more, we will not see him on ceremonial occasions and we will not see at all in public during the platinum jubilee, trooping the colour, on the balcony but we do know after the death of the duke of edinburgh at the queen has relied even more and under, he is very close to her on the windsor estate, the queen lives pretty much full time now at windsor castle apart from when she goes up to scotland and prince andrew visits her daily, she relies on him for emotional support and soccer but in terms of his public role, that is over. �* ,
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terms of his public role, that is over. �* y , over. and yet he denies the allegations _ over. and yet he denies the allegations made _ over. and yet he denies the allegations made against i over. and yet he denies the i allegations made against him, over. and yet he denies the - allegations made against him, he will say to his mother, i did not sexually assaulted virginia giuffre, as she claims. but it is presumably to do with the fact civil case, a judge ruled this week, can now go ahead so the queen has got to distance herself?— ahead so the queen has got to distance herself? absolutely. the queen and the _ distance herself? absolutely. the queen and the institution - distance herself? absolutely. the queen and the institution have i distance herself? absolutely. the queen and the institution have to| queen and the institution have to create separation between prince andrew as the public figure, as a member of the firm and this awful case. i�*m not sure one could really think of a worse accusation against a member of the royalfamily, sexual assault, hanging out with a paedophile and now ghislaine maxwell, a sex trafficker, these are serious and he must allegations against any member of the public, this man is a senior member of the royalfamily, the this man is a senior member of the royal family, the queen as our head of state, the symbol of duty and responsibility in this country. the queen as the monarch of all the
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world including new zealand, australia, canada. if the royal family have to be beyond reproach, more so than the average individual. virginia giuffre claims prince andrew slept with her on three separate occasions. i think by now it is because the weight of the newspaper headlines and coverage, this trial will go ahead as the judge said, he had no truck for the arguments from andrew �*s lawyer is trying to get it through out on a technicality. i don�*t think he wants to settle, he has always claimed he is innocent, he has always said to his mother, he says a record he did not even meet her, that infamous photograph with his hand around her waist shows that he did and if he wants to fight then he must do it as a private citizen because nobody wants to go to trial, whoever you are, prince or pauper because of everything that comes out, it is not
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pleasant. having said that he is darnedif pleasant. having said that he is darned if he does and darned if he does not, guilty in the court of public opinion before the case is heard, perhaps he wants to roll the dice, go to trial, hopefully prove as he would see, of his innocence. virginia giuffre has not indicated that she will not take a settlement, she wants to do this, she says, on behalf of people who have been trafficked all across the world. could he lose anything else like his police protection? i could he lose anything else like his police protection?— police protection? i don't think he will. and police protection? i don't think he will- and harry — police protection? i don't think he will. and harry comes _ police protection? i don't think he will. and harry comes back- police protection? i don't think he will. and harry comes back to - police protection? i don't think he will. and harry comes back to the j will. and harry comes back to the uk, he still gets police protection, he will still keep it.— he will still keep it. thank you for s-ueakin he will still keep it. thank you for speaking to _ he will still keep it. thank you for speaking to us- — new figures suggest the uk economy climbed above above its pre—pandemic level for the first time in november, shortly before omicron struck. the office for national statistics said gross domestic product increased by 0.9 percent. the construction sector grew strongly during the month, with the services sector also benefiting.
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public money should be withheld from cricket unless it can "clean up its act", according to a report by a parliamentary committee. it comes in response to the emotional testimony given last year by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who spoke about the racial abuse he had suffered at the club. laura scott reports. eradicating racism from cricket will be a long and difficult road. that is a conclusion from mps after they had powerful evidence from across the game, which convinced them that discrimination is endemic. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they issued the starkest of warnings to the england and wales cricket board, if this watershed moment does not bring significant improvements. i would like to see public money withheld from cricket if the measures the ecb come up with in terms of trying to ensure that racism, the scourge of racism, is removed from the game.
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if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee praised the former yorkshire the the lid on problems within cricket. his testimony led to his old club imploding, and a crisis engulfing the sport. rafiq commended what he called the sensible action of the committee, saying it shows just how seriously politicians are taking an issue that too many people ignored for so long. the committee understands how important it is to clean up the game, he said. meanwhile, the new chairman of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the county has begun in earnest. i have literally taken the club and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at processes, our procedures, leadership, engaging with people, our pathways, no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue
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to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress. another evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb said it welcomed the recommendations in the report, and agreed that sharing regular public updates on our progress is important to rebuilding trust in our sport. as cricket continues to address its uncomfortable past, the scrutiny on it creating a more inclusive future has never been more intense. laura scott, bbc news. joining me now is aisha hussain a cricket coach from bradford. thank you for talking to us. do you agree this is the way some extent, i do agree. i agree this is the way some extent, i do auree. , ., . agree this is the way some extent, i do aree. , . �* do agree. i believe that the ecb has been held accountable _ do agree. i believe that the ecb has been held accountable and - do agree. i believe that the ecb has| been held accountable and yorkshire county cricket, and in orderfor there to be positive change in the future we need to ensure they are...
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scrutiny is being applied over the next couple of years. as we have seen throughout history, change does not happen overnight, it takes time. as lord patel said, he has gone right into the full of it to ensure that they are being held accountable and that there is some positive change. it and that there is some positive chan . e. , , and that there is some positive chance. , , , , change. it is interesting because the report. _ change. it is interesting because the report, effectively, - change. it is interesting because the report, effectively, suggests change. it is interesting because l the report, effectively, suggests it does not trust the england and wales cricket board, the ecb, it said it wants them to report to the committee every few months to update them on progress and that is after them on progress and that is after the ecb published the 12 point plan to tackle discrimination last november which according to them would tackle the dressing room culture, diversity training for all those involved in the sport, etc. i think it's clear racism is a big think it�*s clear racism is a big barrier to participation in sport and i think it�*s important for the government to make sure these things do not happen again in the future.
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in the report mentioned the asian action plan, it was actioned out a couple of years ago and i was a part of the plan so for me, it was important, it highlighted the fact the ecb and why cc recognised what they did was wrong but azeem rafiq had faced years of discrimination and racism which cannot be taken back. and i think going forward, any sports player or anybody participating in a sport and anything else should never have to face racism or any element, we know what kind of detrimental effects it had on his mental and physical well—being so in order to ensure these things do not happen again, yes, the government should be checking in every now and then with why cc and ecb to make sure the things that happened over a period of time, years and yours, do not happen again. in school, children have reports, that is a clear
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example, it helps people to see what is going wrong. and people are giving you advice. so yes, i think it is a perfect way to go forward. ensuring they are being held accountable. flan ensuring they are being held accountable.— ensuring they are being held accountable. . ., , ., ., ensuring they are being held accountable. ., ., , ., . , ., accountable. can i ask you have you faced any barriers _ accountable. can i ask you have you faced any barriers in _ accountable. can i ask you have you faced any barriers in the _ accountable. can i ask you have you faced any barriers in the sport - faced any barriers in the sport because you are a woman and because of the colour of your skin? fortunately enough, for me, i have had a massive love for sport since i was a little girl and throughout my teenage years, ijoined a couple of clubs and it was not cricket specifically, it was netball, it did hurt me in a number of ways, i never felt like i belonged, it made me feel like i had to fight for the people that felt, felt that sense of not belonging in certain areas so for me, a couple of years ago, i felt like that but i thought it is important for me to be resilient and ensure kids my age do not have to
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face the same experiences as me and they are able to reach their maximum potential. as a south asian girl, cricket has been a massive part of my life, laying in the house every week, my father, my grandad loves it, everyone comes together. it is a positive element in my household however, i think because of the scrutiny that is happening, it has had a knock—on effect on all of us. i want to ensure that there is plenty of south asian players within the england team who are able to reach their maximum potential and as a coach myself i will do everything i can to make sure every single player does not ever have to face the battles that some of these individuals have done. and i will be held accountable and responsible for years to come and because of that, i will make sure 100% i do everything i can within my means to have a positive impact on these children and anybody else, going forward. if things do go wrong, it is important,
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so important for us to hold ourselves accountable by educating ourselves. it is important to learn these things at a young age so they are drilled into our minds, so definitely. are drilled into our minds, so definitely-— are drilled into our minds, so definitely. are drilled into our minds, so definitel . ., ,, . ., definitely. thank you so much for talkin: to definitely. thank you so much for talking to us _ definitely. thank you so much for talking to us and _ definitely. thank you so much for talking to us and good _ definitely. thank you so much for talking to us and good luck. - definitely. thank you so much for| talking to us and good luck. thank you. china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned that an agent of the country had infiltrated parliament. the security service said christine ching kui lee had "established links" with mps on behalf of the chinese communist party. she then gave donations to some politicians, including the labour mp barry gardiner, who received more than £400,000. our correspondent stephen mcdonell is in beijing. so what is the latest from there about these claims? the chinese government _ about these claims? the chinese government has _ about these claims? the chinese government has just _ about these claims? the chinese government hasjust issued - about these claims? the chinese government hasjust issued a - about these claims? the chinesel government hasjust issued a very government has just issued a very strong denial regarding these allegations from mi5 that the
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communist party had been using london—based solicitor christine lee as an intermediary to funnel covert funds into the pockets of uk parliamentarians as a means of generating political influence. it has come from the foreign ministry where the spokesman said someone in london is a little too obsessed with 007 movies. he said beijing was calling on officials in britain to stop hyping up these issues, as he put it. interestingly, i asked stop hyping up these issues, as he put it. interestingly, iasked him if christine lee held either chinese citizenship or had done any work at all that the chinese government. he refused to answer both of those questions but again, he reiterated that he thought these allegations were baseless and they were based on hearsay. people should remember that she hasn�*t been arrested, she hasn�*t been deported and it could well be that there is nothing illegal in the making of these payments. in australia, for example, new
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legislation had to be introduced to stop overseas payments being made to politicians and it could be that in the uk a new law like this is brought in in the future. thank you very much- — now it�*s time for a look at the weather with matt. thank you very much, good morning. it is 9 degrees at the moment in the north of scotland, —5 in some central and southern parts of england and wales. big temperature contrast and with the thrust in the south, some dense fog patches which could linger until lunch. mo parts of england and wales will have a sunny day again. north—west england fairly cloudy, as is northern ireland and western scotland, the north, the cloud thick enough for some rain. light winds across the country, staying on the mild side in the north of the uk but stay chilly, especially where fog lingers, in some central and southern parts of england and wales. tonight, the frost and fog returns, not quite as cold tonight across england and wales because we expect to see more mr low cloud develop. in the north
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with a shift of wind direction there will be a chillier night than the nightjust gone. a cooler start to the weekend, more cloud on saturday. england and wales noticing what that more than anyone else. some breaks and some sunshine coming through and staying cool in some eastern areas, trying to get milder in the west and a few splashes of rain on sunday. bye—bye for now. hello, this is bbc news, with victoria derbyshire. the headlines at 9.30: novak djokovic has had his australian visa cancelled... again. he�*s set to be deported. staff at downing street have been accused of holding two parties there, the night before the duke of edinburgh�*s funeral. the former communications chief james slack, who is leaving do it was, has apologised. the woman who accsues prince andrew of sexually assualting her when she was 17 welcomes the court ruling that her
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civil case against him can go ahead china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned an agent of the country had infiltrated westminster. a report recommends starving cricket of taxpayers money until it tackles �*deep—seated�* racism in the sport, following azeem rafiq�*s testimony. and more on this in the sport in two seconds. a strong start for england�*s cricketers in the final test — before another century by an australian batsman. sport now and time for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. do fill us in. hello, victoria. it is going on in australia. we will get to the cricket in a moment. novak djokovic has had his visa cancelled for a second time and is facing deportation from australia. ajudge had ruled earlier this week, that the world number one, who hasn�*t been vaccinated,
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could stay in the country and he was released from a detention hotel. the australian open starts on monday and he is the reigning champion, but over the past few days, it�*s emerged that there was an error in his original application to enter the country and he�*s also admitted to breaking covid rules in serbia before christmas. in the last few hours, the immigration minister alex hawke has cancelled djokovic�*s visa again "on health and good order grounds on the basis that it was on the public interest to do so." our tennis correspondent russel fuller is in melbourne. they must now decide whether they want to appeal, whether they want to take this to a judicial review. the other question must be, how quickly can that happen? the australian open starts on monday. at the moment, djokovic is in the top line of the draw is the number one seed, meant to be playing a fellow serb. i think one of the options for his legal team if they decide to appeal is to try and get it fast tracked to have
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a decision made by sunday, so that the australian open can go ahead without being affected by perhaps the champion pulling out midway through. another thing to say is normally in these circumstances if your visa is revoked in the circumstances, you are not eligible to apply for another reason for a further three years. it does also say that that might not occur if there are compelling circumstances that affect the interest of australia but potentially djokovic is now 3a, couldn�*t play at 35, 36 or 37, wouldn�*t be coming back to compete in the australian open as a nine time champion until he was 38. wejust had this nine time champion until he was 38. we just had this through in the last couple of minutes from melbourne. in the next ten minutes or so, there will be a directions hearing on a melbourne court between djokovic�*s legal team and the judge there as to the timetable, perhaps, of any legal challenge for him to have his visa
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given back to him yet again. we will have the very latest on that as and when but it sounds as if djokovic and his legal team are going to fight that latest deportation order. let�*s stay in australia. the final ashes test is under way in hobart. england won the toss and are bowling first that looked to be a good idea on a fairly green wicket and they had australia on the ropes early on. ollie robinson with the breakthrough. david warner out for a duck, caught by zack crawley. steve smith was also dismissed without scoring, falling to the same combination of robinson and crawley. the hosts were reeling on 12—3. marnus labushagne rallied with 44 but was bowled by stuart broad after slipping in his crease. it was a bizarre way to go, but that was a second wicket for broad. then came the fightback, and a fifth wicket partnership of 121 between travis head and cameron green. head made 101 — but was out next ball after his reaching his century.
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green is on 57 and australia look to be on top. they are just they arejust coming they are just coming back after an interval. 220—5 early in the final session in hobart. a parliamentary report on racism in cricket has been published and has warned that the sport could have public funding withdrawn unless the england and wales cricket board show "continuous, demonstrable, progress" in eradicating "deep—seated racism." the report praised the courage of the former yorkshire player azeem rafeeq, who gave emotional testimony to a committee of mp�*s in november, recounting his experiences in two spells at the county. yorkshire have since made a raft of changes, with a number of sackings. rafiq says that the threat of losing governemnt funding across the sport could be the prompt that�*s needed for the ecb to seriously address the issues of racism. we need to see actions and it�*s important that we keep them to
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account throughout. the ecb need to be held to account, i think, as they recommendation says. when they are hit in the pocket, it�*s something they stand up and do something about. hopefully the county game and the ecb will take no notice and do something about this big problem that we�*ve got. arsenal managed to hold on for a goaless draw despite playing most of the match with ten men against liverpool in last night�*s league cup semifinal first leg at anfield. the first half went by without a shot on target and the gunners had granit xhaka dismissed for this lunge on diogo jota. but liverpool failed to take advantage with the best chance of the match falling to takumi minamino. the second leg is next thursday, with the winners facing chelsea in the final. i�*m really proud of what the boys did today in extremely difficult stadium against a great opponent and playing 70 minutes with ten men. i
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see a team here that plays with emotion, that transmits everything that we talked about every day and i�*ve seen that today. so i�*m really happy. finally, some in more news out of australia. it is all going on there. great news, andy murray has reached his first atp tour final for three years. he won in three sets in the sydney tennis classic. if dan evans wins in the other semi, it will set up the first all—british final at atp tour level. murray through to his first final in quite a while. more on the website — that�*s bbc.co.uk/sport. cheers, good news for andy murray. the welsh government is set to ease covid restrictions after a fall in cases. the measures came into place on boxing day, and included the closure of nightclubs and a ban on fans at stadiums.
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the changes are expected to be phased in, and could be reversed if the public health situation worsens. it�*s hoped that crowds will be allowed back for the six nations rugby tournament, which begins in february. several murder victims killed by a loyalist paramilitary group were not warned by police they were under threat, according to a report. the police ombudsman looked into 19 attacks by the ulster defence association, and found "collusive behaviour" among members of the security services, paramilitaries and the police. france has begun easing restrictions on british travellers — after rules were tightened last month. vaccinated travellers will no longer need a compelling reason to enter the country but a negative covid test, taken 2a hours before leaving the uk, will still be required for all those arriving. there�*s been a cyber attack across government websites in ukraine. the pages of the ministry of foreign affairs, the ministry of education and several others were taken down for a while. the ukranian government says most affected resources have already
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been restored an others will be available soon. ukraine says no personal data was leaked during cyber attack but the government has opened an investigation. the attack comes as tensions continue on ukraine�*s border with russia — with moscow building up a huge military presence there. reuters have quoted a ukrainian foreign ministry spokesman saying it�*s too early to draw conclusions on the cyber attacks, but there is a long record of rusian attacks against ukraine in the past. told us more about the cyber attack. reading yesterday about rumours that russia can launch some cyber attacks and stage a sort of coup d�*etat in ukraine and it happens that ukraine was celebrating its second new year. you know, ukrainians have a tradition of two christmases, two new years and this was that special night, the so—called old new year. so maybe people were drinking and eating and having fun but this was the moment to launch this cyber attack and the results
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are quite visible. still, i would not exaggerate the consequences, the application for e—services is working. the message from hackers reads, "ukrainian, be aware that your data, your personal data on our computer is being eliminated." it�*s just not possible. the website of the minister of education and science does not keep any personal data. they are all in registers and all registers, the state—owned registers of ukraine, are safe. a former us paratrooper has been charged with conspiring to over thrown the government over the deadly attack on congress on january the sixth last year. stewart rhodes is the leader of an extreme far right militia group and has been charged with 10 other members over the deadly riot where donald trump supporters tried to overthrow joe biden�*s election victory.
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here�*s our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal. more than 725 people have been arrested and charged for the attack that shocked the world. but this is the most serious indictment yet — and the first for seditious conspiracy, which is defined as trying to overthrow the government. it�*s alleged the oath keepers planned an attack the moment president biden�*s victory had been made official. they are a loosely knit militia that believes the us government has been corrupted by elites. leading the charge was the yale—educated lawyer and army veteran, stewart rhodes, claim investigators. they say, in december — the month before the attack — he organised the violence using encrypted apps. speaking to one local oath keeper chapter, he said... he appears to confirm a plan in the run—up to january 6th on the infowars conspiracy site. what we�*re doing is we have men already stationed outside dc as a nuclear option —
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in case they attempt to remove the president illegally, we will step in and stop it. on that day, oath keeper members wearing full combat gear were seen marching through the crowd, up the east steps of the capitol in a military—style stack formation. prosecutors say rhodes, who wasn�*t inside the building, was directing them using a mobile phone and chat app. once inside, the indictment alleges the stack split in two, heading in different directions. prosecutors say rhodes had several armed quick—reaction forces on standby that could be called into escalate the attack. rhodes, who was arrested in texas along with others, has said in previous interviews with conservative groups that the members who entered the capitol had gone off—mission and were not acting on his orders. one of the reasons i think the indictment is so... ..is so specific and outlines so many specific communications is to try to dispel the notion that�*s out there amongst certain
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circles that this was simply a band of merry pranksters, you know, and they were a simple group of people who were just protesting without any kind of ulterior motives. most republicans have downplayed the seriousness of the capitol riots, arguing no—one had yet been charged with sedition or treason. but this now marks an escalation by the prosecution — who, for the first time, have alleged there was a plot against the government that day. nomia iqbal, bbc news, washington. the headlines on bbc news... novak djokovic has had his australian visa cancelled... ..again. he�*s set to be deported. staff at downing street had two parties there, the night before the queen sat alone cos of covid restrictions to mourn her husband at his funeral. china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned an agent of the country had infiltrated westminster.
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new figures from the rac show their patrols attended the equivalent of 27 pothole—related breakdowns every day last year — the highest since 2018. joining me now is mark morrell, he�*s been campaigning to fix the uk�*s roads for nine years. so it is not going well, is it? no, not really- _ so it is not going well, is it? iirr, not really. unfortunately, although i�*ve had millions of roads worth of roads resurface, there is a massive backlog in total road maintenance in this country that the government don�*t want to fund. this country that the government don't want to fund.— this country that the government don't want to fund. according to the rac, their don't want to fund. according to the rac, their red _ don't want to fund. according to the rac, their red patrols _ don't want to fund. according to the rac, their red patrols attended - don't want to fund. according to the l rac, their red patrols attended more pothole incidents than ever before, why, what is going on? the pothole incidents than ever before, why, what is going on?— pothole incidents than ever before, why, what is going on? the roads are failina. why, what is going on? the roads are failing- our— why, what is going on? the roads are failing. our roads _ why, what is going on? the roads are failing. our roads are _ why, what is going on? the roads are failing. our roads are 60, _ why, what is going on? the roads are failing. our roads are 60, 70 - why, what is going on? the roads are failing. our roads are 60, 70 years i failing. our roads are 60,70 years old and a road would last about 20 years, so they are coming to the end of their life. the extra load, wear
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and tier on the roads itself. bad weather gets blamed but well maintained roads don�*t get affected ljy maintained roads don�*t get affected by bad weather. it will get worse because when you think about electric vehicles and the weight of those, the batteries and the wheels, they will make more stress on the road. i�*m calling for an annual researching programme, because that is the only way out of it. we pairing potholes is a waste of money. and the government has suspended the smart motorways for up to five years. use the money that was ring fenced by government for those to get on top and start resurfacing our roads because unless we resurface our roads, it will get worse and worse. fir we resurface our roads, it will get worse and worse.— we resurface our roads, it will get worse and worse. or use that money to help people _ worse and worse. or use that money to help people with _ worse and worse. or use that money to help people with rocketing - worse and worse. or use that money to help people with rocketing fuel i to help people with rocketing fuel bills, those are the kind of choices, aren�*t they? bills, those are the kind of choices, aren't they?- bills, those are the kind of choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we aet choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on — choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on that _ choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on that thing, _ choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on that thing, i _ choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on that thing, i would - choices, aren't they? yes, i mean if we get on that thing, i would scrap| we get on that thing, i would scrap hsz we get on that thing, i would scrap hs2 immediately put that into supporting... how we can afford a white elephant like that with all the problems we have in this country
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and what the situation we find ourselves in... but i really, i�*ve been campaigning because there is a serious side where 250 cyclists in the last five years have been killed or seriously injured as a result of potholes and 7a motorcyclists killed as a result of bad roads. i5 potholes and 74 motorcyclists killed as a result of bad roads.— as a result of bad roads. is that true? that _ as a result of bad roads. is that true? that has _ as a result of bad roads. is that true? that has come _ as a result of bad roads. is that true? that has come from - as a result of bad roads. is that true? that has come from the i true? that has come from the motorcycle — true? that has come from the motorcycle accident _ true? that has come from the motorcycle accident group, i true? that has come from the i motorcycle accident group, who true? that has come from the - motorcycle accident group, who have 50,000 members. ok. motorcycle accident group, who have 50,000 members.— 50,000 members. ok. what is your messaue 50,000 members. ok. what is your message to — 50,000 members. ok. what is your message to the _ 50,000 members. ok. what is your message to the government - 50,000 members. ok. what is your message to the government right i 50,000 members. ok. what is your. message to the government right now? look at putting that money that was ring fenced for smart motorways into roads and look... take things seriously. i�*m fed up with rhetoric and spin by government, they spin more than a propeller on a spitfire. it's more than a propeller on a spitfire. it�*s about time to do something. they will come out saying they are spending billions of pounds but if they are spending billion pounds and roads are getting worse and the backlog is not being cleared, then why are they doing it, it isn�*t
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working and it needs a cultural change, probably at the department for transport as well.— for transport as well. thank you very much _ for transport as well. thank you very much for— for transport as well. thank you very much for talking _ for transport as well. thank you very much for talking to - for transport as well. thank you very much for talking to us, - for transport as well. thank you l very much for talking to us, mark. take care, good luck. in 2014, a devastating storm struck the south devon coast, destroying a stretch of railway and cutting cornwall and most of devon off from the rest of the country for several weeks. you might remember these astonishing pictures of the tracks in dawlish, dangling in mid air after the sea wall was hit by 80 mile per hour winds and washed away. in 2019, work started on construction of a new sea wall to protect the railway and the local community, asjohn maguire reports. a hairline crack appeared, and then throughout the day, itjust kept opening up and just kept opening up and the cracks just got — kept getting bigger and bigger. you were standing onjust, like, moving land when we were trying to move the fences because the fences were there and the crack was appearing and we were open at the time. didn't quite know what to do.
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and people were coming in. we couldn't afford to close, so we were just ferociously trying to fence it off as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years, cara strom has woken up every morning wondering whether her home and her business, the blue anchor pub, would still be standing. at high tide, you could feel the waves inside, so you could feel not... the building wouldn't shake, but you would definitely be able to feel when it was hitting. recently installed, huge boulders, rock armour, as it�*s known, should reduce the wave power and prevent the cliffs on this stretch of the west somerset coastline from collapsing. i've said they'll fish me out of the bristol channel if they have to. i'm not giving up, and i'm really glad that i didn't give up. i never thought of giving up. not once. obviously, there are days, aren't there, when you think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing's ever going to be done. i'm going to fall in and see. i'm going to have nothing. but i've neverthought, "oh, you know, it's not worth... it's not worth carrying on." luckily.
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winter�*s the most anxious time for those at risk from coastal erosion. here at sandy bay in east devon, a huge section of land fell away last week with holiday caravans just metres away. but land slips can occur all year round. last spring, what was said to be the biggest in 60 years saw a major collapse on dorset�*s jurassic coastline. our foreshores are constantly changing. to understand what forces are at play in reshaping them, researchers from the university of plymouth studied the cliffs, dunes and sands at perranporth on the north cornwall coast. this is ourfavourite beach. we�*ve come here already for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and a severe winter storm can shift up to one million cubic metres of sand out to sea before summer tides bring it back again. the beach isn�*tjust popular with visitors, but it�*s essential to protect the town.
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the amount of sand that�*s on the beach determines how easily the town gets flooded. so if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you�*re lowering the beach surface, if you then get a storm, the town is more likely to flood because people don�*t really realise that beaches and dunes are naturalforms of coastal defence. and the wider the beaches and the higher the beaches, the better protection the beach provides against flooding. and built on these shifting sands is the watering hole pub. the owners here are channelling king canute and holding back natural forces. the way this has been built and the raft it's on is pretty full on. it's how much money do you want to spend on it and how much is it worth to us to do that? and i think for us, yeah, it's a very valuable, valuable thing as it's our livelihoods and it's with the, you know, it's a 42—year—old family business. so it's... so, yeah, it means quite a lot for us to to maintain it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything,
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to do are a balance between risk to people or property and cost. man vs sea is an expensive business and often, despite design, engineering and deep pockets, it�*s the sea that wins the power struggle. john maguire reporting. thank you for your e—mails and messages. you still want to talk about parties, it would seem, some of you anyway. graham says now we know why so many dodgy decisions and deals were done during covid. everyone at downing street was drunk. the excuse of people working very hard doesn�*t wash. are they forgetting the nhs, the transport workers, the power workers, the carers and all the essential workers who worked very hard but chose to respect the rules and not party? dave says, more
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parties at party central, what knights of the week did they not party? malcolm wants to talk about novak djokovic. he says djokovic must leave australia before the tournament begins. apart from all else, it would be unfair on his first round opponent and others to get knocked out only to find that he then gets deported when he shouldn�*t have been playing in the first place. we will bring you the latest news headlines in a few minutes. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with matt. thank you and good morning. a frosty start in england and wales, temperatures at —5 in oxford. mist and fog around. high pressure that is in charge. you can see where it is in charge. you can see where it is centred, to the south of us, pushing the rain bearing clouds to the north and to the east of us. that is why things are rather dry. lighter winds in the south, the issueis lighter winds in the south, the issue is around london and the south—east, medium to high levels of pollution today, so on top of the
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general traffic pollution you normally see. of course still some lingering mist and fog patches in the midlands, southern england and south—east wales. some could hang around into the rest of the day but away from it, most will have some sunshine. a bit more cloud in the north and northern ireland, as few splashes of rain forced a 10 degrees in northern scotland at the moment and will still be in this afternoon. only mid single figures for england and wales. through tonight, signals we will see more in the way of mist and low cloud develop across england and low cloud develop across england and wales, particularly through southern and eastern areas with some clear skies elsewhere and still the chance of frost to take us into saturday morning. a greater chance of frost in scotland and northern ireland. we have clearer skies here, a shift in wind direction today. tomorrow, a bit more sunshine for some. lots of cloud in south—west scotland and northern ireland at times but turning a bit milder. lots more cloud for england and wales tomorrow, could be misty and grey for some of you all day. some sunny breaks, the best of which in the north of england. chilly down
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eastern areas, turning a little milder towards the west. out towards the north—west there are some outbreaks of rain starting together. through saturday night, that will bring a few showers into scotland and northern ireland and on sunday northern england. a view shower is breaking out ahead of it in england and wales. the only real chance of a little bit of rain in the forecast for england and wales as we go through the next week. but many places will still stay dry. the modern club will break up, the afternoon will be a good deal sunnier, turning cloudy in the north west of scotland and temperatures 8-11. west of scotland and temperatures 8—11. actually a couple of degrees where we should be for this stage in january because that�*s what�*s happening in the uk. before we go, let�*s bring you up—to—date elsewhere in the world. southern parts of the hemisphere in summer, exceptional heatin hemisphere in summer, exceptional heat in south america recently was that uruguay had its hottest day since 1960. when srs saw their highest second highest temperature
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record, a1. it has been even hotter towards australia. the joint highest temperature ever recorded on thursday and that is the joint highest across the entire seven dill southern hemisphere. goodbye for now. —— the entire southern hemisphere.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. novak djokovic is set to be deported from australia after having his visa cancelled again there was some hesitancy from victorians about him being let in, now that hesitancy has gone up exponentially and i think there is a lot of relief in victoria that as it stands right now, he�*s not playing in australian open. borisjohnson�*s ex chief spin doctor has apologised for a party at downing street in april — just hours before the queen sat alone at her husband�*s funeral because of covid restrictions. the woman who accuses prince andrew of sexually assualting her welcomes the court ruling that her civil case against him can go ahead
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china has denied interfering in uk politics, after mi5 warned an agent of the country had

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