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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 14, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today — new allegations — downing street staff are accused of holding more rule—breaking parties on the eve of prince philip's funeral. one of borisjohnson�*s key backbench allies now says publicly he has no confidence in the prime minister. as prince andrew loses his military titles, the woman accusing him of sexual assault says her goal is to show the rich and powerful are not above the law. cricket must tackle rascism, or risk losing public funding. thats one of the main recommendations from a parliamentary report into the crisis in the sport, after the powerful testimony
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from former yorkshire player azeem rafeeq. we will be speaking to him after 7.00. a shorter self isolation period in england. businesses hope going from seven to five full days will ease staffing pressures. some companies are also changing their sick pay rules for the unvaccinated. i'll have all the details. and i'll tell you about the weather. good morning. it's friday 14th january. our main story — staff at downing street have been accused of holding two leaving parties inside number ten on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral last april. restrictions in england at the time banned indoor mixing between different households. it comes as the prime minister continues to face calls for his resignation
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from his own mps, and at least one letter of no confidence has already been submitted. our political correspondent ione wells reports. a stark image of the queen sat alone to mourn her husband, prince philip, at his funeral on april 17th last year. at the time, indoor mixing between different households was banned, but downing street staff have been accused of holding two leaving parties the evening before, one of which was for the director of communications at the time, james slack. now a deputy editor at the sun newspaper. today, the telegraph is reporting that around 30 people were present, drinking alcohol and dancing to music. a statement from downing street says... borisjohnson didn't attend either gathering, but the revelations have led to fresh criticism.
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labour's deputy leader angela rayner says... pressure is building too from the prime minister's own tory backbenchers. conservative mp andrew bridgen, who backed borisjohnson for leader, has become the latest tory mp to publicly say he submitted a letter of no confidence in the prime minister, calling his position untenable. he's the leader of our country and part of the key elements of leadership is that you don't ask people you're asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffe— that you're not willing to bear yourself. and clearly, that has not been the case. that then leaves the prime minister morally incapable of having the authority to lead the country. cabinet ministers, meanwhile, have been urging people to wait
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for the findings of civil servant sue gray's inquiry into multiple parties in government during coronavirus restrictions. the met police says it will also wait for the result of this before deciding whether to investigate if the inquiry unearths any potential criminal offences. ione wells, bbc news. let's speak now to our political correspondent, nick eardley, who joins us from westminster. the supreme minister was hoping some kind of wood would be put on these, temporarily at least —— if the prime minister was hoping, that clearly has not happened —— some kind of lid. has not happened -- some kind of lid. ., ., ., has not happened -- some kind of lid. ., . ., . .,, lid. you are right, charlie. we hope that the cabinet — lid. you are right, charlie. we hope that the cabinet had _ lid. you are right, charlie. we hope that the cabinet had was _ lid. you are right, charlie. we hope that the cabinet had was that - lid. you are right, charlie. we hope that the cabinet had was that boris| that the cabinet had was that boris johnson's apology in the commons on wednesday would buy them a bit of time, get rid of some of the immediate growing pressure that borisjohnson was under, i think these revelations in the daily telegraph this morning just below that out of the water. they matter a lot for a couple of reasons. one is,
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this is what many tory mps who were keeping him quiet feared, that there were more allegations to come, and that there could be even more allegations over the next few days into next week. the second reason is, when you look at these allegations, they sound a lot like a party, and not much like work at all. we have heard consistently that there were people who were required to be in work in downing street, and that that mattered because they were not being invited into social occasions, they were just having a drink at their desk after work. the suggestion that people were dancing, music was being played at into the night, i think it is a very difficult one for number ten to answer. the allegations aren't being denied by downing street. downing street is saying that the included people who were in work anyway, that other people who went to some of these leaving dos were joining via
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these leaving dos were joining via the zoom, but we have had these allegations for quite some time. christmas was supposed to be an end to some of the pressure, downing street hoped. it has kept coming. the allegation the prime minister was at one of these events, the fact more will keep coming, suggested pressure willjust keep growing. the question now is whether to prompt more conservative mps to come forward and say that they think the prime minister has run out of road. nick, for the moment, thank you very much. prince andrew's military titles and royal patronages have been handed back to the queen, meaning he will face a civil case against him as a private citizen. virginia giuffre, the woman who accuses the duke of sexually abusing her when she was a teenager has said her goal was to show that the rich and powerful were "not above the law". the duke denies the accusations. our royal correspondent
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nicholas witchell reports. he's determined to fight on — rebutting the charges made against him, according to friends. but andrew will do so as a private citizen, shorn of the last trappings of his life as a royal. so there will be no more appearances on the balcony of buckingham palace alongside his mother and the rest of his family. those days are over, as is his use of the styling as his royal highness, and his remaining military positions. he's no longer honorary colonel of the grenadier guards, entitled to pride of place by the queen at trooping the colour. he stepped down by mutual agreement, so we're told, from that position, and from roles in nearly a dozen other regiments, including the royal highland fusiliers and the yorkshire regiment, and the royal navy and the raf. there was relief in military circles. the mp tobias ellwood is a former army officer. the royal family has an intimate relationship with the regiments going back in history — many of them are honorary colonels and so forth — and it's
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important that the problems that prince andrew has incurred sort of aren't bled over into the regiments that he was representing. it's more than ten years now since this photograph appeared of andrew with the then 17—year—old virginia roberts, and this photograph of him with the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein. in his newsnight interview, andrew said he rued the day he continued his friendship with epstein. that's the bit that... ..as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis. cos it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family, and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices, and i let the side down — simple as that. two years on from that interview, andrew, duke of york, continues to declare his innocence of any impropriety. he must now fight on alone.
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his family's priority is to protect the monarchy�*s reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is outside windsor castle this morning. sarah, it doesn't look like ms giuffre is going to be happy with a quiet out—of—court settlement. good morning. yes, this is the first time we have had directly from virginia giuffre, prince andrew's accuser. —— heard directly. she tweeted this morning.
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prince andrew has always vehemently and consistently denied her claims of sexual assault against him. sources close to him yesterday said he had not actually been surprised by thejudge's he had not actually been surprised by the judge's ruling he had not actually been surprised by thejudge's ruling against his attempts to have the case dismissed, but he said the case was a marathon, not a sprint, and that the duke will continue to defend himself against these claims. so the civil case continues, but the big change between yesterday when i spoke to you here from windsor castle today comes from that statement issued by buckingham palace yesterday afternoon. yes, he is still the second son of the queen, he is still ninth in line to the throne, but he will no longer style himself his royal highness, he will no longer undertake public duties, and all that has military affiliations and royal patronage is have been handed back to the queen and will be distributed among other members of the royal family. and the palace made known that this is a permanent change, there is no way back for the
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prince, and it was also made clear that as he goes on to fight this civil case, he will do so as a private citizen.— civil case, he will do so as a private citizen. sarah, thank you. sarah campbell— private citizen. sarah, thank you. sarah campbell for— private citizen. sarah, thank you. sarah campbell for us _ private citizen. sarah, thank you. sarah campbell for us there. - public money should be withheld from cricket unless it can "clean up its act," according to a report by a parliamentary committee. it comes in response to the emotional testimony given last year by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who spoke about the racial abuse he had suffered at the club. laura scott reports. eradicating racism from cricket will be a long and difficult road. that is a conclusion from mps after they had powerful evidence from across the game, which convince them that discrimination is endemic. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they should the starkest of warnings to the england and wales cricket board, if this watershed moment does not bring significant improvements. i moment does not bring significant improvements-_ improvements. i would like to see ublic improvements. i would like to see public money _ improvements. i would like to see public money withheld _ improvements. i would like to see public money withheld from - improvements. i would like to see| public money withheld from cricket if the measures the ecb come up with
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in terms of trying to ensure that racism, the scourge of racism, is removed from the game. if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee _ to the game, very simple. the committee plays _ to the game, very simple. the committee plays the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq for his courage in a the lid on problems within cricket. his testimony led to his old club imploding, and a crisis engulfing the sport. azeem rafiq commended what he called the sensible action of the committee, saying it shows just how seriously politicians are taking an issue that too many people ignored for so long. the committee understand how important it is to clean up the game, he said. meanwhile, the new chairman of yorkshire says the clean—upjob at the chairman of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the club has begun in earnest. i clean-upjob at the club has begun in earnest. ., ., , in earnest. i have literally taken the club and _ in earnest. i have literally taken the club and turned _ in earnest. i have literally taken the club and turned it _ in earnest. i have literally taken the club and turned it upside . in earnest. i have literally taken - the club and turned it upside down, given— the club and turned it upside down, given it _ the club and turned it upside down, given it a _ the club and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at processes, — given it a good shake, looking at processes, procedures, leadership,
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engaging _ processes, procedures, leadership, engaging with people, our pathways, no stone _ engaging with people, our pathways, no stone left unturned, actually. but the — no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress, and evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb said it welcomed the recommendations in the report, and agreed that sharing regular public updates on our progress is important to rebuilding trust in our sport. as cricket continues to address its uncomfortable pass, the scrutiny on it creating a more inclusive future has never been more intense. laura scott, bbc news. the welsh government is set to ease covid restrictions after a fall in case numbers. the first minister is expected to set out the two—week plan to ease measures that came into place on boxing day, which included the closure of nightclubs and a ban on fans at stadiums. the changes are expected to be phased, and could be halted if the public health situation worsens.
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it's hoped that crowds will be allowed back for the six nations rugby tournament, which begins in february. france has begun easing restrictions on british travellers after rules were tightened because of concerns about the spread of the omicron variant. they'll remain in place for unvaccinated travellers, and a negative covid test, taken 2a hours before leaving the uk, will still be required for all those arriving. the chinese embassy has denied claims by mi5 that it's identified an agent attempting to influence parliament. the security service says christine lee tried to establish links with mps on behalf of her country's ruling communist party. tim muffett reports. she is a lawyer with extensive contacts in westminster. christine lee is now the subject of a highly unusual warning from mi5, one of the chinese embassy in london claims as a smear against the chinese community in the uk. the uk security service says christine lee has been working secretly on behalf of the
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chinese state, in order to convert we interfere in uk politics through establishing links with established and aspiring parliamentarians. fiur and aspiring parliamentarians. oi" intelligence and and aspiring parliamentarians. ij' intelligence and security agencies have been working together to really spot and identify this type of activity, activity that could potentially do harm to our country and harm to our democracy. there was no sin of and harm to our democracy. there was no sign of christine _ and harm to our democracy. there was no sign of christine lee _ and harm to our democracy. there was no sign of christine lee at _ and harm to our democracy. there was no sign of christine lee at her- no sign of christine lee at her london office yesterday, but last night, a spokesperson for the chinese embassy in london issued a statement. it said... labourmp labour mp barry gardner received more than £500,000 from christine
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lee over five years. he said he more than £500,000 from christine lee overfive years. he said he had been liaising with security services for a number of years, been liaising with security services fora number of years, and been liaising with security services for a number of years, and that they had known about donation to fund research is in his office. he added that steps were taken to ensure christine lee had no role in either the appointment or management of those researchers. all the donations were properly reported at the time. barry gardiner says he stopped receiving funding for the in twenty20, although christine lee's son was working in his office until he resigned yesterday. this son was working in his office until he resigned yesterday.— he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. _ he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. if _ he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. if we _ he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. if we do - he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. if we do not i he resigned yesterday. this is i really serious. if we do not play this down, i am not running scare stories, i am genuinely concerned and shocked that this has been allowed to happen, we need to understand why and to do something about it, but we also have to recognise that the chinese government poses a clear and present danger to us, and stop messing around. ~ �* , . around. within british intelligence, there has been _ around. within british intelligence, there has been concern _ around. within british intelligence, there has been concern about - around. within british intelligence, i there has been concern about growing chinese influence in recent years.
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it is now clear those fears grow to the heart of westminster. tim muffett, bbc news. several murder victims killed by a loyalist paramilitary group were not told by police they were under threat, according to a report. the police ombudsman looked into 19 attacks by the ulster defence association, and found "collusive behaviour" among members of the security services, paramilitaries, and the police. the time now is 6.17. we should get an update on the weather with matt. what a contrast in temperatures. is that at the same time, those different temperatures? that is in the last hour, yes. good morning. a mass contrast across the uk is mine. 10 celsius, if any man would start in the north of scotland. —it further
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south, widespread frost across south england, the midlands and wales. some fog around this morning, particularly across the bristol channel through and towards the midlands. another thing i should mention, with high pressure in place, very light winds, very poor air quality, high pollution levels in the london temperature. lots of cloud across north—west england, northern ireland, parts of south—west scotland. the cloud in the northern scotland mild here, but splashes of rain particularly for caithness, sutherland identity moray firth. continue to see some sunshine across eastern part of sunshine —— scotland, another sunny afternoon trusty southern half of the country, but staying pretty chilly especially when before going lingers longest, temperatures sticking around ten or 11 celsius for some in the north of scotland. conscious that a little with tonight, greater fog through some eastern areas, temperatures dropping more across the north where we see clearer skies develop to take
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us into tomorrow morning. but some frost around, some fog patches are england and wales winds again start your weekend. the weekend predominantly dry, a chance of some splashes of rain for a time at later on saturday and into sunday morning. but most places will stay dry and getting a bit milder. more than half an hour. matt, thanks so much, see you later. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mirror leads on reports that downing street staff held two parties the night before prince philip's funeral, hours before the queen mourned alone. the telegraph also features that story, saying number ten workers were allegedly drinking alcohol late into the night. the rest of the papers all focus on the news that the duke of york's military titles and royal patronages have been returned to the queen. "throne out" is the sun's headline. the paper says the decision to reduce the prince to a "private citizen" was one of the hardest in the queen's 70 years on the throne. the guardian calls it a "devastating blow" to prince andrew. norman baker, the royal commentator
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and former government minister, says the royal family can't escape the "immense damage" the case he is facing will cause. a look at the inside pages, and we do completely change the tone. this is for all you parents out there, turn your backjust for a couple of minutes, especially with toddlers, turn your back for a couple of minutes, thinking everything is in fine, just going to grab the nappies or something like that, check the oven... , y ., or something like that, check the oven... , ,, , or something like that, check the oven... , , oven... did you see wrap a nappy? no, crab oven... did you see wrap a nappy? no. grab a — oven... did you see wrap a nappy? no. grab a nappy. _ oven. .. did you see wrap a nappy? no. grab a nappy. i— oven... did you see wrap a nappy? no, grab a nappy, i said. - oven. .. did you see wrap a nappy? no, grab a nappy, i said. this- no, grab a nappy, isaid. this is what happened when a mum left her three—year—old alone with sudocrem, there are other antiseptic healing creams available. a26—year—old
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mother for a shower, creams available. a26—year—old motherfor a shower, and creams available. a26—year—old mother for a shower, and you creams available. a26—year—old motherfor a shower, and you know this with p, getting a shower is difficult at the best of times with young children. she returned to find her daughter kicked in sudocrem. that is a proper mess. i her daughter kicked in sudocrem. that is a proper mess.— her daughter kicked in sudocrem. that is a proper mess. i don't how much you — that is a proper mess. i don't how much you know — that is a proper mess. i don't how much you know about _ that is a proper mess. i don't how much you know about sudocrem, | that is a proper mess. i don't how| much you know about sudocrem, it is very sticky. it is very effective for certain things. she had a jumbo tub of this stuff, and it is on the walls, the floors, the bed sheets, and the mother says they are all a lost cause. but she did find it quite funny. she actually looks like something out of a horror movie. doesn't she? ila something out of a horror movie. doesn't she?— doesn't she? no offence to the famil . doesn't she? no offence to the family- that — doesn't she? no offence to the family. that is _ doesn't she? no offence to the family. that is a _ doesn't she? no offence to the family. that is a proper- doesn't she? no offence to the family. that is a proper mess. l doesn't she? no offence to the i family. that is a proper mess. on doesn't she? no offence to the - family. that is a proper mess. on a different tack, you know it is a new year, and lots of people are looking at fitness, and they are doing things they didn't do previously. big piece in the telegraph all about boomers, older people who find gems a little bit unappealing. they do
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not like going, there was a survey done seeing it out of ten people find gems intimidating, more particularly older people. and there is a book review in the daily mail today... do is a book review in the daily mail toda ,, is a book review in the daily mail toda , today... do you find the gym intimidating? _ today. .. do you find the gym intimidating? i— today... do you find the gym intimidating? i don't - today... do you find the gym intimidating? i don't really i today... do you find the gym l intimidating? i don't really go, today... do you find the gym - intimidating? i don't really go, so i don't intimidating? i don't really go, so i don't really _ intimidating? i don't really go, so i don't really know! _ intimidating? i don't really go, so i don't really know! not _ intimidating? i don't really go, so i don't really know! not really - intimidating? i don't really go, so| i don't really know! not really part of my well. this is the book of the week, it is called let's get physical. is the story of women's is a collector size, when women started doing organised fitness classes. that links with the intimidation about the gym. that links with the intimidation about the gym-— that links with the intimidation about the gym. yeah. it traces it back to the _ about the gym. yeah. it traces it back to the 1960s, _ about the gym. yeah. it traces it back to the 1960s, just - about the gym. yeah. it traces it back to the 1960s, just around . about the gym. yeah. it traces it i back to the 1960s, just around the corner from vidal sassoon's studio, a former dancer called lottie burke starts a class which is then exported to the us, and they'll get that excited about it, and apparently is the first time it has been organised for women to do classes. it metamorphoses into
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jazzercise, just before disco came in, when jane jazzercise, just before disco came in, whenjane fonda in the early 80s came up with all the disco moves and the fitness then, itjust the fitness then, it just falls through the whole history of fitness classes. d0 through the whole history of fitness classes. j, , ., through the whole history of fitness classes. , ., ~ ., ., �* through the whole history of fitness classes. ~ ., ., �* .,~ classes. do you know what i've taken awa from classes. do you know what i've taken away from this? _ classes. do you know what i've taken away from this? i _ classes. do you know what i've taken away from this? i now _ classes. do you know what i've taken away from this? i now have - classes. do you know what i've taken away from this? i now have an - away from this? i now have an earworm, olivia newtonjohn's let's get physical. a great song. it will go over the heads of loads of people. i was trying to look up what year it came out, i can't find it, it is old, but a great song. the time is 6.23. news that self—isolation rules in england will be cut from seven to five full days has been welcomed by companies dealing with staff absences. but what if you're concerned your employer isn't following the rules safely? sarah's been looking into this one for us. we have to get our heads round the new rules, five full days, and how this plays out at work.
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good morning, everyone. these changes could make a big difference for sectors where people can't work from home. this comes as a welcome change. but as you say, it throws up a lot of questions. these changes could make a big difference for sectors where people can't work from home. jobs in factories, on production lines, shops or bars, for example. from monday, people in england can leave isolation after negative lateral flow tests on days five and six. it's something that industry leaders have been pushing for. latest figures suggest that, at the start of january, 7% of people in the uk were isolating. that's around two million workers. some companies are actually reporting absence rates of up to 25%. the boss of a chocolate factory told me yesterday that half
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of his staff were stuck at home. so for many businesses, this change will have an immediate impact, especially for the hospitality industry. i think it has become quite frustrating for staff, that they are actually feeling quite well with the previous variant. that was not the case, the last thing we want is for people to come back to work ill. that is not the case this time around. the guys wants to be here, it is frustrating when they feel well they cannot just get it is frustrating when they feel well they cannotjust get back in and get on with that. but what happens if you're worried your boss is bringing people back too quickly? you should discuss your concerns with your employer first. if you're still not convinced, you can raise a formal grievance or contact the health and safety executive. and we're also seeing changes around sick pay from companies like ikea, next, wessex water, and ocado. unvaccinated staff will not get their full company sick pay if they have to self—isolate
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due to covid exposure. they will only get the minimum legal level of sick pay, around £96 a week. however, if they test positive, they will get the full amount. so legally, what are the rules? businesses must have a good reason to do this. it can'tjust be to save money. there is precedent. some companies already bar you from full sick pay if you're hurt doing extreme sports, for example. hr experts say companies need to tread carefully and make sure they're not discriminating against people. if they are treating any staff member less favourably, there is risk in _ member less favourably, there is risk in that, — member less favourably, there is risk in that, because you have to look— risk in that, because you have to look behind _ risk in that, because you have to look behind the change. are people choosing _ look behind the change. are people choosing to be unvaccinated because of medical_ choosing to be unvaccinated because of medical exemption, may be because of medical exemption, may be because of fear— of medical exemption, may be because of fear if— of medical exemption, may be because of fear if they are a pregnant woman or race _ of fear if they are a pregnant woman or race or— of fear if they are a pregnant woman or race or religious reasons? and if
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they apply— or race or religious reasons? and if they apply that rule, and they are found _ they apply that rule, and they are found to — they apply that rule, and they are found to have treated somebody less favourably, there's the of discrimination claims will stop so that is_ discrimination claims will stop so that is a — discrimination claims will stop so that is a massive consideration, as well as— that is a massive consideration, as well as the — that is a massive consideration, as well as the feeling it creates, is it divisive — well as the feeling it creates, is it divisive in some way, what impact does _ it divisive in some way, what impact does it— it divisive in some way, what impact does it have — it divisive in some way, what impact does it have on reservation? and what _ does it have on reservation? and what impact does it have on retention _ what impact does it have on retention and treatment? —— recruitment? we're going to be looking at all of this in more detail after 8.00. do get in touch with some of your question on all of this. contact us in the usual ways on screen now. we are seeing a growing list of companies introducing some of these measures to try to encourage or pressure staff to get vaccinated. and i think there are some pros and cons to this approach, and it may mean some people perhaps test less because they might worry they can't afford to go off sick if they are not going to get the full sick pay. and then more broadly, we are seeing the staff approach from industry because across the globe,
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politicians are really ramping up the rhetoric on being vaccinated. do you want to have a guess, let's get physical?— get physical? this is the olivia newton john — get physical? this is the olivia newton john song. _ get physical? this is the olivia newton john song. early - get physical? this is the olivia newton john song. early 80s? j get physical? this is the olivia - newton john song. early 80s? yes, che l newton john song. early 80s? yes, cheryl commander, _ newtonjohn song. early 80s? yes, cheryl commander, alison, thank you for getting in touch. lots of you, and nigel got in touch, and emma, a deputy editor, 1981. there you go. just to embed the earworm for you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. well, as we've been hearing, there's mounting pressure on borisjohnson to resign over allegations of downing street parties. and the tory chair of the london assembly, andrew boff, has told bbc radio london that the issue threatened to damage
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the conservatives' prospects of winning borough seats in may's local elections. when asked if the prime minister should go, he said he thought that was a "strong option." cabinet ministers though have rallied around the prime minister. the northern line will partially close for 17 weeks from tomorrow for upgrade works. the line between kennington and moorgate will be closed until mid—may meaning there will be no northern line service from elephant and castle, bank, borough, and london bridge stations. one of london's busiest tube lines is set to partially close for four months while upgrade works take place. staying with transport, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. next, imagine the task of trying to count sealife! well, that's what staff at the london aquarium do every
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january for its annual stock—take. in wetsuits. and they count the nearly 6,000 creatures and marine species at the attraction, including the tiny tropical milk frog and boris the green sea turtle. it's also an opportunity for a spring clean too. part of our scheduled maintenance is cleaning the substrate in the bottom of the tank, cleaning the windows so members of the public can see all our lovely animals and also scrubbing the rockwork. it gets a bit dirty in there, so it's good to keep on top of it and keep it nice and clean. on to the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start again this morning with temperatures hovering around zero. bit of frost where they have dipped just below. high pressure is in charge, the wind is light. a few mist and fog patches out there as well. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for the dense fog in parts of west and north—west london, parts surrey.
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anywhere really could see a fog patch. if you've got it, it could just linger through the morning. elsewhere, we've got sunshine. it will eventually lift and we will see some blue skies. a brighter afternoon. the wind stays light and the temperature's somewhere between 6—8 celsius. overnight it will be a chilly start to the night. the minimum temperature dropping down below zero. cloud moving in from the east and with that again some dense patches of mist and fog potentially by saturday morning. the minimum down to minus 2. a murky start to saturday. more cloud around across the weekend. the high pressure gradually starts to slide away towards the east and allows fronts to come in from the west. there is a chance of a shower on sunday morning but not widespread, however. as i said, quite a bit of cloud but the temperature milder, not only during the daytime but temperatures overnight should stay above zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning... we're once again going to be transported into the weird and wonderful world of plants, as sir david attenborough's latest series, the green planet continues. we'll speak to the makers of the show. swapping his studs for skates, rugby star ben foden is one of 12 celebrities taking part in this year's dancing on ice. he'll be with us after 9am. and paralympic swimmer will perry tells us why he wants attitudes to change, after he revealed he gets constant abuse because of his dwarfism. british army officer preet chandi made headlines across the world after completing an expedition to the south pole. it's believed she's the first woman of colour to ski solo and unsupported across the antarctic. she said wanted to do
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it to encourage people to "push their boundaries". preet endured temperatures as low as minus 50 — and wind speeds of up to 60 miles per hour — while pulling a 90 kilogram sled containing her kit, fuel and food across the world's southern—most continent. her route took her from the hercules inlet to the south pole in a0 days, seven hours and three minutes. she was so quick, she completed the 700—mile challenge almost a week ahead of schedule, making her the third quickest woman to do it solo. preet is due back in the uk in a few hours, and frankie mccamley is at heathrow�*s terminal 5, waiting for her. morning. good morning. i havejust morning. good morning. i have 'ust run into morning. good morning. i have 'ust into the— morning. good morning. i have 'ust run into the arrivals i morning. good morning. i have 'ust run into the arrivals lounge i morning. good morning. i have 'ust run into the arrivals lounge andh run into the arrivals lounge and preet is expected back here soon. we will be speaking to first hear live on bbc breakfast. captain preet or
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polo preet finished her cheque to the south pole just over a week ago but because of an outbreak of coronavirus, one of the flight crew had to go into isolation. she is arriving this morning. joining me to meet her are two people who know her very well, colonel graham johnson and major louise bates. thank you forjoining us this morning. you have known captain preet for a very long time. you were her commander in the reservists. what was your reaction when she said she was going to take on this epic challenge? well! what a challenge! what a preet! — well! what a challenge! what a preet! what a sportswoman. she was in the _ preet! what a sportswoman. she was in the army— preet! what a sportswoman. she was in the army reserves when i met her and then— in the army reserves when i met her and then she — in the army reserves when i met her and then she transferred to the regutar— and then she transferred to the regular army. and then she transferred to the regulararmy. she and then she transferred to the regular army. she has had a real journey — regular army. she has had a real journey. the thing that struck me about— journey. the thing that struck me about preet was her grit and
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determination. what a leader! she is humble _ determination. what a leader! she is humble and — determination. what a leader! she is humble and recognises the team that -ot humble and recognises the team that got her— humble and recognises the team that got her to— humble and recognises the team that got her to where she is. as an army physio _ got her to where she is. as an army physio i _ got her to where she is. as an army physio i have — got her to where she is. as an army physio i have personally benefited from her~ — physio i have personally benefited from her. she patched me up and kept me going _ from her. she patched me up and kept me going in _ from her. she patched me up and kept me going in kenya. i was not surprised _ me going in kenya. i was not surprised when she said she had this idea _ surprised when she said she had this idea. ., ,., ., , surprised when she said she had this idea. ., ., , ., idea. how important is it for someone — idea. how important is it for someone from _ idea. how important is it for someone from her - idea. how important is it for i someone from her background idea. how important is it for - someone from her background to do a journey like this? i someone from her background to do a journey like this?— journey like this? i think preet really shows — journey like this? i think preet really shows the _ journey like this? i think preet really shows the character - journey like this? i think preet really shows the character of l journey like this? i think preet i really shows the character of the british— really shows the character of the british soldier. she has a goal, she is forward — british soldier. she has a goal, she is forward thinking and has a real drive _ is forward thinking and has a real drive and — is forward thinking and has a real drive and determination about her. the will— drive and determination about her. the will to— drive and determination about her. the will to succeed. she set herself, _ the will to succeed. she set herself, what a girl! she has achieved _ herself, what a girl! she has achieved it.— herself, what a girl! she has achieved it. ., ., ,, ., ., achieved it. what an inspiration! have had team _ achieved it. what an inspiration! have had team been _ achieved it. what an inspiration! have had team been cheering i achieved it. what an inspiration! | have had team been cheering her achieved it. what an inspiration! - have had team been cheering her on? we had been with her in spirit. we went— we had been with her in spirit. we went through the festive spirit. many— went through the festive spirit. many of— went through the festive spirit. many of the wider army and wider defence _ many of the wider army and wider defence were supporting the nhs and
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the national crisis. we were with her in _ the national crisis. we were with her in spirit _ the national crisis. we were with her in spirit but she was out there cracking _ her in spirit but she was out there cracking on— her in spirit but she was out there cracking on with determination. thank— cracking on with determination. thank you — cracking on with determination. thank you very much. louise me had been part of the journey, doing a lot of the admin back home for preet. she finished the journey over a week early. preet. she finished the “ourney over a week early.— a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised- _ a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised. i _ a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised. i had _ a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised. i had a _ a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised. i had a feeling - a week early. knowing preet i was not surprised. i had a feeling she| not surprised. i had a feeling she was going to try and push it out and she really did, i am so impressed. my she really did, i am so impressed. my work starts now. on the female engagement team we aim to get better connected, we want the army to get better connected with young women and girls across the uk and we do it by using people like preet. what preet is going to do for the next few weeks is going around the uk and deliver presentations in schools, colleges, youth groups, cadets and so on, telling them of her adventure and inspiring them to go and do
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something different and not be held back by what cultural norms suggest they might do. she back by what cultural norms suggest they might do— they might do. she is an inspiration. _ they might do. she is an inspiration. from - they might do. she is an inspiration. from an - they might do. she is an - inspiration. from an ordinary background. _ inspiration. from an ordinary background, she _ inspiration. from an ordinary background, she has- inspiration. from an ordinary background, she has done i background, she has done extraordinary things. she has steely grit and determination and has proven with the resilience and right support you can achieve anything you want. she does not want to just break the glass ceiling, she wants to smash it to smithereens, as she said. ,, , ., ., ., to smash it to smithereens, as she said. . , ., ., said. she is due to go to antarctica next. this said. she is due to go to antarctica next- this is _ said. she is due to go to antarctica next. this is her _ said. she is due to go to antarctica next. this is her plan, _ said. she is due to go to antarctica next. this is her plan, apparently. | next. this is her plan, apparently. she does hope _ next. this is her plan, apparently. she does hope to _ next. this is her plan, apparently. she does hope to be _ next. this is her plan, apparently. she does hope to be the - next. this is her plan, apparently. she does hope to be the first - next. this is her plan, apparently. i she does hope to be the first woman ever to cross coast—to—coast by the south pole alone but well supported. that means no ration resupply is at all. that is her aim, no woman has ever achieved it. by, all. that is her aim, no woman has ever achieved it.—
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ever achieved it. a very busy time for preet when _ ever achieved it. a very busy time for preet when she _ ever achieved it. a very busy time for preet when she learned - ever achieved it. a very busy time for preet when she learned here | ever achieved it. a very busy time | for preet when she learned here in just over an hour. thank you very much. we are going to be talking to azeeem rafiq later. —— azeem rafiq. this report concludes there is a deep—seated issue of racism in cricket and warns that public funding, so potentially government grants, and money from sport england could be witheld unless the england and wales cricket board showed real progress in its efforts to eradicate rascism in the sport. the committee which made the report, praised the courage of the former yorkshire player azeem rafeeq, who told of his own experiences of rascism during his time at yorkshire, to the digital, culture, media and sport select committee. that was back in november.
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the club have been widely criticised for their handling of rafiq's allegations but have since made a whole raft of sweeping changes. the ecb also welcomed the report, which warns racism is a problem throughout english cricket. this isn'tjust a matter of racism in yorkshire cricket, it's racism in english cricket. i think the ecb's own figures show that since they launched their information line, their whistle—blowing line, 4,000 complaints have been made. the number of stories that we have been told as a committee, and as committee members, often by whistle—blowers, we continue to be told by people everyday, indicates it's a much wider spread problem than just yorkshire. therefore, it needs a game wide approach. the report has been widely wrap welcomed, including by azeem rafiq. we will hear from him welcomed, including by azeem rafiq. we will hearfrom him later.
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it's the first day of the fifth and final ashes test — the first time austrlia and england have ever played a test in hobart, tasmania. and we've witnessed the rare sight of england actaully getting on top in this series. the ashes long gone, of course. england made five changes. one of those returning was ollie robinson — he got david warner for nought. usman khawaja made two centuries in the last test but this time he scored just 6 — falling to stuart broad. and then the big one — steve smith — a second catch for zak crawley off robinson for a duck. the aussies have recovered with marnus labuschagne going well. but he was bowled by broad. at the dinner break australia 85 for 1l arsenal managed to hold out for a goalless draw against liverpool last night, in their delayed league cup semi—final first leg at anfield. the first half went by without a shot on target
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and the gunners were down to ten men when granit xhaka was dismissed for his lunge on diogojota. but liverpool failed to take advantage with the best chance of the match falling to takumi minamino. the second leg is next thursday with the winners facing chelsea in the final. what a chance! almost in the six yard box. over the bar. how costly is that? all set, ready to go. the growing list of parties reported to have taken place in downing street during the pandemic mean boris johnson's future looks increasingly uncertain. there have been calls for him to resign. we're joined now by the snp's leader in westminster, ian blackford. this is accusations made in the daily telegraph newspaper that downing street staff held two leaving parties in downing street on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. ~ . , the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. ~ ., , , ., ., funeral. what is your reaction? i was 'ust
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funeral. what is your reaction? i wasjust staggered, _ funeral. what is your reaction? i wasjust staggered, charlie, - funeral. what is your reaction? i i wasjust staggered, charlie, when i saw the news last night. i know there have been multiple allegations of really what is improper behaviour taking place around 10 downing street over the course of the lockdown. i thinkjust the imagery of all of this, and i think everyone can remember the picture of the queen sitting alone at the duke of edinburgh's funeral. just the crass insensitivity of those around the prime minister, those in number 10, with parties and all the talks of these being brought in in suitcases. this culture is not acceptable. a booze culture in lockdown inside number 10. booze culture in lockdown inside number10. people booze culture in lockdown inside number 10. people could not grieve for loved ones, you could not hold funerals the way you would have wanted. he said he could not hold breaks. the fact that people were
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not with loved ones, they cannot comfort them, whether in hospital care homes. government quite frankly did not seem to care about what they were doing. the prime minister ought to have gone by now. had he had any self—respect and dignity, he would realise he had reached the trust of the public. anybody with any sense of the right thing to do would have recognised they had to go. i am just ashamed at what this means for leadership that parliament, government is supposed to show. i would say to the prime minister this morning, for goodness' sake, recognise you cannot carry on like this, you cannot lead the country through a pandemic, you are not worthy of the office of prime minister ship and you should go. i want to point out a couple of things. people will be wising up to the story, the new allegations. it is important to point out and this
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is important to point out and this is factual, the prime minister was not at downing street when the two latest parties took place. he not at downing street when the two latest parties took place.— latest parties took place. he was not there- _ latest parties took place. he was not there. no, _ latest parties took place. he was not there. no, he _ latest parties took place. he was not there. no, he was _ latest parties took place. he was not there. no, he was not i latest parties took place. he was not there. no, he was not there | latest parties took place. he was i not there. no, he was not there but he is the prime minister, he leads the government, he leads downing street. it is his senior staff that were partying at this event on the 16th of april. this full is on the allegations that were seen in the party that did take place in the previous year. i think it is a prime minister who has abused the office of government repeatedly over the course of the last two years, not just with this but everything else that has gone on, the prorogation of parliament, shutting down a parliament, the fact he has put his cronies into the house of lords. the fact we have had dodgy coronavirus contracts. courts have given their judgment on that this week as well. it is serious for our democracy. it
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has to be brought to an end. if he won't go, i need to say to conservative mps that they had to exercise the power that they have to remove this man. he cannot be left in office one day longer. let remove this man. he cannot be left in office one day longer.— remove this man. he cannot be left in office one day longer. let me put a thou . ht in office one day longer. let me put a thought to — in office one day longer. let me put a thought to you — in office one day longer. let me put a thought to you that _ in office one day longer. let me put a thought to you that some - in office one day longer. let me put a thought to you that some people | a thought to you that some people have. you are the leader of the sm pm borisjohnson is directly accountable for things that you say, even when he was not physically at downing street. can you categorically say there were no parties linked to the snp, for example, that maybe you don't yet know about? the example, that maybe you don't yet know about?— example, that maybe you don't yet know about? ,, �* ., know about? the snb government in edinbur: h know about? the snb government in edinburgh have _ know about? the snb government in edinburgh have shown _ know about? the snb government in edinburgh have shown outstanding i edinburgh have shown outstanding leadership. == edinburgh have shown outstanding leadershi -. ,, ., , ,, edinburgh have shown outstanding leadershi -. ,, . , ,, ., leadership. -- s np. i asked that auestion leadership. -- s np. i asked that question fairly _ leadership. -- s np. i asked that question fairly deliberately i leadership. -- s np. i asked that question fairly deliberately on i leadership. -- s np. i asked that. question fairly deliberately on that basis. the position of borisjohnson as he did not know about these events, he has apologised for the events, he has apologised for the
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events will stop it is important to have a side to the argument, otherwise wejust have a side to the argument, otherwise we just have a one—sided statement from you. the position of borisjohnson, on many occasions he simply did not know the events were taking place, it was his style. it is only reasonable for me to say, could you be so certain something happened he did not know about? the prime happened he did not know about? iie: prime minister happened he did not know about? tie: prime minister is in the dock. this man is a proven liar. last november, days before the daily mirror broke the story, i had a motion of censure against the prime minister before parliament because of the behaviour of the prime minister. he came to parliament on the 8th of december and lied about the parties. he has beenin and lied about the parties. he has been in contempt of parliament and in breach of the ministerial code. notjust one episode material parties. we know because the prime minister has admitted to being at the parties. it is the culture, the contempt by laughing at the public, the fact they have continued to
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party while people were making sacrifices. it is not good enough. he needs to pay the ultimate sacrifice way that he is not fit to lead at a time like this. i sacrifice way that he is not fit to lead at a time like this.- lead at a time like this. i 'ust come back i lead at a time like this. i 'ust come back to i lead at a time like this. i 'ust come back to my i lead at a time like this. ijust come back to my original i lead at a time like this. ijust come back to my original question, you panel know. i asked you whether you panel know. i asked you whether you know for sure that has not happened with snp members. the culture happened with snp members. tie: culture that we are seeing in 10 downing street and borisjohnson was not replicated in edinburgh and the scottish government. thank goodness we can trust the leadership. there is a point for people of scotland, do we want to be continue —— want to continue to be led by then? we should be having a referendum on scottish independence. we have seen tories in london, jacob rees—mogg, belittling the tory leader in scotland. the imagery is quite
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clear. here we do have the choice as to whether or not we want to have any further part in this. if we want to say enough is enough, we should be going our own way.— to say enough is enough, we should be going our own way. thank you for “oininu us. be going our own way. thank you for joining us. thank _ be going our own way. thank you for joining us. thank you _ be going our own way. thank you for joining us. thank you for _ be going our own way. thank you for joining us. thank you for your i be going our own way. thank you for joining us. thank you for your time. | in 2014, a devastating storm struck the south devon coast, destroying a stretch of railway and cutting cornwall and most of devon off from the rest of the country for several weeks. you might remember these astonishing pictures of the tracks in dawlish, dangling in mid air after the sea wall was hit by 80 mile per hour winds and washed away. i remember seeing these pictures. they do not fail to amaze me. in 2019, work started on construction of a new sea wall to protect the railway and the local community. our reporterjohn maguire is there this morning. john, morning to you. this work is so crucial. seeing the pictures again brings backjust how it
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actually could have been so much worse, couldn't it? if there were a train on the lines it could have been a tragedy beyond imagination. yes, of course. absolutely. 2014, there is storm pictures. incredible to see the line suspended in midair. it always reminds me of a roller—coaster. normally pretty safe but that was in a very perilous state. the waves crashed into the seawall. anyone who has taken the slide, built by brunel180 years ago. that is not an original bridge but that is the mainline running over our heads. it goes from penzance to cornwall. a glut of corbel during the storms. work took place to reopen the line initially and now to build a plan to future proof it over the next 100 years or so. here is an idea of one other
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thing is they are doing. they are diverging a river, dawlish water, which runs through the centre of the town. as you can see, they have excavated a new channel and they will run the water out. one way they are protecting their line, the station and the town of dawlish from the ravages of the sea. coastal erosion a major problem around the uk coastline, for people, properties and businesses who are fighting against what he wants to do to make sure they can live their lives the way they want. a hairline crack appeared, and then throughout the day, itjust kept opening up and just kept opening up and the cracks just got — kept getting bigger and bigger. you were standing onjust, like, moving land when we were trying to move the fences because the fences were there and the crack was appearing and we were open at the time. didn't quite know what to do. and people were coming in.
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we couldn't afford to close, so we were just ferociously trying to fence it off as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to anyone. for the past 18 years, cara strom has woken up every morning wondering whether her home and her business, the blue anchor pub, would still be standing. at high tide, you could feel the waves inside, so you could feel not... the building wouldn't shake, but you would definitely be able to feel when it was hitting. recently installed, huge boulders, rock armour, as it's known, should reduce the wave power and prevent the cliffs on this stretch of the west somerset coastline from collapsing. i've said they'll fish me out of the bristol channel if they have to. i'm not giving up, and i'm really glad that i didn't give up. i never thought of giving up. not once. obviously, there are days, aren't there, when you think i'm just not getting anywhere, nothing's ever going to be done. i'm going to fall in and see. i'm going to have nothing. but i've neverthought, "oh, you know, it's not worth... it's not worth carrying on." luckily. winter's the most anxious time for those at risk from coastal erosion. here at sandy bay in east devon, a huge section of land fell away last week
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with holiday caravans just metres away. but land slips can occur all year round. last spring, what was said to be the biggest in 60 years saw a major collapse on dorset�*s jurassic coastline. our foreshores are constantly changing to understand what forces to understand what forces are at play in reshaping them, researchers from the university of plymouth studied the cliffs, dunes and sands at perranporth on the north cornwall coast. this is ourfavourite beach. we've come here already for 15 years and we survey the whole beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and a severe winter storm can shift up to one million cubic metres of sand out to sea before summer tides bring it back again. the beach isn'tjust popular with visitors, but it's essential to protect the town. the amount of sand that's on the beach determines how easily the town gets flooded.
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so if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you're lowering the beach surface, if you then get a storm, the town is more likely to flood because people don't really realise that beaches and dunes are naturalforms of coastal defence. and the wider the beaches and the higher the beaches, the better protection the beach provides against flooding. and built on these shifting sands is the watering hole pub. the owners here are channelling king canute and holding back natural forces. the way this has been built and the raft it's on is pretty full on. it's how much money do you want to spend on it and how much is it worth to us to do that? and i think for us, yeah, it's a very valuable, valuable thing as it's our livelihoods and it's with the, you know, it's a 42—year—old family business. so it's... so yeah, it means quite a lot for us to to maintain it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are a balance between risk to people or property and cost. man vs sea is an expensive business
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and often, despite design, engineering and deep pockets, it's the sea that wins the power struggle. let's introduce you to the project manager at dawlish in the station involved with the power struggle with the sea. we are talking about future proofing it for 100 years, how will you do that?— how will you do that? there are vafious how will you do that? there are various ways — how will you do that? there are various ways to _ how will you do that? there are various ways to do _ how will you do that? there are various ways to do it. _ how will you do that? there are various ways to do it. we i how will you do that? there are various ways to do it. we do i how will you do that? there are various ways to do it. we do a i how will you do that? there are i various ways to do it. we do a lot of ground — various ways to do it. we do a lot of ground investigation works. what we do _ of ground investigation works. what we do is _ of ground investigation works. what we do is determine what pro profile the existing levels. it is a sea watt— the existing levels. it is a sea wait with _ the existing levels. it is a sea wall with a unit on top of it. the idea _ wall with a unit on top of it. the idea so— wall with a unit on top of it. the idea so we — wall with a unit on top of it. the idea so we can get an understanding of how— idea so we can get an understanding of how the _ idea so we can get an understanding of how the rock will erode over the years _ of how the rock will erode over the years on— of how the rock will erode over the years on the — of how the rock will erode over the years on the beach. we instill protection in front of our structure to protect — protection in front of our structure to protect it. as the rock profile erodes. —
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to protect it. as the rock profile erodes. it — to protect it. as the rock profile erodes, it is still protected. you allow for coastal _ erodes, it is still protected. gm. allow for coastal erosion which will properly increase with climate change over the years to come. mast change over the years to come. most definitel . change over the years to come. most definitely. there _ change over the years to come. most definitely. there are _ change over the years to come. most definitely. there are other things we can— definitely. there are other things we can do— definitely. there are other things we can do in the future. coastal erosion — we can do in the future. coastal erosion wilt _ we can do in the future. coastal erosion will speed up through climate — erosion will speed up through climate change. we can install more protection _ climate change. we can install more protection at a later date if required. protection at a later date if required-— protection at a later date if reuuired. ., ., ~ , ., required. you have untilaugust to comlete required. you have untilaugust to complete vessels _ required. you have untilaugust to complete vessels that _ required. you have untilaugust to complete vessels that there i required. you have untilaugust to complete vessels that there will i required. you have until august to | complete vessels that there will be a footbridge over it. the complete vessels that there will be a footbridge over it.— a footbridge over it. the plan is to connect a new _ a footbridge over it. the plan is to connect a new footbridge - a footbridge over it. the plan is to connect a new footbridge over i a footbridge over it. the plan is to connect a new footbridge over it. | connect a new footbridge over it. there _ connect a new footbridge over it. there is— connect a new footbridge over it. there is a — connect a new footbridge over it. there is a lot of work to do with the station _ there is a lot of work to do with the station platforms as well. the new footbridge over there. the new channel— new footbridge over there. the new channel dawlish water runs behind us which _ channel dawlish water runs behind us which we _ channel dawlish water runs behind us which we discussed earlier. thank ou ve which we discussed earlier. thank you very much- — which we discussed earlier. thank you very much. i'd _ which we discussed earlier. thank you very much. i'd better - which we discussed earlier. thank you very much. i'd better let i which we discussed earlier. thank you very much. i'd better let you | you very much. i'd better let you get back to work. 13 different types of concrete they are using here on the project, including concrete that sets underwater they can pump into
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the sea, concrete that is resistant to salt. gives an idea of the type of ingenuity that is needed to be employed in this job to try to push back the sea. employed in this “ob to try to push back the sea.— employed in this “ob to try to push hack the sea.— back the sea. back to you. really interesting _ back the sea. back to you. really interesting seeing _ back the sea. back to you. really interesting seeing what - back the sea. back to you. really interesting seeing what is i back the sea. back to you. really interesting seeing what is going i back the sea. back to you. really i interesting seeing what is going on when the construction work. john maguire. a suggestion there may be developments with novak djokovic's status, looking ahead to the australian open which starts on monday. we will bring you will the details on that in just a moment. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. well, as we've been hearing, there's mounting pressure on borisjohnson to resign over allegations of downing street parties. and the tory chair of the london assembly, andrew boff, has told bbc radio london that the issue threatened to damage the conservatives' prospects of winning borough seats
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in may's local elections. when asked if the prime minister should go, he said he thought that was a "strong option." cabinet ministers, though, have rallied around the prime minister. the northern line will partially close for 17 weeks from tomorrow for upgrade works. the line between kennington and moorgate will be closed until mid—may meaning there will be no northern line service from elephant and castle, bank, borough, and london bridge stations. staying with transport, this is how tfl services are looking right now. a good service on all tube lines right now. next, imagine the task of trying to count sealife! well, that's what staff at the london aquarium do every
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january for its annual stock—take. in wetsuits. and they count the nearly 6,000 creatures and marine species at the attraction, including the tiny tropical milk frog and boris the green sea turtle. it's also an opportunity for a spring clean too. part of our scheduled maintenance is cleaning the substrate in the bottom of the tank, cleaning the windows so members of the public can see all our lovely animals and also scrubbing the rockwork. it gets a bit dirty in there, so it's good to keep on top of it and keep it nice and clean. on to the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start again this morning with temperatures hovering around zero. bit of frost where they have dipped just below. high pressure is in charge, the wind is light. a few mist and fog patches out there as well. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for the dense fog in parts of west and north—west london, parts of surrey. anywhere really could see a fog patch. if you've got it, it could just linger through the morning. elsewhere, we've got sunshine.
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it will eventually lift and we will see some blue skies. a brighter afternoon. the wind stays light and the temperature's somewhere between 6—8 celsius. overnight it will be a chilly start to the night. the minimum temperature dropping down below zero. cloud moving in from the east and with that again some dense patches of mist and fog potentially by saturday morning. the minimum down to —2. a murky start to saturday. more cloud around across the weekend. the high pressure gradually starts to slide away towards the east and allows fronts to come in from the west. there is a chance of a shower on sunday morning but not widespread, however. as i said, quite a bit of cloud but the temperature milder, not only during the daytime but temperatures overnight should stay above zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today — new allegations as downing street staff are accused of holding more rule—breaking parties on the eve of prince philip's funeral. one of borisjohnson's key backbench allies now says publicly he has no confidence in the prime minister. as prince andrew loses his military titles, the woman accusing him of sexual assault says she wants to show the rich and powerful are not above the law. and breaking news this morning —
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australia cancels tennis star novak djokovic's visa just days ahead of the start of the austrailian open. cricket must tackle racism, or risk losing public funding. that's one of the main recommendations from a parliamentary report into the crisis in the sport, after the powerful testimony from former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. we will be speaking to him after 7.00. and i'll tell you about the weather. good morning. it's friday 14th january. our main story — staff at downing street have been accused of holding two leaving parties inside number ten on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral last april. restrictions in england at the time banned indoor mixing between different households. it comes as the prime minister
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continues to face calls for his resignation from his own mps, and at least one letter of no confidence has already been submitted. our political correspondent ione wells reports. a stark image of the queen sat alone to mourn her husband, prince philip, at his funeral on 17th april last year. at the time, indoor mixing between different households was banned, but downing street staff have been accused of holding two leaving parties the evening before, one of which was for the director of communications at the time, james slack, now a deputy editor at the sun newspaper. today, the telegraph is reporting that around 30 people were present, drinking alcohol and dancing to music. a statement from downing street says... borisjohnson didn't attend either gathering, but the revelations have led to fresh criticism.
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labour's deputy leader angela rayner says... pressure is building too from the prime minister's own tory backbenchers. conservative mp andrew bridgen, who backed borisjohnson for leader, has become the latest tory mp to publicly say he submitted a letter of no confidence in the prime minister, calling his position untenable. he's the leader of our country and part of the key elements of leadership is that you don't ask people you're asking to follow you to make sacrifices and suffer privations that you're not willing to bear yourself. and clearly, that has not been the case. that then leaves the prime minister morally incapable of having the authority to lead the country. cabinet ministers, meanwhile, have been urging people to wait for the findings of civil servant sue gray's inquiry into multiple parties in government
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during coronavirus restrictions. the met police says it will also wait for the result of this before deciding whether to investigate if the inquiry unearths any potential criminal offences. ione wells, bbc news. the australian government has cancelled novak djokovic's visa for a second time, saying he may pose a risk to the community. let's get the latest with our australian correspondent shaima khalil. this has just this hasjust come this has just come out in the last couple of minutes, tell us what has been said. igate couple of minutes, tell us what has been said. ~ . , ., ., been said. we have been waiting for da s to been said. we have been waiting for days to government _ been said. we have been waiting for days to government to _ been said. we have been waiting for days to government to make i been said. we have been waiting for days to government to make a i days to government to make a decision about nowak djokovic, and right now we know that they have. the views of the world number one has been cancelled again, and he faces deportation from australia, just a few days before the australian open, the event that you wanted to defend his title in. we
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know that a legal challenge is known as the option, we know legal team will try to ask for a review of the government's decision, but today we have had from the immigration minister in a statement, he said i have exercise my power and decided to cancel nowak djokovic's visa. presumably they will be questioned as to what the reasoning is given the questions of what forms he had filled in, where he had been, what reason has been given? because they are presumably required to say why. absolutely, and i'm just looking at the statement now, there are a couple of bits there that i can read you. it said, in making this decision are carefully considered information provided to me by the department of home affairs, the australian border force, and mr djokovic himself. and he said the decision or followed orders
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djokovic himself. and he said the decision orfollowed orders by djokovic himself. and he said the decision or followed orders by the court, crossing a prior cancellation decision, and so it is based... i have decided to cancel the visa held by mr nowak djokovic on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so. but you are right, this is the argument, if you will, that the immigration minister presents. but what information did he base that decision on? we know that in the last few days, nowak djokovic has come out and said he has provided wrong information on his travel declaration form, we know he has admitted, too, to being covid positive, knowing that, and doing an interview. there are discrepancies on exactly when he knew he was covid positive, and of course there's the bigger question, is his exemption valid? is a prior covid—19 infection a valid reason for an exemption? and whether or not this was the basis of his decision or other reasons, that
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is going to become clear when it goes to court inevitably, because this is what is legal team is going to try and do, because he is still adamant about defending his title. but right now, we know that the government has decided to cancel his visa again, to use its executive powers and cancel nowak djokovic's visa. i powers and cancel nowak d'okovic's visa. ~ ., , , visa. i know you're 'ust catching up on information i visa. i know you're 'ust catching up on information as i visa. i know you're just catching up on information as it _ visa. i know you're just catching up on information as it comes - visa. i know you're just catching up| on information as it comes through. i am thinking back through the story, you will remember very well when the prime minister scott morrison made that a point of principle, he said rules are rules earlier in the process, rules are rules, and when it comes to our borders, nobody is above the rules. it's melbourne, i think i lost audio. i it's melbourne, i think i lost audio. ., it's melbourne, i think i lost audio. ~' ., , it's melbourne, i think i lost audio. ~' . , audio. i think we have 'ust lost contact, audio. i think we have 'ust lost contact we * audio. i think we have 'ust lost contact, we will i audio. i think we have 'ust lost contact, we will come i audio. i think we havejust lost contact, we will come back- audio. i think we havejust lost contact, we will come back in i audio. i think we havejust lost| contact, we will come back in a couple of minutes. the world number one, just to bring you right up to date, this is come up in the last
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few minutes, he had been granted a visa, he had won the right to stay in australia, this morning, that decision has been overturned. igate decision has been overturned. we will decision has been overturned. - will keep you up—to—date throughout the morning of that story develops. the duke of york, will fight allegations of sexual assault as a private citizen after it was announced his military titles and royal patronages would be handed back to the queen. ajudge in new york has allowed virginia giuffre to pursue her civil case against prince andrew. in a tweet last night, ms giuffre said her goal is to show that the rich and powerful are "not above the law." the duke strongly denies the accusation. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is outside windsor castle this morning. sarah, it doesn't look like ms giuffre is going to be happy with a quiet out—of—court settlement. she has also said she is notjust about a money settlement, she is out to prove thatjust because you are
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powerful that certain things can be let go. powerful that certain things can be let to, , ., ., powerful that certain things can be let to, ., powerful that certain things can be let to. ., ., , ., let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of _ let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of the _ let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of the last _ let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of the last 24 _ let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of the last 24 hours i let go. good morning. lots of the relevance of the last 24 hours in i relevance of the last 24 hours in this study. let's go straight to that tweet from virginia giuffre, as you say this is prince andrew's accuser, the first time she has made any comment since that ruling on wednesday. she said on twitter... prince andrew has vehemently and consistently denied her claims, and sources close to him yesterday said that he had been surprised that the judge had ruled against the attempts to get the case dismissed, but the case was a marathon, not a sprint,
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and the duke will continue to defend himself. of course, things have somewhat changed since yesterday, when buckingham palace issued that statement, saying that he will no longer be able to style himself and his royal highness, he will no longer undertake public duties, and all has military affiliations and royal patron edges have been taken back and will be redistributed among the family. so while the civil case goes forward, the royal family have very much distance themselves from him, and we know that he will continue to fight this case is a private citizen.— continue to fight this case is a private citizen. continue to fight this case is a trivate citizen. ., ., ~ , ., j. private citizen. sarah, thank you so much. private citizen. sarah, thank you so much- sarah _ private citizen. sarah, thank you so much. sarah campbell— private citizen. sarah, thank you so much. sarah campbell there i private citizen. sarah, thank you so much. sarah campbell there for. private citizen. sarah, thank you so much. sarah campbell there for us| private citizen. sarah, thank you so i much. sarah campbell there for us at windsor. the welsh government is set to ease covid restrictions after a fall in case numbers. the first minister is expected to set out the two—week plan to ease measures that came into place on boxing day, which included the closure of nightclubs and a ban on fans at stadiums. reporter mark hutchings is in cardiff for us. mark, what restrictions
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are we expecting to be lifted? as all governments are, they are adapting to the new figures. igate as all governments are, they are adapting to the new figures. we are headint adapting to the new figures. we are heading back _ adapting to the new figures. we are heading back to _ adapting to the new figures. we are heading back to what _ adapting to the new figures. we are heading back to what is _ adapting to the new figures. we are heading back to what is called i adapting to the new figures. we are heading back to what is called alert| heading back to what is called alert level zero, the current restrictions arrived just as we were finishing our leftover scraps on boxing day. they are going rather earlier than many feared, and certainly earlier than the first minister himself forecast just a week ago, than the first minister himself forecastjust a week ago, when he said that wales was in the middle of a storm of omicron. as you say, the figures have been going down. the belief now if that the peak has already passed, so we will see this two—week programme of restrictions, the lifting of the cap of 50 people at organised outdoor events. that could kick in as early as tomorrow, so they could be a bit of scrabbling around for volunteers if they get the go—ahead. the return of crowds
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to stadiums, significantly in times for the wales v scotland six nations game next month. and of the figures continue to tumble, the end of the rule of six hospitality, hit so badly of course, and the reopening of nightclubs. most conservatives say this was proof that it was all an overreaction by the welsh government, the government say they have simply been acting to keep wales safe. whether you agree with either or neither, the gloom of this metaphorically is to lift.— metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much- — metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much- -- _ metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much. -- the _ metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much. -- the gloom - metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much. -- the gloom at- metaphorically is to lift. thank you very much. -- the gloom at least i very much. -- the gloom at least metaphorically. _ here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. i know why i would rather be, being someone who definitely prefers it warmer. —— where i would rather be. inverness and aberdeen for you this morning, naga. good morning, whata contrast we have across the uk at
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the moment. blue colours shown in widespread frost across central and southern parts of england, as well as wheels, and here we also have some dense fog patches around to get your morning commute under way. particularly through the severn valley up towards the midlands. stagnant air across the south—east, pollution levels very high today and they want an area, something to bear in mind. eastern side of the pennines dry and sunny, side grey and cloudy. some outbreaks of rain in the north of scotland in this morning, fairly light splashes of rain and drizzle. fife with some sunny spells throughout the day. while some of the cloud will shrink away across south—west scotland, north—west england and northern ireland, storm cloud in these areas. most of the fog gone for the bulk of england. like we had yesterday. but staying fairly cool, special before going as longest, temperatures still 11 celsius and in the north of scotland. a cold night tonight. and in particular, clear skies around, and a shift in wind direction. could be a bit of frosty and there. we
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frost not as sharp and doesn't wales and tomorrow morning. mist and low cloud to start and we could. a great start to be weakened from some of you, but another predominately dry day, though. through saturday night, rain for scotland and northern ireland, which will bring the odd shout england and wales on sunday. but overall, naga and charlie, staying largely dry. thanks, matt, see you later on. the time now is 7.14. you may remember last year's deeply personal and emotional testimony from former cricketer, azeem rafiq, about the racism he faced whilst playing for yorkshire. now a report from the parliamentary committee listening to that evidence has concluded his experience is "typical of an endemic problem" across the whole of the sport, and urged it to "clean up its act." laura scott reports. eradicating racism from cricket will be a long and difficult road.
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that is the conclusion of mps after they had powerful evidence from across the game, which convinced them that discrimination is endemic. despite acknowledging there are grounds for optimism, they issued the starkest of warnings to the england and wales cricket board, if this watershed moment does not bring significant improvements. i would like to see public money withheld from cricket if the measures the ecb come up with in terms of trying to ensure that racism, the scourge of racism, is removed from the game. if they fail to meet those targets, then there should be a stopping of public money to the game, very simple. the committee praised the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq for his courage in lifting the lid on problems within cricket. and a crisis engulfing the sport. rafiq commended what he called the sensible action of the committee, saying it shows just how seriously politicians are taking an issue that too many people ignored for so long. the committee understands how important it is to clean up the game, he said. meanwhile, the new chairman
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of yorkshire says the clean—up job at the county has begun in earnest. i have literally taken the club and turned it upside down, given it a good shake, looking at processes, procedures, leadership, engaging with people, our pathways, no stone left unturned, actually. but the committee will continue to keep a close eye on cricket, with the ecb required to produce quarterly reports on their progress. another evidence session will be held in the early part of this year. in a statement, the ecb said it welcomed the recommendations in the report, and agreed that sharing regular public updates on our progress is important to rebuilding trust in our sport. as cricket continues to address its uncomfortable past, the scrutiny on its attempts to create a more inclusive future has never been more intense. laura scott, bbc news. we're joined now by azeem rafiq.
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thank you very much for talking to me on breakfast this morning. how are you? it was so emotional when you are giving that testimony, i will get your reaction to that in a moment, but you said you were to take some time to spend with family, and reset, how are you? good morning. _ and reset, how are you? good morning, thanks _ and reset, how are you? good morning, thanks for _ and reset, how are you? good morning, thanks for having i and reset, how are you? good i morning, thanks for having me. i thought i would get some time to reset and get some time with my family, but it has been challenging. i think it has shown why a lot of people do not come forward with their experiences, i expected all that, but, yeah, really it has been a whirlwind couple of months. but i think we are moving forward, which is the most positive thing. ok. movint is the most positive thing. ok. moving forward, _ is the most positive thing. 0k. moving forward, how has that report, this report, helped you in that? i am impressed by how seriously politicians are taking it, i want to thank them for the session on that day as well. the fact they will call the ecb to account every quarter i think is impressive, because we have
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had these documents in the past and nothing has actually happened. , so i think it is important to have some sort of check and balance throughout. shes sort of check and balance throughout.— sort of check and balance throuthout. ~ , y., sort of check and balance throuthout. . , ,. ., throughout. as you say, there have been reports _ throughout. as you say, there have been reports like _ throughout. as you say, there have been reports like this _ throughout. as you say, there have been reports like this before, i throughout. as you say, there have been reports like this before, what| been reports like this before, what are the exact checks and balances that make you think that this will help to eliminate the scourge of racism from cricket? i help to eliminate the scourge of racism from cricket?— help to eliminate the scourge of racism from cricket? i am not sure if it will at — racism from cricket? i am not sure if it will at this — racism from cricket? i am not sure if it will at this stage, _ racism from cricket? i am not sure if it will at this stage, the - racism from cricket? i am not sure if it will at this stage, the ecb i if it will at this stage, the ecb has delivered quite a quick action plan, but we need to see actions, and it is important that we hold them to account throughout. i think them to account throughout. i think the ecb and the county needs to be held to account as the report recommendation said, when they are hitting the pocket, it is something that they stand up and do something about, so hopefully the county game at the ecb are going to take more notice and do something about this big problem that we've got. xffeah. big problem that we've got. yeah, the re tort big problem that we've got. yeah, the report says — big problem that we've got. yeah, the report says that _ big problem that we've got. yeah, the report says that first _ big problem that we've got. yeah, the report says that first from i big problem that we've got. yeah, the report says that first from any | the report says that first from any future public funds to cricket
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should be dependent on the constant demonstrable process of getting rid of this is a member of the dressing rooms and on the stands. and particularly interested, the stands, it is easy to see, but in the dressing rooms, you are one of the first to come out and talk about it, and it took you years. do you think your fellow players are comfortable now, and the procedures are in place for them to come out and talk about it, and feel free to come and know that they will be listened to this time? �* ., , ., , time? i'm not sure, really, there is, time? i'm not sure, really, there is. because _ time? i'm not sure, really, there is. because as — time? i'm not sure, really, there is, because as we _ time? i'm not sure, really, there is, because as we saw _ time? i'm not sure, really, there is, because as we saw what i time? i'm not sure, really, there is, because as we saw what went time? i'm not sure, really, there i is, because as we saw what went on in the report has talked about the smear and discredit that went on around after my committee evidence. so i am not sure people will be more comfortable, and that is something the game needs to have a look at. there needs to be some safe place that the players do feel they can come forward, and they will be listened to and not sort of attack to the way i have been, which is a bit of a shame, because as we understand it, thousands of people on the city commission, but there
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seems to be a lot of reluctance to give formal evidence now from the reaction that has taken place against me. reaction that has taken place against me— reaction that has taken place atainst me. . y., ., ,, , against me. have you addressed us with anyone? _ against me. have you addressed us with anyone? the _ against me. have you addressed us with anyone? the world _ against me. have you addressed us with anyone? the world of- against me. have you addressed us with anyone? the world of cricket i with anyone? the world of cricket says it is talking to you, and it will use you to help guide improvements within the game. have you put this forward to anyone's said, this is still a problem, and what has someone said? i said, this is still a problem, and what has someone said?- said, this is still a problem, and what has someone said? i have had contact with — what has someone said? i have had contact with lord _ what has someone said? i have had contact with lord patel, _ what has someone said? i have had contact with lord patel, many i contact with lord patel, many straight forward contact, i said to him at the club tries to do the right thing, i will support it. but from an ecb point of view and the game more widely, i am not sure still i have seen anything substantial. it feels like at the minute, the ashes performance is being looked at a lot more important within the racism in the game. hagar within the racism in the game. how do ou within the racism in the game. how do you feel — within the racism in the game. how do you feel about _ within the racism in the game. how do you feel about yorkshire at the moment? it seems to be getting the bulk of criticism, i do not know if you would agree with that. perhaps
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the away from other clubs which also haveissues the away from other clubs which also have issues when it comes to racism. i wrote a column earlier in the week where i talked about this, there seems to be attempts to throw the book at yorkshire from the ecb and the counties. there are over 4000 on the counties. there are over 4000 on the ecb, only 50 in yorkshire, which means there's more racism elsewhere, at least yorkshire is trying to do the right thing and move on the right direction. the other counties, as i see it, seem to be pretending that everything is fine in their garden, but i can assure you this is a problem throughout the game that needs to be looked at a lot more seriously moving forward. it is interesting. — seriously moving forward. it is interesting, isn't _ seriously moving forward. it is interesting, isn't it, _ seriously moving forward. it is interesting, isn't it, when you look at people who make mistakes? you yourself have made mistakes, you have been holed up for anti—semitic comments in the past, you have been allowed to move on, i think it is fair to say that. when do those who make these mistakes get the chance to move on and contribute to the game they love?— to move on and contribute to the game they love? that is one thing i am incredibly _ game they love? that is one thing i am incredibly sorry _ game they love? that is one thing i
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am incredibly sorry about, - game they love? that is one thing i am incredibly sorry about, and i am incredibly sorry about, and something that has me most, because it is not something that i believe, and i have tried to do as much as i possibly can to educate myself and make sure that i help other people not make the same mistakes. from my point of view, anyone who accepts and apologises, they should be given and apologises, they should be given a chance to move on, and that has been my stance from day one, and i hope that will continue to happen. oh, thank you so much for your time with us this morning, good to talk to you. with us this morning, good to talk to ou. . .. with us this morning, good to talk to ou. ., ,, ,., with us this morning, good to talk to you-_ the _ with us this morning, good to talk to you._ the time i with us this morning, good to talk to you._ the time is i with us this morning, good to talk i to you._ the time is 7.22. to you. thank you. the time is 7.22. nowak djokovic, _ to you. thank you. the time is 7.22. nowak djokovic, you _ to you. thank you. the time is 7.22. nowak djokovic, you will _ to you. thank you. the time is 7.22. nowak djokovic, you will be - to you. thank you. the time is 7.22. nowak djokovic, you will be familiar| nowak djokovic, you will be familiar with what has been going on in australia, he had been given permission to stay in the country. this morning, as are about 12 minutes ago, we had a statement from australia's immigration minister. probably easiest if ijust read this out for you. it said, today, i
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exercise my power under the migration act to cancel the views are held by mr nowak djokovic on health and good order granted —— cancel the visa, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so. this of course follows a prior cancellation decision which was overturned on procedure, how authorities have gone about detaining nowak djokovic before, and that decision then was overturned to revoke his visa. the statement continued, in making this decision, carefully considered information provided to me by the department of home affairs, the australian border force, and mr djokovic. and then referred to the government, the morrison government is firmly committed to protecting australia's borders, particularly in relation to
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the cover 19 pandemic. we will get analysis on this, but a lot of that referring back to recent behaviour by nowak djokovic, who did contract covid, and his behaviour and contact with people and also has a certain travel claims a ceramic whether or not he travelled and whether or not that was declared as well. we will be live in australia for reaction to that. it is worth remembering what he said as nowak djokovic headed to australia, this was just at the beginning ofjanuary, said, i think you tweeted this, i am heading down under with an exemption permission. that is what he was given at the time. but now we know that visa has been rescinded, and he will be kicked out of the country. more on that coming up of course throughout the programme this morning. the australian open starts on monday. the time now is 7.24. the chinese embassy has denied claims by m15 that it's identified an agent attempting to influence parliament. the security service says
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christine lee tried to establish links with mps on behalf of her country's ruling communist party. tim muffett reports. she is a lawyer with extensive contacts in westminster. christine lee is now the subject of a highly unusual warning from m15, one the chinese embassy in london claims is a smear against the chinese community in the uk. the uk security service says christine lee has been working secretly on behalf of the chinese state, in order to covertly interfere in uk politics through establishing links with established and aspiring parliamentarians. our intelligence and security agencies have been working together to really spot and identify this type of activity, activity that could potentially do harm to our country and harm to our democracy. there was no sign of christine lee at her london office yesterday,
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but last night, a spokesperson for the chinese embassy in london issued a statement. it said... labour mp barry gardiner received more than £500,000 from christine lee over five years. he said he had been liaising with security services for a number of years, and that they had known about donations to fund researchers in his office. he added that steps were taken to ensure christine lee had no role in either the appointment or management of those researchers. all the donations were properly reported at the time. barry gardiner says he stopped receiving funding for researchers in 2020, although christine lee's son was working in his office
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until he resigned yesterday. this is really serious. we don't play this down, i am not running scare stories, i am genuinely concerned and shocked that this has been allowed to happen, and we need to understand why and to do something about it, but we also have to recognise that the chinese government poses a clear and present danger to us, and stop messing around. within british intelligence, there has been concern about growing chinese influence in recent years. it's now clear those fears go to the heart of westminster. tim muffett, bbc news. joining us is former m15 officer annie machon. help people with this one, because on the one hand, because the fact that christine lee has done nothing illegal. m15 have taken quite externally step of naming her
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publicly. in effectively seeing she is a risk to people, they should be aware of what she is doing, why have they done that? what is the evidence around this? i they done that? what is the evidence around this?— around this? i think there's been a build u- around this? i think there's been a build up over— around this? i think there's been a build up over the _ around this? i think there's been a build up over the last _ around this? i think there's been a build up over the last couple i around this? i think there's been a build up over the last couple of i build up over the last couple of years of both politicians and also intelligence briefings about the growing threat of chinese influence across british life. not only in parliament, with this case, but also within academia and also british corporations. mainly in terms of sort of corporate spying tape issues. but i think in this case, it issues. but i think in this case, it is more clear—cut. it looks like she was paying cash for access and for influence. but so many other countries do the same thing. russia certainly has been accused of this many times over recent years, by the knitting huge amounts of money to the tory party. american corporations do the same thing, israeli lobby groups to the same thing, so, no, i don't think she has done anything illegal, but what is interesting is that m15 has named
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her. so perhaps there is more behind the scenes going on here. yes. her. so perhaps there is more behind the scenes going on here.— the scenes going on here. yes, given what ou the scenes going on here. yes, given what you said — the scenes going on here. yes, given what you said just _ the scenes going on here. yes, given what you said just then, _ the scenes going on here. yes, given what you said just then, that - what you said just then, that was going to be my next question. why, in this instance, take this step? i think at the moment, there is a sort of geopolitical ramping up between the west and china and russia, the new source of power axis in the east. so they are trying to smear those two countries as much as they can with any sort of adverse news. but i think this does highlight for the british, that one, there needs to be improved vetting in parliament and anyone who works there, we have seen russian researchers having affairs with british mps and things ten years ago, and also there needs to be a tightening up of the rules, of who is paying money to whom, and how is it being used, and what of the mps who are receiving these donations doing on the part of the donations doing on the part of the donation company or the donating country? so i think those of the two things that needs to be looked at. it doesn't sound like some dsp
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espionage threat, it does seem like just a case of paying for influence. annie machon, thank you very much for your time this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. well, as we've been hearing, there's mounting pressure on borisjohnson to resign over allegations of downing street parties. and the tory chair of the london assembly, andrew boff, has told bbc radio london that the issue threatened to damage the conservatives' prospects of winning borough seats in may's local elections. when asked if the prime minister should go, he said he thought that was a "strong option." cabinet ministers though have rallied around the prime minister. the northern line will partially close for 17 weeks from tomorrow for upgrade works. the line between kennington
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and moorgate will be closed until mid—may, meaning there will be no northern line service from elephant and castle, bank, borough, and london bridge stations. staying with transport, this is how tfl services are looking right now. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. next, imagine the task of trying to count sealife! well, that's what staff at the london aquarium do every january for its annual stock—take. in wetsuits and armed with a calculator, they count the nearly 6,000 creatures and marine species at the attraction, including the tiny tropical milk frog and boris the green sea turtle. it's also an opportunity for a spring clean too.
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part of our scheduled maintenance is cleaning the substrate in the bottom of the tank, cleaning the windows so members of the public can see all our lovely animals and also scrubbing the rockwork. it gets a bit dirty in there, so it's good to keep on top of it and keep it nice and clean. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start again this morning with temperatures hovering around zero. bit of frost where they have dipped just below. high pressure is in charge, the wind is light. a few mist and fog patches out there as well. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for the dense fog in parts of west and north—west london, parts of surrey. anywhere really could see a fog patch. if you've got it, it could just linger through the morning. elsewhere, we've got sunshine. it will eventually lift and we will see some blue skies. a brighter afternoon. the wind stays light and the temperature's somewhere between 6—8 celsius. overnight it will be a chilly start to the night. the minimum temperature dropping down below zero. cloud moving in from the east and with that again some dense patches of mist and fog potentially by saturday morning.
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the minimum down to minus 2. a murky start to saturday. more cloud around across the weekend. the high pressure gradually starts to slide away towards the east and allows fronts to come in from the west. there is a chance of a shower on sunday morning but not widespread, however. as i said, quite a bit of cloud but the temperature milder, not only during the daytime but temperatures overnight should stay above zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. staff at downing street have been accused of holding two parties the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral in april. restrictions in england at the time banned indoor mixing between different households, and meant the queen had to sit alone during the service.
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mps are calling for borisjohnson to resign — including conservative andrew bridgen who has submitted a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. we are getting news the former communications director who was reportedly giving a leaving speech on date he has said he wants to apologise unreservedly for the anger and hurt caused by a party held to mark his leaving do at downing street months. he said it should not have happened at the time it did. when you think about all the references to whether or not a gathering at a party or not, he has used the word party. we are going to be talking to damien heinz, the security minister in about two
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minutes. we have got him. thank you for joining us here this morning. the news has come through. he was at one of the parties. he said he wants to apologise unreservedly for the anger and hurt caused by a party held to mark his leaving downing street in april, 2021. we are talking about the 16th of april, 2021. he said it should not have happened at the time it did. your reaction, damian hinds. reading the story this morning, i think everybody hearing about it was shocked. there was a particularly solemn time for our whole nation as her majesty the queen was morning prince philip. i was shocked by these allegations. i personally
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don't know more about them. what you have just read out to me, don't know more about them. what you havejust read out to me, that don't know more about them. what you have just read out to me, that is the first time i have heard that. it is difficult for me to comment further. ., , ., ., further. tell me how you would react. further. tell me how you would react- there — further. tell me how you would react. there was _ further. tell me how you would react. there was a _ further. tell me how you would react. there was a party i further. tell me how you would react. there was a party in - further. tell me how you would - react. there was a party in downing street on the 16th of april, 2021, held at 10 downing street, at least one on that evening. haw held at 10 downing street, at least one on that evening.— one on that evening. how do you react to that? _ one on that evening. how do you react to that? l _ one on that evening. how do you react to that? i was _ one on that evening. how do you react to that? i was shocked - one on that evening. how do you react to that? i was shocked to l one on that evening. how do you i react to that? i was shocked to read that. ~ , ., react to that? i was shocked to read that. ~ ,, , , react to that? i was shocked to read that. ~ , , we react to that? i was shocked to read that-_ we can i react to that? i was shocked to read i that-_ we can go that. where you disgusted? we can go throuuh a that. where you disgusted? we can go through a number— that. where you disgusted? we can go through a number of— that. where you disgusted? we can go through a number of words, _ that. where you disgusted? we can go through a number of words, i - that. where you disgusted? we can go through a number of words, i am - through a number of words, i am sure. iam... through a number of words, i am sure- lemm— through a number of words, i am sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was _ sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was the _ sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was the start _ sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was the start of _ sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was the start of it - sure. i am... was it proper to mark shocked was the start of it will - shocked was the start of it will stop i am not in a position to talk about the detail of what happened or did not happen, not because i am holding it back from you but i do not know, i was not there. it is not know, i was not there. it is important _ not know, i was not there. it is important to — not know, i was not there. it is important to have _ not know, i was not there. it is important to have an _ not know, i was not there. it 3 important to have an investigation ongoing into events, pleural,
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events, and alleged events. it is right that process led by a senior civil servant who can get access to the investigation... sea civil servant who can get access to the investigation. . ._ the investigation... sea grey is all over and we _ the investigation... sea grey is all over and we had _ the investigation... sea grey is all over and we had been _ the investigation... sea grey is all over and we had been told - the investigation... sea grey is all i over and we had been told obviously to wait for this. there was a party. james slack has said there was a party, he was there, director of communications. there was a party. knowing that there was a party on the 16th of april, 2021, you accept it broke the rules? fin the 16th of april, 2021, you accept it broke the rules?— it broke the rules? on the face of it, as i it broke the rules? on the face of it. as i say _ it broke the rules? on the face of it. as i say this— it broke the rules? on the face of it, as i say this is _ it broke the rules? on the face of it, as i say this is literally - it broke the rules? on the face of it, as i say this is literally the - it, as i say this is literally the first time i have heard that. i it, as i say this is literally the first time i have heard that. i am aaivin first time i have heard that. i am giving you _ first time i have heard that. i am giving you a _ first time i have heard that. i am giving you a formal— first time i have heard that. lam giving you a formal statement the former director of communications who said there was a party. 1 am former director of communications who said there was a party. i am not den in: who said there was a party. i am not denying that — who said there was a party. i am not denying that at _ who said there was a party. i am not denying that at all, _ who said there was a party. i am not denying that at all, of _ who said there was a party. i am not denying that at all, of course - who said there was a party. i am not denying that at all, of course i - denying that at all, of course i totally accept what you say. i
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suppose what i am saying, i am genuinely not in a position to enable to tell you more than you have had from him. —— had heard. it is right all the gatherings and alleged gatherings are looked together in the round and we will have to hear the outcome. in terms of reference to the enquiry, it should look into the nature of the events, the purpose, the attendance and also we should hear that as swiftly as possible. time needs to be taken to do the work properly but i think we will hear back really quite soon, and then there will be scrutiny in parliament, a statement from the prime minister and questioning from mps, and of course from the scrutiny of the media can make you and your colleagues, and thatis make you and your colleagues, and that is the right way to do it. if
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there was a party and the rules where you could not have social gatherings, does it break the rules? yes, on the face of it. if you have a large number of people being invited to a social event and socialising taking place. i am not, as i sit here in your studio in millbank, having seen exactly the same presto you have seen, the first time you read out those lines. i do not know more than that about these events. when i say i do not know more than that i am conscious in a deliberative democracy we want to have proper investigations where all the different facts can be considered and then the findings become public and there is an opportunity for proper parliamentary public and journalistic scrutiny. let's go through this. do you expect
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or know if this is now part of the sue grey investigation?- or know if this is now part of the sue grey investigation? yes, my understanding — sue grey investigation? yes, my understanding is, _ sue grey investigation? yes, my understanding is, absolutely. . sue grey investigation? yes, my| understanding is, absolutely. any gatherings are part of that investigation.— gatherings are part of that investigation. gatherings are part of that investiuation. ., ., ., investigation. there are now more than ten allegations. _ investigation. there are now more than ten allegations. there - investigation. there are now more than ten allegations. there is - investigation. there are now more than ten allegations. there is an l than ten allegations. there is an accusation from all sides. much of the public is furious that this government has a culture of rule breaking. can you say quizzically thatis breaking. can you say quizzically that is not the case? == breaking. can you say quizzically that is not the case?— that is not the case? -- it quizzically- _ that is not the case? -- it quizzically- i— that is not the case? -- it quizzically. i know- that is not the case? -- it quizzically. i know it - that is not the case? -- it quizzically. i know it is - that is not the case? -- it| quizzically. i know it is the that is not the case? -- it - quizzically. i know it is the case there is a great deal of fury, as you put it. anger, upset my disappointment. the prime minister talked about that on wednesday when he made his apology. i talked about that on wednesday when he made his apology.— he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. _ he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. i _ he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. i am _ he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. i am not _ he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. i am not asking - he made his apology. i apologise if i am not clear. i am not asking youj i am not clear. i am not asking you to recognise there is fury. i i am not clear. i am not asking you to recognise there is fury.- to recognise there is fury. i know what ou to recognise there is fury. i know what you are _ to recognise there is fury. i know what you are saying _ to recognise there is fury. i know what you are saying and - to recognise there is fury. i know what you are saying and i - to recognise there is fury. i know what you are saying and i am - to recognise there is fury. i know - what you are saying and i am coming on to that. i know it sounds
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repetitive, but we do need to have the proper investigation to get to the proper investigation to get to the heart of some of these questions. pray that important. obviously, if you are a rule maker, you can't be a rule breaker. of course that is correct. we need to let this investigation run. we need to hear what comes out of that and then there will be, of course rightly, the proper scrutiny in parliament and elsewhere of what comes out. i parliament and elsewhere of what comes out-— comes out. i will ask the question auain, comes out. i will ask the question again. damian — comes out. i will ask the question again, damian hinds. _ comes out. i will ask the question again, damian hinds. my- comes out. i will ask the question | again, damian hinds. my question was, there was fury and anger because this government is seen, with more than ten allegations of parties, is seen to have a culture of rule breaking. can you quizzically say that is not the case? i
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quizzically say that is not the case? ., ., , case? i do not believe in the government _ case? i do not believe in the government which _ case? i do not believe in the government which i - case? i do not believe in the government which i support | case? i do not believe in the - government which i support and which i am a member of, i do not believe that to be the case. flan i am a member of, i do not believe that to be the case.— that to be the case. can i 'ust say, i am — that to be the case. can i 'ust say, i am you i that to be the case. can i 'ust say, i am sure you will h that to be the case. can i 'ust say, i am sure you will be _ that to be the case. can ijust say, i am sure you will be aware, - that to be the case. can ijust say, i am sure you will be aware, when j i am sure you will be aware, when the party to placement the country was in a period of national mourning for prince philip. when you know thatis for prince philip. when you know that is the case, and two parties took place the night before the funeral, what should the public think? i funeral, what should the public think? ., , , funeral, what should the public think? , , ., funeral, what should the public think? , ., think? i absolutely accept what you sa . i think? i absolutely accept what you say- i think — think? i absolutely accept what you say- i think i _ think? i absolutely accept what you say. i thinki said _ think? i absolutely accept what you say. i think i said at— think? i absolutely accept what you say. i think i said at the _ think? i absolutely accept what you say. i think i said at the start - think? i absolutely accept what you say. i think i said at the start of - say. i think i said at the start of this interview, i was shocked to read what i read and particularly because of the time that it referred to, which was a time of very... a very solemn time, a time of mourning. iam sure very solemn time, a time of mourning. i am sure the reaction
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people will have over their breakfast this morning as they travel to work, i am sure everyone will be shocked by what they read. but we do also need to make sure that we take a proper imaginative approach stop we hear all the facts that are there to be had and we wait to get the outcome of the investigation, which will cover not just this that the series of difference of events and alleged events. i do think that is the right way to go about it. this events. i do think that is the right way to go about it.— way to go about it. as security minister. _ way to go about it. as security minister. i— way to go about it. as security minister, i must _ way to go about it. as security minister, i must ask _ way to go about it. as security minister, i must ask you - way to go about it. as security| minister, i must ask you about way to go about it. as security - minister, i must ask you about this warning from m15 that an alleged chinese agent had interfered in uk politics. this woman has been photographed with david cameron, theresa may, jeremy corbyn, barry gardner has worked with her son and
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been across all the parties. she has had access to parliamentarians. why is this warning being made now? what has she done wrong? what has she been accused of? is it illegal? why should we be concerned? indie been accused of? is it illegal? why should we be concerned? we should be concerned when _ should we be concerned? we should be concerned when people _ should we be concerned? we should be concerned when people acting - should we be concerned? we should be concerned when people acting on - concerned when people acting on behalf of foreign states, in this case the chinese communist party, seeking to influence our domestic processes. there are different ways you can try to do that. in this case, obviously, this has been about finance stop but the issuing of this notice, this is an example of our system working. in issuing this notice, it is disrupting this particular activity but also it serves as a notice, a warning to the whole of our political system, to
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parliamentarians and others about some of the risks and about some of what others may seek to do, may be seeking to de—commit may be seeking to influence and interfere and may not be all that they seem. there will be more of these notices likely in future. it is an example, an illustration of the system at work. damian hinds, security minister, thank you for your time with us this morning on bbc breakfast. ijust want to recap on the information we had from james slack, he was at one of the parties on the 16th of april, 2021. he has apologised unreservedly for the anger caused by the party. he said it should not have happened at the time that it did. the market is on the 17th of april, 2021, that
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was the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. a lot of breaking news stories this morning. this isa is a decision by the australian government. this only happened 30 minutes ago. i willjust go through the statement and you can take us through more detail. this is the immigration minister who said he has exercised his powers under the migration act to cancel the visa held by novak djokovic on health and good order grounds, on the basis it was in the interests of the public to do so. if was in the interests of the public to do so. u, , was in the interests of the public todoso. , to do so. if we recap, you remember that visa was — to do so. if we recap, you remember that visa was cancelled _ to do so. if we recap, you remember that visa was cancelled before. - that visa was cancelled before. djokovic appeared in court on monday. he won the appeal until he was able to play in the australian open, which starts in three days'
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time. the immigration minister has used his ultimate power to overturn the ruling of the court and revoke the ruling of the court and revoke the visa for a second time, so now he faces deportation. he had been due, to defend his australian open title in melbourne, and was seen training on court earlier today. let's get more on this decision with the bbc�*s tennis correspondent, russell fuller. good morning. what has been the reaction where it is evening now? everybody is waiting to see what the response _ everybody is waiting to see what the response of novak djokovic's legal team _ response of novak djokovic's legal team will— response of novak djokovic's legal team will be. we anticipated the verdict _ team will be. we anticipated the verdict would come today but we thought — verdict would come today but we thought that yesterday. as the clock was ticking toward six o'clock local time, _ was ticking toward six o'clock local time, we _ was ticking toward six o'clock local time, we wondered if we would not -et time, we wondered if we would not get a _ time, we wondered if we would not get a definitive answer from the immigration minister before the end of the _ immigration minister before the end of the week. it arrived just before six o'ciock— of the week. it arrived just before six o'clock local time. djokovic's legal— six o'clock local time. djokovic's legal team — six o'clock local time. djokovic's legal team we understand were served with papers to be informed of the decision— with papers to be informed of the decision a — with papers to be informed of the decision a few minutes afterwards. they must—
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decision a few minutes afterwards. they must now decide whether they want to— they must now decide whether they want to appeal committee take it to judicial— want to appeal committee take it to judicial review. the other question, have quickly can happen? the australian open starts on monday. at the moment djokovic is in the top line of— the moment djokovic is in the top line of the — the moment djokovic is in the top line of the draw as number one seed. he is— line of the draw as number one seed. he is meant— line of the draw as number one seed. he is meant to be playing a fellow serh _ he is meant to be playing a fellow serh they— he is meant to be playing a fellow serb. they will want to try to get it fast— serb. they will want to try to get it fast track to get a decision made tty it fast track to get a decision made by sunday— it fast track to get a decision made by sunday so the australian open can io by sunday so the australian open can go ahead _ by sunday so the australian open can go ahead without the champion having to putt— go ahead without the champion having to pull out— go ahead without the champion having to pull out midway through. the immigration _ to pull out midway through. iie: immigration minister said to pull out midway through. ii9 immigration minister said it was in the interests of the public after the interests of the public after the decision and the fact novak djokovic had admitted the mistake and whether he broke isolation rules backin and whether he broke isolation rules back in serbia. would you say it is in keeping with the general consensus of opinion? in keeping with the general consensus of oinion? . : . :, :, :, consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll— consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll a _ consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll a couple _ consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll a couple of— consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll a couple of days - consensus of opinion? according to a massive poll a couple of days ago, i massive poll a couple of days ago, over 80% —
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massive poll a couple of days ago, over 80% of people according to that survey— over 80% of people according to that survey said _ over 80% of people according to that survey said it was time for novak djokovic— survey said it was time for novak djokovic to— survey said it was time for novak djokovic to leave. this is always the australian government's instinct _ the australian government's instinct. judge anthony kelly ruled instinct. judge anthony kelly ruled in favour— instinct. judge anthony kelly ruled in favour of novak djokovic because he felt _ in favour of novak djokovic because he felt he _ in favour of novak djokovic because he felt he was unreasonably treated at the _ he felt he was unreasonably treated at the border when he arrived at melbourne airport. all along the australian government had been saying. — australian government had been saying. if— australian government had been saying, if you have had a recent coronavirus— saying, if you have had a recent coronavirus infection in the last months — coronavirus infection in the last months that is not good enough reason — months that is not good enough reason to— months that is not good enough reason to come to australia without a vaccination. what has made it easier— a vaccination. what has made it easier for— a vaccination. what has made it easier for them to devious djokovic released _ easier for them to devious djokovic released a — easier for them to devious djokovic released a statement two days ago when _ released a statement two days ago when he _ released a statement two days ago when he admitted back in serbia he broke _ when he admitted back in serbia he broke isolation rules, he went to a locai— broke isolation rules, he went to a local tennis — broke isolation rules, he went to a local tennis and conducted an interview— local tennis and conducted an interview when he knew he was infectious, _ interview when he knew he was infectious, orat interview when he knew he was infectious, or at least he knew he had coronavirus and i went down very hadiy— had coronavirus and i went down very badly indeed and that is why he is in the _ badly indeed and that is why he is in the situation he is in now. normally— in the situation he is in now. normally in these circumstances, if your visa _ normally in these circumstances, if your visa is — normally in these circumstances, if your visa is revoked in these circumstances, you are not eligible
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to apply— circumstances, you are not eligible to apply for— circumstances, you are not eligible to apply for another visa for a further— to apply for another visa for a further three years. it does also say that— further three years. it does also say that might not occur if there are compelling circumstances that affect _ are compelling circumstances that affect the — are compelling circumstances that affect the interest of australia but potentially djokovic is now 34, could — potentially djokovic is now 34, could not— potentially djokovic is now 34, could not play at 35, 36, seven, it would _ could not play at 35, 36, seven, it would not — could not play at 35, 36, seven, it would not be able to come back to compete _ would not be able to come back to compete until he was 38. -- would not be able to come back to compete until he was 38.- compete until he was 38. -- 37. i su ose compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they _ compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they now— compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they now have _ compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they now have to - compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they now have to be - compete until he was 38. -- 37. i suppose they now have to be two | suppose they now have to be two scenarios when they replace djokovic as a seed and a lucky loser comes in or they play... they have an arrangement where djokovic does defend his title. then;r arrangement where d'okovic does defend his titleh arrangement where d'okovic does defend his title. they would like a cuick defend his title. they would like a quick decision. _ defend his title. they would like a quick decision. it _ defend his title. they would like a quick decision. it is _ defend his title. they would like a quick decision. it is possible - defend his title. they would like a quick decision. it is possible thatl quick decision. it is possible that novak— quick decision. it is possible that novak djokovic does realise in the face of— novak djokovic does realise in the face of huge opposition from the australian government and a lot of bad feeling within the country he will accept defeat now and he could be will accept defeat now and he could he on _ will accept defeat now and he could he on a _ will accept defeat now and he could be on a flight home tonight. somebody will be in the jaw, it will be one _ somebody will be in the jaw, it will be one of— somebody will be in the jaw, it will be one of the lucky losers from
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qualifying. they will have a bit of a reiig _ qualifying. they will have a bit of a reiig of — qualifying. they will have a bit of a rejig of the seedings as you were hinting _ a rejig of the seedings as you were hinting at — a rejig of the seedings as you were hinting at. ultimately it causes huge _ hinting at. ultimately it causes huge confusion. if there is a judicial— huge confusion. if there is a judicial review over the weekend and it makes— judicial review over the weekend and it makes things very complicated indeed — it makes things very complicated indeed. ultimatelyjustice has to run its _ indeed. ultimatelyjustice has to run its natural course. the australian open are secondary to that _ australian open are secondary to that if— australian open are secondary to that. if djokovic does want to pursue — that. if djokovic does want to pursue a _ that. if djokovic does want to pursue a further appeal in the courts — pursue a further appeal in the courts. :, .. pursue a further appeal in the courts. :, ~' , :, pursue a further appeal in the courts. :, ,, i. :, pursue a further appeal in the courts. ., ~' i:, :, ,:, iam sure i am sure it will be a long night from you in melbourne. getting reaction from around the world, the shock this decision will cause. difficult to know where the ball is now. what it team in terms of timing with djokovic? morning to you. can you help us with this technicality? the technicality
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being, your immigration minister used his executive powers and a special section 133 c of the migration act. is that an executive decision that can be challenged as an appeal or is it full and final? no, it is not full and final. this can be challenged in the court once again. where we found ourselves on monday, we could be back there as soon as tomorrow. remarkable to think that but that is what the legal team of novak djokovic is thinking right now. if they do not put in the application for appeal, novak djokovic could be out of australia in the next three to four macro hours, most of the flights back to europe leave late at night. he would be on one of those if he does not decide to appeal tonight. to russell's point, that is the
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decision novak djokovic has two face. is he going to accept or fight for the title and make it a narrative no one will ever forget? people will remember, and you will have followed this very closely, when he appealed his original decision, thejudge came back and one key line he said was, what more could this man had done to agree to all the things he had been asked to do in order to get into the country? i am mindful do in order to get into the country? iam mindful of do in order to get into the country? i am mindful of those words now. i think public sentiment has certainly changed during the week. the fact his statement recognise the travel declaration he submitted was in fact false, even though he blamed a support team member. the fact when he was diagnosed with coronavirus he still went out in belgrade, attended events, and of course did the media interview where he was 100% certain he had coronavirus but still went ahead with the interview. when you
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look at the statement from the immigration minister, that is where there is concern about novak djokovic and public health and that is why the decision was reached today. the feeling around novak djokovic, eversince today. the feeling around novak djokovic, ever since he got the exemption late last week and i was hesitancy from victorians about him being let in and now they hesitantly has gone up exponentially and there is a lot of relief in victoria as it stands right now he is not playing in the australian open.— in the australian open. there is a sense of deja _ in the australian open. there is a sense of deja vu _ in the australian open. there is a sense of deja vu about _ in the australian open. there is a sense of deja vu about our- sense of deja vu about our conversation. as you said at the beginning of remains a chance he could get play. tell us a bit more about their feelings in australia, but most specifically in melbourne and victoria, about what has happened, the prospect of novak djokovic playing. happened, the prospect of novak djokovic playing-— happened, the prospect of novak djokovic playing. people are sick of the sto , djokovic playing. people are sick of the story. no _ djokovic playing. people are sick of the story, no doubt _ djokovic playing. people are sick of the story, no doubt about - djokovic playing. people are sick of the story, no doubt about that. - the story, no doubt about that. novak djokovic has been a dark cloud over the build—up to the australian open. it is the biggest event we have had since the part of the
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pandemic an occasion celebrate aussie tennis. none of the stories had been talked about. it has been drowned out by novak djokovic. if he decides to appeal, it will continue to be drowned out by novak djokovic. the final weekend before the australian open go do not worry about rafael nadal and ash barty, it is all about novak djokovic. he has taken away from the australian open. to read a point in terms of, i guess, the sentiment in victoria, they do not like it. this is a vaccinated society. 93% of people are vaccinated. he tried to get around the rules. he had an extension and people did not like it. he had his is cancelled and they accepted the ruling ofjudge anthony kelly. more discrepancies came out. as it developed during the week, now we are here finding his visa is
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cancelled again.— we are here finding his visa is cancelled again. we are here finding his visa is cancelled aaain. : , :, :, ~' cancelled again. always good to talk to ou. cancelled again. always good to talk to you- thank— cancelled again. always good to talk to you. thank you _ cancelled again. always good to talk to you. thank you for _ cancelled again. always good to talk to you. thank you for your _ cancelled again. always good to talk to you. thank you for your insight. l to you. thank you for your insight. we will be following the story with interest to see what happens next. in the last one hour we have had breaking news on novak djokovic, breaking news on novak djokovic, breaking news on novak djokovic, breaking news regarding the parties at downing street on the 16th of april, 2021, we have had a lot of news to bring you. i think now we will take a moment of calm and we are going to show you some beautiful camera work permit some great itches and bring you some nature. sir david attenborough's latest series is all about plants and how they look at each other —— after each other. the venus fly trap has a problem. it needs to avoid false alarms, snapping shut on something inedible, like a rain drop or little bit of twig. that would be a waste
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of both time and energy. so how does it avoid that? well, it does it by counting. if i touch this one sensitive hair just there, no reaction. that could be a false alarm. but the plant remembers that for 20 seconds. if i touch it a second time within that time, then it's much more likely to be worth eating. and so... it closes. i love those plants. we are joined now by the green planet's series producer, rupert barrington, and the director of timelapse photography, tim shepherd. good morning to you. i cannot tell you at this moment in time we will revel in this comment not only do we love these programmes byjust the
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calm and the adventure that comes with nature is so surprising. it is. the welder _ with nature is so surprising. it is. the welder plants _ with nature is so surprising. it is. the welder plants is _ with nature is so surprising. it 3 the welder plants is something we do not know a great deal about or have not know a great deal about or have not done. —— the world of plants. how exciting their lives are is fantastic. it has been privilege to make a series and show what it is like. it make a series and show what it is like. , :, ,:, . make a series and show what it is like. , :, . ., like. it is not so much about the lant, it like. it is not so much about the plant. it is _ like. it is not so much about the plant, it is about _ like. it is not so much about the plant, it is about the _ like. it is not so much about the plant, it is about the moment. i like. it is not so much about the - plant, it is about the moment. very difficult to say. _ plant, it is about the moment. very difficult to say. in _ plant, it is about the moment. very difficult to say. in that _ plant, it is about the moment. - difficult to say. in that piece you have just shown, where difficult to say. in that piece you havejust shown, where david difficult to say. in that piece you have just shown, where david talks about the venus flytrap, it is a fantastic moment, an amazing adaptation to live in a world when it cannot get nitrogen so it to capture prey to get nitrogen. this is a beautiful explanation of an extraordinary piece of the plant world. , : .. extraordinary piece of the plant world. , a , extraordinary piece of the plant world. , , , :, , ., world. tim, pick up the story for us. you world. tim, pick up the story for us- you are _ world. tim, pick up the story for us. you are director _ world. tim, pick up the story for us. you are director of _ world. tim, pick up the story for i us. you are director of time-lapse us. you are director of time—lapse photography. paint a picture for us. there is you with your camera, you are looking at a plant.—
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are looking at a plant. hello. well, we not to are looking at a plant. hello. well, we got to think _ are looking at a plant. hello. well, we got to think about _ are looking at a plant. hello. well, we got to think about how - are looking at a plant. hello. well, we got to think about how long - are looking at a plant. hello. well, we got to think about how long the j we got to think about how long the plan is _ we got to think about how long the plan is going to take to do what we wanted _ plan is going to take to do what we wanted to— plan is going to take to do what we wanted to do and then we work out how quickly— wanted to do and then we work out how quickly to film it. time—lapse is really— how quickly to film it. time—lapse is reallyjust filming over a long time _ is reallyjust filming over a long time and — is reallyjust filming over a long time and playing it back over a much shorter— time and playing it back over a much shorter time. time and playing it back over a much shorter time-— shorter time. presumably things do not alwa s shorter time. presumably things do not always go _ shorter time. presumably things do not always go according _ shorter time. presumably things do not always go according to - shorter time. presumably things do not always go according to plan, . shorter time. presumably things do not always go according to plan, i l not always go according to plan, i understand there are a few mishaps along the way the camera is falling over, that happens.— along the way the camera is falling over, that happens. yes, it happens, ho efull over, that happens. yes, it happens, hopefully not — over, that happens. yes, it happens, hopefully not too _ over, that happens. yes, it happens, hopefully not too frequently. - over, that happens. yes, it happens, hopefully not too frequently. we - hopefully not too frequently. we have had — hopefully not too frequently. we have had a camera that submerged itself— have had a camera that submerged itself when it should not have done, filming _ itself when it should not have done, filming the — itself when it should not have done, filming the giant water lily for a programme, there was a breakage on a hearing _ programme, there was a breakage on a hearing on— programme, there was a breakage on a hearing on a _ programme, there was a breakage on a bearing on a regular on the camera disappeared underwater when it was now in— disappeared underwater when it was now in underwater housing. things like that— now in underwater housing. things like that happen.—
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like that happen. what is it like as a series producer _ like that happen. what is it like as a series producer when _ like that happen. what is it like as a series producer when you - like that happen. what is it like as a series producer when you hear. a series producer when you hear things like that happening, it must be a head in your hands moment. with wildlife you are waiting for that kind of behaviour but with plants it is a longer period. when you hear from your camera team, your production team, the camera fell in the pond, we have lost the whole sequence. it the pond, we have lost the whole seuuence. , , :, , sequence. it is definitely worrying. a sin . le sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot _ sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot can _ sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot can be _ sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot can be a _ sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot can be a day, - sequence. it is definitely worrying. a single shot can be a day, a - sequence. it is definitely worrying. | a single shot can be a day, a week, several months. if your camera goes down and has to start again it can be a lot of time last. tim is the ultimate professional and has been doing what he has been doing for 30 years or more. these incidents happen so rarely, he has captured everything we hoped he would. it is not 'ust everything we hoped he would. it is not just the — everything we hoped he would. it is notjust the cameras everything we hoped he would. it is not just the cameras that misbehave, notjust the cameras that misbehave, plants can as well. you have a lovely anecdote about when sir david attenborough got caught by a plant, actually, even though he had the protective equipment, still got
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nipped, shall we say? irate protective equipment, still got nipped, shall we say? we were filmin: in nipped, shall we say? we were filming in the _ nipped, shall we say? we were filming in the deserts - nipped, shall we say? we were filming in the deserts of - nipped, shall we say? we were filming in the deserts of the i filming in the deserts of the southern us. the one thing people say is do not go near this practice. from the distance it looks like it has a smooth, soft coating of fur. when you get up close it is massive of interlocked spines. —— masses. they are very painful and hard to get out. we thought it would be interesting to show people why you should not go near a practice. we gave him ethic, welded glove that was virtually bullet—proof. he shoved his hand in and even with that protection one spine went through the glove into his hand. being a total professional, all he said was, that is a bit uncomfortable and then when on telling everyone about the practice.
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thank you very much. the next episode is airing on sunday on bbc one. the headlines coming up in a moment. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today — an unreserved apology over another downing street party — the prime minister's former director of communications says his leaving event on the eve of prince philip's funeral should not have happened when it did. in the last half hour, the security minister has told us that he recognises the public anger at the government.
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obviously at the government. if you are a rule maker, you obviously if you are a rule maker, you cannot be a rule breaker, of course that is correct. australia cancels tennis star novak djokovic's visa just days ahead of the start of the austrailian open. as prince andrew loses his military titles, the woman accusing him of sexual assault says she wants to show the rich and powerful are not above the law. cricket must tackle racism, or risk losing public funding. that's one of the key recommendations from a parliamentary report into the crisis in the sport after the experiences of former yorkshire player azeem rafiq and others. good morning. a shorter self isolation period in england. businesses hope going from seven to five full days will ease staffing pressures. some firms are also changing their sick pay rules for the unvaccinated. i'll have all the details. and i'll tell you about the weather.
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good morning. it's friday 14th january. our main story — the prime minister's former director of communications, james slack, has apologised for the "anger and hurt" caused by a downing street party in his honour held last year. staff at downing street have been accused of holding two leaving parties inside number ten on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral last april. our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us now. we are the security minister, we spoke to him this morning about half an hour ago, spoke to him this morning about half an hourago, damian spoke to him this morning about half an hour ago, damian hinds. just as we went to him, we have that statement from james slack. james slack says there was a party, and thatis slack says there was a party, and that is a list of what this investigation by civil servant sue gray is looking into at the moment. where does this take the government, borisjohnson, now? where does this take the government, boris johnson, now?— boris johnson, now? these allegations _ boris johnson, now? these allegations just _ boris johnson, now? these allegations just keep i boris johnson, now? these i allegationsjust keep coming,
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boris johnson, now? these - allegationsjust keep coming, don't allegations just keep coming, don't the? that was the fear that some tory mps had, that this was far from done, and that allegations would keep emerging. we now have claims of parties or social gatherings spanning almost a year in downing street, in contravention of the covid rules at the time. this one really matters for two reasons, it is such a contrast with what happened the following day at the funeral of the duke of edinburgh, when you have that infamous picture of the queen sitting on her own as she said goodbye to her husband. the night after these events had taken place in the downing street. the other reason that it really matters is that these reports in the daily telegraph are clearly a social event, if the reports are correct, about dancing, about music playing, about dancing, about music playing, about somebody being dispatched to the local supermarket with a suitcase to stock up on booze. so
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this adds considerably more pressure to the government this morning, it is going to be part of that investigation that the senior civil servant sue gray is carrying out. have a listen to what the security minister damian hinds told breakfast about what this all means for the government's authority. obviously if ou are a government's authority. obviously if you are a rule _ government's authority. obviously if you are a rule maker, _ government's authority. obviously if you are a rule maker, you _ government's authority. obviously if you are a rule maker, you cannot- government's authority. obviously if you are a rule maker, you cannot be| you are a rule maker, you cannot be a rule _ you are a rule maker, you cannot be a rule breaker, of course that is correct — a rule breaker, of course that is correct but— a rule breaker, of course that is correct. but we need to let this investigation run, we need to hear what _ investigation run, we need to hear what comes— investigation run, we need to hear what comes out of that, and then there _ what comes out of that, and then there will— what comes out of that, and then there will be, of course, rightly, there will be, of course, rightly, the proper— there will be, of course, rightly, the proper scrutiny in parliament and elsewhere of what comes out. | and elsewhere of what comes out. should say and elsewhere of what comes out. i should say that number ten have not denied the substance of the reports about these parties. either we have had that unreserved apology for the hurt caused from james slack, the former head of communication for the
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pro—minister. one of the events was his leaving do, but he has said the smoke should not have happened when it did. this puts more pressure on the government, but it also puts pressure on tory mps who are remaining silent at the moment. a lot of them have concerns privately. the question now is whether more of them will feel the need to speak up, and it also raises the question of what is going to happen in that sue gray report, which damian hinds told us on breakfast was expected soon. nick, i wonder when that sue gray report will come out, if more and more parties as they seem to be appealing. i should correct myself, james slack has described this as an event, but what has been reported as there was drinking, and there may have been dancing at this event, i should clarify. nick, thanks very much. neck and live there, our
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political correspondent —— nick eardley. james slack, who was the rector of communications at —— director of communications at downing street, had a living event on the 16th of april 2021, and has apologised for the anger and hurt caused by that event which was held in his honour. the australian government has cancelled novak djokovic's visa for a second time, saying he may pose a "risk to the community". the decision by the immigration minister means the world number one now faces being deported. let's get the latest with our australia correspondent, shaima khalil. good morning, shaima. this study has broken in the last hour and a half or so, tell us is that with what has been said. or so, tell us is that with what has been said-— or so, tell us is that with what has been said. :, ._ , ., , been said. four days, we have been waitin: for been said. four days, we have been waiting for a — been said. four days, we have been waiting for a decision _ been said. four days, we have been waiting for a decision from - been said. four days, we have been waiting for a decision from the i waiting for a decision from the government on a nowak djokovic's visa status. today, at the end of the day, we had a statement from the
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emigration minister who said today, i exercise my power to cancel the visa hold by mr nowak djokovic on health and good order grounds on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so. we have also had a statement from prime minister scott morrison, saying that he second is the minister's decision, that he has seen it, and also making the point that australians have made sacrifices and they expect these sacrifices and they expect these sacrifices to be protected. —— immigration minister. referring here to the core of the anger by australians ever since nowak djokovic announced on social media that he had an exemption, that he was on his way to australia to defend his title in the australian open, many have made the point that this is a world famous athlete that was public about not wanting to get the vaccine, coming here on a vaccination exemption, while australians have come as many people say, done the right thing, got
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vaccinated, but also are struggling with the rise of cases and hospitalisations of covid—19 of the omicron wave here. and the government has been criticised for that. and so scott morrison, the immigration minister, the government, wanted to make the point they are strict on borders, that they are strict on borders, that they are strict on borders, that they are adhering to border rules, and that they have made that decision to cancel nowak djokovic's visa. but we also know that this is not the end of it, because his legal team are likely, or will, challenge this decision and to court. shaima, 'ust this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate _ this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate a _ this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate a little _ this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate a little bit _ this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate a little bit on - this decision and to court. shaima, just elaborate a little bit on that i just elaborate a little bit on that for us, because there is a lot of news coming in. this is not a final decision, i think they are calling it an executive order from the immigration minister, but it is still subject, if they want to, to appeal. still sub'ect, if they want to, to a - eal. , ., ., still sub'ect, if they want to, to a - eal. , :, :, , appeal. they will want to, they will want to review _ appeal. they will want to, they will want to review that _ appeal. they will want to, they will want to review that decision. i appeal. they will want to, they will want to review that decision. his i want to review that decision. his legal team, you know, will want to fight that in court. the government, remember, when they lost the initial
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court hearing, when a judge ruled in a nowak djokovic's favour, that the way he was treated in the airport when he arrived was unreasonable, ordered the government to take him out of detention. the government's lawyer, even though they conceded the point, they said they could still use their executive power, which is exact with what they have done today and cancelling his side one more time, and with facing deportation. his legal team will now ask for that to be reviewed, and for this to be reviewed, it has to go to court. we understand from a source, a court source, but they are on standby. we do not know if anything has yet been filed, but this is the root, this is the direction that you would expect nowak djokovic's legal team to take in the next few days. remember, we are two days away from, a bit more than two days away, from the australian open, where he is the defending champion. he is already in the draw as top seed. the tournament starts on monday the 17th. he has been training for the past few days. he has been training earlier today,
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even, but now we don't know, still we don't know, even with that government decision, what the court will decide on whether he will it be able to take part in that. because as it stands, the government has decided he is due to be deported, and also for that to happen he has to be in detention as well.- to be in detention as well. shaima khalil, for the _ to be in detention as well. shaima khalil, for the moment, _ to be in detention as well. shaima khalil, for the moment, thank i to be in detention as well. shaimaj khalil, for the moment, thank you very much. the time is 8.12. matt, how many layers would you wear in this type of weather? maybe not so many in scotland. image contrast in temperatures and clothing out there this morning. in wolverhampton, it looks like this this morning, but a 15 degrees difference from the south of england and wales to the north of scotland. and with the floss across the south, some dense fog patches to watch out for when your morning commute, very high pollution levels as well in the
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london area, the air stagnating, not much wind around. but a lot of sunshine, too. cloudier in the north west of england, scotland, northern ireland. and in the finals of scotland, cloud in some patchy light rain. this place is dry across the country, though, some sunshine at times, aberdeenshire, angus, fife throughout the day. on trend developing across england and wales. but stay in cardiff are some in north—west scotland, northern ireland and the north west of england. —— staying cloudy in those areas. a crisp feel across the south, but still someone with to the sun on your back, but sticking attempt at around ten, 11 celsius, feeling much milder the further north you are. into tonight, greater chance of some mist, fog and low cloud across and wooden wheels, a bit more so in eastern and southern areas compared to last night. with that in mind, maybe not quite as cold for some of you, but it cold night for scotland and northern ireland, a shift in wind direction, and more clear skies to take you to the start of the weekend. saturday
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looking dry, grey for some of you throughout, with a few sunny spells breaking through. right on sunday, but a few showers on saturday night into sunday morning moving their way south. that is how it is looking. matt, thanks so much. see you later on. the time now is 8.14. the duke of york will fight allegations of sexual assault as a private citizen after it was announced his military titles and royal patronages would be handed back to the queen. ajudge in new york has allowed virginia giuffre to pursue her civil case against prince andrew. in a tweet last night, ms giuffre said her goal is to show that the rich and powerful are "not above the law." the duke strongly denies the accusation. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is outside windsor castle this morning. we learned yesterday that ms giuffre
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did not want a purely financial settlement. and it quite settlement does not seem to be her intention either. , :, :, , :, either. yes, good morning to you, nana. we either. yes, good morning to you, naga- we had _ either. yes, good morning to you, naga. we had heard _ either. yes, good morning to you, naga. we had heard from - either. yes, good morning to you, naga. we had heard from virginia | naga. we had heard from virginia giuffre's lawyer yesterday on her behalf yesterday, suggesting she might want to stay in cloud, would not be interested in a settlement. she said she might want this day in cloud. we had for the first time yesterday from virginia giuffre herself, would you put forward a series of tweets. —— we heard for the first time. —— when she put forward a series of tweets.
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prince wintry has always vehemently and consistently denied her claims against him, celsius close to him yesterday —— prince andrew —— sources close to him yesterday said he had not been surprised by the ruling, but this was a marathon not a sprint and he will continue to defend himself. he remains ninth in line to the throne and of course the queen's second son, but they have done as much as they can to distance themselves from him, by ensuring he cannot use the title his royal highness. he will not undertake any public duties, and he has had to hand back all those military affiliations and royal patron edges, and when he has to fight this case, he will do so as a private citizen. sarah, thanks so much. sarah campbell for a at windsor.
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we're joined now by royal commentatorjennie bond, and colonel rupert wieloch, who trained with prince andrew for a year in the royal lancers. he has been stripped of his military titles, was that the right thing to do? , ., :, :, “ titles, was that the right thing to do? :, ,, , :, do? good morning. ithinki should start by offering — do? good morning. ithinki should start by offering my _ do? good morning. ithinki should start by offering my sympathy i do? good morning. ithinki should start by offering my sympathy to i do? good morning. i thinki should i start by offering my sympathy to her majesty for the position she has been placed, and obviously the courageous decision that she has taken, and also to all those victims of child sexual violence, who must be watching this with very concerned eyes. but yes, i think it was absolutely the right thing to do, and in many views, it was overdue. had it been a real concern for people that he still was having those titles, and in theory, at least, we know not in practice, but in theory at least, associated with
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various organisations including many in the military? i various organisations including many in the military?— in the military? i think many people in the military? i think many people in the military? i think many people in the military _ in the military? i think many people in the military will— in the military? i think many people in the military will have _ in the military? i think many people in the military will have felt - in the military? i think many people in the military will have felt very i in the military will have felt very uncomfortable with him as an honorary titular head of their particular regiment, and so the army board will have looked at this over several months, and taken advice and probably had a couple of options, given what might have happened in the court case in america. and clearly, if this court case has dragged on into the platinumjubilee year, it would have been very difficult, a great distraction from what should be her majesty's great celebration. what should be her ma'esty's great celebration. _, :, what should be her ma'esty's great celebration. :, . celebration. good morning, jennie. do ou celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want _ celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want to _ celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want to pick _ celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want to pick up _ celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want to pick up on - celebration. good morning, jennie. do you want to pick up on those i do you want to pick up on those thoughts the colonel was making a moment ago? a lot of people not surprised by the decision and the timing of buckingham palace and the cream and ticking away those titles, but it is an extraordinary step none the less. —— and the queen ticking
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away those titles. it the less. -- and the queen ticking away those titles.— away those titles. it is, and i think the _ away those titles. it is, and i think the pressure _ away those titles. it is, and i think the pressure had i away those titles. it is, and i think the pressure had been| away those titles. it is, and i - think the pressure had been building on the _ think the pressure had been building on the queen, and when a letter went on the queen, and when a letter went on from _ on the queen, and when a letter went on from something like 150 military veterans— on from something like 150 military veterans are things usually have start, _ veterans are things usually have start, i— veterans are things usually have start, i think she had veterans are things usually have start, ithink she had no veterans are things usually have start, i think she had no choice. the queen— start, i think she had no choice. the queen and her advisers will be waking _ the queen and her advisers will be waking up — the queen and her advisers will be waking up this morning with two main thoughts _ waking up this morning with two main thoughts. one is, thank goodness it is a very— thoughts. one is, thank goodness it is a very heavy newsday, and this story— is a very heavy newsday, and this story is— is a very heavy newsday, and this story is no— is a very heavy newsday, and this story is no longer dominating the headlines, — story is no longer dominating the headlines, as it might have been expected. — headlines, as it might have been expected, not completely dominating, and also _ expected, not completely dominating, and also that they have probably done _ and also that they have probably done what they can to lance the boil which _ done what they can to lance the boil which prince andrew has come to represent, — which prince andrew has come to represent, the toxicity around him, and had _ represent, the toxicity around him, and had done all they can to separate _ and had done all they can to separate the man from the monarchy, and this— separate the man from the monarchy, and this is— separate the man from the monarchy, and this is what it is about, it is about— and this is what it is about, it is about building a defence more around the institution of the monarchy. and ma be ou the institution of the monarchy. and maybe you can _ the institution of the monarchy. fific maybe you can help us with a little of the detail, jennie, what does he remain? what are the titles that remain? what are the titles that remain? ,, , :, remain? what are the titles that remain? ,, , ., ., , ~ remain? what are the titles that remain? ,, , :, ., , ,, :, remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn _ remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn a _ remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn a royal _ remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn a royal prince, - remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn a royal prince, but i remain? she is a means the duke, who demesne spawn a royal prince, but he | demesne spawn a royal prince, but he will not _ demesne spawn a royal prince, but he will not use _ demesne spawn a royal prince, but he
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will not use his style, as it is called. — will not use his style, as it is called, hrh, officially, so official he is— called, hrh, officially, so official he is not — called, hrh, officially, so official he is not that. that means that in private. _ he is not that. that means that in private, technically, people like prince _ private, technically, people like prince george will not have precedence over him, because he is hrh~ _ precedence over him, because he is hrh~ it _ precedence over him, because he is hrh. it would situation but he would have to _ hrh. it would situation but he would have to bow to prince george. that is all— have to bow to prince george. that is all silliness, isn't it, really? but what _ is all silliness, isn't it, really? but what it— is all silliness, isn't it, really? but what it actually means is that he is _ but what it actually means is that he is no _ but what it actually means is that he is no longer any part of the official— he is no longer any part of the official royal family, he can is a official— official royal family, he can is a official duties. he says in his own words. _ official duties. he says in his own words. he — official duties. he says in his own words. he is _ official duties. he says in his own words, he is a private citizen. that is a bit _ words, he is a private citizen. that is a bit laughable, he will never be a private _ is a bit laughable, he will never be a private citizen, and the civil suit _ a private citizen, and the civil suit is— a private citizen, and the civil suit is going to go forward, and it will be _ suit is going to go forward, and it will be headline news, messi settles out of— will be headline news, messi settles out of court, being a private citizen — out of court, being a private citizen or— out of court, being a private citizen or not. the glare of publicity _ citizen or not. the glare of publicity has not gone away. colonel. _ publicity has not gone away. colonel, just so that people understand, there may be some confusion, he does retain his service rank. can you just explain that for us? service rank. can you 'ust explain that for not service rank. can you 'ust explain that for us? any promotion he has had through _ that for us? any promotion he has had through this _ that for us? any promotion he has had through this course, - that for us? any promotion he has had through this course, the i that for us? any promotion he has had through this course, the list i had through this course, the list promotion in the royal navy was as
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vice admiral, will continue. it is the titular appointment of colonel in chief, for example, of regiments. in my regiment, he is the deputy colonel in chief because of her majesty as the colonel in chief, others are still important roles, they provide him with a privileged position in the national commemorations for remembrance sunday, for the normandy landings. this year, we have got the 80th anniversary of the great north african battles, and these are events that he would expect, as well as the falklands, he would be leading on, but he will not be able to do that. so it is very important to do that. so it is very important to him that he loses these titles. and indeed, in regiments like mine, the colonel in the deputy colonel in chief and a very important role in
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when they visit in the showing empathy with those on the front line, and also the families, the wives and husbands and children, of those in the regiment.— those in the regiment. colonel, thanks so _ those in the regiment. colonel, thanks so much _ those in the regiment. colonel, thanks so much for— those in the regiment. colonel, thanks so much for your - those in the regiment. colonel, thanks so much for your time, | those in the regiment. colonel, i thanks so much for your time, and jennie, thanks for your time as well. the time is 8.22. in 2014, a devastating storm struck the south devon coast, destroying a stretch of railway and cutting cornwall and most of devon off from the rest of the country for several weeks. you might remember these astonishing pictures of the train tracks in dawlish, dangling in mid air after the sea wall was hit by 80 mile per hour winds and washed away. in 2019, work started on construction of a new sea wall to protect the railway and the local community. our reporterjohn maguire is there this morning.
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he has been taking us around, seeing how things are progressing. john, hard hat, hi vizjacket, it will exhibit foggy behind you, but it was none of those awful winds and sea, highways that we saw in 2014. irate highways that we saw in 2014. we talked highways that we saw in 2014. - talked about a dollar, didn't we? those pictures are incredible come every time you see them, you cannot quite believe what you're seeing. that is the main line that you saw dangling in midair between london and penzance, built by ice and bad kingdom brunel180 years ago, of course, let mejust kingdom brunel180 years ago, of course, let me just show you, i think there's a train coming down the at the moment. so if you would just below where the lights of the train are, see the dog will there, thatis train are, see the dog will there, that is the original seawall. and where the train is about now, that is where the tracks were suspended. it is a long—term project, as you say started in 2019, they are spending £80 million trying to hold
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back the sea. that wall is around four metres below where i am now. this is the top of the seawall, the title is renowned as we have been on air this morning, previously it was right up against the seawall, but it gives you an idea of the challenges that are taking place. now, all this money has been spent here, all of this work has taken place, to protect the mainline. other parts of the uk coastline where there are not such valuable resources at risk, thatis such valuable resources at risk, that is a different story. a hairline crack appeared, then throughout the day, itjust kept opening — throughout the day, itjust kept opening up and opening up, the cracks— opening up and opening up, the cracks kept getting bigger and bigger~ — cracks kept getting bigger and bigger. you were just standing and moving _ bigger. you were just standing and moving [and when trying to miss defences, — moving [and when trying to miss defences, because the crack was appealing, and we were open at the
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time, _ appealing, and we were open at the time, did _ appealing, and we were open at the time, did not quite know what to do, people _ time, did not quite know what to do, people were — time, did not quite know what to do, people were coming in, we could not forced _ people were coming in, we could not forced to— people were coming in, we could not forced to close, so we were just ferociously _ forced to close, so we were just ferociously trying to fence it off as it _ ferociously trying to fence it off as it was — ferociously trying to fence it off as it was moving, so that it was not as it was moving, so that it was not a danger— as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to— as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to anyone. for as it was moving, so that it was not a danger to anyone.— a danger to anyone. for the 18 ears, a danger to anyone. for the 18 years. carla — a danger to anyone. for the 18 years, carla strong _ a danger to anyone. for the 18 years, carla strong has - a danger to anyone. for the 18 years, carla strong has woken| a danger to anyone. for the 18 i years, carla strong has woken up every morning, wondering whether her home and her business, the blue anchor pub, said there would still be standing. you anchor pub, said there would still be standing-— be standing. you could feel the waves inside _ be standing. you could feel the waves inside at _ be standing. you could feel the waves inside at high _ be standing. you could feel the waves inside at high tide, i be standing. you could feel the waves inside at high tide, the i waves inside at high tide, the building — waves inside at high tide, the building would not shake, but you could _ building would not shake, but you could feel it. building would not shake, but you could feel it— could feel it. these rocks should reduce the _ could feel it. these rocks should reduce the wave _ could feel it. these rocks should reduce the wave power - could feel it. these rocks should reduce the wave power to i could feel it. these rocks should l reduce the wave power to prevent could feel it. these rocks should i reduce the wave power to prevent the coast from collapsing. i reduce the wave power to prevent the coast from collapsing.— coast from collapsing. i have said the will coast from collapsing. i have said they will fishing _ coast from collapsing. i have said they will fishing out _ coast from collapsing. i have said they will fishing out of _ coast from collapsing. i have said they will fishing out of the - coast from collapsing. i have said they will fishing out of the bristol channal— they will fishing out of the bristol channel if they have to, i am not giving _ channel if they have to, i am not giving up. — channel if they have to, i am not giving up, and i am really glad i did not— giving up, and i am really glad i did not give up. i never thought of giving _ did not give up. i never thought of giving up — did not give up. i never thought of giving up. not once. there are days when _ giving up. not once. there are days when you _ giving up. not once. there are days when you think i am just not getting anywhere, _ when you think i am just not getting anywhere, nothing will ever be done, i will anywhere, nothing will ever be done, i will follow _ anywhere, nothing will ever be done, i will follow in the sea and have nothing. — i will follow in the sea and have nothing, but i have never thought, it is not— nothing, but i have never thought, it is not worth carrying on.
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luckily _ it is not worth carrying on. luckil . ~ , :,, it is not worth carrying on. luckil . ~ , ., :, , luckily. winter is the most anxious time for those _ luckily. winter is the most anxious time for those at _ luckily. winter is the most anxious time for those at risk _ luckily. winter is the most anxious time for those at risk of _ luckily. winter is the most anxious time for those at risk of coastal i time for those at risk of coastal erosion. here in devon, a huge section fell away last week, was just holiday caravans just metre away. but landslips can occur all year round. last spring, what was said to be the biggest in 60 years saw a major collapse on dorset�*s jurassic coastline. our shores are constantly changing. to understand what forces at play in the re—shipping them, such as from the university of plymouth study the cliffs, dunes and sand on the north cornwall coast. this cliffs, dunes and sand on the north cornwall coast.— cornwall coast. this is our favourite _ cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach. - cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach. we i cornwall coast. this is our favourite beach. we come cornwall coast. this is our- favourite beach. we come here for cornwall coast. this is our— favourite beach. we come here for 15 years— favourite beach. we come here for 15 years and _ favourite beach. we come here for 15 years and survey _ favourite beach. we come here for 15 years and survey the _ favourite beach. we come here for 15 years and survey the whole - favourite beach. we come here for 15 years and survey the whole beach i years and survey the whole beach every _ years and survey the whole beach every month _ years and survey the whole beach every month. the _ years and survey the whole beach every month-— years and survey the whole beach every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres — every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, _ every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and _ every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and a _ every month. the beach here is 3.5 kilometres long, and a severe - kilometres long, and a severe winter storm can shift up to 1 million cubic metres of sand out to sea. before summer tides bring it back again. the beach is notjust popular
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with visitors, but it is essential to protect the town. the with visitors, but it is essential to protect the town. the amount of sand that is — to protect the town. the amount of sand that is on _ to protect the town. the amount of sand that is on the _ to protect the town. the amount of sand that is on the beach _ to protect the town. the amount of. sand that is on the beach determines how easily— sand that is on the beach determines how easily the — sand that is on the beach determines how easily the town _ sand that is on the beach determines how easily the town gets _ sand that is on the beach determines how easily the town gets flooded, . how easily the town gets flooded, so if you _ how easily the town gets flooded, so if you have _ how easily the town gets flooded, so if you have an— how easily the town gets flooded, so if you have an extreme _ how easily the town gets flooded, so if you have an extreme winter - how easily the town gets flooded, so if you have an extreme winter with l if you have an extreme winter with lots of _ if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand — if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being _ if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken _ if you have an extreme winter with lots of sand being taken away - lots of sand being taken away from the beach, — lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so— lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you _ lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you are _ lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you are lowering - lots of sand being taken away from the beach, so you are lowering the| the beach, so you are lowering the beach _ the beach, so you are lowering the beach that — the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, _ the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, if _ the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, if you _ the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, if you then - the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, if you then get - the beach, so you are lowering the beach that is, if you then get a - beach that is, if you then get a storm. — beach that is, if you then get a storm. the _ beach that is, if you then get a storm, the town _ beach that is, if you then get a storm, the town is— beach that is, if you then get a storm, the town is more - beach that is, if you then get a storm, the town is more likely| storm, the town is more likely to flood. _ storm, the town is more likely to flood, because _ storm, the town is more likely to flood, because people _ storm, the town is more likely to flood, because people do - storm, the town is more likely to flood, because people do not - storm, the town is more likely to. flood, because people do not really realise _ flood, because people do not really realise that — flood, because people do not really realise that beaches _ flood, because people do not really realise that beaches and _ flood, because people do not really realise that beaches and dunes - flood, because people do not really realise that beaches and dunes are | realise that beaches and dunes are naturat— realise that beaches and dunes are natural forms — realise that beaches and dunes are natural forms of— realise that beaches and dunes are natural forms of coastal— realise that beaches and dunes are natural forms of coastal defence, i natural forms of coastal defence, and the _ natural forms of coastal defence, and the wider _ natural forms of coastal defence, and the wider and _ natural forms of coastal defence, and the wider and higher- natural forms of coastal defence, and the wider and higher the - and the wider and higher the beaches, _ and the wider and higher the beaches, the _ and the wider and higher the beaches, the better- and the wider and higher the l beaches, the better protection and the wider and higher the - beaches, the better protection the beach— beaches, the better protection the beach provides _ beaches, the better protection the beach provides against _ beaches, the better protection the beach provides against flooding. . beaches, the better protection the . beach provides against flooding. find beach provides against flooding. and build on beach provides against flooding. build on these shifting sands beach provides against flooding. bird build on these shifting sands is beach provides against flooding. build on these shifting sands is the watering hole pub. the owners here are holding back naturalforces. it are holding back natural forces. it is about how much money it is worth to spend _ is about how much money it is worth to spend for— is about how much money it is worth to spend for us to do that, and for us it— to spend for us to do that, and for us it is— to spend for us to do that, and for us it is a _ to spend for us to do that, and for us it is a very— to spend for us to do that, and for us it is a very valuable thing because _ us it is a very valuable thing because it is our livelihoods and a 42-year-old — because it is our livelihoods and a 42—year—old family business. so it mearrs— 42—year—old family business. so it means quite a lot for us to maintain it and _ means quite a lot for us to maintain it and keep — means quite a lot for us to maintain
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it and keep it here.— it and keep it here. decisions about what, if it and keep it here. decisions about what. if anything. _ it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to _ it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do _ it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are - it and keep it here. decisions about what, if anything, to do are a - what, if anything, to do are a balance between risk to people or property and cost. man versus sea is an expensive business, and often, despite design, engineering, and deep pockets, it is the sea that wins the power struggle. so here we are, down on the beach at dawlish. that is where we were talking to you just before the film, all the way down the steps, the line goes back that way, london that way, penzance that way. the wall that you can see there, that first seawall, in its totality, is 18 metres high, it goes well down into the sand until it hits the bedrock. so, i don't know, 55 feet, something like that. as you can see, a major undertaking. susie from network rail, good morning. the reason you are having to do this is to protect the mainline, isn't it? whether any alternatives? could you have moved
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the further inland? —— were there any alternatives? irate the further inland? -- were there any alternatives?— the further inland? -- were there any alternatives? we have to keep this railway _ any alternatives? we have to keep this railway line _ any alternatives? we have to keep this railway line open, _ any alternatives? we have to keep this railway line open, because - any alternatives? we have to keep this railway line open, because it | this railway line open, because it serves— this railway line open, because it serves all— this railway line open, because it serves all the communities along here~ _ serves all the communities along here we — serves all the communities along here. we did look at various options. _ here. we did look at various options, including reopening a route inland _ options, including reopening a route inland as— options, including reopening a route inland as well, we concluded that actually— inland as well, we concluded that actually spending the money on upgrading this route was the best thing _ upgrading this route was the best thing to— upgrading this route was the best thing to do it in that case. not upgrading this route was the best thing to do it in that case.- thing to do it in that case. not an easy task. _ thing to do it in that case. not an easy task. partly _ thing to do it in that case. not an easy task, partly because - thing to do it in that case. not an easy task, partly because this - thing to do it in that case. not an i easy task, partly because this beach is only here at certain times. in high tide, you cannot work on this beach, can you? he. high tide, you cannot work on this beach. can you?— high tide, you cannot work on this beach, can you? no, it has been an extreme or — beach, can you? no, it has been an extreme or challenging _ beach, can you? no, it has been an extreme or challenging project - beach, can you? no, it has been an extreme or challenging project of. extreme or challenging project of people _ extreme or challenging project of people working throughout the 2lr-hour— people working throughout the 24—hour period, and even doing things— 24—hour period, and even doing things like — 24—hour period, and even doing things like trying to get concrete setting _ things like trying to get concrete setting on the beach, digging under the sand, _ setting on the beach, digging under the sand, and it has been a really, really— the sand, and it has been a really, really challenging task, and all the best to _ really challenging task, and all the best to all— really challenging task, and all the best to all the people who did it. i think— best to all the people who did it. i think they— best to all the people who did it. i think they found it quite tricky at times _ think they found it quite tricky at times |— think they found it quite tricky at times. . think they found it quite tricky at times- itut— think they found it quite tricky at times.- but it _ think they found it quite tricky at times.- but it is _ think they found it quite tricky at times.- but it is great - think they found it quite tricky at times. i bet. but it is great to see it all done — times. i bet. but it is great to see
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it all done now. _ times. i bet. but it is great to see it all done now. and _ times. i bet. but it is great to see it all done now. and who - times. i bet. but it is great to see it all done now. and who knows? | times. i bet. but it is great to see i it all done now. and who knows? no such thing in — it all done now. and who knows? no such thing in life _ it all done now. and who knows? no such thing in life as _ it all done now. and who knows? no such thing in life as a _ such thing in life as a guarantee when you're talking about climate change coastal erosion, but the idea is to future proof it for how long? well, it has been designed to cope with lreing — well, it has been designed to cope with being able to accommodate sea-level — with being able to accommodate sea—level rises, and to be able to cope _ sea—level rises, and to be able to cope with — sea—level rises, and to be able to cope with a — sea—level rises, and to be able to cope with a one and 200 years extreme — cope with a one and 200 years extreme storm, so it has been designed — extreme storm, so it has been designed around the forecast for climate — designed around the forecast for climate change and sea—level rises. so hopefully it will improve. | climate change and sea-level rises. so hopefully it will improve.- so hopefully it will improve. i hope so. if so hopefully it will improve. i hope s0- if anyone _ so hopefully it will improve. i hope so. if anyone saw— so hopefully it will improve. i hope so. if anyone saw us _ so. if anyone saw us building it, not going — so. if anyone saw us building it, not going to come down any time soon _ not going to come down any time soon. ,, , . ~ i. , not going to come down any time soon. ,, , . ,, i. , . soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask you _ soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask you to — soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask you to swing _ soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask you to swing around? - soon. susie, thank you very much. can i ask you to swing around? we willjust show can i ask you to swing around? we will just show you the sun can i ask you to swing around? we willjust show you the sun coming up through the mist this morning. what a beautiful sight. the sea, beautiful, but often, of course, extremely problematic and challenging. back to you. john, that is a stunning — challenging. back to you. john, that is a stunning scene _ challenging. back to you. john, that is a stunning scene you _ challenging. back to you. john, that is a stunning scene you have - is a stunning scene you have finished on there. and anyway, as
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you say, it is perfect, because it looks so beautiful there, and then all that damage was done all those years ago. thank you very much, john. beautiful picture. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. well, as we've been hearing, there's mounting pressure on borisjohnson to resign over allegations of downing street parties. and the tory chair of the london assembly, andrew boff, has told bbc radio london that the issue threatened to damage the conservatives' chances of winning borough seats in may's local elections. when asked if the prime minister should go, he said he thought that was a "strong option." cabinet ministers though have rallied around the prime minister. the northern line will partially close for 17 weeks from tomorrow for upgrade works. the line between kennington and moorgate will be closed
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until mid—may meaning there will be no northern line service from elephant and castle, bank, borough, and london bridge stations. one of london's busiest tube lines is set to partially close for four staying with transport, this is how tfl services are looking right now. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. next, imagine the task of trying to count sealife! well, that's what staff at the london aquarium do every january for it's annual stock—take. in wetsuits and armed with a calculator, they count the nearly 6,000 creatures and marine species at the attraction, including the tiny tropical milk frog and boris the green sea turtle. it's also an opportunity for a spring clean too. part of our scheduled maintenance is cleaning the substrate in the bottom of the tank,
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cleaning the windows so members of the public can see all our lovely animals and also scrubbing the rockwork. it gets a bit dirty in there, so it's good to keep on top of it and keep it nice and clean. on to the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start again this morning with temperatures hovering around zero. bit of frost where they have dipped just below. high pressure is in charge, the wind is light. a few mist and fog patches out there as well. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for the dense fog in parts of west and north—west london, parts of surrey. anywhere really could see a fog patch. if you've got it, it could just linger through the morning. elsewhere, we've got sunshine. it will eventually lift and we will see some blue skies. a brighter afternoon. the wind stays light and the temperature's somewhere between 6—8 celsius. overnight it will be a chilly start to the night. the minimum temperature dropping down below zero. cloud moving in from the east and with that again some dense patches of mist and fog potentially by saturday morning. the minimum down to minus 2.
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a murky start to saturday. more cloud around across the weekend. the high pressure gradually starts to slide away towards the east and allows fronts to come in from the west. there is a chance of a shower on sunday morning but not widespread, however. as i said, quite a bit of cloud but the temperature milder, not only during the daytime but temperatures overnight should stay above zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store from sam and gethin. it's a shocking scam that is doing the rounds right now.
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you think you have paid for all your funeral costs, but once you have gone, your loved ones are hit with the bill because the funeral plan does not exist. with new rules coming into crackdown on this com, fraudsters are desperate to get your cash now. so, don't miss gloria hunniford's advice on what to watch out for. and scammers have no limits as to who they will target. with valentine's day around the corner, this is the busiest time for romance fraud. rav wilding is here with tips to keep your wallet and heart safe. some people seem to always stay safe on covid, while others keep getting it. but why? dr punam has the answer, plus, she will also tell us how getting a cold might stop you catching covid. and they are masters at catching their prey. from hunting animals, to the fungus that mind controls ants. sir david attenborough shows us the secret life of plants in his new series, the green planet. we have got an exclusive
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look at that episode. graziano do prima brings us our friday strictly fitness. he has got a routine that will have you dancing like a pro, even if it is in your own living room! we will explain more at 9:15am. as it stands, the world number one men's tennis player, novak djokovic, is facing deportation from australia after having his visa revoked for a second time. he had been due to defend his australian open title in melbourne, and was seen training on court earlier today. what next? that is the question. it is happening _ what next? that is the question. it is happening so — what next? that is the question. it is happening so fast. _ what next? that is the question. it is happening so fast. there - what next? that is the question. it is happening so fast. there are - what next? that is the question. itj is happening so fast. there are two options. novak djokovic could say, enough is enough, i will accept the deportation. there is the implication of bargaining that if you have your visa without you could
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not be able to come back for three years. that is one train of thought. he could stay to fight the decision in court, knowing he did when the initial appeal. you in court, knowing he did when the initial appeal-— initial appeal. you have been watchinu initial appeal. you have been watching the _ initial appeal. you have been watching the statements - initial appeal. you have been - watching the statements coming out from australia very closely. i am not sure if you have seen this one in the last b minutes. scott morrison, the prime minister, of course, was backing up alex full, the immigration minister. i will read you out a statement from the prime minister. i note the immigration decision and understand following careful consideration action was taken on the basis it was in the interests of the public to do so. when on to say australians have been through very difficult times, sticking together in saving lives.
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australia's have made sacrifices during the pandemic and they'll expect the results of their sacrifices to be protected for that this is what the minister is doing in taking this action today. he is certain phrases _ in taking this action today. he is certain phrases like _ in taking this action today. he is certain phrases like in _ in taking this action today. he is certain phrases like in the - certain phrases like in the interests of the public and those of health and safety. it is a matter of seeing what novak djokovic does. [30 seeing what novak djokovic does. do we know there is a meeting on saturday? we we know there is a meeting on saturday?— we know there is a meeting on saturda ? ~ ~ ., , . saturday? we know the core staff are on standby- — saturday? we know the core staff are on standby- he _ saturday? we know the core staff are on standby. he is _ saturday? we know the core staff are on standby. he is meeting _ saturday? we know the core staff are on standby. he is meeting with - on standby. he is meeting with authorities _ on standby. he is meeting with authorities tomorrow. - on standby. he is meeting with authorities tomorrow. he - on standby. he is meeting with authorities tomorrow. he is - authorities tomorrow. he is anticipating it could be a challenge by the team of novak djokovic. if he challenges it he could alienate the australian public even further, according to consensus. i spoke to russell fuller earlier about this very point. russell fuller earlier about this very point-— russell fuller earlier about this ve oint. ~ ., . . ,, very point. according to a massive oll done very point. according to a massive poll done a _ very point. according to a massive poll done a couple _ very point. according to a massive poll done a couple of _ very point. according to a massive poll done a couple of days - very point. according to a massive poll done a couple of days ago, i poll done a couple of days ago, there were over 80% of people according to that survey that said it was time for novak djokovic to
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leave that this is always the instinct of the australian government. thejudge ruled in favour of novak djokovic because he felt he was unreasonably treated at the border when he arrived in melbourne. all along the australian government has been saying, if you have had a recent covid infection in the last six months for that is not a reason to come to australia. djokovic released a statement two days ago when he admitted were back in february he had broken isolation rules, he had gone to a tennis centre and conducted an interview with a team from the keep when he was infectious and knew he had covid. one other thing to say, normally in the circumstances, if you're ether is revoked in these circumstances, you are not eligible to apply for another these are for
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another three years. it does also say that might not occur if there are compelling circumstances affecting the interests of australia. potentially djokovic is now 34. could not play at 35, 36 or 37. could not come back until he was 38. he 37. could not come back until he was 38. , ., y 37. could not come back until he was 38. _, y ., 38. he is also trying to get the record 21 grand _ 38. he is also trying to get the record 21 grand slam - 38. he is also trying to get the record 21 grand slam titles. i 38. he is also trying to get the l record 21 grand slam titles. that could come elsewhere in the year, of course. there will be a meeting between immigration officials and novak djokovic's team. he will not had to spend friday night back in the detention hotel, which at first was suggested because his visa has been revoked. reportedly he would have had to have gone back into the hotel. he will not have to do this. tennis have had this nightmare now. the draw with novak djokovic as top seed that is one scenario, depending if he were to win the appeal, maybe, if he were to win the appeal, maybe,
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if he were to win the appeal, maybe, if he does appeal. the other scenarios, they have to replace him at the top of the order with maybe it has been suggested that this seed and a lucky loser comes into the jewel at the bottom as well. lots to talk about. we need to find out what is happening with the weather. they will not be one experience the same across the country but there is such across the country but there is such a breadth of experience in terms of temperatures. he had a halo behind you. i know that is not true or at! overall in the uk ends are relatively quiet weather—wise. before we get onto what is happening, let me taking a short trip away towards western parts of norway where it has been a completely different story. hold onto your breakfast. stomach churning seas off the western coast. it has been a story of extensive floods. a lot of snowmelt and as
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much as a month's worth of rain fell in 24 hours. that has caused all sorts of problems. there is no way of getting it is because of our weather. high pressure over us diverting all the cloud and rain to the north of ascending to the western coast of norway. under the air of high pressure, the air has started to stagnate across parts of london and south—east where there are medium to high levels of background pollution at the moment. there will be traffic peaks across the country but because of the stagnating and this is where we will struggle with pollution levels today. also in the south as well as widespread frost in temperatures as low as —5 by dense patches of fog to hamper the morning journey. they were left unclear. then cloudy in north—west england and northern ireland, as he splashes of rain. most places dry, aberdeenshire and angus, temperatures are up to 10 degrees. it will stay around those
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levels will submit to single figures —— is in her mid—single figures in the south. more in a way of mist and low cloud tonight particularly in the south and east. a cold night in scotland and northern ireland compared with last night. temperatures in double figures. tomorrow we could be close to freezing. top a lot more clad across england and wales. an misty and murky start with dense patches of fog around. that will let unclear in some places. some sunshine coming through, not as much as today. medicalfor many. on through, not as much as today. medical for many. on saturday night into sunday, high pressure will sneak away. —— cool for many. the chance of the odd shower. most places stay dry on sunday. more of a breeze this time coming in from the
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north—west which will break up the cloud more readily. there will be a lot more sunshine around it will feel milder. that is how the weekend forecast is looking. have a good weekend. last summer, swimmer will perry, made his paralympic debut at the tokyo games — he was brilliant. we know what support we gave to everyone at the paralympic games. when he came home, it was different. you are a paralympian. there you are, proudly wearing the shirt that you and buy your achievements. that presumably was a wonderful time for you. it your achievements. that presumably was a wonderful time for you.- was a wonderful time for you. it was incredible, the _ was a wonderful time for you. it was incredible, the most _ was a wonderful time for you. it was incredible, the most special- was a wonderful time for you. it was incredible, the most special time . was a wonderful time for you. it was incredible, the most special time of| incredible, the most special time of my life. such a celebration of disability and inclusion.- my life. such a celebration of disability and inclusion. what were
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our disability and inclusion. what were your events? _ disability and inclusion. what were your events? how _ disability and inclusion. what were your events? how did _ disability and inclusion. what were your events? how did you - disability and inclusion. what were your events? how did you do. - disability and inclusion. what were your events? how did you do. i - disability and inclusion. what were | your events? how did you do. i was disability and inclusion. what were i your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer. — your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer. i — your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer, i made _ your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer, i made one _ your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer, i made one final _ your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer, i made one final with - your events? how did you do. i was a swimmer, i made one final with the l swimmer, i made one final with the relay team, which was fantastic. i believe i had top 20 finishes in all the other races, which is more than i could have hoped for. i was very happy with my achievements. the reason we are _ happy with my achievements. the reason we are highlighting your achievements, absolutely right, this is a wonderful time. then you come back home. there is a sequence of events you think you just cannot keep to yourself. you to make public, to do with how people respond to you. what we have suggested, i know you tweeted quite a bit about it at that time. these are your words greatly thought maybe you would read out some of the tweet sheep attack because people will understand the sentiment behind them. if you are happy to do that, go ahead. i know you have some of their words. go ahead. i know you have some of their words-—
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their words. nine times out of ten when i no their words. nine times out of ten when i go into _ their words. nine times out of ten when i go into public, _ their words. nine times out of ten when i go into public, i— their words. nine times out of ten when i go into public, i can - their words. nine times out of ten when i go into public, i can take i when i go into public, i can take the abuse, laughter, staring, etc. are you ok meeting these out? are you 0k meeting these out? yes. when i are you 0k meeting these out? yes. when i wrote — are you 0k meeting these out? yes. when i wrote this _ are you 0k meeting these out? yes. when i wrote this i _ are you 0k meeting these out? yes. when i wrote this i was _ are you 0k meeting these out? jazz when i wrote this i was really angry. i had a really bad day. i just wanted to relax. then you have events where i get laughed at. you exlained events where i get laughed at. you explained what happened. you said you had one of those days going into the shop. you had one of those days going into the shop. n you had one of those days going into the sho -. ., you had one of those days going into the sho -. . ., ., you had one of those days going into the sho. . ., ., .,, you had one of those days going into the sho. . ., ., , the shop. i had one of those days when going _ the shop. i had one of those days when going into _ the shop. i had one of those days when going into the _ the shop. i had one of those days when going into the shop. - the shop. i had one of those days when going into the shop. three | when going into the shop. three girls ran 16—year—old burst out laughing. not difficult to hear. laughing at you? laughing. not difficult to hear. laughing at you?—
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laughing. not difficult to hear. laughing at you? yes, it is a very common occurrence. _ laughing at you? yes, it is a very common occurrence. to - laughing at you? yes, it is a very common occurrence. to be - laughing at you? yes, it is a very i common occurrence. to be honest, i wanted to cry. there were so many occasions when i am consistently reminded that to some my presence in life is just a reminded that to some my presence in life isjust a joke. me living life to actually hilarious, why should this be? ~ ., to actually hilarious, why should this be? ~ . i. . to actually hilarious, why should this be? ~ . . ., . this be? what you had done and i will say for _ this be? what you had done and i will say for anyone _ this be? what you had done and i will say for anyone watching, i this be? what you had done and i will say for anyone watching, you | will say for anyone watching, you have done an incredibly brave and bold thing by calling it out. but some people say those things and do not do it. he had done that then, you have called it out, loud and proud. where are you now? is it feeling any better to get out there, to say it so people can know more about how it makes you feel? the really fantastic _ about how it makes you feel? tue: really fantastic thing about how it makes you feel? he really fantastic thing i about how it makes you feel? tte: really fantastic thing i have got, the reaction is knowing how many people are standing by me. it is a really good reminder this is a minority of the public. the great minority of the public. the great minority stand behind me. it is really good to educate them. so many people do not know this is
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happening. people do not know this is happening-— people do not know this is happening. that is what the paralympics _ happening. that is what the paralympics are _ happening. that is what the paralympics are all- happening. that is what the paralympics are all about. l happening. that is what the | paralympics are all about. it happening. that is what the i paralympics are all about. it is a shame we _ paralympics are all about. it is a shame we can — paralympics are all about. it is a shame we can only _ paralympics are all about. it is a shame we can only do _ paralympics are all about. it is a shame we can only do that i paralympics are all about. it is a shame we can only do that once| paralympics are all about. it is a i shame we can only do that once every four years. the other three years we are pretty irrelevant. so i think it is great, i have seen so many people backing michaels, so many people messaging and support saying they will call others out, they understand. parents with people of my disability message in saying, i'm really worried about my child growing up that what can i do? at the moment there is nothing we can do. i am trying harder to fight it. at the moment we must band together and fight the cause. tt at the moment we must band together and fight the cause.— and fight the cause. it feels quite ho eless and fight the cause. it feels quite hopeless when _ and fight the cause. it feels quite hopeless when you _ and fight the cause. it feels quite hopeless when you say _ and fight the cause. it feels quite hopeless when you say to - and fight the cause. it feels quite | hopeless when you say to parents and fight the cause. it feels quite i hopeless when you say to parents we are worried about their children and there is nothing we can do. tt is there is nothing we can do. it is tou~h. i there is nothing we can do. it is tough- i have — there is nothing we can do. it is tough. i have no _ there is nothing we can do. it is tough. i have no one _ there is nothing we can do. tit 3 tough. i have no one to look and follow, this is what they did to try to combat it. i have looked and looked. in terms of models. there are lots of role models with my
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condition, so many people to look up to but not in fighting this public abuse that we get. it is quite difficult in terms of offering advice. i am learning as well. i am learning permit maybe we need to do this to get everyone together. at the moment it is spreading the word that seems to work me getting out there and getting people talking about it. that is what is working the most was need a long—term solution. the most was need a long-term solution. ~ ., the most was need a long-term solution. ~ . ., , ., the most was need a long-term solution. ~ . ., ., solution. what do you do in practice? — solution. what do you do in practice? you _ solution. what do you do in practice? you said - solution. what do you do in practice? you said that i solution. what do you do in practice? you said that wasj solution. what do you do in i practice? you said that was written on a particularly bad day. when something like that happens and you hear voices, something like that happens and you hearvoices, it something like that happens and you hear voices, it is probably rarely done explicitly, maybe it is. maybe you hear conversations or whatever. what do you do? haifa you hear conversations or whatever. what do you do?— you hear conversations or whatever. what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't — what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a — what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a bad _ what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a bad day _ what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a bad day in _ what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a bad day in terms - what do you do? how do you react? in on a wasn't a bad day in terms of i on a wasn't a bad day in terms of the incident will stop it can be a lot worse than that. i have been filmed, photographed, shouted at.
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that was pretty mild. most of the time... i have been brought up really well to take it on the chin, take it on the shoulder because i have been told we cannot change it, you havejust have been told we cannot change it, you have just got to live, you have got to be strong. i want to be strong and i think i am but i should not have to be. i should not have to take it on the chin and the shoulder. i go through enough difficulties in life as it is with my dwarfism. i had to modify my car and cannot reach stuff. some have the condition far worse than me. you should not have too have this extra strength to go out in public and face public abuse, we should be able to blend in. . face public abuse, we should be able to blend in. , , . , to blend in. there is the phrase, when you _ to blend in. there is the phrase, when you saw — to blend in. there is the phrase, when you saw with _ to blend in. there is the phrase, when you saw with black- to blend in. there is the phrase, when you saw with black lives i to blend in. there is the phrase, i when you saw with black lives matter and lesser conversations about racism, it is not enough to say you are not racist. you need to be antiracist. it is the same thing. it is not enough to just kind of go,
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tat, tat, should not say things like that, should not use those words. now it is about friends and allies calling people out as well. exactly. it is about standing _ calling people out as well. exactly. it is about standing together. i calling people out as well. exactly. it is about standing together. we l it is about standing together. we have come so far with black lives matter, religion, everything. this is something we have missed out on. everyone needs to stand together with this. when the whole public gets behind it, everyone realises, this is really not acceptable, we didn't realise it was happening in something we really need to back. t something we really need to back. i hope this doesn't sound insensitive but it is at the heart of what you are talking about. someone today is out with their kids and acu, children often unwittingly... i suppose you have to say anyway they are the least guilty on all of this, out of curiosity because you look different. how is that made better in terms of you not feeling like something really wrong has happened
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in those situations? should an adult —— what should an adult say to a child, as one example? that -- what should an adult say to a child, as one example? that happened when i was starting _ child, as one example? that happened when i was starting off— child, as one example? that happened when i was starting off the _ child, as one example? that happened when i was starting off the media i when i was starting off the media campaign on this. the reporter had someone educate a child. one thing i will always say is it is ok for children to be curious because i am sure when i was six, seven years old, i would have been looking at others with disabilities curious. i am not exempt from it, i was a child as well. curiosity is fine, they are children. when it is adults, teenagers, grow up. when they are making a joke, we have all heard it before. you are not funny, not original. it is ok for children to be curious, it is the age when brains are like a sponge. they are absorbing all of these things and thatis absorbing all of these things and that is when we need to educate them. parents ask me, can you explain to my son or daughter why
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you are like this? i am more than happy to do that. sometimes they can do it can sometimes they have asked me to do it. it makes me happy because they want to make a difference and that is brilliant. really interesting hearing from you. are you training? it is very tiring. i have had five hours in the pool roughly yesterday. just i have had five hours in the pool roughly yesterday.— i have had five hours in the pool roughly yesterday. just making me feel really slovenly. _ roughly yesterday. just making me feel really slovenly. another- roughly yesterday. just making me feel really slovenly. another four, | feel really slovenly. another four, five to no feel really slovenly. another four, five to go before _ feel really slovenly. another four, five to go before the _ feel really slovenly. another four, five to go before the weekend. i feel really slovenly. another four, | five to go before the weekend. we have trials in one month and we are really busy. all guns blazing. excellent. that is what it takes to be a paralympian. thank you so much. take care. a host of brand new celebrities will be lacing up their skates and donning those sequins as "dancing on ice" returns to our screens this weekend. joining them is a former england international who is no
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stranger to performing under pressure, but might feel more at home on grass than ice — it's rugby star ben foden — and we can speak to him now. how are you doing? good morning. how are you? how are you doing? good morning. how are ou? ., , how are you doing? good morning. how are ou? . , . i. are you? really well. had you started training? _ are you? really well. had you started training? we - are you? really well. had you started training? we went i are you? really well. had you | started training? we went into trainin: started training? we went into training three _ started training? we went into training three months - started training? we went into training three months ago. i started training? we went into i training three months ago. when you sign up, i think it is more for safety as well you have to learn to skate before you meet up with your partner. when you meet up with your professional partner, it is about doing moves tricks and lifts. when i was in new york i did 20 hours. could you skate before?- was in new york i did 20 hours. could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been _ could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been 21 _ could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been 21 years. _ could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been 21 years. in - could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been 21 years. in my i could you skate before? when i was 15. it has been 21 years. in my head| 15. it has been 21 years. in my head i thought i was that 15—year—old. it has taken some getting used to, that is the show. we has taken some getting used to, that is the show. ~ has taken some getting used to, that is the show— is the show. we can only see your head and shoulders _ is the show. we can only see your head and shoulders shot. - is the show. we can only see your head and shoulders shot. i i is the show. we can only see your head and shoulders shot. i am i head and shoulders shot. i am assuming you are wearing... are you
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wearing an ice skating all in one body stocking by way of preparation? we cannot see the rest of you. t am we cannot see the rest of you. i am not. i we cannot see the rest of you. i am not- i decided _ we cannot see the rest of you. i am not. i decided to _ we cannot see the rest of you. i am not. i decided to wear _ we cannot see the rest of you. t —n not. i decided to wear black because it is slimming, is it not? hagar not. i decided to wear black because it is slimming, is it not?— it is slimming, is it not? how are ou it is slimming, is it not? how are you getting _ it is slimming, is it not? how are you getting on — it is slimming, is it not? how are you getting on with _ it is slimming, is it not? how are you getting on with the _ it is slimming, is it not? how are you getting on with the outfit? i it is slimming, is it not? how are i you getting on with the outfit? that has been a battle _ you getting on with the outfit? tngit has been a battle as well that usually i like black, white and grey. yellow, pink sequins, and lack of outfits as well, that is a bit of a shocker. it is all about glitz and glamour and entertainment. a shocker. it is all about glitz and glamourand entertainment. i'm a shocker. it is all about glitz and glamour and entertainment. i'm sure rugby boys will be prepped and ready to read me on some of the outfits i will be wearing. you to read me on some of the outfits i will be wearing.— will be wearing. you come from a sort will be wearing. you come from a sport where _ will be wearing. you come from a sport where there _ will be wearing. you come from a sport where there are _ will be wearing. you come from a sport where there are colossal. will be wearing. you come from a | sport where there are colossal hits and you get injured a lot. let's talk about falling over on ice, instead of dancing on ice, how is that going? to instead of dancing on ice, how is that going?— instead of dancing on ice, how is that uuoin? ., , ., , , ., that going? to be honest, i try not to fall over— that going? to be honest, i try not to fall over as _ that going? to be honest, i try not to fall over as much _ that going? to be honest, i try not to fall over as much as _ that going? to be honest, i try not to fall over as much as possible i to fall over as much as possible which puts me at more risk. i am
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adamant i do not want to fall over. in a rugby field you get smashed, hit, cat. usually if you are on the floor for longer than a couple of seconds, you get your cars up and get back on the defensive line. here, everyone stops to make sure you are fine and ok. do not worry about it and it is fine. nice to have concerned faces around you when you fall over for once.— you fall over for once. didn't you have that _ you fall over for once. didn't you have that in _ you fall over for once. didn't you have that in mind, _ you fall over for once. didn't you have that in mind, the _ you fall over for once. didn't you have that in mind, the whole i you fall over for once. didn't you i have that in mind, the whole falling over? i know you can take knocks on the rugby pitch and all of that, thatis the rugby pitch and all of that, that is fine, you are tough enough and do not have to prove it. it is dangerous on ice. tt and do not have to prove it. it is dangerous on ice.— dangerous on ice. it really is. talkin: dangerous on ice. it really is. talking to — dangerous on ice. it really is. talking to the _ dangerous on ice. it really is. talking to the ice, _ dangerous on ice. it really is. talking to the ice, talking i dangerous on ice. it really is. talking to the ice, talking to | dangerous on ice. it really is. i talking to the ice, talking to my partner and saying, what kind of things have happened? last season, i think rebecca bardy nicked andy's, robin's husband with a skate and the iron caused stitches, people dislocating shoulders and breaking bones. —— on the eye and it caused
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stitches. you do get the respect and you realise how the guys are and the risks they go through. some of the stunts and tricks they perform are mind blowing, so definitely. t stunts and tricks they perform are mind blowing, so definitely. i know ou have mind blowing, so definitely. i know you have been _ mind blowing, so definitely. i know you have been watching _ mind blowing, so definitely. i know you have been watching the i mind blowing, so definitely. i know you have been watching the film i you have been watching the film blades of glory, how much are you channelling the main character? honestly i think you are well in there and you have embraced it. on a scale of one to ten, where are you? i would definitely say definitely at 27. we will get there. —— up to seven. tt 27. we will get there. -- up to seven. . 27. we will get there. -- up to seven. , ., seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance- _ seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance. what _ seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance. what is _ seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance. what is going i seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance. what is going to i seven. it is posture as well, grace and elegance. what is going to be your trick you have strength on your side, i suppose. your trick you have strength on your side, isuppose. stability. you know
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how to hold your ground. iaghast side, i suppose. stability. you know how to hold your ground.— how to hold your ground. what will be our how to hold your ground. what will be your trick? _ how to hold your ground. what will be your trick? that _ how to hold your ground. what will be your trick? that is _ how to hold your ground. what will be your trick? that is a _ how to hold your ground. what will be your trick? that is a funny i be your trick? that is a funny thing. many see other competitors and meat, it is a nice environment. the element of competition comes in. you start to weigh everyone up. guys like brendan, kimberly and regan, who had a very good dance background, they look very nice on theice background, they look very nice on the ice and they know when the cameras are and stuff. what will i be better than them? it will be more of the lists for me. my partner works me quite hard. we did 20 minutes of less before we go on to the ice. i will be working on that and trying to do some impressive lifts. you must be terrified of dropping your partner. i had been quite confident. yesterday was the first time there was a proper slip and it could have been bad. it made me think i have a due diligence to
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make sure she does not get hurt. it was quite scary. because she is so high in the air and the ground is so hard, she has no control. if i do it wrong... every time you are lifting man always get confident —— is do get too confident and comfortable. good luck. we will see how it goes. really looking forward to seeing you in the pink outfit and yellow. thank ou ve in the pink outfit and yellow. thank you very much- _ dancing on ice starts this sunday at 6:30pm on itv and itv hub. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59am.
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morning, it's friday — welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are yuor headlines at 9 am. novak djokovic has had his australian visa cancelled... again. he's set to be deported. there was some hesitancy from victorians about him being let in, now that hesitancy has gone up exponentially and i think there is a lot of relief in victoria that as it stands right now, he's not playing in australian open. is it the right decision do you think? let me know. staff at downing street have been accused of holding two parties there, the night before the queen sat alone cos of covid restrictions to mourn her husband at his funeral. the woman who accsues prince andrew of seually assualting her when she was 17
9:01 am
welcomes the court ruling that her civil case against him can go ahead.

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