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tv   Context  BBC News  January 13, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. prince andrew is losing his royal and military titles — he will no longer officially be known as his royal highness. buckinham palace says prince andrew — seen leaving windsor this morning — is handing his titles back to the queen — and will continue not to undertake any public duties. the move comes the day after a judge in new york ruled the prince must defend an accusation of sexually assaulting virginia guiffre in a civil court case — an accusation he denies. no let up in the pressure on borisjohnson, as some tory mps say he should resign, for attending a drinks party, during lockdown. tonight with the context, chair of young labour, jess barnard and former member of donald trump's presidential transition team bryan lanza.
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hello. buckingham palace has announced that "with the queen's approval and agreement," all of prince andrew's military titles and royal patronages have been returned. the duke of york is facing a civil lawsuit in new york in which he accused him of having sex with a teenager trafficked by the disgraced financierjeffrey epstein. an accusation he strenously denies. prince andrew has been mostly out of the public eye for the past year but he had retained his honourary military roles with a number of british regiments. let's bring in our correspondent danjohnson he will be defending this case, this civil case as a private citizen? it looks that way. he will no longer be a functioning representative or a working member of the british royal
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family. what happened today effectively ends his formal role in the well family. he will step back from the honourary positions that he maintains, notjust in army, navy, and air force regimens in the uk but also various commonwealth countries and all of those titles will be handed back to the queen and the understanding will be spread amongst other members of the royal family. this is notjust a temporary measure or adjust brings angela stepping back while he sees through that court case base is a permanent and into his role in the royalfamily regardless of the outcome of that civil case but the message we are getting from people close to him if this is an indication that he is prepared to fight that case and defend himself but he is aware that might take time and might be expensive and could be embarrassing and on the royalfamily in a big year does not want that sort of thing hanging over at the royal jubilee.
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thing hanging over at the royal jubilee. . , jubilee. that is the point, the patentability _ jubilee. that is the point, the patentability celebration - jubilee. that is the point, the i patentability celebration coming jubilee. that is the point, the - patentability celebration coming up later this year and you could see why they would not wanted to be a further embarrassment and further focused during what is an important yearfor focused during what is an important year for royal family. the focused during what is an important year for royal family.— year for royal family. the intention is to create — year for royal family. the intention is to create some _ year for royal family. the intention is to create some space _ year for royal family. the intention is to create some space privately l is to create some space privately for angela to fight this case if thatis for angela to fight this case if that is his intention but also so that is his intention but also so that the royal family to some degree is shielded from what could be a messy protracted potentially embarrassing process and it may take a long time and there may be court hearings that dubuque has to appear on. who knows what sort of evidence may be produced if the case gets that far. what happened today gives no indication as to let it think is likely to set up a case by whether he would potentially lose it. if he does continue this is not about what he is guilty or not but in the widest sense of recognising the potential application harm that has already been suffered to some degree and could come in the future and putting that distance between them now the other members and senior
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members of the well family so he is not going to use the title hrh any longer so he will still remain a prince and he will still be called the duke of york but he want undertake any formal functions on behalf of the queen. this undertake any formal functions on behalf of the queen.— undertake any formal functions on behalf of the queen. this is a very british thing- _ behalf of the queen. this is a very british thing. he _ behalf of the queen. this is a very british thing. he does _ behalf of the queen. this is a very british thing. he does not - behalf of the queen. this is a very british thing. he does not get - behalf of the queen. this is a very | british thing. he does not get more british than this. i put the question to you. is it the right decision? it comes very soon after the ruling from the judge yesterday. absolutely it's the right decision but i would say it's a deal. there been serious allegations and questions should have been asked of his involvement in this the allegations against him. it's really concerning that he's continued to hold the title and position of power that he has and continues to be protected and what's really important to remember is that there
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are victims of sexual assault involved in this situation and particularly in the case against him the allegation he's sexually assaulting a minor and his association with a convicted child sex trafficking, abuse, and paedophile, sir is no way all this time he should have continued to be a public figure and associates with the royal family. a public figure and associates with the royalfamily. it is a public figure and associates with the royalfamily.— the royalfamily. it is an allegation _ the royalfamily. it is an allegation he _ the royalfamily. it is an allegation he denies - the royalfamily. it is anj allegation he denies but the royal family. it is an i allegation he denies but as the analyst saying it seems he's going to fight it and fight if he read in the coming months. british cabinet ministers are lining up to show their support for the prime minister after he yesterday admitted to attending a drinks party in lockdown, and apologised for the way it had been handled. but a second political crisis is now brewing — beyond the question of whether boris johnson broke the rules by attending that party. that is a growing division within the conservative party between its scottish branch
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and the national party. every single one of the 31 conservative members of the scottish parliament have now called on borisjohnson to resign, including their leader douglas ross. here was jacob rees—mogg last night. few conservative politicians representating voters north of the scottish border are supporting the prime minister. douglas ross has been a lightweight figure so... oof, so wait, hang on. the leader of the scottish conservatives an msp an mp is a lightweight figure? alastair and jack tried to repair the damage when he said douglas ross was a very serious politician. while telling the cabinet learning on supporting the prime minister. we know supporting the prime minister. - know he did not get an e—mail telling him that was a bring your own person party or event we know he went into the garden at six o'clock and we know he left at 695 and he made that clear in his statement and he has made a heartfelt apology and he has made a heartfelt apology and he understands people are angry about these events and as i say we
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should wait for the outcome for his inquiry. let's speak first to adam tomkins — professor of law at glasgow university and until last year a conservative member of the scottish parliament. do you agree with douglas ross that he should go? i do you agree with douglas ross that he should go?— he should go? i am afraid i do. with ureat he should go? i am afraid i do. with great reluctance _ he should go? i am afraid i do. with great reluctance the _ he should go? i am afraid i do. with great reluctance the position - great reluctance the position has become untenable and indefensible and it's perfectly clear that he and his senior team broke rules that the rest of us were abiding by and we have very small number on the fundamental precepts of this country one of which is at the same rules apply to the government equally and i'm afraid the prime minister has gone some way to cultivate a sense that the rules don't somehow apply to him and that is good enough and for those reasons he's right to call
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for this. this for those reasons he's right to call for this. �* , . for those reasons he's right to call forthis. r . , , ~ for those reasons he's right to call forthis. , , . , . ., for this. as a public difference of oinion for this. as a public difference of opinion between _ for this. as a public difference of opinion between the _ for this. as a public difference of opinion between the leader - for this. as a public difference of opinion between the leader of i for this. as a public difference of| opinion between the leader of the scottish conservatives and the studies secretary in westminster. how does that play out? do you think it could lead to a split between the two sides of the party? it it could lead to a split between the two sides of the party?— two sides of the party? it could and i think it should. _ two sides of the party? it could and i think it should. i _ two sides of the party? it could and i think it should. i would _ two sides of the party? it could and i think it should. i would make - two sides of the party? it could and i think it should. i would make it i i think it should. i would make it to in the sense that i think the scottish electorate is much more sophisticated than the scottish political party sometimes get credit for being and the scottish voters got used to having two very different sorts of elections the scottish parliament and for the apartment in house of commons and we have different voting systems and on the one and the scottish electorate now expects that there are likely to be different party political structures by the parties that seek to represent the people of scotland
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in the scottish parliament and seek to represent everyone in the house of commons and i think it's long since past time that those of us on the centre right of scottish but it takes detach ourselves from the uk party to form i would use different labels and call it something like the liberal unionists or something like this because all of the bad days at the scottish conservatives have in hollywood are caused by things that are going wrong. i wonder about the optics. when we are talking about the union because here you have backing a farmer administer and then today in the house this happened. just watch. following his
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dis-harain happened. just watch. following his disparaging remarks _ happened. just watch. following his disparaging remarks about - happened. just watch. following his disparaging remarks about the - happened. just watch. following his l disparaging remarks about the leader of the scottish conservatives can we have a statement from him about exactly what he meant by that. for example does he think the leader of the mouse conservatives is a likely take care and can you name him? my honourable friend the secretary of state _ my honourable friend the secretary of state is — my honourable friend the secretary of state is called salmon hearts. the leader of the most conservatives who was elected over ten years ago that's the point that there seems to be within the conservative a union problem he was unable to recall the name of the leader of the conservative party and given his
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unhelpful and inaccurate remarks yesterday and jacob called douglas a lightweight and douglas is anything but a lightweight. if a man of steel in principal and he has some today and during the last couple of days indeed has he did when he resigned from the government of the dominant cummings affect even a year and a half ago he's a man of real integrity and honesty of the principal and have a great deal more confidence in the future than they do in borisjohnson. aslur confidence in the future than they do in boris johnson.— confidence in the future than they do in boris johnson. our politics on both sides becoming _ do in boris johnson. our politics on both sides becoming so _ do in boris johnson. our politics on both sides becoming so toxic - do in boris johnson. our politics on both sides becoming so toxic and l do in boris johnson. our politics on | both sides becoming so toxic and so divisive the general public opinion of politics so no that we are starting to see real fragmentation that he is putting that the strains
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of your union and ndb union here in the uk? i of your union and ndb union here in the uk? 4' , of your union and ndb union here in the uk? ~ , , , of your union and ndb union here in theuk? ~ ,,, , the uk? i think every issue becomes more partisan _ the uk? i think every issue becomes more partisan as _ the uk? i think every issue becomes more partisan as people _ the uk? i think every issue becomes more partisan as people jump - the uk? i think every issue becomes more partisan as people jump into i more partisan as peoplejump into their quarters and get in combat mode really quickly and let's happening borisjohnson it's a dumb mistake and we have that same situation with politicians here in america where they put tough lockdown rules in new york but they spend their vacation in florida which has very liberal rules. it's the hypocrisy that becomes too much for us in the hypocrisy coming to much for the british people. i want to ask ou much for the british people. i want to ask you about _ much for the british people. i want to ask you about the _ much for the british people. i want to ask you about the apology - much for the british people. i want to ask you about the apology boris| to ask you about the apology boris johnson gave yesterday and man u previously worked for would never apologise. he saw and appointed as weakness appointed me and i don't know what is true, reportedly today in borisjohnson at the prime minister's questions went into the tea rooms he did not think he needed
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to apologise for anything because he does not think he has broken the rules. do you think you should have apologised? ii rules. do you think you should have apologised?— apologised? if the apology is insincere. — apologised? if the apology is insincere, don't _ apologised? if the apology is insincere, don't think - apologised? if the apology is insincere, don't think the - apologised? if the apology is - insincere, don't think the apology. you never apologise from trump plus plus ten point because he were never awarded for it. in he apologised they say ok you are guilty of something you are guilty of some conditions that found and that becomes a narrative. i think trump displayed that there are four years he was president and you cannot apologise but he was also very good at changing the narrative and i don't think borisjohnson is as effective as donald trump as changing the narrative so he was put in a difficult position and he displayed weakness. {line in a difficult position and he displayed weakness. one thing he would be interested _ displayed weakness. one thing he would be interested in _ displayed weakness. one thing he would be interested in is- displayed weakness. one thing he would be interested in is the - would be interested in is the polling today. labour has a ten point lead butjohn curtis who was a sage on these things he says what is happening here is that terry supports is following and is not
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necessarily at the public has discovered an enthusiasm for the opposition. with that in mind would seniorfigure is opposition. with that in mind would senior figure is actually back boris johnson to hang around? i senior figure is actually back boris johnson to hang around?- senior figure is actually back boris johnson to hang around? i think the thin we johnson to hang around? i think the thing we have _ johnson to hang around? i think the thing we have got _ johnson to hang around? i think the thing we have got to _ johnson to hang around? i think the thing we have got to remember - johnson to hang around? i think the thing we have got to remember is l thing we have got to remember is it's really— thing we have got to remember is it's really important that we have a government that cares about the general— government that cares about the general public and the help of the general— general public and the help of the general public and the help of the general public but also the trust in democracy— general public but also the trust in democracy and i elected representatives and the longer we have people in charge i and constantly seem to walk around making — constantly seem to walk around making the worst mistakes and are responsible for one of the west records — responsible for one of the west records in — responsible for one of the west records in dealing with the covid—19 pandemic— records in dealing with the covid—19 pandemic it's really bad for the general— pandemic it's really bad for the general public and sol pandemic it's really bad for the general public and so i think we would _ general public and so i think we would like to see borisjohnson resign— would like to see borisjohnson resign and we are united on that but make _ resign and we are united on that but make no— resign and we are united on that but make no mistake it's important that we mell— make no mistake it's important that we melt the conservatives are an absolute — we melt the conservatives are an absolute mess at the moment and they
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are looking _ absolute mess at the moment and they are looking for this as an opportunity for promotions and opportunities to be divisive and get each other— opportunities to be divisive and get each other and i think it's important to rememberwe each other and i think it's important to remember we are still ina pandemic and important to remember we are still in a pandemic and thousands of people — in a pandemic and thousands of people are withoutjobs in a pandemic and thousands of people are without jobs and they should _ people are without jobs and they should be put in the general public first before their own careers. let us turn to — first before their own careers. us turn to the first before their own careers. let us turn to the pandemic now. there was an enormous spite at the end of 2021 but now look at that. a notable decline in infections similar trend here in the uk.
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0micron was spreading here in south africa but you can see if the beginning of a turn and in the united states and in the us, where new waves of infection have lagged europe by a few week, new york, newjersey, and washington dc have all seen case numbers falling, in recent days. the picture across the us very different, it is still on the rise. here in england the minimum isolation period has just been cuts from seven days to five, as it was in the united states a few weeks. here's the health secretary sajid javid: from monday people can test twice before they go, leaving isolation at the start of day six. these two tests are critical to these balanced and proportional plans and i urge everyone to take advantage of the capacity we have built up in tests, so we can restore the freedom to this country while we are keeping
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everyone safe. we can speak to professor sarah hawkes, expert at university college london's institute for global health: going back to those graphs. that is a ten to back up what we suspected that omicron burns bright and then burns out quite quickly? it that omicron burns bright and then burns out quite quickly?— burns out quite quickly? it does seem like _ burns out quite quickly? it does seem like it. _ burns out quite quickly? it does seem like it. so _ burns out quite quickly? it does seem like it. so omicron - burns out quite quickly? it does seem like it. so omicron is - burns out quite quickly? it does l seem like it. so omicron is doing exactly what we would expect a virus that has a high transmission rates to do. it spreads very quickly to a susceptible population and then everybody who is susceptible will become infected and the virus that eventually not quite speaker out but the rapid rate of increase will slow down so it's very much doing what we would expect it to do. itruiith down so it's very much doing what we would expect it to do.— would expect it to do. with that in mind, would expect it to do. with that in mind. you've _ would expect it to do. with that in mind. you've got _ would expect it to do. with that in mind, you've got to _ would expect it to do. with that in mind, you've got to test _ would expect it to do. with that in mind, you've got to test twice, . would expect it to do. with that in mind, you've got to test twice, is| mind, you've got to test twice, is that sensible? it mind, you've got to test twice, is that sensible?— that sensible? it depends what ou're that sensible? it depends what
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you're looking _ that sensible? it depends what you're looking for _ that sensible? it depends what you're looking for is _ that sensible? it depends what you're looking for is your - that sensible? it depends what. you're looking for is your outcome measures so if what you are looking for is to absolutely stop transmission then that scientific evidence would suggest that you are better off waiting until they set them because they're still about 30% of people as as e—mail who are still shaping the virus on the five which is why the lateral flow tests are those tests on days five and six are so important that if what you are trying to do which is what i suspect is the basis of how the decision was made is actually get the economy moving again and to limit the impact of not having so many people out of work because they're isolating for example the decision to improve to be five becomes more understandable. i was talking to the russian ambassador today but the reports are in russia they are going to see a
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very intense rise in the coming weeks because a lot of them were vaccinated with the sputnik vaccine of course an entirely different in the west and are we starting to move towards an end by nick rather than pandemic? in towards an end by nick rather than andemic? . ., towards an end by nick rather than andemic? _, _, , pandemic? in high income countries such as western _ pandemic? in high income countries such as western europe _ pandemic? in high income countries such as western europe on - pandemic? in high income countries such as western europe on the - such as western europe on the grounds that we have a far bigger proportion of the population that has received two doses of what we now are effective vaccines and has received a booster dose that the idea that we're somehow moving to an academic situation is a dangerous one for us to accept politically. i don't think we can ever say we have moved to an endemic situation in any particular part of a globalised world until the entire world has had equitable access to the vaccine
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because otherwise what we are constantly going to be up against is mutations arising in unvaccinated populations and while we might be in the situation in global britain where we are seeing low levels of new infections as 2022 goes on we will always be at risk of a meal even more pathogenic strain of the virus coming in while we allow a situation where for example in sub—saharan africa well under 15% of the entire population have received any vaccine at all. it is the entire population have received any vaccine at all.— any vaccine at all. it is what i call the musketeer _ any vaccine at all. it is what i l call the musketeer philosophy. any vaccine at all. it is what i - call the musketeer philosophy. also wanted one for all. thank you for being with us. this is context on the bbc. still to come: president biden's hopes of passing meaningful vote reform has just hit a major hurdle. we'll discuss — next.
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let's look at some of the other stories making headlines today in france where more than 300,000 uk infections have been recorded to be that government announced its reopening exporters to british travellers and holiday makers. talk from tomorrow i'll vaccinated travellers but have to show a negative pcr right lateral flow taking 2a hours before departure. chief medical officer has a earthy stepping down from the wall in march and will return to his work at the university of nottingham and has been praised for his style of communicating public health messages and his colourful analogies at downing street news conferences. borisjohnson thanked him for his extraordinary contribution to our country. not a single river in england is free from pollution according to the findings from a group of mps. they said it's uncovered a chemical cocktail of sewage and agricultural waste and plastic in our waterways and calling
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for tougher enforcement of rules and dumping and better monitoring of the problem. president biden went to capitol hill today to inject some momentum into his new year agenda. he has spoken passionately in recent days — maybe too passionately according to some — about the threat to american democracy. on tuesday, he said he was backing a plan to change senate voting rules, so that democrats could bypass a filibuster and pass two bills on voting rights with a simple majority. but today — despite this charm offensive — the democratic senator from arizona threw a giant sized spanner in the works. these bills help to reap the symptoms of the disease but they did not fully address the disease itself. i'm glad i continue to support these bills, i will not support these bills, i will not support separate actions that were sent the underlying disease of
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division infecting our country. that statement on the floor was timed to pre empt president biden's discussions with the democratic caucus. kirsten sinema supports these two voting rights bill. but she doesn't support ripping up senate rules. and she is not the only one. yesterday, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell accused mr biden of �*pure demagogery�* as he attempts to force through his legislation. yesterday he invoked the bloody disunion of the civil war — the civil war — to demonise americans who disagree with him. he compared — listen to this — a bipartisan majority of senators to literal traitors. how profoundly, profoundly unpresidential. i wonder if it's my politics. if you don't have the votes you don't have
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the votes and he was elected to unite the country and some would say he is now pushing an agenda he can't deliver and in doing so he's creating greater attention. he is -aushin a creating greater attention. he is pushing a radical— creating greater attention. he is pushing a radical edge _ creating greater attention. he is pushing a radical edge in - creating greater attention. he is pushing a radical edge in the - creating greaterattention. he: 3 pushing a radical edge in the cell organising the opposition pretty well and that's why he can't push things through. he can't even unify the democratic party. and the more he continues to do this the more he continues to unify the party and the micelle the democrats are heading into a landslide election this november and at the end of the day he got voted because he made promises and being able to fair do not bode well for him and his supporters. if he does not change the voting rolls they'll be a lot of people in the african—american community who don't like it. there are similarities between the labour party and democrats on the split between the progressive side of the party and the centuries to run it and i wonder if you have sympathy forjoe biden in his attempt to try and deliver what brian calls a
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radical agenda and let others would the progressive agenda. i radical agenda and let others would the progressive agenda.— radical agenda and let others would the progressive agenda. i would not seem like he _ the progressive agenda. i would not seem like he is _ the progressive agenda. i would not seem like he is proposing _ the progressive agenda. i would not seem like he is proposing is - the progressive agenda. i would not seem like he is proposing is radicall seem like he is proposing is radical at all _ seem like he is proposing is radical al all i_ seem like he is proposing is radical at all. i think a lot of his premises _ at all. i think a lot of his premises he failed to deliver on mostly— premises he failed to deliver on mostly around health care is form and a _ mostly around health care is form and a minimum wage improved infrastructure across the country some _ infrastructure across the country some not— infrastructure across the country some not sympathetic in that effect but there _ some not sympathetic in that effect but there is a long history of discrimination when it comes to voting _ discrimination when it comes to voting white rates in the united states— voting white rates in the united states but this is a broader question— states but this is a broader question about suppression of voters and those _ question about suppression of voters and those impacted are hispanic and black voters and poor voters from across _ black voters and poor voters from across the — black voters and poor voters from across the united states so it's clear— across the united states so it's clear that — across the united states so it's clear that there needs to be change and its— clear that there needs to be change and it's concerning that there is such— and it's concerning that there is such a — and it's concerning that there is such a staunch efforts to suppress votes _ such a staunch efforts to suppress votes and — such a staunch efforts to suppress votes and if they care about the engagement in the democratic process then surely— engagement in the democratic process then surely they should be looking for those _ then surely they should be looking for those solutions as well. we will
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talk next for many of us it's been a lovely day with plenty of winter sunshine especially for england and wales and regency mark crowd around once again but here it's been mild with the air flow coming in off the atlantic. the next few days will stay dry and settled thanks to high pressure and again they will be frost and fog again they will be frost and fog again for england and wales reforming tonight becoming extensive in places once again and further north coming in off the atlantic with dell of 48 degrees with northern ireland in particular and hard places —— area of high—pressure sitting top of a centre towards the south of the country. it's whether
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frontal bring for cloud outbreaks of rain to the north of scotland. central and southern scotland and northern ireland said see sunshine and more than what we had today. england and wales will see most of the sunshine but missed and fog will be stepping to clear in places and if it does it be cold and grey otherwise you have sunshine. after that cold start temperatures will be where they should be for the time of year. some subtle changes into the start of the weekend. and whether frontal pushing to the rest of the country. it would increase the cloud here with a few showers by the end of the day. for most of england and wales it will be what we have been experiencing him the beep. wind with fog and frost. sunshine but marcotte around january. as we head into saturday afternoon. if few showers reaching resting areas. the weather frontal perceived on sunday. spreading south across the country.
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it will bring a band of crowd and showers. they will be more of a breeze january and less problems for a sunday morning. the weather frontal clearly and skies were brightened with one or two showers pushing north and west. it would be breezy with temperatures ranging around seven through 9 degrees with double figures across the south and southwest. next week it would be high pressure building and with a repeat performance like we've had this week and next week will be dry and settled.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. mis m15 issues a rare alert about a chinese agent operating for years at the heart of british politics. christine lee said m15 has been trying to influence british politicians and is engaged in interference on behalf the chinese communist party. russia says they will not be peace in ukraine until the united states and other western states stop encroaching on its influence in eastern europe. irldta influence in eastern europe. nato enlargement _ influence in eastern europe. nato enlargement continues _ influence in eastern europe. iisgtf: enlargement continues to put in danger european security. on the one hand,it danger european security. on the one hand, it is very dangerous for us... and the us supreme court refuses to hear the appeal of an alabama woman who left several years ago —— back
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seven years ago to join iis and now returns. tonight with the con text, bryan lanza, and jess barnard. welcome back. m15 has issued a rare warning to british mps, alerting them to a woman who has been working in and around parliament as an agent for the chinese state, trying to influence politicians. the security service claims christine lee has been engaged in political interference on behalf of the chinese communist party. the home secretary, priti patel, said it was "deeply concerning", though she insisted the uk had "strong structures" in place to identify and deal with such matters. but a former leader of the conservative party, sir iain duncan smith, who has been a vocal critic of the chinese communist party and has himself been sanctioned by beijing, was not entirely convinced by the assurances given. i understand that the latest news
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that i hear is this individual is not to be deported and no further action to be taken. how can it be, mr deputy speaker, that an agent of a foreign, despotic and despicable power that is hell—bent on reducing many of those people into penury, it seems, how can they put somebody into parliament — this mother of parliaments — and then that individual have nothing done to them, other than they are not allowed in parliament? this is surely not good enough. isabel hilton is visiting professor at the lau institute, king's college london and a long—time china watcher. welcome to the programme. just so we are clear, i want to understand it, what is an inference operation? well, and influence operation is... usually involves some measure of deception. it is relatively covid and it seeks to persuade someone of influence to support an objective that you have, so in the case of
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this operation, this lady and indeed the law firm that she works for, who have been mentioned many times with connections to what is called the united front work department. that is a key part of the chinese communist party, has been since the beginning and thejob of communist party, has been since the beginning and the job of the united work department is to utilise people who are perceived as hostile to china or to advance china's ambitions with nonparty elements, so it began inside china with managing party relations with things like religious bodies or important sources of opinion who were not part of the party, in order to neutralise them and since china went global, so has the united front work department. so it is not a surprise that this kind of thing goes on because china seeks to advance its policies and objectives through many different ways. we knew about christine lee, though, all the way
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back, if you look on google, to 2017. it back, if you look on google, to 2017. ., , ,., back, if you look on google, to 2017. _ , 2017. it was reported by the times newsa er 2017. it was reported by the times newspaper and _ 2017. it was reported by the times newspaper and since _ 2017. it was reported by the times newspaper and since then - 2017. it was reported by the times newspaper and since then labour. 2017. it was reported by the times i newspaper and since then labour mp barry gardiner says he has been liaising with the security services, but it seems according to the reporting she is still listed as a donor for reporting she is still listed as a donorfor him and more than reporting she is still listed as a donor for him and more than that, her son was working as his diary manager. her son was working as his diary manauer. ~ .,, her son was working as his diary manauer. ~ ., , ., her son was working as his diary manauer. . ., ., . manager. was he naive? well, he seems to be _ manager. was he naive? well, he seems to be extraordinarily - manager. was he naive? well, he seems to be extraordinarily naive | seems to be extraordinarily naive and, as i say, this law firm has been mentioned and you're quite right, in 2017 it was reported and i think at that point barry gardiner was reported to have received £180,000 in support. think through this organisation and now he's up to half a million, which is a considerable sum of money and to have somebody with a house of commons pass, you know, you can come and go, you can collect intelligence about who is, you know, who is in favour, who is against a particular
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policy. you know, it is immensely useful and i cannot think why barry gardiner continue to let that happen and i do know that today it ended rather abruptly, so in touch with the intelligence services, perhaps, but certainly i think this arrangement was extremely doubtful. well, let me bring up again barry gardiner�*s statement because i want to read it, it is important. he says... steps a re steps are taken to ensure christine lee had meant no role in either the appointment or management of anyone in my office. he goes on to say... christine lee's son volunteered in
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his office many years ago and were subsequently employed by me. he was fired by me today. but let me bring you in on this because i was looking at the fbi's most recent counter intelligence report and it said the chinese government is employing tactics that seek to influence lawmakers, so it is a big problem in the us congress as well? irate lawmakers, so it is a big problem in the us congress as well?— the us congress as well? we had a congressman, in _ the us congress as well? we had a congressman, in california - the us congress as well? we had a congressman, in california who - the us congress as well? we had a | congressman, in california who was sleeping _ congressman, in california who was sleeping with — congressman, in california who was sleeping with a _ congressman, in california who was sleeping with a chinese _ congressman, in california who was sleeping with a chinese spy- congressman, in california who was sleeping with a chinese spy and - congressman, in california who was sleeping with a chinese spy and hel sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a _ sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a special— sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a special hearing _ sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a special hearing from - sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a special hearing from the - sleeping with a chinese spy and he had a special hearing from the fbi | had a special hearing from the fbi informing — had a special hearing from the fbi informing him— had a special hearing from the fbi informing him of— had a special hearing from the fbi informing him of what _ had a special hearing from the fbi informing him of what was - had a special hearing from the fbi informing him of what was going i had a special hearing from the fbi i informing him of what was going on and that— informing him of what was going on and that chinese _ informing him of what was going on and that chinese spy _ informing him of what was going on and that chinese spy has _ informing him of what was going on and that chinese spy has since - informing him of what was going on and that chinese spy has since leftl and that chinese spy has since left the united — and that chinese spy has since left the united states, _ and that chinese spy has since left the united states, but— and that chinese spy has since left the united states, but this - and that chinese spy has since left the united states, but this is - and that chinese spy has since left the united states, but this is not i the united states, but this is not new to _ the united states, but this is not new to us — the united states, but this is not new to us and _ the united states, but this is not new to us and i_ the united states, but this is not new to us and i think— the united states, but this is not new to us and i think from - the united states, but this is not new to us and i think from my i new to us and i think from my standpoint— new to us and i think from my standpoint i_ new to us and i think from my standpoint i am _ new to us and i think from my standpoint i am just _ new to us and i think from my standpoint i am just shocked. new to us and i think from my . standpoint i am just shocked that person— standpoint i am just shocked that person is— standpoint i am just shocked that person is allowed _ standpoint i am just shocked that person is allowed to _ standpoint i am just shocked that person is allowed to stay - standpoint i am just shocked that person is allowed to stay in - standpoint i am just shocked that person is allowed to stay in the i standpoint i am just shocked that i person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least _ person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we — person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we want _ person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we want to _ person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we want to hear- person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we want to hear is - person is allowed to stay in the uk. the least we want to hear is that i the least we want to hear is that she fled — the least we want to hear is that she tied it— the least we want to hear is that she fled. , , . , , she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, kevin mccarthy _ she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, kevin mccarthy has _ she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, kevin mccarthy has in _ she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, kevin mccarthy has in said - she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, kevin mccarthy has in said that l she fled. it is unbelievable. yes, j kevin mccarthy has in said that if he wins the house and the republicans take the house, he is going to be really tough on china and they will take some of those initiatives into the work of
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numerous congressional committees and that might explain why. i should point out, jess, that barry gardiner is not the only one, not by any stretch, who was caught out by this. theresa may, who was then prime minister, actually gave this woman and a ward, even though m15 knew about her. , . ~ and a ward, even though m15 knew about her. , . ,, , about her. yes, and i think it is extremely _ about her. yes, and i think it is extremely worrying _ about her. yes, and i think it is extremely worrying to - about her. yes, and i think it is extremely worrying to see - about her. yes, and i think it is i extremely worrying to see foreign interference in our democracy and 'ust interference in our democracy and just how— interference in our democracy and just how embedded it is within westminster. we do have a really failing _ westminster. we do have a really failing system were foreign powers and corporations as well can throw money— and corporations as well can throw money or— and corporations as well can throw money or fancy invitations or have a private meetings with our elected representatives, in essence buying support— representatives, in essence buying support or— representatives, in essence buying support or silencing opposition and it is extremely common for it to happen — it is extremely common for it to happen. so _ it is extremely common for it to happen. sojust today it is extremely common for it to happen. so just today as well there was a _ happen. so just today as well there was a parliamentary debate on the human— was a parliamentary debate on the human rights abuses happening in the kingdom _ human rights abuses happening in the kingdom of— human rights abuses happening in the kingdom of bahrain. tory mp bob hope spoke _ kingdom of bahrain. tory mp bob hope spoke and _ kingdom of bahrain. tory mp bob hope spoke and denied these abuses happening, but he himself in his own register— happening, but he himself in his own register of— happening, but he himself in his own register of interests has had to declare — register of interests has had to declare financial payments he has received — declare financial payments he has received from the kingdom of bahrain _
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received from the kingdom of bahrain. there is case after case of this happening in our democracy, so where _ this happening in our democracy, so where is _ this happening in our democracy, so where is the — this happening in our democracy, so where is the overhaul of this process— where is the overhaul of this process and how we we ensure our democracy— process and how we we ensure our democracy is protected from foreign interference?— democracy is protected from foreign interference? , , ., interference? yes, the member of the common affairs _ interference? yes, the member of the common affairs committee _ interference? yes, the member of the common affairs committee today - interference? yes, the member of the common affairs committee today said| common affairs committee today said we need a comprehensive approach to china and russia and that understands the competitive nature of the problem. thank you very much, isabel hilton, for being on the programme. three times this week, the americans have sat opposite the russians to try and find a solution to the dispute over ukraine and nato's military presence in the baltic states. it has not gone very well. in fact, they are deadlocked. and today russia raised the stakes. the deputy foreign minister refused to rule out sending military deployments to america's doorstep, if tensions were to escalate further. in an apparent attempt to up the ante with the biden administration, sergei ryabkov said he could neither confirm nor exclude sending military assets to cuba and venezuela if the talks fail. i have been putting some of that to the russian ambassador to the uk, andrei kelin. mr ambassador, is the russian
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federation preparing to invade ukraine? well, we have given this answer many times. it is not in our intention in the current situation, of course. that is all i can say for the moment. well, the deputy foreign minister in vienna today says his country will need to take "unspecified necessary measures" if russia's demands are not met. what does that mean? that is true because, as our colleague has already explained at length, the nato enlargement continues to put in danger european security. on the one hand, it is very dangerous for russia. on the other hand, it turns upside down the whole european security. the fundamental obligations that has been signed by all leaders of the european states, including the united states and canada, by the way, starting in �*75, then in 1990 and then in 1999 about invisibility of security,
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about the security of each state is inextricably linked to the security of the other state and all of this has been suddenly turned down by the nato enlargement. it is a dangerous situation. but what does "unspecified necessary measures" mean? i cannot talk about this in the open air. it is... i canjust imagine, i am an ambassador, not a nuclear man, —— i am not ——iam nota —— i am nota military man. but i can imagine what our own military people, they are preparing different variants of answering to this danger. it is like... the deputy foreign minister said today there was no point going over the same
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conversation, so what does the biden administration do about it i don't think there's anything they can do. i think they have shown from day one they are _ i think they have shown from day one they are ill—equipped to handle the threat _ they are ill—equipped to handle the threat. afghanistan has caused a lot of our— threat. afghanistan has caused a lot of our allies — threat. afghanistan has caused a lot of our allies to be scared about the strength— of our allies to be scared about the strength of— of our allies to be scared about the strength of the american foreign policy— strength of the american foreign policy and at the end of the day we are talking — policy and at the end of the day we are talking about, you know, russian troops _ are talking about, you know, russian troops in _ are talking about, you know, russian troops in cuba. that was before i was born— troops in cuba. that was before i was born that we had that crisis andm — was born that we had that crisis and... . ., i. was born that we had that crisis and... . ., ,. �* was born that we had that crisis and... . ., �* and... hang on, you couldn't say donald trump — and... hang on, you couldn't say donald trump a's _ and... hang on, you couldn't say donald trump a's policy - and... hang on, you couldn't say donald trump a's policy towards | donald trump a's policy towards beauty and was a success either, he literally formed over him. he beauty and was a success either, he literally formed over him.— literally formed over him. he may have formed over _ literally formed over him. he may have formed over him, _ literally formed over him. he may have formed over him, but - literally formed over him. he may have formed over him, but i - literally formed over him. he may have formed over him, but i will l literally formed over him. he may i have formed over him, but i will say this _ have formed over him, but i will say this he _ have formed over him, but i will say this he may— have formed over him, but i will say this. he may have formed over him, but he _ this. he may have formed over him, but he did _ this. he may have formed over him, but he did a — this. he may have formed over him, but he did a lot in ukraine. he did sanctions — but he did a lot in ukraine. he did sanctions on — but he did a lot in ukraine. he did sanctions on nord stream too. biden releasing _ sanctions on nord stream too. biden releasing the sanctions on nord stream — releasing the sanctions on nord stream two was a message to russia that he _ stream two was a message to russia that he is— stream two was a message to russia that he is not going to be tough and that he is not going to be tough and that is— that he is not going to be tough and that is why— that he is not going to be tough and that is why we see very aggressive posture _ that is why we see very aggressive posture coming out of the russians towards _ posture coming out of the russians towards him and we are now talking about— towards him and we are now talking about russian troops in cuba. that has not _ about russian troops in cuba. that has not been an issue since the 605 before _ has not been an issue since the 605 before i_ has not been an issue since the 605 before i was— has not been an issue since the 605 before i was born. none of those
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things— before i was born. none of those things are — before i was born. none of those things are an accident, that is on at the _ things are an accident, that is on at the sorry— things are an accident, that is on at the sorry looking at the american leader. _ at the sorry looking at the american leader, 5eeing weakne55, 5eeing at the sorry looking at the american leader, 5eeing weakne55, seeing him retreat— leader, 5eeing weakne55, seeing him retreat on— leader, 5eeing weakne55, seeing him retreat on very important things and seeing _ best, that is what is happening. je55, the ambassador talks about the jess, the ambassador talks about the unique relations they have with former soviet states. they clearly psychologically still see themselves as a superpower and they see those countries on the border is the question, if you will, to further encroachment. is it a fair accusation that nato has gone too far, that it has expanded too far towards russia i would say it is a really, really worrying situation. most of all for the civilians in those countries and military build—up and increased tensions on all sides is going to help no one. we are seeing the problems where this has increased the tensions and it leads to a lack of dialogue and then further conflict in places like ukraine, so i think our priorities
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should be emphasising the need for dialogue, forfinding peaceful resolutions that puts the civilians' needs first. resolutions that puts the civilians' needs first-— needs first. dialogue is important and ou needs first. dialogue is important and you sort _ needs first. dialogue is important and you sort of— needs first. dialogue is important and you sort of wonder _ needs first. dialogue is important and you sort of wonder what - needs first. dialogue is important and you sort of wonder what role | and you sort of wonder what role britain plays on this. the british secretary, full foreign secretary, liz truss, says she wants to travel to moscow in the coming weeks and meet with a cat part diffuse the tension in ukraine. it would be the first visit for a while, which is what i put to the ambassador. must be interest in russia, though, because it would be... interest in moscow, though, because it would be the first meeting in moscow that a foreign minister has been to since the russian operation in salisbury. let's not talk about that in a hypothetical manner because we have not seen any demand oran idea oran interest to go where we are in these papers, of course. you didn't deny that it was a russian operation in salisbury. well, i do deny that it was a russian operation. i am quite sure that it was an operation by the special services of the bbc, of course.
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they still see it as a laughing matter, jess. it is a poisoning brought about by the bbc. should they be going to russia when that is they be going to russia when that is the attitude?— they be going to russia when that is the attitude? ~ , ,., , . ., the attitude? absolutely. we need to be 0 enin: the attitude? absolutely. we need to be opening dialogue. _ the attitude? absolutely. we need to be opening dialogue. obviously - the attitude? absolutely. we need to be opening dialogue. obviously there has been increased tensions involving russia and the uk and the whole of the west for years now and it is policies, behaviour internationally, it is domestic policies and repression of lgbtq plus people. it is obviously deeply concerning, but it is really important that we work and use a role to de—escalate and reduce tensions. the last thing anyone wants right now is another huge war and conflict, in which we lose thousands of lives in the middle of a pandemic and at a time where people really want to be coming together and looking to build a better future.— better future. well, the nato secretary _ better future. well, the nato secretary general _ better future. well, the nato secretary general says - better future. well, the nato secretary general says the i better future. well, the nato i secretary general says the door better future. well, the nato - secretary general says the door is open, setting the ball firmly in moscow's court. we will leave that fair. the supreme court in the united states has refused to hear the appeal of a woman...
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..who left the country to join is more than seven years ago, and is now trying to return. hoda muthana was born in newjersey, and grew up in alabama. she then travelled to syria tojoin is in 2014, where she gave birth to a son. the obama administration revoked her passport in 2016. three years later, the trump administration took it a step further, determining she was no longer a us citizen. reacting to the supreme court decision, her lawyers said "we continue to dispute the legality of these administrative revocations, while we remain resolute in continuing to fight for our clients, this is a sad day for the muthana family, and for the sanctity of united states citizenship in general." it is of course reminiscent of a similar case here in the uk, that of shamima begum who was stripped of her citizenship after travelling to syria, tojoin is. let's bring in alka pradhan, who is human rights counsel at the guantanamo bay military commissions, and is a lawyerfor one of the 9/11 defendants. thank you very much for being with
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us. the champ administration argued that she was never in that day us citizen because her father was a yemeni diplomat. —— the donald trump administration. yemeni diplomat. -- the donald trump administration.— administration. yes, and that is 'ust administration. yes, and that is just factually — administration. yes, and that is just factually incorrect, - administration. yes, and that is just factually incorrect, false i just factually incorrect, false argument and we are talking about 14th amendment constitutional birthright citizenship. the fact is that her father, who did birthright citizenship. the fact is that herfather, who did impact birthright citizenship. the fact is that her father, who did impact at one point have diplomatic immunity, that immunity was nullified before she was born, so that automatically makes her a citizen by birth. you can't really... you know, the old saying goes, you are entitled to your own opinions, you're not entitled to your own facts and neither the donald trump administration of the biden administration of the biden administration are entitled to their own facts on this.— own facts on this. yes, the british government _ own facts on this. yes, the british government took _ own facts on this. yes, the british government took a _ own facts on this. yes, the british government took a similar - own facts on this. yes, the british i government took a similar viewpoint on it, to be honest. they said that shamima begum when talking about her case said it is possible to strip a citizen of british citizenship if they have a nationality to fall back
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on. i was looking at the figures today. 40,000 jihadists went to syria tojoin eis between 2010 today. 40,000 jihadists went to syria to join eis between 2010 and 2019.10-20,000 of them syria to join eis between 2010 and 2019. 10—20,000 of them have survived, so this is a case, ruling that really applies to a lot of countries because there is no solution over what to do with them. i think there is a very clear—cut legal solution and the answer is if they are a citizen of a country, that country is responsible for them. this idea that if a citizen is radicalised, commits crimes or, you know, the natural extension of that is expressing views that are not in the interest of the state, we can then refuse responsibility for them, wash our hands of them, that is so incredibly dangerous and there is no stopping point want to go down that road and ijust want stopping point want to go down that road and i just want to stopping point want to go down that road and ijust want to point out that these cases are really coming up that these cases are really coming up only against one particular group of people. we are not seeing white nationalists, white supremacists abroad being stripped of their citizenships. it is reallyjust
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muslims, people of colour for whom this is happening, which sends a very, very dangerous signal... but if white very, very dangerous 5ignal... but if white 5upremaci5t went abroad to if white supremacist went abroad to fight, they would be banned from coming back as well, wouldn't they? it just so coming back as well, wouldn't they? itjust so happens that it is muslims that went to syria. well, i would be very _ muslims that went to syria. well, i would be very interested _ muslims that went to syria. well, i would be very interested in - muslims that went to syria. well, i l would be very interested in hearing, for example, at the moment right now we are prosecuting people who participated in the january six insurrection, many of whom were white supremacists and when members of white supremacist groups. you're telling me there were no americans abroad who subscribe to that ideology and have been vocal of it? they have not been stripped of their citizenship, i guarantee you will hear about it if they had. just today the _ hear about it if they had. just today the oath _ hear about it if they had. just today the oath keepers militia, stuart rhodes, the founder of that group and ten alleged members of that group, they have just been charged with judicious conspiracy, which is about the most serious crime you can be charged with, but they are in the country.— they are in the country. exactly, that proves _ they are in the country. exactly, that proves my _ they are in the country. exactly, that proves my point, _ they are in the country. exactly, that proves my point, it - they are in the country. exactly, - that proves my point, it undermines ourjustice that proves my point, it undermines our justice system that proves my point, it undermines ourjustice system is to say, look,
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we can try white people for these crimes, but we can't even try these people of colour, we can't even grant them that citizenship they are entitled to, bring them home and trust our justice system entitled to, bring them home and trust ourjustice system to handle it. can only handle them if there are certain religions or racist. bryan, you're shaking your head, but it ultimately comes down to whether governments decide whether it is more dangerous to keep their former nationals out of the country or whether to bring them back and prosecute them. the whether to bring them back and prosecute them.— whether to bring them back and rosecute them. . , prosecute them. the danger is here. the have prosecute them. the danger is here. they have received _ prosecute them. the danger is here. they have received specific - prosecute them. the danger is here. they have received specific training i they have received specific training in syria. _ they have received specific training in syria, afghanistan _ they have received specific training in syria, afghanistan or— they have received specific training in syria, afghanistan or any- they have received specific training in syria, afghanistan or any of - in syria, afghanistan or any of those — in syria, afghanistan or any of those other— in syria, afghanistan or any of those other countries- in syria, afghanistan or any of those other countries in- in syria, afghanistan or any of i those other countries in conflict, why should — those other countries in conflict, why should we _ those other countries in conflict, why should we allow _ those other countries in conflict, why should we allow them - those other countries in conflict, why should we allow them to - those other countries in conflict, i why should we allow them to come back and _ why should we allow them to come back and use their— why should we allow them to come back and use their training - why should we allow them to come back and use their training to- why should we allow them to come back and use their training to hurtl back and use their training to hurt americans? — back and use their training to hurt americans? we _ back and use their training to hurt americans? we are _ back and use their training to hurt americans? we are going - back and use their training to hurt americans? we are going to - back and use their training to hurt- american5? we are going to prosecute americans? we are going to prosecute those _ americans? we are going to prosecute those people who _ americans? we are going to prosecute those people who were _ americans? we are going to prosecute those people who were involved - americans? we are going to prosecute those people who were involved in - those people who were involved in january— those people who were involved in january the — those people who were involved in january the six— those people who were involved in january the six and _ those people who were involved in january the six and we _ those people who were involved in january the six and we will- those people who were involved in january the six and we will throw l january the six and we will throw the lrook— january the six and we will throw the book at— january the six and we will throw the book at them. _ january the six and we will throw the book at them. we _ january the six and we will throw the book at them. we should - january the six and we will throw the book at them. we should if. the book at them. we should if anyone — the book at them. we should if anyone says _ the book at them. we should if anyone says we _ the book at them. we should if anyone says we should throw l the book at them. we should if- anyone says we should throw them out of the _ anyone says we should throw them out of the country. — anyone 5ay5 we should throw them out of the country. i— anyone says we should throw them out of the country, i say— anyone says we should throw them out of the country, i say yes. _ anyone says we should throw them out of the country, i say yes. if— anyone says we should throw them out of the country, i say yes. if you - of the country, i say yes. if you want _ of the country, i say yes. if you want to— of the country, i say yes. if you want to do— of the country, i say yes. if you want to do crime5 _ of the country, i say yes. if you want to do crimes against - of the country, i say yes. if you want to do crimes against this. want to do crimes against this country. — want to do crimes against this country. the _ want to do crimes against this country, the rules— want to do crimes against this country, the rules should - want to do crimes against this country, the rules should noti want to do crimes against this - country, the rules should not apply to you _ country, the rules should not apply to you you — country, the rules should not apply to you. you should _ country, the rules should not apply to you. you should be _ country, the rules should not apply to you. you should be thrown - country, the rules should not apply to you. you should be thrown out, | to you. you should be thrown out, that it _
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to you. you should be thrown out, that it is _ to you. you should be thrown out, that it is the — to you. you should be thrown out, that it is the fight _ to you. you should be thrown out, that it is the fight with— to you. you should be thrown out, that it is the fight with the - that it is the fight with the iihadists_ that it is the fight with the jihadi5t5 in— that it is the fight with the jihadi5t5 in the _ that it is the fight with the jihadi5t5 in the east - that it is the fight with the jihadi5t5 in the east or- that it is the fight with the jihadi5t5 in the east or the that it is the fight with the - jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the — jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the us— jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the us capitol. _ jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the us capitol. we - jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the us capitol. we have - jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight for the us capitol. we have to. jihadi5t5 in the east or the fight - for the us capitol. we have to stand for the us capitol. we have to stand for something — for the us capitol. we have to stand for something and _ for the us capitol. we have to stand for something and not _ for the us capitol. we have to stand for something and not let these - for something and not let these people — for something and not let these people who _ for something and not let these people who train _ for something and not let these people who train in _ for something and not let these people who train in violet - for something and not let these people who train in violet to - for something and not let these i people who train in violet to come in and _ people who train in violet to come in and manipulate _ people who train in violet to come in and manipulate our— people who train in violet to come in and manipulate our laws... - people who train in violet to comej in and manipulate our laws... that is not _ in and manipulate our laws... that is not how— in and manipulate our laws... that is not how you _ in and manipulate our laws... that is not how you create order, - in and manipulate our laws... that is not how you create order, that i in and manipulate our laws... that| is not how you create order, that is how you _ is not how you create order, that is how you create _ is not how you create order, that is how you create chaos. _ is not how you create order, that is how you create chaos. [— is not how you create order, that is how you create chaos.— how you create chaos. i will come back to you _ how you create chaos. i will come back to you in _ how you create chaos. i will come back to you in a _ how you create chaos. i will come back to you in a minute _ how you create chaos. i will come back to you in a minute because . how you create chaos. i will come. back to you in a minute because he was shaking your head, but let me just put this to you. there were 400 syrians who returned from the syrian battle space to the uk and they have presented very few security challenges, but m15 and m16 say those people who came back with those people who came back with those who went out in the early years and then came back because they were disenchanted with what went on. those that have stayed they see as a much greater security threat. ~ , ., ~ ., , ., threat. well, you know, first of all, threat. well, you know, first of all. funnily _ threat. well, you know, first of all, funnily enough, _ threat. well, you know, first of all, funnily enough, in - threat. well, you know, first of all, funnily enough, in a - all, funnily enough, in a traditional war you have to look at the facts of the case, this woman would have been considered a noncombatant or a civilian force to participate in hostilities and to the gentleman who said we should throw the book at them, the point is
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exactly that these are citizens of the united states who have both the ability to be prosecuted and the rights and privileges under the due process clause of the constitution and that is exactly what this woman is entitled to as well. bring her back. the federal government has the ability to prosecute. but when we are talking about threat scenarios, the idea that a 27—year—old woman who has actually... we don't have information that she has been trained, we have information that she went there, that she had a child and that that child that is a child now is being condemned to, being forced, ironically, to stay in a situation that we consider to be extreme, the and that is i think not just an overstatement of the threat but really in the long term undermines our own national security. i undermines our own national securi . , ., . , security. i tell you what is interesting. _ security. i tell you what is interesting. president - security. i tell you what is i interesting. president putin security. i tell you what is - interesting. president putin takes a very different view on this. he has taken back a lot of the nationals that went from a north caucasus
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region and made a clear statement children were not responsible for what they parents did and that russia could not leave them behind in the war zone. where do you stand on this, just because a while, as i understand it, this woman was radicalised and recruited while she was on american soil. she radicalised and recruited while she was on american soil.— was on american soil. she is an american _ was on american soil. she is an american citizen _ was on american soil. she is an american citizen and _ was on american soil. she is an american citizen and she - was on american soil. she is an american citizen and she is - was on american soil. she is an american citizen and she is a i american citizen and she is a problem _ american citizen and she is a problem for the american legal system — problem for the american legal system and she should face ju5tice system and she should face justice in america — system and she should face justice in america. it is concerning to hear bryan's— in america. it is concerning to hear bryan's i_ in america. it is concerning to hear bryan's i guess lack of confidence in the _ bryan's i guess lack of confidence in the american... bryan's i guess lack of confidence in the american. . .— in the american... bryan is not alone, in the american... bryan is not alone. public— in the american... bryan is not alone, public opinion _ in the american... bryan is not alone, public opinion is - in the american... bryan is not alone, public opinion is very i in the american... bryan is not. alone, public opinion is very firmly on bryan's side. but alone, public opinion is very firmly on itryan's side-— on bryan's side. but we have a 'ustice on bryan's side. but we have a justice system _ on bryan's side. but we have a justice system and _ on bryan's side. but we have a justice system and rights - on bryan's side. but we have a justice system and rights in i on bryan's side. but we have a i justice system and rights in place for ju5tice system and rights in place for this— justice system and rights in place for this very reason. she should face _ for this very reason. she should face ju5tice from the country in which — face ju5tice from the country in which she _ face ju5tice from the country in which she is a citizen. gk. face justice from the country in which she is a citizen.- face justice from the country in which she is a citizen. ok. we will leave it there. thank _ which she is a citizen. ok. we will leave it there. thank you - which she is a citizen. ok. we will leave it there. thank you very - which she is a citizen. ok. we will i leave it there. thank you very much indeed for that. alka pradhan, thank you for joining the programme. something very close to my heart to finish. bakers in france are unhappy with a major supermarket chain that is offering baguettes at knock down prices — they say
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the move will undermine competition. this was the ad, released on tuesday, that sparked the row. "because of inflation, the average price of baguettes could increase significantly. that's unthinkable. " the supermarket says it will limit the cost of the french loaf to 29 cents, which is much less than you would pay at the boulangerie. the head of the anmf millers�* association is furious — especially since the decision has been taken in the midst of a pandemic — "we're trying to keep up jobs and quality here he said and there's a price for that." do you like french bread, brown? i love its! what _ do you like french bread, brown? i love its! what about _ do you like french bread, brown? i love its! what about you, - do you like french bread, brown? i love its! what about you, jess? - do you like french bread, brown? i love its! what about you, jess? do | love its! what about you, jess? do like begets? _ love its! what about you, jess? do like begets? absolutely. _ do you want some facts on begets before we go? go on. it has the highest density of bakeries in the world, france, 32,000 bakeries, and until 2014 there was a law that prevented all bakers in paris from taking summer holidays at the same time, so crucial was it to national
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security. but when i go on holiday, bryan, there isn't a boulangerie in the place i go any more because the consumption of bread is falling. it has gone from three begets a day in the 1900s to a whole baguette in the 19705 the 1900s to a whole baguette in the 1970s to just half a baguette now. you see? , ,, you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what — you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what makes _ you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what makes it _ you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what makes it so _ you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what makes it so good, - you see? oh, my goodness! do you know what makes it so good, jess? | you see? oh, my goodness! do you. know what makes it so good, jess? it has got no rubbish in it. it has got just flour, yeast, salt and water, and i will leave you with this fort. do you know where it came from? you can't march an army on an empty stomach. it came from napoleon and they put it in that long shape, so i believe, so they could stick it in their backpack. you see, bryan, you come on this programme, you learn something. come on this programme, you learn something-— come on this programme, you learn. something—jess something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard. lovely— something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, lovely to _ something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, lovely to talk _ something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, lovely to talk to _ something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, lovely to talk to you - something. amazing, thank you. jess barnard, lovely to talk to you and - barnard, lovely to talk to you and bryan, thank you forjoining us again and we hope you have enjoyed the programme. dojoin us again next week. that is the end of our first week. that is the end of our first week of programming. it is very
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different, we get plenty of conversation in, and we get a context as well. i hope you'lljoin us again for some more programmes, goodbye! we've seen decent amounts of sunshine across the country, particularly around southern areas, which will be cold and frosty to start, but lots of that winter sunshine around. the next few days are pretty similar story high pressure dominating the scene, fosterand story high pressure dominating the scene, foster and frost and fog continuing, some of it likely to cause issues through friday and the start of the week, likely to cause some trouble before it clears. keep an eye on your forecast for that. some area of high pressure across the scene on friday. this area across the north of the country will bring showery bursts of rain to scotland, but it is the fog we are most concerned about three friday morning, extensive through england
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and wales and very dense in places. most of it should lift and clear, but a few patches will hang around even into the afternoon. could see a bit more sunshine across northern ireland, central and southern scotland and we will have that weather front dimension bringing outbreaks of rain across the north of scotland. top temperatures 10 degrees in stornoway, but for most 4-8 , but degrees in stornoway, but for most 4—8 , but where fault back fog lingers it will feel quite cold. overnight it makes a return, the fog, to central and southern portions of the country and further north more breezy, so we should not see problems with frost and fog. over the weekend most places dry, but some fog pushing into the west, which is likely to bring an increasing chance of showers. these frontal systems are slowly working into western areas, but again wins will be light enough for england and wales on saturday to allow for mist and fog to form once again with some low cloud as well. further west we will start to see that weather front which could bring a few showers into
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western areas and the wind is picking up from the south—west, so fairly mild in the south—west, but elsewhere quite chilly, particularly where it is this cloudy, misty and murky. on sunday the weather front move south across the country, more isobars across the uk, so generally a breezy day, windy in the north and certainly i don't think we will have many problems with mist and fog for sunday morning. good spells of sunshine once that weather front with the showers cleared through, but a breezy day for all, quite windy across scotland, a few showers here and a bit of sunshine, the wind speeds higherfor that. temperatures speeds higher for that. temperatures again speeds higherfor that. temperatures again single figures for most, temperatures across the south—west pretty much where we should be at this time of year. then into next week a repeat performance of the week a repeat performance of the weekjust gone, high pressure building back in across the country, settling things down and more of a breeze across the north of the uk, variable cloud, may be the odd shower, but otherwise mostly dry. the best of the sunshine further south closer to the centre of that
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high, but the chance of some mist and fog in the morning again across the south, but in the sunshine it should not feel too bad for the time of year, highs of 7—10. should not feel too bad for the time of year, highs of 7—10 . beyond that through the next of best of next week, it looks like this high pressure will absorb into this new one developing across the west and that will push right across the country bringing more finance settled weather, but it could just bring an influx of cold northerly winds as well as it pushes east across the uk. you can see that in the blue colours, but it does not last and it is nothing particularly cold. you can see that in the outlook for the coming week, temperatures dipping a bit to single digits for all, a risk of overnight frost and fog, but a very subtle outlook really, even as we head towards the end of january. —— write a very settled outlook.
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prince andrew loses his royal and military titles, and he will no longer be officially known as his royal highness. buckingham palace says the prince is handing his titles back to the queen and will continue to play no part in public life. it's important that the problem is that prince andrew has incurred aunt bled over into the regiments that he was representing. it comes a day after a judge in new york ruled the prince must defend an accusation of sexually assaulting virginia guiffre in a civil court case. the prince denies the accusation. buckingham palace says he will now defend himself as a private citizen. also tonight... m15 issues a rare alert warning of a chinese agent operating at the heart of westminster trying to influence mps.
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the isolation period for anyone with covid in england is being cut

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