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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 13, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... no let—up in the pressure on borisjohnson, as some tory mps say he should resign for attending 3 drinks party during the first lockdown. cabinet ministers rally round him, while labour says the facts, are already clear. he accepts he ought not to have done that, but it was done in good faith. there was no possible malice or intention to anything other than to give a heartfelt thank you to the people who had been working incredibly hard. [30 people who had been working incredibly hard.— people who had been working incredibly hard. do they really think this behaviour _ incredibly hard. do they really think this behaviour is - incredibly hard. do they really - think this behaviour is excusable? are they— think this behaviour is excusable? are they really going to defend him? are they really going to defend him? are they— are they really going to defend him? are they really going to defend him? are they really going to defend him? are they really going to stand by him? _ are they really going to stand by him? because in the end, it is not 'ust him? because in the end, it is not just the _ him? because in the end, it is not just the prime minister the voters will conclude is unfit to govern, it is conservative mps who stand by
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him _ is conservative mps who stand by him. ~ , ., ., ., ., him. mi5 identifies a woman who carried out _ him. mi5 identifies a woman who carried out intelligence _ him. mi5 identifies a woman who carried out intelligence for- him. mi5 identifies a woman who j carried out intelligence for china. i was at this woman can do this? how is it that this organisation can seek to subvert a political party by giving them donations? if it was a concern, why is that still going on today? the self—isolation period for people who test positive for covid is being cut in england. from monday, people will be freed on day six if they've had negative tests on days five and six. the home secretary says it's deeply concerning that a chinese agent has how many times have you seen the other side take it 4—3. he became famous for his colourful analogies. but now, professor sirjonathan van—tam, one of the faces of the government's battle against coronavirus,
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borisjohnson�*s future as prime minister remains in the balance, despite his apology for attending a drinks party during the first coronavirus lockdown in 2020. some senior conservatives are calling for him to resign. but members of the cabinet have rallied to his defence, after he said yesterday he understood the public�*s rage at his actions. he pulled out of a planned visit to a vaccination clinic today, following a family member testing positive for coronavirus. with all the latest, here's our political correspondent, helen catt. westminster is waiting. as the fallout from the prime minister's apology for how he handled what he maintains was a work event continues, borisjohnson should have been out in front of the cameras in lancashire today,
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but the visit was cancelled. one of his family members tested positive for covid. but some of his own mps have been on the airwaves. the prime minister, at the dispatch box yesterday, first of all made an apology, which was the right thing to do, i accept that. but unfortunately then went on to say that he spent 25 minutes at what he described as a work event, which was in fact a party. having said on the 8th of december at the dispatch box, that he was not aware of any parties in downing street when he clearly attended one, which means he misled the house. the mood isn't great. there is a lot of concern amongst my colleagues about the damage that these revelations are doing to the conservative party. but i do think yesterday there was a bit of a turning of colleagues' opinion. it was a very contrite, a very heartfelt apology. do you still support borisjohnson? absolutely, 100%. the cabinet is backing
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borisjohnson. the chancellor's tweet of support quite, not quite so efusive. he said he had been right to apologise and agreed there should be patient while an inquiry is carried out. other ministers have given more full throated backing. there is no question in my mind borisjohnson was acting in good faith to thank the people who had been helping to guide the country through the crisis, working incredibly hard. he accepts that oughtn�*t to have done that, looking back, but it was done in good faith. one minister's defence sparked a backlash after he said this about the leader of the scottish conservatives. douglas ross has always been quite a lightweight figure so i don't think he is... hang on. the leader of the scottish - conservatives, an msp and mp, is a lightweight figure? mr ross is one of four conservative mps who have publicly called on mrjohnson to go. meanwhile, the opposition is upping the pressure on tory mps. do they really think this behaviour is excusable? are they really going to defend him? are they really going to stand by him? because in the end it's notjust
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the prime minister that voters will conclude is unfit to govern, it is conservative mps who stand by him. many conservative mps appear to be holding off passing judgment until the senior civil servant sue gray finishes her report. that is expected in the next week. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. the culture secretary is the latest government minister to back the prime minister. she has called on fellow tories to have calm heads saying everyone needs to judge tories to have calm heads saying everyone needs tojudge boris johnson on his track record of achievement. i johnson on his track record of achievement.— johnson on his track record of achievement. ~ ., ., ., achievement. i know nothing about the event, achievement. i know nothing about the event. i — achievement. i know nothing about the event, i know— achievement. i know nothing about the event, i know as _ achievement. i know nothing about the event, i know as much - achievement. i know nothing about the event, i know as much as - achievement. i know nothing aboutj the event, i know as much as every body else. what i do know is that the prime minister made a really fulsome and genuine apology at the despatch box yesterday. and what he said is that when sue gray report, he will come back to the despatch box with a statement and answer questions from all mps and all journalists. like everybody else, i'm waiting for the publication of that report. i'm waiting for the publication of that report-—
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that report. you still trust the prime minister? _ that report. you still trust the prime minister? i _ that report. you still trust the prime minister? i absolutely. that report. you still trust the - prime minister? i absolutely trust the prime minister. _ prime minister? i absolutely trust the prime minister. wholesome l the prime minister. wholesome su - ort the prime minister. wholesome suaport there- _ let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. nadeem doris and other cabinet numbers have come out, where is rishi sunak? he numbers have come out, where is rishi sunak?_ numbers have come out, where is rishi sunak? ., , ., rishi sunak? he tweeted last night a bit later than — rishi sunak? he tweeted last night a bit later than some _ rishi sunak? he tweeted last night a bit later than some other— rishi sunak? he tweeted last night a bit later than some other cabinet - bit later than some other cabinet ministers had got around to tweeting. liz ministers had got around to meeting-— ministers had got around to tweeting._ yes, i ministers had got around to. tweeting._ yes, she ministers had got around to - tweeting._ yes, she was tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was sliuhtl tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was slightly earlier, _ tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was slightly earlier, i _ tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was slightly earlier, i think— tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was slightly earlier, i think one - tweeting. liz truss. yes, she was slightly earlier, i think one hour. slightly earlier, i think one hour earlier than the chancellor. we are mentioning the two of them because they are the two favourites if there was to be a leadership challenge. i think at the moment, certainly when i have been in parliament today, there is a sense of waiting to see what happens over the next few days. if doesn't feel like there is a clamour at the moment for more people to put their head above the parapetjust people to put their head above the parapet just yet. people to put their head above the parapetjust yet. let me tell you a few things that tory mps say they are going to be looking for over the next few days. the first of what
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happens in their constituencies, what sort of message they get from the public about how borisjohnson�*s comments in parliament have gone down. just one snapshot, a former cabinet minister was chatting to me and said they have got 45 e—mails in 13 minutes, complaining about boris johnsonjust after prime 13 minutes, complaining about boris johnson just after prime minister's questions yesterday. so some think that this is not going particularly well. the other things some tory mps will be doing is looking at the polls over the next few days and trying to see if the conservatives are doing badly, does that change their calculation that borisjohnson is a vote winner? they like boris johnson because he helps them with their seat, johnson because he helps them with theirseat, if johnson because he helps them with their seat, if there is a sign that that may start be changing my do some tories turn against them? then the sort of the end point of all of this in terms of some tory mps making their minds up is that report from sue gray, the civil servant who is looking into all of these parties. does it say anything that is bad for the prime minister? does
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it implicate him in bad decision making or potentially more events? if any of that happened, things could move pretty quickly. boris johnson absolutely is not out of the woods yet, even if some of the fee while atmosphere we saw yesterday has calmed down ever so slightly today. mi has calmed down ever so slightly toda . �* . ~ has calmed down ever so slightly toda . �* ., ~ i. has calmed down ever so slightly toda . �* ., ~' i., ., today. all right, thank you for that. today. all right, thank you for that- nick _ today. all right, thank you for that. nick there _ today. all right, thank you for that. nick there at _ today. all right, thank you for i that. nick there at westminster. today. all right, thank you for - that. nick there at westminster. we have a new story that has just come in which is breaking news from buckingham palace. it says that the duke of york's military affiliations and royal patronage is have been returned to the queen. this news that has just come us in last couple of minutes, we knew that news out of new york yesterday where a judge ruled that a civil lawsuit brought by a woman alleging sexual assault
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on the part of the duke of york. that a civil lawsuit can go ahead. so there could well be a possible trial with that, although the duke of york has consistently denied all of york has consistently denied all of the allegations made against him. that trial could go ahead later this year. now we find out from buckingham palace that the duke of york's military affiliations and royal patron edges have been returned to the queen. the implication the that it is the duke of york himself who has decided to do this. that is just speculation on my part, apologies for that. but we will see later on in the day when we get more information on that. mi5 has warned mps that a woman working for the chinese government has been seeking to improperly influence politicians.
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the house of commons speaker, nigel evans, said the security service had found that christine ching kui lee was engaged in what were decscribed as political interference activities on behalf of the chinese communist party. the home secretary, priti patel, has described it as "deeply concerning". well, a little earlier, our security correspondent gordon corera explained more to my colleague annita mcveigh. about a i—page document that mps were sent. it's basically from the security service mi5, and it has a picture of this woman christine lee, and it is a warning to parliamentarians to say this individual, mi5 believes, is acting on behalf of something called the united front work department, which is in itself a front for the chinese communist party. the allegation in it is that this has been clandestine activity on behalf of the chinese communist party to influence british politics. primarily, it looks like through donations. so the claim is that this individual, christine lee, was saying these donations were coming from the chinese community in the uk, but were actually coming from individuals in china and hong kong with the purpose of trying to influence british politics, for instance,
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to have a more positive view of the chinese communist party, perhaps to limit criticism of chinese human rights issues. and the security service has taken the pretty unusual move of going public to try and disrupt that activity by issuing this alert to people. you mentioned donations, we have had a statement from barry gardiner who is the mp for brent north about this. and donations made by christine lee to researchers in his office. what else is he saying? it's interesting that the allegation here is not like espionage in the sense of being a spy stealing secrets or passing on secret it is a very interesting statement. the alert itself doesn't name any particular individuals and says it was across political parties. but we do know that from barry gardiner who said himself
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he's been liaising with the security service for a number of years about this individual, christine lee, and that she was funding researchers in his office in the past. he says steps were taken to ensure that she had no role in the appointment or management of those researchers and that stopped in june 2020. but he notes that her son volunteered in barry gardiner�*s office and actually only left, it appears, today from that office. so clearly a lot of focus will be on barry gardiner and the relationship with christine lee and those donations to fund his office. there appear to be a lot of other signs she was active across the political spectrum in terms of being involved in british politics. and the allegation is this is as a covert agent on behalf of the chinese communist party. we have not been able to reach christine lee herself for any comment. that was our security correspondent. our political correspondent nick eardley spoke to sir ian duncan smith after the mp had raised the issue in parliament. this story and if this alert from m15 this story and if this alert from mi5 has caused a lot of shop around parliament, the extent of what has
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been alleged. with iain duncan smith the former conservative minister who is one of those who i think it's fair to say has been most critical of chinese influence in the uk. how worried are you by what we have heard today? i’m worried are you by what we have heard today?— worried are you by what we have heard today? i'm very worried. i'm one of those _ heard today? i'm very worried. i'm one of those mps _ heard today? i'm very worried. i'm one of those mps who _ heard today? i'm very worried. i'm one of those mps who have - heard today? i'm very worried. i'm one of those mps who have been l one of those mps who have been sanctioned by the chinese government and could _ sanctioned by the chinese government and could possibly be arrested on a red notice — and could possibly be arrested on a red notice in a country that has extradition _ red notice in a country that has extradition arrangements is that there _ extradition arrangements is that there is— extradition arrangements is that there is a — extradition arrangements is that there is a lot going on here for us. we also _ there is a lot going on here for us. we also have been working with democracy campaigners who have had to flee _ democracy campaigners who have had to flee hong kong, many have gone at risk, that— to flee hong kong, many have gone at risk, that sort of information kicking — risk, that sort of information kicking around in my office and my colleagues' — kicking around in my office and my colleagues' offices. we now discover there _ colleagues' offices. we now discover there is_ colleagues' offices. we now discover there is an _ colleagues' offices. we now discover there is an individual, an agent of there is an individual, an agent of the chinese — there is an individual, an agent of the chinese government who has been working _ the chinese government who has been working their way around parliament, could _ working their way around parliament, could have _ working their way around parliament, could have got access to my office when _ could have got access to my office when i'm — could have got access to my office when i'm out, i don't know. and is
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also _ when i'm out, i don't know. and is also busy— when i'm out, i don't know. and is also busy paying money to persuade people _ also busy paying money to persuade people to _ also busy paying money to persuade people to become supporters of this brutal regime, it is a brutal— supporters of this brutal regime, it is a brutal regime guilty of genocide, forced labour, and smashing the christians and threatening the taiwanese. i mean, this is— threatening the taiwanese. i mean, this is a _ threatening the taiwanese. i mean, this is a threatening government. and here — this is a threatening government. and here it— this is a threatening government. and here it has taken years and we didn't— and here it has taken years and we didn't know— and here it has taken years and we didn't know about has why was this? they have _ didn't know about has why was this? they have given money to the labour party. _ they have given money to the labour party. lots _ they have given money to the labour party, lots of money to barry gardiner's _ party, lots of money to barry gardiner's office, got access to david _ gardiner's office, got access to david cameron, theresa may, why won't _ david cameron, theresa may, why won't they— david cameron, theresa may, why won't they warn about this? i gather she gave _ won't they warn about this? i gather she gave him an award, this woman. i don't _ she gave him an award, this woman. i don't know— she gave him an award, this woman. i don't know what is going on but we need _ don't know what is going on but we need to— don't know what is going on but we need to know. we need to open this up need to know. we need to open this up and _ need to know. we need to open this up and say— need to know. we need to open this up and say "what in heavens name in our security _ up and say "what in heavens name in our security forces doing?" what up and say "what in heavens name in our security forces doing?"— our security forces doing?" what do our security forces doing?" what do ou want our security forces doing?" what do you want the _ our security forces doing?" what do you want the government _ our security forces doing?" what do you want the government to - our security forces doing?" what do you want the government to tear? l you want the government to tear? clearly there is a lot of concern in parliament about this comically something appears to have gone badly wrong for this to happen for so long. what should the government be doing now? long. what should the government be doinu now? ,, , long. what should the government be doinu now? ., , , doing now? speed, apparently the time around _ doing now? speed, apparently the time around the _ doing now? speed, apparently the time around the story, _ doing now? speed, apparently the time around the story, and - doing now? speed, apparently the time around the story, and i - time around the story, and i remember it in 2017. if they were
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looking _ remember it in 2017. if they were looking at— remember it in 2017. if they were looking at base 2017, i was at this individual— looking at base 2017, i was at this individual access to senior members of government, prime minister? how is it that _ of government, prime minister? how is it that this— of government, prime minister? how is it that this organisation can seek— is it that this organisation can seek to — is it that this organisation can seek to subvert a political party by giving _ seek to subvert a political party by giving them donations? and how is it that 500,000 £600,000 goes to an mp and put _ that 500,000 £600,000 goes to an mp and put a _ that 500,000 £600,000 goes to an mp and put a member of staff here? all of this— and put a member of staff here? all of this stuff, if it was a concern, why— of this stuff, if it was a concern, why oh— of this stuff, if it was a concern, why oh why— of this stuff, if it was a concern, why oh why is that still going on today? — why oh why is that still going on today? literally this morning as the first we _ today? literally this morning as the first we know about this. we need to look at _ first we know about this. we need to look at our— first we know about this. we need to look at our clearance system is here, _ look at our clearance system is here, because how is this individual cleared _ here, because how is this individual cleared without anyone going "no, they shouldn't be here because of their track— they shouldn't be here because of their track record." there is money hidden in accounts in hong kong where _ hidden in accounts in hong kong where all— hidden in accounts in hong kong where all these alarm bells should be going _ where all these alarm bells should be going off. we need to open this up be going off. we need to open this up and _ be going off. we need to open this up and ask— be going off. we need to open this up and ask ourselves the question how can _ up and ask ourselves the question how can we — up and ask ourselves the question how can we do this? i'm a privy councillor. _ how can we do this? i'm a privy councillor. i_ how can we do this? i'm a privy councillor, i have had plenty of briefings — councillor, i have had plenty of briefings and government ministers, not in _ briefings and government ministers, not in the _ briefings and government ministers, not in the public domain because i was in _ not in the public domain because i was in government at some point. so the sorts— was in government at some point. so the sorts of— was in government at some point. so the sorts of things are kicking around — the sorts of things are kicking around parliament. this is really
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dangerous, subverting which politicians and are seeking information.— politicians and are seeking information. ., , ,, ., information. iain duncan smith on that developing _ information. iain duncan smith on that developing story. _ information. iain duncan smith on that developing story. we - information. iain duncan smith on that developing story. we will. information. iain duncan smith on that developing story. we will get j that developing story. we will get more on that a bit later. i brought you have breaking news a few seconds ago that buckingham palace has announced that the duke of york's military affiliations and royal patronages have been returned to the queen. that news in the last five or so minutes. that is the royal communication there sent to all of the newsrooms. news correspondent is here. there is a full statement on all of this, just take us through it. all of this, 'ust take us through it. , , ., , ., ., , it. this is a statement that we 'ust received from fl it. this is a statement that we 'ust received from buckingham i it. this is a statement that we just received from buckingham palace| received from buckingham palace about the duke handing back his remaining titles. the statement says "with the queen's approval and agreement, the duke of york's military affiliations and royal patronages have been returned to the queen. the duke of york will continue not to undertake any public
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duties and he is defending this case as a private citizen. is script that is referring to the civil case that we know now he is going to face in new york as a result of that decision that was made by the judge there yesterday. the duke has not been undertaking any public duties for the last few months since this case erupted around him, since that interview that he gave the bbc newsnight some time ago now. this is a further step in that progress of him essentially withdrawing from public life. we don't know if that is to continue fighting this case, to take some other move in terms of trying to resolve that case, reach a settlement. no indication of that from buckingham palace. he had already given up some titles and positions, the duke, this is now a further step really that means he is now completely withdrawn from public life, ceases to be, in effect, a working member of the royalfamily
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until this case is resolved. to working member of the royal family until this case is resolved.— until this case is resolved. to be clear, until this case is resolved. to be clear. the _ until this case is resolved. to be clear, the duke _ until this case is resolved. to be clear, the duke has _ until this case is resolved. to be clear, the duke has made - until this case is resolved. to be clear, the duke has made it - until this case is resolved. to be | clear, the duke has made it clear throughout the controversy concerning his alleged relationship with this woman, virginia giuffre, who he says he actually does not recall meeting. he has maintained his innocence throughout. absolutely, strenuous and repeated denials from the duke. and we shouldn't take anything from this step today in terms of indicating any guilt on his part. this mayjust be an ordinary step that the palace thinks it is required in orderfor him to focus on fighting that case, thatis him to focus on fighting that case, that is what is going to happen. there is none of that detail here. but he was still holding some official positions, things like colonel in chief of the grenadier guards. and people were pointing out yesterday that that potentially would have meant that he was at events like trooping the colour, he would have been at the forefront of events in the queen'sjubilee here. and if at the same time he is trying to fight a civil case with such
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grave allegations against him in court in new york at the same time, that would not have been particularly a brilliant look for the royal family. particularly a brilliant look for the royalfamily. it would have cast a shadow over thosejubilee year events. it looks like another duke is now effectively being removed entirely from any official position and he won't be at any official events as a member of the royal family. at least for the time being while we see what is going to happen nextin while we see what is going to happen next in the progress of that civil court case. next in the progress of that civil court case-— next in the progress of that civil court case. ., ., ., , ., ., court case. the allegations are of sexual assault _ court case. the allegations are of sexual assault against _ court case. the allegations are of sexual assault against this - court case. the allegations are of i sexual assault against this woman, that who jude has consistently denied. ., , denied. indeed, that is the allegation _ denied. indeed, that is the allegation made _ denied. indeed, that is the allegation made against i denied. indeed, that is the i allegation made against him. it is denied. indeed, that is the - allegation made against him. it is a civil case, not a criminal case, he is not facing criminal prosecution. there is no possible prison sentence or anything like that at the end of this particular case. this is a civil case that has been brought by virginia giuffre. of course, all links tojeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell who has not been convicted. virginia giuffre has or is maintained that she was a victim
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—— always maintained she was a victim ofjeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell and the prince was a part of that at some point. we don't take any reading from this move today as to whether he is indicating guilt or not, just that he is giving up the last of his official titles and positions so that he can, as a private citizen, focus on resolving this case one way or another. we still don't know what his next move will be. lian or another. we still don't know what his next move will be.— his next move will be. dan johnson, many thanks- _ his next move will be. dan johnson, many thanks. with _ his next move will be. dan johnson, many thanks. with the _ his next move will be. dan johnson, many thanks. with the very - his next move will be. dan johnson, many thanks. with the very latest i his next move will be. dan johnson, | many thanks. with the very latest on that breaking news. we will go back to that story about mi5 and its warning to mps that a woman working for the chinese government has been seeking to improperly influence politicians. howard jack is a bbc chinese service editor and jointly now. thanks for being with us. tell us about this woman, christine lee, what we know about her? she us about this woman, christine lee, what we know about her?— us about this woman, christine lee, what we know about her? she is known in the uk's chinese _ what we know about her? she is known in the uk's chinese community -
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what we know about her? she is known in the uk's chinese community is i what we know about her? she is known in the uk's chinese community is a i in the uk's chinese community is a leading immigration lawyer. if you watch any of the chinese language television programmes or go on the internet, you see her and her law firm everywhere. and she is also known as a leading participant or champion the chinese— british to be involved in politics. she is also known as somebody who has met with prime ministers and been given awards. it is quite a bit of a community pillar in that sense. so a sirnificant community pillar in that sense. so a significant figure _ community pillar in that sense. so a significant figure then? hobnobbing it with the great and the good. and what do you believe the response could well be from the chinese authorities to the allegation that she is working on behalf of the chinese communist party? i know it is the middle of the night in china. yes, and if you go buy some of the
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previous similar incidents happening in other countries, the response is likely to be an outright dismissal of this allegation and calling it an anti—china propaganda. and deny that anything improper is done. what anti-china propaganda. and deny that anything improper is done.— anything improper is done. what kind of influence was _ anything improper is done. what kind of influence was she _ anything improper is done. what kind of influence was she trying _ anything improper is done. what kind of influence was she trying to - anything improper is done. what kind of influence was she trying to bring i of influence was she trying to bring to bear? when it comes to british politicians? i to bear? when it comes to british politicians?— politicians? i guess each country will have to _ politicians? i guess each country will have to ask— politicians? i guess each country will have to ask the _ politicians? i guess each country will have to ask the intelligence | will have to ask the intelligence agency and the parliament to reveal more of the actual details of some of this. if we base on incidents in canada, the usa and in australia, this pattern of trying to use money to funnel money into certain targeted mps or congresspeople, and
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eventually trying to influence their attitudes towards contentious issues in relation to china. for example, the uk's attitudes to hong kong or taiwan or the uighurs in xinjiang. if there is a bill or other things, that will maybe influence peddling that will maybe influence peddling that way. bud that will maybe influence peddling that wa . �* , that will maybe influence peddling thatwa . �* , ., that will maybe influence peddling that wa . �* , ., ., that way. and she was doing that throu . h that way. and she was doing that through money. _ that way. and she was doing that through money, essentially i that way. and she was doing that through money, essentially stop| through money, essentially stop using money to give two particular causes that a particular politician might be interested in?- causes that a particular politician might be interested in? well, yes, essentially they _ might be interested in? well, yes, essentially they are _ might be interested in? well, yes, essentially they are using - might be interested in? well, yes, essentially they are using what i might be interested in? well, yes, | essentially they are using what they perceive as a weakness in the western system, that people have to raise funds for their campaigns. so, often this is a way that once you get the money... there was a famous case a couple of years back in australia, one of the members of parliament had to resign as well
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because he was identified as taking money from an identified chinese agent. irate money from an identified chinese arent. ~ ., ., ., agent. we will leave it there, good to talk to you- _ agent. we will leave it there, good to talk to you. thanks _ agent. we will leave it there, good to talk to you. thanks for - agent. we will leave it there, good to talk to you. thanks forjoining . to talk to you. thanks forjoining us. let's go back to our top story actually which is those comments that were made by the leader of the commons jacob rees—mogg in relation to the situation concerning boris johnson and that downing street party. and douglas ross the leader of the scottish conservatives made it clear that he believed boris johnson should resign. well, jacob rees—mogg suggested that douglas ross was actually a lightweight. we have been talking to some of mr ross's constituency in elgin see what they have to say. for rees-mogg to sa that what they have to say. for rees-mogg to say that the — what they have to say. for rees-mogg to say that the leader _ what they have to say. for rees-mogg to say that the leader of _ what they have to say. for rees-mogg to say that the leader of the _ what they have to say. for rees-mogg to say that the leader of the tory i to say that the leader of the tory party of scotland was a nobody is
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pretty shocking. it’s party of scotland was a nobody is pretty shocking-— pretty shocking. it's 'ust so ical pretty shocking. it's 'ust so typical of i pretty shocking. it's 'ust so iypicai of his * pretty shocking. it's 'ust so typical of his kind. i pretty shocking. it'sjust so typical of his kind. they i pretty shocking. it'sjust so | typical of his kind. they are pretty shocking. it'sjust so i typical of his kind. they are just rubbish, — typical of his kind. they are just rubbish, they rubbished scotland. at every— rubbish, they rubbished scotland. at every turn _ rubbish, they rubbished scotland. at eve turn. ~ . rubbish, they rubbished scotland. at eve turn. ., ., ., every turn. what you make of what jacob rees-moog _ every turn. what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has _ every turn. what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had - every turn. what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had to i every turn. what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had to say? | every turn. what you make of what| jacob rees-mogg has had to say? i jacob rees—mogg has had to say? i never heard what he said. he jacob rees-mogg has had to say? i never heard what he said. he said i jacob rees-mogg has had to say? i i never heard what he said. he said he was a lightweight. _ never heard what he said. he said he was a lightweight. douglas _ never heard what he said. he said he was a lightweight. douglas ross i never heard what he said. he said he was a lightweight. douglas ross was| was a lightweight. douglas ross was a lightweight? _ was a lightweight. douglas ross was a lightweight? what _ was a lightweight. douglas ross was a lightweight? what you _ was a lightweight. douglas ross was a lightweight? what you make i was a lightweight. douglas ross was a lightweight? what you make of i was a lightweight. douglas ross was i a lightweight? what you make of what jacob rees-mogg _ a lightweight? what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has _ a lightweight? what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had _ a lightweight? what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had to - a lightweight? what you make of what jacob rees-mogg has had to say? i jacob rees—mogg has had to say? well, he is an idiot, he is. if you get onto television and look at these people, you know they are lying. these people, you know they are l ini. , ., , ., , these people, you know they are lying. joining us now is maurice currie, a former _ lying. joining us now is maurice currie, a former conservative i lying. joining us now is maurice i currie, a former conservative member of the scottish parliament. good to see you, thanks for being with us. what do you make of what jacob rees—mogg actually said? well. what do you make of what jacob rees-mogg actually said? well, it is com-letel rees-mogg actually said? well, it is completely way _ rees-mogg actually said? well, it is completely way off _ rees-mogg actually said? well, it is completely way off the _ rees-mogg actually said? well, it is completely way off the mark, i rees-mogg actually said? well, it is completely way off the mark, he i completely way off the mark, he doesn't understand scotland. he should get back into his box.
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douglas is right, he is doing a greatjob. he is working through difficult times that we have at the moment with covid and various other things. no, ifully support him. jacob has totally missed red douglas ross. it jacob has totally missed red douglas ross. . , jacob has totally missed red douglas ross. ., , ., , ., ., ., ross. it was a bit of a thing to when nicola — ross. it was a bit of a thing to when nicola sturgeon - ross. it was a bit of a thing to when nicola sturgeon came i ross. it was a bit of a thing to l when nicola sturgeon came out ross. it was a bit of a thing to i when nicola sturgeon came out in front of the other msps at holyrood and defended mr ross. weill. front of the other msps at holyrood and defended mr ross. well, nothing ceases to amaze _ and defended mr ross. well, nothing ceases to amaze me _ and defended mr ross. well, nothing ceases to amaze me what _ and defended mr ross. well, nothing ceases to amaze me what the i and defended mr ross. well, nothing ceases to amaze me what the first i ceases to amaze me what the first minister may do. certainly, there is absolutely no question that douglas ross gets my full support and of our party in scotland. he is doing a greatjob. i would suggest that jacob rees—mogg go back and examine what he says, that is absolutely total rubbish and off the mark. i would love to talk to jacob rees—mogg about this myself, but i just wonder why you believe he has held up the scottish secretary above
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the leader of the scottish conservatives? i the leader of the scottish conservatives?— the leader of the scottish conservatives? ., ., ., , conservatives? i have no idea why he has, i conservatives? i have no idea why he has. i personally _ conservatives? i have no idea why he has, i personally haven't _ conservatives? i have no idea why he has, i personally haven't met - conservatives? i have no idea why he has, i personally haven't met the i has, i personally haven't met the scottish secretary. but as far as i'm concerned, ijoin the scottish parliament at the same time as douglas ross did, and i know douglas well. and there is no question about it, he is a man of the people he has had a good job in culture, he has been a councillor, he has very many attributes to him. and he is a force to follow. with alisterjack and he has been in business, i understand that he is a mp. he is doing thejob he has been given by the prime minister. d0 he has been given by the prime minister. , ., , he has been given by the prime minister. i. , , ., ,, minister. do you believe, perhaps, what underlies _ minister. do you believe, perhaps, what underlies this _ minister. do you believe, perhaps, what underlies this to _ minister. do you believe, perhaps, | what underlies this to rees-mogg's what underlies this to rees—mogg's comments is the fact that the snp are so dominant in scotland? and overshadow pretty much every other
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party? overshadow pretty much every other .a 2 . overshadow pretty much every other .a ? . ., ., , , overshadow pretty much every other .a 2 . ., ., , , . ., , party? well, that may be the case, but when you _ party? well, that may be the case, but when you look _ party? well, that may be the case, but when you look at _ party? well, that may be the case, but when you look at the _ party? well, that may be the case, but when you look at the results i party? well, that may be the case, but when you look at the results of| but when you look at the results of independent elections —— the independence referendum that we had independence referendum that we had in 2014, we want substantially, the unionist side. in 2021, in my own constituency which i fought in, we managed to get a unionist back in with an increased majority. and just recently in 2021 in our local by—election in my area near me in a moment north, we increased our share of the vote. there are three unionist wins already. really, i suggest that they minister goes back and looks at the history of how successful the unionists are in scotland. �* , , successful the unionists are in scotland. �* , i. ., , scotland. i'm slightly curious, iiven scotland. i'm slightly curious, given that _ scotland. i'm slightly curious, given that it — scotland. i'm slightly curious, given that it is _ scotland. i'm slightly curious, given that it is the _ scotland. i'm slightly curious, l given that it is the conservative and unionist party...— given that it is the conservative and unionist party... correct, that has always— and unionist party... correct, that has always been _ and unionist party... correct, that has always been the _ and unionist party... correct, that has always been the case - and unionist party... correct, that has always been the case for- and unionist party... correct, that has always been the case for a i and unionist party... correct, that. has always been the case for a long time. i'm a very strong unionist, and i believe that is that we will go forward as a scottish
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conservative unionists and we will hold the uk together. these results that i have given you prove that. already, we will leave it there. good to talk to you, thanks for joining us. former conservative member of the scottish parliament. thick fog in the forecast for tonight. it is going to be really quite dense by the early hours of the morning. and could well lash through the morning tomorrow and into the early afternoon. it will be forming tonight mostly through central and southern parts. this is what we have right now, a lot of clear windless weather out there. and fog will be forming. some will form across the north of england, but i think it is through the midlands southwards when the thickest of the fog will develop. while in scotland, frosty night for england and wales. the fog is because of this high pressure and the windless weather that is across much of the uk but in many parts of
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western europe and is here to stay. most of the fog will clear later on in the morning, but as always, this time of the year there is a chance that in some spots it will linger into the afternoon. sometimes even wants the fog clears it lifts into that no grey sky. it means some cold weather for some of us, maybe 5 degrees and no higher. the mildest of the weather in western scotland. hello, this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. our top stories for you: prince andrew loses his military titles and patronage is over a civil case in the us, allegations he denies. no let up in the pressure on borisjohnson, as some tory mps say he should resign for attending a drinks party during lockdown.
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m15 identifies a woman it says has been carrying out political interference in parliament on behalf of china. the self—isolation period for people who test positive for covid is being cut in england. from monday, people will be freed on day six if they've had negative tests on days five and six. it's a bit like being 3—0 up in a game and thinking, "well, we can't possibly lose this now," but how may times have you seen the other side take it 4—3? he became famous for his colourful analogies. but now, professor sirjonathan van—tam, one of the faces of the government's battle against coronavirus, is leaving his role as england's deputy chief medical officer. the health secretary, sajid javid, has confirmed he's cutting the isolation period for people testing positive for covid in england. from monday, those with a positive result will be freed from isolation at the start of day six if they've
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had negative tests on days five and six. it's hoped the move will ease pressure on employers hit by staff absences, including the nhs. it comes as the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to another record high during the pandemic. they did say there was a space in g a while ago. in the emergency department at warrington hospital, staff are having to manage competing pressures. the omicron wave is sweeping across north—west england with a fast—growing number of covid patients. we are running on escalation numbers every day, just to ensure we are safe. staff are falling sick, and all this while non—covid patients also need urgent care. it's almost a perfect winter storm. across the region, our numbers of covid inpatients are almost as high as they were in previous waves. now, we're also dealing with our usual winter pressures and the need to catch up with all that elective work that we wanted to do in previous years, so we've never felt the pressure so much. keep an eye on it, press on it. the latest data shows more than 40,000 nhs hospital staff in england,
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around 5%, were absent because of covid sickness or isolation last week. four patients waiting... and as more staff fall sick, it's needed everyone to get involved. we've got support from across the organisation of admin staff coming to help us in the mornings, to support with comfort with the patients. so it's a real team effort? absolutely, it's been like that from day one. to ease the pressure on understaffed hospital departments, the government has just changed the rules so isolation can end on day six. ukhsa data shows that around two thirds of positive cases are no longer infectious by the end of day five, and we want to use the testing capacity that we've built up to help these people leave isolation safely. new figures from nhs england show the havoc the pandemic has played with waiting times. in november 2021, six million people were waiting for planned surgery. 307,000 people have been waiting more than a year for their treatment.
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and december saw a record number of ambulance call—outs for the most urgent cases, but average response times failed to meet current targets. fraser knows first—hand the impact a delayed ambulance can have. when he had a heart attack six years ago, an ambulance was there within minutes. on new year's day, he experienced the same symptoms, but this time, he was told it would be at least two hours before an ambulance could get to him. this time, it was going through my mind of, "if it's two hours for the ambulance just to get here, i haven't got a chance." who's going to look after my partner and my kids if this doesn't get sorted in time? in the depths of winter, the nhs is running hot. this is shaping up to be one of the toughest periods the health service and those patients waiting for treatment have experienced. dominic hughes, bbc news, warrington. our health correspondent
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katharine da costa is here. so reducing the isolation period, what is the scientific basis for that? ., ., ., ., that? the data from the uk health security agency — that? the data from the uk health security agency says _ that? the data from the uk health security agency says that - that? the data from the uk health security agency says that two i that? the data from the uk health. security agency says that two thirds of people no longer infectious by day five, so that could mean that lots of people are being restricted when they don't need to be, but obviously the flip side to that is about a third of people could still be infectious and pass virus on. but the health secretary has said it is a balancing act you try to maximise activity in the economy and try to minimise the risk of reducing the isolation period. some scientists have expressed concern. they are saying it is very important that people do the lateral flow tests on day five and a six and report those results, and if they are released, they should still be cautious, wear masks in crowded indoor settings and
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avoid seeing vulnerable people. fiiq avoid seeing vulnerable people. ok, so this is something that will use pressure, potentially, the pcr testing capability and also ease pressure on those employers who perhaps are having employees off wholesale because they are testing? you will remember before christmas the us cut the isolation period to a full five days and there's been this growing pressure for the uk to follow suit, and that is to ease pressure on staff absence and get people back, particularly in the nhs but also teachers and pupils, get them back to school more quickly, so them back to school more quickly, so the health secretary made this announcement in the commons today, that will start england from monday, scotland says the changes will bring england into line with what scotland is doing already. wells has said that there are no plans to cut isolation there and it is not clear what northern ireland plans to do at
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this stage —— wells has —— wales has said. -- wales has said. katharine, thank ou, -- wales has said. katharine, thank you. katharine _ -- wales has said. katharine, thank you, katharine da _ -- wales has said. katharine, thank you, katharine da costa. _ -- wales has said. katharine, thank you, katharine da costa. back- -- wales has said. katharine, thank you, katharine da costa. back to i -- wales has said. katharine, thank| you, katharine da costa. back to the m15 story. the deputy house of commons speaker nigel evans said the security service had found that christine lee was engaged in what we're scribed his political interference activities on behalf of the chinese communist party. the labour mp barry gardiner has issued a statement on this matter. let's take a look at what he has been saying. he says...
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and mr gardiner's statement on the issue continues... let's talk now to the conservative and pete richard —— conservative mp. thank you for joining us. do you ever come across christine lee? it joining us. do you ever come across christine lee?— christine lee? it is possible. we have had a _ christine lee? it is possible. we
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have had a look— christine lee? it is possible. we have had a look back _ christine lee? it is possible. we have had a look back at - christine lee? it is possible. we have had a look back at various. have had a look back at various meetings over the years and ethic it is possible she came to a tourism meeting in 2018, so i may have met her there. ., ., , her there. 0k, and was there any suggestion _ her there. 0k, and was there any suggestion potentially _ her there. 0k, and was there any suggestion potentially from i her there. 0k, and was there any suggestion potentially from what| her there. 0k, and was there any i suggestion potentially from what you have heard that she may have been involved in activities that m15 would later deem to be... obviously not, buti would later deem to be... obviously not, but i think— would later deem to be... obviously not, but i think the _ would later deem to be... obviously not, but i think the general- would later deem to be... obviously not, but i think the general point i not, but i think the general point for listeners, clive, is probably that it for listeners, clive, is probably thatitis for listeners, clive, is probably that it is sensible to assume that anyone who is a mainland chinese citizen may be a number of the chinese communist party. that does not mean that they are necessarily involved in hostile or other espionage activities in the uk or against the uk. and it does mean that it against the uk. and it does mean thatitis against the uk. and it does mean that it is possible that they might be asked to do so, and so the wise thing is to generate the engagement that we need to have with major world superpowers while being very
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cautious about anything that involves, for example, money, let alone having children employed in parliamentarians offices, so i think the messages, be cautious, just as the messages, be cautious, just as the speaker identified last year, that there was a polish and ukrainian national... right, ok, but is there a problem, _ ukrainian national... right, ok, but is there a problem, then, _ ukrainian national... right, ok, but is there a problem, then, for i ukrainian national... right, ok, but is there a problem, then, for the i is there a problem, then, for the security services, for the police, potentially, in that this person is alleged to have been trying to gain influence as opposed to being involved in espionage, per se? yes. involved in espionage, per se? yes, but the influence _ involved in espionage, per se? yes, but the influence thing _ involved in espionage, per se? ya: but the influence thing is quite interesting, because i noticed that the m15 security interference alert said that part of her role was to ensure the uk landscape is favourable to the communist party's agenda, in which case you would have
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to say her and others seeking to do the same have not been very successful.— the same have not been very successful. , ., ., , successful. indeed, but one wonders also, is that — successful. indeed, but one wonders also, is that would _ successful. indeed, but one wonders also, is that would all— also, is that would all representatives of foreign countries do? is the point here that this woman was not clearly identifying herself as a representative of the chinese authorities? this i herself as a representative of the chinese authorities?— chinese authorities? as i say, i think it is _ chinese authorities? as i say, i think it is sensible _ chinese authorities? as i say, i think it is sensible to _ chinese authorities? as i say, i think it is sensible to assume l chinese authorities? as i say, i. think it is sensible to assume that any mainland chinese citizen could be a member of the chinese communist party and there is nothing illegal about that at all, if they represent about that at all, if they represent a chinese government entity, it is extremely likely they will be, so thatis extremely likely they will be, so that is not the issue in itself. the issueis that is not the issue in itself. the issue is really these covert donations to aspiring or actual parliamentarians, and that is where i think everybody in parliament and outside needs to be very cautious, and that is one reason why the all party china group which i am chair of the last ten years has never
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accepted donations from any mainland entity at all, precisely in order to avoid the risk of perception of being perceived to be compromised. we are going to leave it there. richard graham, thank you very much forjoining us, thank you. we are going to return to the breaking news the queen has agreed the duke of york's decision to essentially give back his honorary military roles and real patronage is. and that he will no longer be called his royal highness. the move comes a day after a new yorkjudge rejected prince andrew's lawyers efforts to dismiss us! assault lawsuit against him —— dismiss a sex assault lawsuit. in the last few minutes, a lawyer for presenter has responded to that. dan johnson has more details. this
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presenter has responded to that. dan johnson has more details.— johnson has more details. this has come to us — johnson has more details. this has come to us from _ johnson has more details. this has come to us from a _ johnson has more details. this has come to us from a source - johnson has more details. this has come to us from a source close i johnson has more details. this has come to us from a source close to| come to us from a source close to the duke of york, saying, given... we are unsurprised by the ruling — the ruling the case will proceed. the duke had been try to get the case turned out. that was unsuccessful yesterday. this statement continues, however, it was not a judgment on the merits of miss giuffre's case, just procedurally whether the case could be heard, whether the case could be heard, whether it should proceed, which the judge agreed with. the statement continues, it is a marathon, not a sprint, and the duke will continue to defend himself against these claims, so it seems like the duke is preparing to continue to fight to have his incidents proven, but he is recognising that is going to be a long process —— innocence proven. something that would be embarrassing down the line, that may involve
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court appearances, may distract from his other work and from the reputation and image of the royal family, so looks like that is like the queen has taken the decision today to take back the official titles and military associations that the duke of york held. that is why we had that statement just that the duke of york held. that is why we had that statementjust half an hour ago from buckingham palace, saying that with the queen's... the duke of york, buckingham palace said, will continue not to undertake any public duties and is defending this case as a private citizen, so the duke had in effect taking a step back from public life already, because of the period around this case. he had not been doing any public engagements. his titles were effectively in abeyance, that is becoming permanent, and it is not just for the duration of this case.
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we understand from sources close to the palace the titles will be taken away, given to other members of the royalfamily and away, given to other members of the royal family and that whatever happens in the duke cosmic civil case, he won't get them back. he will continue to be the duke of york, continue to be a member of the royalfamily, but he york, continue to be a member of the royal family, but he won't be known as his royal highness and effectively, at least for the time being, he is no longer a member of the royalfamily. he won't being, he is no longer a member of the royal family. he won't be representing the royal family. the royalfamily. he won't be representing the royal family. thank ou. dan representing the royal family. thank you- danjohnson — representing the royal family. thank you. dan johnson there. _ this move came as a group of veterans wrote to say his position was untenable. we should say the duke denies allegations against them. the queen is chief of the army, navy and air force, the letter said that there were... this had to
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be an... if this were any other military officer, it would be inconceivable they would be in post. graham organised that letter from veterans. thanks very much for joining us. it seems your wishes have been granted in relation to the duke of york and the military patronage he had.— duke of york and the military patronage he had. yes, i've only 'ust patronage he had. yes, i've only just heard _ patronage he had. yes, i've only just heard the _ patronage he had. yes, i've only just heard the news _ patronage he had. yes, i've only just heard the news before i i patronage he had. yes, i've only. just heard the news before i came patronage he had. yes, i've only i just heard the news before i came on now, so i've not seen the detail. they are always very careful with their language, it is taken back and he is not using his hrh title... i don't know how clear it is, as to whether he has lost all his rings or whether he has lost all his rings or whether he has lost all his rings or whether he simply is stepping down from his honorary leadership roles
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within the armed forces, so i do not know the detail, but it is certainly a step in the right direction. there has been quite strong feeling amongst armed forces personnel, both current and former, his position was no longer tenable. you current and former, his position was no longer tenable.— no longer tenable. you are right, there is still _ no longer tenable. you are right, there is still a _ no longer tenable. you are right, there is still a lot _ no longer tenable. you are right, there is still a lot of _ no longer tenable. you are right, there is still a lot of detail- no longer tenable. you are right, there is still a lot of detail we i there is still a lot of detail we need to get out of this — did he hand them back, did the queen take them from him, and so on and so forth? but he has maintained his innocence, nothing has been proved innocence, nothing has been proved in a court of law. is this jumping the gun? in a court of law. is this 'umping the iun? , ., , , in a court of law. is this 'umping the iun? , , the gun? the problem is, as the letter said. _ the gun? the problem is, as the letter said, sorry... _ the gun? the problem is, as the letter said, sorry... as - the gun? the problem is, as the letter said, sorry... as the i the gun? the problem is, as the| letter said, sorry... as the letter said, he has already made and -- his —— his position untenable regardless of the court case because his conduct over the last years has been uncooperative, trying to avoid going to court at all, it has been... the
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bizarre situation last year where he was attempting to avoid having paper served to him, the bizarre allegations or comments and claims he made in the interview two years ago. it all adds up. if this was a senior military officer who was not a royal, getting embroiled in this kind of thing, he would not still be in post, and it is bizarre really live in a country were this person holds this military position and can only be removed by his own mother, and i think that is part of the problem here. ithink and i think that is part of the problem here. i think it reflects very badly on the monarchy as well as the armed forces. i5 very badly on the monarchy as well as the armed forces.— very badly on the monarchy as well as the armed forces. is that why you believe, as the armed forces. is that why you believe. then. _ as the armed forces. is that why you believe, then, that _ as the armed forces. is that why you believe, then, that the _ as the armed forces. is that why you believe, then, that the queen i as the armed forces. is that why you believe, then, that the queen has i believe, then, that the queen has accepted this state of affairs? i think the queen always resists his —— responding to any of these sorts of... these allegations have been around for 11 years sub actions could have been taking a long time
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ago. what i think it has become, reached a point where there was not much choice, and it was invited this is the simplest and most straightforward way of dealing with this matter at the moment —— it was advised that this was. what happens next is anybody�*s asked. what advised that this was. what happens next is anybody's asked.— next is anybody's asked. what are the kind of— next is anybody's asked. what are the kind of things _ next is anybody's asked. what are the kind of things that _ next is anybody's asked. what are the kind of things that veterans i the kind of things that veterans have been saying in relation to all this? i have been saying in relation to all this? ~ , have been saying in relation to all this? ~' , , , this? i think it 'ust brings the institutions _ this? i think it 'ust brings the institutions he— this? i think itjust brings the institutions he is _ this? i think itjust brings the institutions he is connected l this? i think itjust brings the - institutions he is connected with... i think they also knew the double standard, the very fact that he has stayed in these roles for the sole reason that he is the son of the head of state, i think, really sticks in a lot of people's... a lot of people find that in six of the offensive, and ijust think, if they had got into that kind of trouble,
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so publicly, they would have faced quite a serious consequence. but auain, i quite a serious consequence. but again, i reiterate, he has denied all the charges but this has not gone to court, and he firmly maintains his innocence. it feels like, it does feel as if the trial — if it does go ahead eventually — is being preempted at. if it does go ahead eventually - is being preempted at.— if it does go ahead eventually - is being preempted at. again, is the conduct in relation _ being preempted at. again, is the conduct in relation to _ being preempted at. again, is the conduct in relation to the - being preempted at. again, is the conduct in relation to the trial, . conduct in relation to the trial, not the allegations. it has not been proven, but they are very serious allegations, associated allegations proved in a court of law in relation to ghislaine maxwell, so the bakken of the allegations has been demonstrated to be proven, and you would think that his priority would be to ensure that the truth comes out and that the issues are resolved, not least for the benefit of all the women who have been
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victims of epstein�*s activities, and to try and hide in royal residences and have the police deflect lawyers trying to serve papers was one of the last straws, and then the various bizarre attempts to have the whole thing dismissed — it does not look like somebody who is interested in cooperating and allowing the truth to come out, but is instead attempting to avoid accountability of course he may well be innocent, and he is innocent until proven guilty, but if that is the case, let's hear it in the court of law. graham smith from the group republic, thanks forjoining us. let's get more from the journalist and former bbc royal correspondent jenny vond, whojoins and former bbc royal correspondent jenny vond, who joins us and former bbc royal correspondent jenny vond, whojoins us now. what
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do you make of all this? this jenny vond, who joins us now. what do you make of all this?— do you make of all this? this royal sto has do you make of all this? this royal story has kept _ do you make of all this? this royal story has kept me _ do you make of all this? this royal story has kept me jumping - do you make of all this? this royal story has kept me jumping up - do you make of all this? this royal story has kept me jumping up and | story has kept mejumping up and down more than 30 years now. there is always another surprise around the corner. i was not expecting the duke of york to relinquish his titles or to be stripped of them. we don't know what has gone on behind the scenes of the clearly pressure has been exerted on him, and i on the queen was growing for some action, because, as you've been hearing, of disquiet between the military, people beginning to say, we don't want to toast his health at the end of regimental dinners. it was inevitable, but i am surprised at the timing. i thought they would wait before the outcome of these civil suits. i wait before the outcome of these civil suits. . , wait before the outcome of these civil suits. ., , , _ ., civil suits. i was 'ust saying that to graham — civil suits. i wasjust saying that to graham smith, _ civil suits. i wasjust saying that to graham smith, our _ civil suits. i wasjust saying that to graham smith, our last - civil suits. i wasjust saying that. to graham smith, our last guest, civil suits. i wasjust saying that - to graham smith, our last guest, who organised the letter, who felt that these titles and honourariums should be taken away. that this is prejudging the whole court case, if it even goes ahead. yes. prejudging the whole court case, if it even goes ahead.—
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prejudging the whole court case, if it even goes ahead. yes, but we are told that he — it even goes ahead. yes, but we are told that he has _ it even goes ahead. yes, but we are told that he has relinquished - it even goes ahead. yes, but we are told that he has relinquished his - told that he has relinquished his titles. that would imply that perhaps it ultimately was his choice, i really don't know, but it seems a pretty permanent state of affairs. sources close to him are arguing he wants to spent his time defending his name, that this is in no way saying that he feels he has done anything wrong, he denies all the allegations against him, that this is a marathon and not a sprint, and that is true. with the court cases, the way the court procedures are in the united states, this is going to roll on and on probably well into next year, thus overshadowing the queen's putnam jubilee, so that would be very much up jubilee, so that would be very much up inference and your�*s mind —— platinumjubilee. up inference and your's mind -- platinum jubilee.— up inference and your's mind -- platinum jubilee. jennie, thank you for that, jennie _ platinum jubilee. jennie, thank you for that, jennie bond, _ platinum jubilee. jennie, thank you for that, jennie bond, former - platinum jubilee. jennie, thank you for that, jennie bond, former bbc i for that, jennie bond, former bbc royal correspondent and journalist. let's go back to one of our other
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top stories. borisjohnson�*s let's go back to one of our other top stories. boris johnson's future hangs in the balance. in the past few minutes the metropolitan police has indicated any investigation by them would depend on evidence unearthed in the sucre inquiry. nick eardley is at westminster. —— sucre inquiry. the prime minister has not been out in public today. but the pressure is still on him.- pressure is still on him. yeah, it is, pressure is still on him. yeah, it is. clive. — pressure is still on him. yeah, it is, clive. there _ pressure is still on him. yeah, it is, clive. there had _ pressure is still on him. yeah, it is, clive. there had been - is, clive. there had been speculation the police might now want to launch an inquiry after the e—mail that transpired earlier this week, inviting 100 people working in downing street to the bring your own booze events that is now so infamous, that borisjohnson attended, the statement we have just had from the met in the last 20 minutes or so basically sticks to their previous position, that unless there is significant evidence that they're not going to launch an inquiry, they don't routinely look at potential covid regulation breaches that happened or happened
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potentially a fairly long time ago. the reason this matters is that downing street headset investigation has been carried out by the top civil servants looking into all of these allegations of parties, that would have been paused if the met had decided to launch its own investigation, and the fear some had is that this would basically kick the whole process into the long grass while the police looked into it. what they are saying to us this evening is that they will look at any evidence after that inquiry, if it unearths potential criminal conduct, the words they have used our club it will be passed to the met for further consideration, our club it will be passed to the met forfurther consideration, but at the moment they are not lunching that investigation, that means that all eyes are still on that sucre investigation into what went on in downing street. —— sucre investigation. that could come as early as next week. we don't know
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for sure —— sue gray investigation. thank you for that, nick eardley at westminster. sophie has the six o'clock news. tomasz has the details. thank you. it is going to turn foggy. there could be fog forming elsewhere indenture tomorrow morning and into the afternoon, some of that fog will disperse. some of it will stick all through the day. by the end of the night, you can see the extent of the fog across mostly england, and this is also where we will have a frost, so inevitably they will be some freezing fog in places, but further north in scotland it is relatively speaking a much balmy or night. the fog has been brought by the high pressure sitting on top of us right now. most of it will clear through the morning, but some of it,
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particularly in the areas in the countryside, it will linger to the afternoon, so there could be sponsor temperatures were hover around freezing or maybe just above all through the afternoon. for most of us, it'll be more around five, 6 or seven celsius, and indeed plenty of sunny weather and the mildness that will be in southern scotland. as we go into the weekend, i think we will hang onto mist or weather. that's it from me. thanks for watching.
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at six o'clock, prince andrew is losing his royal and military titles. he will no longer be known as his royal highness. buckingham palace, says he is handing his titles back to the queen and will continue not to undertake any public duties. the move comes the day after a judge in new york ruled the prince must defend an accusation of sexually assaulting virginia giuffre in a civil court case. the prince denies the accusation and buckingham palace said he will now defend himself as a private citizen. also tonight... m15 issues a rare alert to mps warning of a chinese agent who has been operating for years
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at the heart of westminster. the isolation period for anyone with covid in england is being cut

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