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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 13, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to bbc news — i'm victoria derbyshire — live in downing street — the headlines at 9.00. pressure continues to mount on borisjohnson to resign after he admitted attending 3 downing street drinks party at the height of lockdown. but cabinet ministers rally round him. the fact is we have got an investigation that is doing that work to get the details and the facts about exactly what happened throughout that period, actually, not just that one period on may 20th. we are looking at that period of time as has been outlined. and when we have got those facts then we can have that conversation. the prime minister's behaviour has angered people across the uk — including relatives of people who died during the pandemic. it wasn't an apology. he didn't say sorry. he basically gas lit the entire nation.
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let me know what you think of the pm's defence, and particularly if you voted conservative at the last election, and what you want to see hapen next. @vicdebryshire on twitter and instagam. we have just heard a we havejust heard a member of we have just heard a member of the prime minister's family has tested positive for covid. i'm martine croxall. also this hour — the lawyer representing virginia giuffre in her civil case alleging sexual assault by prince andrew says she's not interested in a purely financial settlement. a warning that the care system for older and disabled people across the uk is under grim and relentless pressure due to staff shortages. and breaking news this hour — vaccinated uk travellers will be allowed back to france from tomorrow — as the government in paris relaxes restrictions.
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good morning. welcome. we are live in a chilly downing street, that's the weather rather than the atmosphere. some senior conservatives are calling on boris johnson to quit after he admitted attending a drinks party during lockdown. mrjohnson apologised for the way he handled the event in the downing street garden in 2020 — saying he understood the public�*s �*rage�* over it. and this morning — number 10 has confirmed that the prime minister will no longer be making a scheduled visit to lancashire after a member of his family tested positive for coronavirus. they've said that he will follow the guidance for close contacts
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including daily testing and limiting contacts with other people. some of the pm's top team — including the deputy prime minister dominic raab have rallied around the prime minister. some mps, including the scottish tory leader douglas ross, have called on him to go — along with william wragg, caroline nokes and sir roger gale. douglas ross said he would write to the 1922 committee — that is a committee of backbench tory mps which organises conservative leadership contests. he said he had written to them to express his lack of confidence in the prime minister. it takes letters from 5a backbench conservative mps to trigger a leadership challenge. senior ministers are urging mps to wait for the outcome of an investigation into alleged parties at number 10 — by the senior civil servant sue gray. we'll have developments throughout the morning hear from downing street. we will also feed in your reaction. you can get in touch with me in the usual way on instagram and twitter.
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but first here's our political correspondent damian grammaticas. the chill of a westminster morning, and a prime minister in trouble. the question in the cold light of a new day — is his apology enough? in the commons yesterday, borisjohnson did finally admit he had been at a party — but said his garden was a workspace. technically, it was within the rules. i believed implicitly that this was a work event. many watching — including bereaved families — didn't believe him. wasn't an apology, he didn't so sorry, he basically but gas lit the whole country in saying the event was a work event and not a party. we all know that's not true. one by one, his cabinet have come forward to back him. the foreign secretary late in the evening said she was behind him 100%, and the chancellor, too —
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a bit lukewarm — requested patience while an inquiry is under way. a handful of his own mps have lost patience, publicly calling on him to go. i patience, publicly calling on him to to. " ., patience, publicly calling on him to 0. ~' ., , patience, publicly calling on him to go. i know my thoughts are he is damauuin go. i know my thoughts are he is damaging as _ go. i know my thoughts are he is damaging as now, _ go. i know my thoughts are he is damaging as now, he _ go. i know my thoughts are he is damaging as now, he is - go. i know my thoughts are he is l damaging as now, he is damaging go. i know my thoughts are he is - damaging as now, he is damaging the entire _ damaging as now, he is damaging the entire conservative brand with an unwillingness to accept the stricture that other people have lived _ stricture that other people have lived by — stricture that other people have lived by. it stricture that other people have lived b . ., ., , lived by. it has left some tories itted lived by. it has left some tories pitted against — lived by. it has left some tories pitted against one _ lived by. it has left some tories pitted against one another. - lived by. it has left some tories pitted against one another. the j pitted against one another. the scottish leader douglas ross had called on the pm to resign. last nightjacob rees—mogg himself in the cabinet turned on mr ross. night jacob rees-mogg himself in the cabinet turned on mr ross.— cabinet turned on mr ross. douglas ross has always _ cabinet turned on mr ross. douglas ross has always been _ cabinet turned on mr ross. douglas ross has always been quite - cabinet turned on mr ross. douglas ross has always been quite a - ross has always been quite a lightweight figure so i don't think... ., lightweight figure so i don't think... . ., ., ., think... hang on, the leader of the scottish conservatives, _ think... hang on, the leader of the scottish conservatives, and - think... hang on, the leader of the scottish conservatives, and msp, l think... hang on, the leader of the | scottish conservatives, and msp, is a lightweight figure? the scottish secretary is much more substantial and important figure in this. so there is real disquiet among many conservatives while they wait for that inquiry by the civil servant sue gray. that inquiry by the civil servant sue gra . ~ , ., , sue gray. the prime minister has admitted he _ sue gray. the prime minister has admitted he was _ sue gray. the prime minister has admitted he was in _ sue gray. the prime minister has admitted he was in the _ sue gray. the prime minister has admitted he was in the downing i admitted he was in the downing street garden and admitted it was a
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party, therefore she doesn't have to find that, that has already been acknowledged. what she has to find is to work out, you know, who was responsible and who should take blame for it. and, crucially, which occupants of downing street might that be? damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. thank you for some of your messages. catherine says on twitter, "the apology was a pr stunt, he gets to say but i apologised and his supporters get to say he apologised but he doesn't care whether the public believe him not because nothing is changed for him." brian says, they thought they could get away with this because they were in the secure area of the number 10 garden away from public view. that was a half—hearted apology. i heard it. stewart says, it's not an apology when you say in the next breath i didn't do anything wrong, it is like the boyfriend analogy, it's not me, it's you. david says, work events were still prohibited at the time, right? so i don't understand why he made that distinction when he said technically it fell within the guidance. what
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did he mean? thank you for your messages, keep them coming in. we are going to talk to somebody who lost their dad in early 2020. thank you forjoining us. what happened to your dad? good mornin: what happened to your dad? good morning and _ what happened to your dad? good morning and thank— what happened to your dad? good morning and thank you _ what happened to your dad? (emf. morning and thank you for having what happened to your dad? (ef>;f>f. morning and thank you for having me. i lost my dad, like you said, in april 2020. i lost my dad, like you said, in april2020. he i lost my dad, like you said, in april 2020. he was a key worker during the first lockdown and we believe he caught covid from work. he was a healthy man with no underlying health conditions and was told to isolate at home until he recovered but sadly he never did. what was his job? recovered but sadly he never did. what was hisjob? he recovered but sadly he never did. what was his job?— recovered but sadly he never did. what was hisjob?— recovered but sadly he never did. what was his job? what was his “ob? he worked as a day a carer for what was his job? he worked as a day a carer for the — what was his job? he worked as a day a carer for the charity _ what was his job? he worked as a day a carer for the charity mencap, - what was his job? he worked as a day a carer for the charity mencap, so - a carerfor the charity mencap, so working with vulnerable people during that first lockdown. find working with vulnerable people during that first lockdown. and how has his death _ during that first lockdown. and how has his death from _ during that first lockdown. and how has his death from covid _ during that first lockdown. and how has his death from covid impacted l during that first lockdown. and how l has his death from covid impacted on yourself and the rest of your family? it
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yourself and the rest of your famil ? . , , yourself and the rest of your famil ? .. , .,, ., yourself and the rest of your famil ? , ., ~y family? it has been devastating. my dad was very _ family? it has been devastating. my dad was very much _ family? it has been devastating. my dad was very much the _ family? it has been devastating. my dad was very much the leader - family? it has been devastating. my dad was very much the leader of. family? it has been devastating. my| dad was very much the leader of our family, it has left us rudderless. he was supporting and encouraging and caring and he was a confidant and caring and he was a confidant and friend to all of us, his wife and friend to all of us, his wife and children. his sudden loss has been dramatic and very, very destabilising.— been dramatic and very, very destabilisinu. . . , ., ., destabilising. can i ask you what ou destabilising. can i ask you what you thought _ destabilising. can i ask you what you thought of — destabilising. can i ask you what you thought of what _ destabilising. can i ask you what you thought of what the - destabilising. can i ask you what you thought of what the prime i you thought of what the prime minister said in the house of commons yesterday? i minister said in the house of commons yesterday?- minister said in the house of commons yesterday? minister said in the house of commons esterda ? ~ ., commons yesterday? i think what the prime minister _ commons yesterday? i think what the prime minister said _ commons yesterday? i think what the prime minister said just, _ commons yesterday? i think what the prime minister said just, to _ commons yesterday? i think what the prime minister saidjust, to me, - prime minister said just, to me, speaks to a continued contempt for the public. as many people have said, and as you've stated from the messages you have received, it wasn't a real apology. saying sorry doesn't really mean anything if your behaviour doesn't change and it doesn't seem to me as if his attitude changed at all. the idea that the prime minister is taking responsibility for what happened,
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yet somehow feels he should escape any consequence, ifind yet somehow feels he should escape any consequence, i find to yet somehow feels he should escape any consequence, ifind to be somewhat paradoxical. i don't understand how you can take responsibility for something and yet receive absolutely none of the consequences. like many have said, itjust consequences. like many have said, it just felt like a consequences. like many have said, itjust felt like a pr stunt so he could just say i've technically apologised. he seems to operate in technicalities whereas the rest of us have to deal with the practicalities of his decisions. we don't know yet the consequences because we are awaiting the report from this civil servant called sue gray. what do you think the consequences should be for boris johnson? j consequences should be for boris johnson? ., ~ , johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign- _ johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign- i— johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign. i don't _ johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign. i don't think - johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign. i don't think he - johnson? i think the prime minister has to resign. i don't think he can, | has to resign. i don't think he can, in good faith, continue to be the leader of the party or the country at this point in time. he has been found to be dishonest and in giving
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pitiful excuses for his behaviour. the idea that he didn't realise it was a party, one, it seems laughable and two, if true, is more concerning because it would suggest other people have been in charge while we have been in this crisis and thought it was ok to be drinking at work. i think most of the people in this country would agree that if nurses and doctors had taken that same attitude we would be in a much worse position than we are now. so i really don't understand why the prime minister thinks that he is fit to continue to lead this country through one of the biggest crises in living memory when he clearly doesn't take the job seriously. we doesn't take the 'ob seriously. we have doesn't take the job seriously. we have heard this morning that one of mrjohnson's own family members has tested positive for covid as a result, a scheduled ship who was due to make to lancashire has been cancelled and he will limit his
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contacts and do lateral flow test and he will be in the building behind me —— scheduled trip. what would you say to him directly? i would you say to him directly? i guess i'd say that i'm glad to see he is following guidelines and i hope his family members are recovering soon and are doing well. i think the prime minister really needs to consider why he still insists on remaining in the leadership when he has lost the faith of the country and half of his party, it would seem. i don't think we need to wait for an inquiry, especially one that i think is somewhat problematic because sue gray is carrying out an inquiry into her own boss. there is not a sense of independence there. i think if we want to start an inquiry, we should start a statutory public inquiry
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that we have been campaigning for. it is time to start taking the pandemic seriously. it it is time to start taking the pandemic seriously. it remind us of our pandemic seriously. it remind us of your campaign _ pandemic seriously. it remind us of your campaign group _ pandemic seriously. it remind us of your campaign group and _ pandemic seriously. it remind us of your campaign group and what - pandemic seriously. it remind us of your campaign group and what you | pandemic seriously. it remind us of. your campaign group and what you are calling for briefly. i’m your campaign group and what you are calling for briefly.— calling for briefly. i'm a member of the covid-19 _ calling for briefly. i'm a member of the covid-19 bereaved _ calling for briefly. i'm a member of the covid-19 bereaved families - calling for briefly. i'm a member of the covid-19 bereaved families forj the covid—19 bereaved families for justice and we have been calling for a public inquiry into the response to the pandemic in the uk so we can understand where things have gone wrong and do our best to save lives. we have lost hundreds of thousands. we have lost hundreds of thousands. we need to investigate what happened so we can make sure we don't repeat those mistakes.— so we can make sure we don't repeat those mistakes. thank you very much for talkinu those mistakes. thank you very much for talking to — those mistakes. thank you very much for talking to us _ those mistakes. thank you very much for talking to us this _ those mistakes. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. - those mistakes. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. mr - for talking to us this morning. mr akinola last his dad in april 2020. there will be a public inquiry, we just don't know when. let's talk to a conservative mp who has never been a conservative mp who has never been a fan of borisjohnson, so roger gale, mp for north thanet in kent.
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good morning to you. do you know how many others of your colleagues have put in a letter to the particular chairman of the particular committee that organises tory leadership contests? ., ., , ., contests? no, i have absolutely no idea at all- — contests? no, i have absolutely no idea at all. the _ contests? no, i have absolutely no idea at all. the chairman _ contests? no, i have absolutely no idea at all. the chairman of- contests? no, i have absolutely no idea at all. the chairman of the - idea at all. the chairman of the 1922 committee sir graham brady is as tight as a climb and will not tell anybody, as tight as a climb and will not tellanybody, not as tight as a climb and will not tell anybody, not me, as tight as a climb and will not tellanybody, not me, not as tight as a climb and will not tell anybody, not me, not you how many letters he has received until he receives the necessary 5a, if he does. at that point that triggers a leadership contest but i have no idea at all. i'm not part of an orchestrated campaign, i haven't gone around my colleagues saying, will you put in a letter, or have you put in a letter? so i don't know. , ., ,, you put in a letter? so i don't know. i. ,, , you put in a letter? so i don't know. ~' , ~' , know. do you think it is likely the letter count _ know. do you think it is likely the letter count will _ know. do you think it is likely the letter count will reach _ know. do you think it is likely the letter count will reach 54? - know. do you think it is likely the letter count will reach 54? i - letter count will reach 54? i genuinely don't know, i have no idea, as i said, i'm not part of an orchestrated campaign. as far as i'm aware there is no get rid of boris campaign but there are clearly some of us. i made it very clear a long
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time ago, a year ago when mrjohnson failed to dispense with the services of dominic cummings after the barnard castle of that i didn't believe he was the right person to believe he was the right person to be prime minister and i put my letter in a year ago. i have refreshed it since. so that is, so far as i'm concerned, my responsibility. my colleagues have to think and act for themselves and they will do what they believe to be right. fit they will do what they believe to be ri . ht. �* ., they will do what they believe to be riuht. �* ., , , . , right. at the moment, publicly, there is yourself, _ right. at the moment, publicly, there is yourself, there - right. at the moment, publicly, there is yourself, there is - right. at the moment, publicly, i there is yourself, there is another senior conservative william bragg, there is conservative mp caroline nokes, there is the leader of the conservatives in scotland douglas ross, and almost all of the 31 conservative msps in scotland. it would seem that most of the party is either supporting him or waiting for sue gray's report.— sue gray's report. when the prime minister said _ sue gray's report. when the prime minister said at _ sue gray's report. when the prime minister said at the _ sue gray's report. when the prime minister said at the dispatch - sue gray's report. when the prime minister said at the dispatch box i minister said at the dispatch box yesterday that he wanted people to wait for the report i had some
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sympathy with that view, i'd spent 36 hours not talking to the media at all about this because i believed it was right to wait for sue gray's report. that would have been a preferred option. the problem is that at the dispatch box yesterday, first of all the pm made an apology, which was the right thing to do and i accept that, but unfortunately he then went on to say that he had spent 25 minutes at what he described as a work event, which was in fact a party, having said on the 8th of december at the dispatch box that he was not aware of any parties in downing street. well, he clearly attended one, which means that he misled the house, and that is a very serious offence.— serious offence. thank you for talkin: serious offence. thank you for talking to _ serious offence. thank you for talking to us. _ serious offence. thank you for talking to us, sir _ serious offence. thank you for talking to us, sir roger - serious offence. thank you for talking to us, sir roger gale, | talking to us, sir roger gale, conservative mp for north thanet. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. where are we this morning?
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the cabinet fightback is under way, started yesterday with ministers on the airwaves and tweets of varying levels of support and it continues this morning with the northern ireland secretary brandon lewis and rehearsing the argument that we will hear a lot over the next few days, and also the argument i assume that will be used if there was any vote of confidence in the prime minister if there were 54 letter submitted to sir graham brady, if that happened. the argument is that it's ok to be angry about what happened in the downing street garden, but on balance borisjohnson is the right person to lead the country. here is how brandon lewis put it on the airwaves this morning. as the prime minister himself said yesterday, in hindsight he regrets going _ yesterday, in hindsight he regrets going out— yesterday, in hindsight he regrets going out to the garden and thank the staff_ going out to the garden and thank the staff rather than telling them to come — the staff rather than telling them to come back into the office. i think— to come back into the office. i think he — to come back into the office. i think he was right to do that, recognising, as he said, and it's something — recognising, as he said, and it's something i have seen as well, not 'ust something i have seen as well, not just frustration and anger but the upset _ just frustration and anger but the upset people have had around their view that— upset people have had around their view that there has been one thing said to _ view that there has been one thing said to people about what we should all do. _ said to people about what we should all do. as— said to people about what we should all do, as we were doing at the time, — all do, as we were doing at the time, and _ all do, as we were doing at the time, and what they perceive happening in numberio. it is
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time, and what they perceive happening in number 10. it is also why it— happening in number 10. it is also why it is— happening in number 10. it is also why it is right we have this investigation being taken forward, and once — investigation being taken forward, and once we have the details of that, _ and once we have the details of that, the — and once we have the details of that, the prime minister, as he said, _ that, the prime minister, as he said. will— that, the prime minister, as he said, will come back to parliament and we _ said, will come back to parliament and we will— said, will come back to parliament and we will publish the findings of the report— and we will publish the findings of the report and he will take questions from parliamentarians and he's been _ questions from parliamentarians and he's been very clear in a statement to the _ he's been very clear in a statement to the house of commons as well, as he did _ to the house of commons as well, as he did yesterday. we to the house of commons as well, as he did yesterday-— he did yesterday. we have other developments _ he did yesterday. we have other developments this _ he did yesterday. we have other developments this morning, - he did yesterday. we have other i developments this morning, adam, regarding somebody else's future. the future of the deputy chief medical officer for england. jonathan van—tham, famously known as jvc, and even more famous for his slightly tortuous football metaphors about the pandemic as well, the deputy chief medical officer for england, a well—known face during the covid pandemic and i did loads of press conferences. no longer, he is leaving his post as the cmo, as they call it, and returning to his academic post at the university of nottingham. i'm sure there will be speculation this morning that he has maybe got political motives, and i'm sure he will want to clear that up if that's not the case. but he leaves behind a legacy of some great
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quotes. do you remember when he was asked about the guidance and people pushing covid rules and he said don't rip the pants out of it, a phrase that i still don't really know what it means but i also simultaneously know what it means. in other covid news, a few other things to bring you up—to—date with, i'm told there is a decision due imminently from ministers about whether to reduce the isolation period for covid cases from seven days down to five days, ministers have said for a few days it would be helpful for the economy of people were off work for less time. but they would only go ahead with it if they would only go ahead with it if the science allows. they will obviously have to balance the risk and science and needs of the economy when they make that decision. i don't know exactly when it will be announced but i've just seen now that sajid javid the health secretary will be making a statement to parliament this morning, so that decision could be very imminent. and also a last bit of covid news. the prime minister has cancelled a trip to lancashire he was meant to be doing today because a member of his family has tested positive for
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covid, and so he is following the guidance which is that you don't need to isolate if you are a contact of a positive case but you are advised to reduce look your level of contacts, so he's not going to be exposing the people of lancashire to any potential covid risk.— any potential covid risk. thank you very much. — any potential covid risk. thank you very much, adam. _ any potential covid risk. thank you very much, adam. and _ any potential covid risk. thank you very much, adam. and thank- any potential covid risk. thank you very much, adam. and thank you | any potential covid risk. thank you i very much, adam. and thank you for your messages from around the country. nicky on twitter says, i think we need to move on to important problems, and green leaves says i think the media should move on. i'm fed up to the eyeballs of hearing and reading about it. i thought covid and brexit were bad enough, this is 100 times worse. whereas hannah, who was a head teacher says, they may have believed he was at a work event but they weren't allowed either. imagine what would have happened if a head teacher had invited staff in to meet on the school field with a bottle of wine. i'm pretty certain they would have been lambasted and lost their job. if you want to get in touch you are welcome on instagram, twitter or tiktok if that's your thing. as borisjohnson faces
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tiktok if that's your thing. as boris johnson faces calls from some conceiving to stand down, let's have a look at some of the key dates for the next few months of his tenure. the report from the senior civil servant sue gray is to be published soon, that's all we know, she is looking into all of the alleged parties held by staff at downing street while the uk was in lockdown. we don't have a date for its publication but it is expected in the next fortnight. we also don't know how much of it will be published. england's current plan b covid rules will be reviewed by the prime minister on 26th of january and he will be under pressure from some of his own mps to relax the rules if 0micron infections continue to fall. there are one or two important votes approaching as well. the southend west by—election happens on the 3rd of february and the local elections on the 5th of may. we can talk to a former chairman of the committee on standards in public life, sir alistair graham. good morning to
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you. alistair graham. good morning to 0“. , ., .. alistair graham. good morning to 0“. , ., ., .. alistair graham. good morning to you-_ what - alistair graham. good morning to you-_ what do - alistair graham. good morning to you-_ what do you| alistair graham. good morning to - you._ what do you think you. good morning. what do you think of what the prime _ you. good morning. what do you think of what the prime minister _ you. good morning. what do you think of what the prime minister said - of what the prime minister said yesterday?— of what the prime minister said esterda ? ~ ., . ., yesterday? well, i thought he cut a rather sad figure _ yesterday? well, i thought he cut a rather sad figure and _ yesterday? well, i thought he cut a rather sad figure and is _ yesterday? well, i thought he cut a rather sad figure and is a _ yesterday? well, i thought he cut a rather sad figure and is a number. yesterday? well, i thought he cut a | rather sad figure and is a number of your people who have spoken to you said, i didn't think the excuse given that this was technically a work meeting really cut very much and it leaves the prime minister very vulnerable. d0 and it leaves the prime minister very vulnerable.— and it leaves the prime minister very vulnerable. do you think the prime minister _ very vulnerable. do you think the prime minister thinks _ very vulnerable. do you think the prime minister thinks he's - very vulnerable. do you think the prime minister thinks he's done i prime minister thinks he's done anything wrong?— prime minister thinks he's done anything wrong? prime minister thinks he's done an hinu wron: ? ~ ,. ,, ., anything wrong? well, you never know uuite with anything wrong? well, you never know quite with boris. _ anything wrong? well, you never know quite with boris. he _ anything wrong? well, you never know quite with boris. he doesn't _ anything wrong? well, you never know quite with boris. he doesn't like - quite with boris. he doesn't like rules, as he has a long track record of circling round them rather than meeting rules, so who knows what he
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thinks deep down whether he did anything wrong. i cannot believe he is convinced by the argument he put yesterday that this was a work meeting when the whole country think that it clearly was a social event, and was in breach of the regulations. and the problem for the prime minister is that he seems to have breached the ministerial code. he misled parliament about parties and admitted yesterday he spent about 25 minutes at what most of us think was a party. and therefore he is in breach of the ministerial code and should resign. you is in breach of the ministerial code and should resign.— is in breach of the ministerial code and should resign. you say he is in breach of the _ and should resign. you say he is in breach of the ministerial— and should resign. you say he is in breach of the ministerial code - breach of the ministerial code because previously he said i have not broken any covid rules and previously he told the house of commons i've been repeatedly assured that there were no parties and no
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covid rules were broken, that's what i have been repeatedly assured will stop you are saying that by now admitting he was at that event, that means he has misled parliament? that's been his biggest mistake throughout a whole series of ethical issues. he is never honest and open at the time when he should be that he has breached a rule, or that he didn't meet the full spirit of the rule. if he had done that on this issue at the time, people might take a different view. but because he misled parliament and has got this dreadful track record i think his position is, as many other people have said, untenable.— position is, as many other people have said, untenable. when he said, even if it could _ have said, untenable. when he said, even if it could be _ have said, untenable. when he said, even if it could be said _ have said, untenable. when he said, even if it could be said technically i even if it could be said technically to full within the guidance, do you think he meant by that that it was his own garden and he was allowed to be in his own garden? well, no, i presume it's the argument that the
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garden was part of the office space, so to speak garden was part of the office space, so to sea 4 ., ., garden was part of the office space, sotosea ., garden was part of the office space, so to spea— so to speak although it has got walls around _ so to speak although it has got walls around the _ so to speak although it has got walls around the garden, - so to speak although it has got i walls around the garden, without so to speak although it has got - walls around the garden, without any roof to it because of the good weather. but itjust doesn't cut the ice, does it? peoplejust don't believe him. he's totally lost the trust of people believing his explanations, and therefore, his authority is totally diminished and i think his position as leader of the country is terminally undermined.— the country is terminally undermined. ., , ., undermined. one alli is quoted in the newspapers _ undermined. one alli is quoted in the newspapers today _ undermined. one alli is quoted in the newspapers today saying - undermined. one alli is quoted in the newspapers today saying he l undermined. one alli is quoted in | the newspapers today saying he is undermined. one alli is quoted in i the newspapers today saying he is a fighter, he has more fighter in him that the vast majority of people —— and alli. if sue gray finds he doesn't break the rules, he can carry on. doesn't break the rules, he can car on. . . doesn't break the rules, he can car on. , ., ., doesn't break the rules, he can carry on-_ doesn't break the rules, he can car on. ,., ., , carry on. yes, and of course boris has a very — carry on. yes, and of course boris has a very good — carry on. yes, and of course boris has a very good knack _ carry on. yes, and of course boris
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has a very good knack of - carry on. yes, and of course borisj has a very good knack of surviving the most disastrous situations. however, i did work with sue gray when i was chairman of the committee on standards. she is a feisty senior civil servant and i think she will tell us the truth as it is.- tell us the truth as it is. thank ou tell us the truth as it is. thank you very _ tell us the truth as it is. thank you very much _ tell us the truth as it is. thank you very much for _ tell us the truth as it is. thank you very much for talking - tell us the truth as it is. thank you very much for talking to i tell us the truth as it is. thank| you very much for talking to us tell us the truth as it is. thank - you very much for talking to us this morning, siralastair you very much for talking to us this morning, sir alastair gray, former chairman of the committee on standards in public life. we will have more from downing street later. let's bring you the rest of the day's news now with martin. victoria, thank you very much. france has just announced a relaxation of its coronavirus regulations for british people entering the country. 0ur correspondent hugh schofield is in paris. what are they saying? there was a tweet from — what are they saying? there was a tweet from a _ what are they saying? there was a tweet from a junior _ what are they saying? there was a tweet from a junior minister- what are they saying? there was a tweet from a junior minister and i l tweet from a junior minister and i just looked at the french website in
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the uk and it says there will be an announcement so we haven't had an official announcement but everything indicates that from tomorrow, the 14th, friday, the restrictions which were imposed a month ago on the 18th of december will be removed. those restrictions, as everyone knows, who is wanting to come to france were draconian. it meant you couldn't come for tourism and you had to declare, had to have a compelling reason to come over here, which meant you basically had to be french or domiciled in france to come across the channel and that played havoc with a lot of people's arrangements for christmas and skiing holidays. it seems that from tomorrow that requirement for a justification to come will be removed. it has already been slightly loosened a week ago. work travel became possible within certain limits. now it seems that all requirements for a justification to travel will be removed from midnight tonight. we await a decree and an official announcement, but
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everything seems to be pointing in that direction. loath? everything seems to be pointing in that direction.— that direction. why now? why are they making _ that direction. why now? why are they making this _ that direction. why now? why are they making this decision - that direction. why now? why are they making this decision at - that direction. why now? why are they making this decision at this | they making this decision at this point? i they making this decision at this oint? .. . . . they making this decision at this oint? ~' ., , , ., point? i think there has been an awful lot of _ point? i think there has been an awful lot of pressure _ point? i think there has been an awful lot of pressure on - point? i think there has been an awful lot of pressure on the - point? i think there has been an i awful lot of pressure on the french government because the original justification seems to be no longer valid. the originaljustification was that britain had a surge in covid cases linked to 0micron, france didn't, france needed to protect itself, or at least slow down the arrival of 0micron in france. whether or not it worked we don't know but the fact is that 0micron is now here and there is no particular difference in the level of infection between the two countries. so the justification that france needed to put up a barrier to at least slow down the arrival of 0micron is no longer tenable. and as we are more or less on the same level of infection it is silly and we should just go on and travel as we should just go on and travel as we were travelling before. i rather
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liked how you _ we were travelling before. i rather liked how you set _ we were travelling before. i rather liked how you set omicron - we were travelling before. i rather liked how you set omicron in - we were travelling before. i rather liked how you set omicron in a - we were travelling before. i rather| liked how you set omicron in a sort liked how you set 0micron in a sort of french accent there. i rather liked it. you should do it again! that through him, i'm afraid. 9:28am. the lawyer representing virginia giuffre, the woman who's accused prince andrew of sexually assaulting her when she was 17, has told the bbc he doesn't think she would accept a purely financial settlement. ajudge in new york has rejected the duke's attempts to dismiss the civil case. prince andrew has always denied the allegations. tim muffett has more. prince andrew now knows that a civil sex assault case against him can go ahead, following a ruling by a judge in new york. the case has been brought by virginia giuffre, who claims prince andrew abused her in 2001, when she was 17 — claims the prince has consistently and firmly denied. his lawyers argue that ms giuffre's complaint should be dismissed — they refer to a 2009 deal she signed with convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein, in which she agreed not to sue other potential defendants.
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but a new yorkjudge has ruled the case can continue, saying that deal had been ambiguous. the defendant's motion to dismiss the complaint is denied in all respects, judge kaplan said. last night, virginia giuffre's lawyer gave his reaction. she's obviously very pleased that the judge has rejected prince andrew's legal arguments. i think it's very important to virginia giuffre that this matter be resolved in a way that vindicates her. a purely financial settlement is not anything that i think that she's interested in. if he doesn't appeal against this latest ruling, prince andrew effectively has three choices. he could default — ignore the court case — but by doing so, there would be a finding against him. he could take part in the case — he will be questioned under oath, and his lawyers could test virginia giuffre's allegations.
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or he could try and settle out of court — there would be no admission of liability, but he would perhaps pay a large sum of money to virginia giuffre, who might not want to settle. in the short term, a lot of legal arguments are predicted. we'll have arguments over discovery — whether each party has supplied the information that they should. we may well have arguments overjurisdiction — whether virginia giuffre has sufficient connection with america to rely on this piece of legislation because she now lives in australia. in this — the queen's platinum jubilee year — her second son faces some stark choices. tim muffett, bbc news. case has let's speak to our royal correspondent sarah campbell who's at windsor castle. correspondent sarah campbell what correspondent sarah campbell options does prince
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now? what options does prince andrew have now? are in what options does prince andrew have now? ar . what options does prince andrew have now? ar , ., .., now? are in terms of comment, we have not had _ now? are in terms of comment, we have not had any _ now? are in terms of comment, we have not had any comment - now? are in terms of comment, we have not had any comment from . now? are in terms of comment, we . have not had any comment from prince andrew's legal team but clearly, there will be a lot of discussions going on since that motion to dismiss byjudge kaplan yesterday. effectively, prince andrew has options in front of him to appeal the motion to dismiss, most legal commentators say that it is unlikely that an appeal would be successful, simply becausejudge kaplan was so definitive in his dismissal on all reasons, in his motion to dismiss. the other options are to fight the case in court and of course the civil case now is ongoing, and the timetable is quite quick. the next stage is something called a process of discovery. this is where the key players, and sam grewe and virginia giuffre will have to do is sit down with lawyers from the opposing teams and answer questions under oath and on camera, and notjust them but also other witnesses that the defence teams might want to speak
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to, so it is not without question that other members of prince andrew's family might also have to give evidence. and i think for this reason, the potential embarrassment, if you like, private details coming out in court throughout this trial, many legal commentators have said actually the least worst option open to prince andrew now is to settle. that would presumably be expensive and also relies on virginia giuffre, his accuser, accepting settling, and actually the statement that she gave yesterday, or her lawyer gave on her behalf, suggested she wants her day in court. prince andrew has always strenuously denied any wrongdoing, but as i say, clearly, a lot for him and his legal team to mull over, as this civil case progresses. and his legalteam to mull over, as this civil case progresses.— this civil case progresses. thank ou, this civil case progresses. thank you. sarah _ this civil case progresses. thank you, sarah campbell, _ this civil case progresses. thank you, sarah campbell, at - this civil case progresses. thank| you, sarah campbell, at windsor castle. a bit of breaking news now regarding the mp for shrewsbury,
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daniel kaczynski. the commons standards committee has recommended that the conservative mp be suspended from the house for a day. this is for an interview he gave to bbc radio shropshire about a previous finding from that same committee. he was investigated for leaking details of the finding, for breaching the complaints —— my complaining's anonymity and for undermining the process by saying he was only apologising because he had been ordered to do so. he will now been ordered to do so. he will now be suspended from the house of commons for a day. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mike. good morning. the wait goes on for novak djokovic, because he still doesn't know, if he will be deported, before, the start of the australian open on monday. he's been training today, on court in melbourne, but the immigration minister is still considering what to do. if he is allowed to stay and play, he found out in today's draw that he'll face, a fellow serbian player in the first round. here's our tennis
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correspondent russell fuller. in keeping with the australian open the drawer did not go off without a hint of drama when it was postponed indefinitely, just two minutes before it was due to start and with the australian prime minister scott morrison due to give a press conference people started to put two and two together and the drawer eventually took place. 75 minutes later, with novak djokovic in it, facing a fellow serb, in the first round. should he be allowed to play, by the australian government. a relatively friendly face for jock itch in that first round match. 0ther itch in that first round match. other highlights from the british point of view, andy murray against nicolas basilashvili, the big hitting jordan, and cameron norrie will play sebastian korda, the american who reach the fourth round at wimbledon but has been in isolation hitting tennis balls against his bedroom wall having tested positive on arrival in adelaide. a very tough draw for the
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us open champion emma raducanu against another us open champion sloane stephens, emma raducanu with little preparation having caught covid, stevens, meanwhile, got married on new year's day. chelsea manager thomas tuchel, said his side were "playing with fire", despite their comfortable win over spurs, to reach the league cup final. already 2—0 up from the first leg, antonio rudiger scored the only goal, of the game at the tottenham hotspur stadium. chelsea's opponents at wembley will be either arsenal or liverpool, who play the first leg, of their semi—final tonight. west ham manager david moyes said jarrod bowen is knocking on the door of the england team, after he scored both goals in their 2—0 win over bottom side norwich. a result that took the hammers back into the top four of the premier league — not that that counts for much, according to their manager. i don't think being forced this moment is time has got any real importance except that shows you have been a good, consistent site for half of the season. we have
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picked up some good wins, the business end starts probably once you get to march, april, so as long as we can get into the mix for the european places that will be very good but obviously we always want to look up and if we can hang onto the coat—tails of the ones above us, we will try and do that. there were chaotic scenes, at the africa cup of nations where mali beat tunisia 1—0. ibrahima kone, scored mali's goal from the penalty spot early in the second half. but with just 85 mintues on the clock, the referee got mixed up and blew for full—time. play did resume but he then brought the match to an early close again, just before the 90 minutes were up, minutes of injury time. the post—match press conferences were under way, and some tunisia players were in their ice baths, when the teams were called back out again to play on — mali returned but tunisia didn't, and they've lodged a complaint. there's a suggestion that the referee was suffering from sunstroke. judd trump said he was just getting warmed up, after making it into the quarter—finals of snooker�*s masters at alexandra palace. he came from behind to beat mark allen 6—5,
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and he said he'd been waiting to produce a performance, like that for a long time and just couldn't help his fist pump — although he's usually quite reserved, he was lifted by the rowdiness of the london crowd. that's all the sport for now — it's back to victoria at downing street. welcome back to downing street. we know there is a cabinet meeting going on now, at which they will be discussing whether covid isolation should be brought down from seven days to five days, with a decision expected imminently, and as soon as we have that we will bring it to you. we have been asking for your reaction to what the prime minister said yesterday in the commons, and the defence that he thought that eventin the defence that he thought that event in the downing street garden,
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as he put it, he believed implicitly it was a work event. richard says, lies, lies, and more lies and his position is untenable, he must go. karen says that it should be let go, does it affect what is going on with covid or people crossing the channel? i don't think so. but there are more messages like this from tracy in newbold, borisjohnson lie that misled parliament, he must resign, you cannot govern the country by changing the rules on a whim and spinning the plates. let's speak to sam rhydderch — member of the young conservatives and laura perrins is the co—founder of conservative women. she is also a political commentator and former barrister. i would like to hear two in conversation with each other about your prime minister. i would like to hear you to you and your views. sam, do you purport —— support the prime minister still? do you purport —— support the prime ministerstill? i’m do you purport -- support the prime minister still?— minister still? i'm finding it difficult to _ minister still? i'm finding it difficult to continue - minister still? i'm finding it. difficult to continue supporting him, because he has failed a few
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crucial tests, and the test i cared about yesterday was the test of accepting responsibility and accepting responsibility and accepting the consequences that come with it. it is an important part of being a prime minister i still support the party and my values but it is becoming difficult to support, and the way that him and his advisers have behaved in the past few weeks. advisers have behaved in the past few weeks-— advisers have behaved in the past fewweeks. ., ., ., ., few weeks. laura, doctor sam and tell him what _ few weeks. laura, doctor sam and tell him what you _ few weeks. laura, doctor sam and tell him what you think. _ few weeks. laura, doctor sam and tell him what you think. good - tell him what you think. good morning. _ tell him what you think. good morning. to _ tell him what you think. good morning, to you _ tell him what you think. good morning, to you both. - tell him what you think. good morning, to you both. it - tell him what you think. good morning, to you both. it is i tell him what you think. good morning, to you both. it is al tell him what you think. good - morning, to you both. it is a very bad situation the prime. he has never— bad situation the prime. he has never been a person of integrity. we have always — never been a person of integrity. we have always been very critical of him on — have always been very critical of him on the _ have always been very critical of him on the website. it involves two main _ him on the website. it involves two main principles for me when thinking about— main principles for me when thinking about this _ main principles for me when thinking about this over night. the first is obviously— about this over night. the first is obviously the important principle of
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the rule _ obviously the important principle of the rule of— obviously the important principle of the rule of law. those who make the rules _ the rule of law. those who make the rules must _ the rule of law. those who make the rules must follow the rules. and he is saying _ rules must follow the rules. and he is saying currently he didn't break them _ is saying currently he didn't break them but — is saying currently he didn't break them but whether or not the investigation size with him or not has yet _ investigation size with him or not has yet to— investigation size with him or not has yet to be seen. and staying on the issue _ has yet to be seen. and staying on the issue of— has yet to be seen. and staying on the issue of the investigation the second _ the issue of the investigation the second principle is that of due process — second principle is that of due process. he is entitled to some form of due _ process. he is entitled to some form of due process, and if we have to wait _ of due process, and if we have to wait another few weeks for this report. — wait another few weeks for this report. it — wait another few weeks for this report, it may well be that it is worth— report, it may well be that it is worth doing so. but it certainly looks— worth doing so. but it certainly looks very— worth doing so. but it certainly looks very bad. for me, what it highlights — looks very bad. for me, what it highlights is how this —— how draconian— highlights is how this —— how draconian and disproportionate to the rules— draconian and disproportionate to the rules were in the first place because — the rules were in the first place because if— the rules were in the first place because if those who made the rules didn't— because if those who made the rules didn't believe in it themselves then they should never have imposed it on they should never have imposed it on the rest _ they should never have imposed it on the rest of— they should never have imposed it on the rest of the country, because, not only— the rest of the country, because, not only did _ the rest of the country, because, not only did they stop people from literally— not only did they stop people from literally going to their relatives' funerals. — literally going to their relatives' funerals, stop new fathers from senior— funerals, stop new fathers from senior babies, they literally terrified _ senior babies, they literally terrified the country for months and months _ terrified the country for months and months on — terrified the country for months and months on end, and it seemed they
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were _ months on end, and it seemed they were not— months on end, and it seemed they were not so— months on end, and it seemed they were not so terrified because they were _ were not so terrified because they were happy to have a drinks party in the garden — were happy to have a drinks party in the garden at the very height of the first lockdown, which was probably the worst — first lockdown, which was probably the worst for most people. actually, i think this the worst for most people. actually, i think this is — the worst for most people. actually, i think this is less _ the worst for most people. actually, i think this is less to _ the worst for most people. actually, i think this is less to do _ the worst for most people. actually, i think this is less to do with - the worst for most people. actually, i think this is less to do with the - i think this is less to do with the party than it is about who boris johnson is a prime minister. i think the is actually a sideshow, and what the is actually a sideshow, and what the party itself represents is boris johnson's ability to accept responsibility and to learn a bit more about who he is as a person. we know that boris johnson is more about who he is as a person. we know that borisjohnson is very good with people, with his party also with people, with his party also with the voters, it is very rare that the party wins in 80 plus majority but unfortunately, when it comes to the crisis management, the people he surrounds himself with, there is a big floor. it could be fatal, although we know that, boris
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with his close circle, is this something which will ultimately topple him? i'm not sure. like other leaders there will come a point in time where he will have to resign, but i think at the moment, the party are struggling to find a suitable replacement. you have to ask yourself who will replace the prime minister. and also, we must remember that borisjohnson imposed these draconian rules in lockdown but the uk has also been one of the freest country since the summer so it is a double edge sword, if michael gove comes in, we know that he believes very much in covid rules, and we have liz truss who is performing well, we also have rishi sunak, perhaps even sajid javid, but really it is who will replace boris johnson? we have to look to the long—term. long term is boris johnson still a man with policy and a man fit to lead the country and i
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am not sure, i can speak on behalf of my fellow young conservatives in the group chats at the moment. they mostly think that it reflects poorly on the conservative party and many young conservatives who have left the party because of borisjohnson, because he is on conservative, and i think that is the prevailing issue at the moment. —— unconservative. does it come down to whether conservatives think borisjohnson is still a winner or not? a yougov poll in the times today suggests six out of ten voters want him to resign, and that includes one third who voted conservative at the last election. ,., ., ., election. the polling at the moment is bad for him. _ election. the polling at the moment is bad for him. i _ election. the polling at the moment is bad for him. i think _ election. the polling at the moment is bad for him. i think overnight - is bad for him. i think overnight the cabinet have come out and supported him. being cynical, i the cabinet have come out and supported him. being cynical, lam 'ust supported him. being cynical, lam just looking — supported him. being cynical, lam just looking at this, the party will back him — just looking at this, the party will back him if— just looking at this, the party will back him if they think they can survive — back him if they think they can survive this and move on and he can return— survive this and move on and he can return to _ survive this and move on and he can return to his— survive this and move on and he can return to his winning ways. he seems
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to be _ return to his winning ways. he seems to be one _ return to his winning ways. he seems to be one of— return to his winning ways. he seems to be one of these people who can -et to be one of these people who can get away— to be one of these people who can get away with things that mere mortals — get away with things that mere mortals could simply not. and, oddly. — mortals could simply not. and, oddly. his— mortals could simply not. and, oddly, his slightly dodgy liar reputation seems to help him, because — reputation seems to help him, because it _ reputation seems to help him, because it is all baked in, we know the rules— because it is all baked in, we know the rules don't apply to borrowers, previouslym — the rules don't apply to borrowers, previously... you are completely right. _ previously... you are completely right. it — previously... you are completely right. it is — previously... you are completely right, it is different, and the question— right, it is different, and the question is, it will fall into two camps. — question is, it will fall into two camps. do _ question is, it will fall into two camps, do people care, and do people not car? _ camps, do people care, and do people not car? i_ camps, do people care, and do people not car? i agree with sam in what he said previously in that it is fortunate for him now because in the last few— fortunate for him now because in the last few months he has done very well _ last few months he has done very well he — last few months he has done very well. he has resisted these hysterical calls for lockdown, when we were _ hysterical calls for lockdown, when we were being terrified again by the public— we were being terrified again by the public health experts with talk of 5000 _ public health experts with talk of 5000 deaths a day, thankfully, thank god, nothing like that has happened and we _ god, nothing like that has happened and we are _ god, nothing like that has happened and we are not even close to that, so he _ and we are not even close to that, so he has — and we are not even close to that, so he has done well for the last few months. _ so he has done well for the last few months. so — so he has done well for the last few months, so it is very unfortunate
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for the _ months, so it is very unfortunate for the country, genuinely, for the country. _ for the country, genuinely, for the country, that this is coming out now _ country, that this is coming out now. . ~' country, that this is coming out now. . ~ , ., country, that this is coming out now. ., ~ ., ., country, that this is coming out now. ., ., ., ., ~ now. thank you to both of you. thank ou, now. thank you to both of you. thank you. sam. — now. thank you to both of you. thank you. sam. l'm — now. thank you to both of you. thank you. sam. l'm going _ now. thank you to both of you. thank you, sam, i'm going to _ now. thank you to both of you. thank you, sam, i'm going to pose - now. thank you to both of you. thank you, sam, i'm going to pose there i now. thank you to both of you. thank you, sam, i'm going to pose there ifl you, sam, i'm going to pose there if i may but thank you for your time. we'll have more from downing street later — i will read you more of your messages then. but let's hand you back to martine croxall in the studio. england's rivers are filled with a "chemical cocktail" of sewage, agricultural waste and plastic, according to a cross—party group of mps — and it's putting both public health and nature at risk. a new report released today finds that not a single river in england is free from pollution. the environmental audit committee wants to see tougher monitoring and enforcement. joining me now is christine colvin from the rivers trust. good morning and thank you for
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joining us. ifind this so upsetting. i go for a lot of walks along rivers, they look clean, they are clearly not. why are we in such are clearly not. why are we in such a bad state? to cap it is a very sad state of affairs. i think that this report is really important in giving this message in a crystal—clear way to government, that the way that we have been managing and governing rivers up until now is not acceptable.— rivers up until now is not accetable. ., , , ., acceptable. too many rivers are failin: acceptable. too many rivers are failing good _ acceptable. too many rivers are failing good psychological- acceptable. too many rivers are l failing good psychological health. 0nly14% failing good psychological health. only 14% of failing good psychological health. 0nly14% of rivers in england have good ecological health and it is really not good enough —— good ecological health. we are seeing pollution from agriculture, from towns, from run—off, and water companies as well, and this report is calling for dramatic changes in how we do this.— how we do this. what will bring about those — how we do this. what will bring about those dramatic _ how we do this. what will bring j about those dramatic changes? how we do this. what will bring - about those dramatic changes? what sort of thing, better regulation,
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monitoring, prosecution? absolutely, all of those- — monitoring, prosecution? absolutely, all of those. this _ monitoring, prosecution? absolutely, all of those. this report _ monitoring, prosecution? absolutely, all of those. this report is _ monitoring, prosecution? absolutely, all of those. this report is trying - all of those. this report is trying to catch us up with the best science and understanding. it highlights that we have got outdated and inadequate monitoring and enforcement and regulation at the moment. it is echoing a lot of the calls that the rivers trust and environmental groups have been making for a long time, that we need to see much morejoined up planning around new activity happening in catchments, as well as stronger enforcement and holding to account polluters, making sure that the fines they receive really hurt their bottom line, and there are some great ideas that have been incorporated into this, such as nutrient budgets for catchments, so that we are not going to see a continued planning for failure that we are not going to see a continued planning forfailure in the first instance, where we have to then come in and regulate and clean up. let's get the planning right
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first, ensure that enforcement is watertight and rock—solid and polluters are held to account. and importantly it also opens the door for citizen scientists and local catchment groups, partnerships, to play a much more active role in monitoring and helping to ensure good governance of the catchments of our river systems.— our river systems. there are sections _ our river systems. there are sections of _ our river systems. there are sections of the _ our river systems. there are sections of the river - our river systems. there are sections of the river wye i our river systems. there are i sections of the river wye which our river systems. there are - sections of the river wye which has seen big improvement, and that has included the public. how can the public get involved?— public get involved? obviously, there's lots _ public get involved? obviously, there's lots we _ public get involved? obviously, there's lots we can _ public get involved? obviously, there's lots we can do - public get involved? obviously, there's lots we can do in - public get involved? obviously, there's lots we can do in our i public get involved? obviously, l there's lots we can do in our own homes. it highlights the problem of fatbergs when people pour too much oil and grease down the sink. it supports the new bill on banning plastics in single use wet wipes as well. those should not be flushed down the toilet. there are our own actions at home, and also getting
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involved in the better monitoring and good governance of the catchment, and the rivers trust are starting a big citizen science programme where the kind of measurements that citizens on their own local rivers take could be admissible, where they are following admissible, where they are following a recognised guideline to make it scientific. this means that we could have much more data on our rivers around the country.— around the country. christine collins from _ around the country. christine collins from the _ around the country. christine collins from the rivers - around the country. christine| collins from the rivers trust, around the country. christine - collins from the rivers trust, thank you very much for talking to us. —— christine colvin. a record 12,996, nearly 13,000 people have had to wait more than 12 hours in english a&e departments in december, from a decision to admit, to actually being admitted. that is up from 10,000
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people in november, the highest since records began in august 2010. 123,218 people had to wait at least four hours from the decision to admit, to admission, in december, which is slightly below the all—time high ofjust under 121,000, last october. so, very high numbers 0ctober. so, very high numbers again, a record high in fat, 0ctober. so, very high numbers again, a record high infat, number of people waiting for admission in english a&e departments. —— a record high in fact. the care system that supports people who are older and disabled is under "grim and relentless" pressure, according to an organisation representing not—for—profit care providers in the uk. the national care forum says existing staff shortages have been compounded by absences caused by 0micron and delays in getting pcr tests back. a rapid survey of care providers shows many are now unable to take on new clients, even though there is significant demand for help.
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let's speak to vic rayner, executive of the national care forum. grim, difficult and relentless is how it is being described. what does this mean for care workers and the people looking after them? it is mean for care workers and the people looking after them?— looking after them? it is usually challenging- _ looking after them? it is usually challenging. this _ looking after them? it is usually challenging. this survey - looking after them? it is usually challenging. this survey shows. looking after them? it is usually i challenging. this survey shows the vacancy levels, the roles that people cannot currently fill, standing at around 18% and on top of that an additional 14% of absences from covid, so this is enormous pressure on the people still able to deliver care, so we have got staff delivering an enormous amount of additional overtime, and extra working shifts, but we have staff who don't normally deliver front line care, being trained up and supporting them to be able to do that and a great reliance on agency staff, who come at a very high, significant cost. for the people
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receiving care, it means that they will not necessarily get care and support from the people they normally see. sometimes they will not be able to do all the things they want to do to continue the independent living, and of course there are many people, whether they are leaving hospital or out in the community, who are not able to get access to care, now, because those organisations just can't take on new and additional people. organisationsjust can't take on new and additional people.— and additional people. what, in terms of the — and additional people. what, in terms of the causes, _ and additional people. what, in terms of the causes, how- and additional people. what, in terms of the causes, how muchj and additional people. what, in i terms of the causes, how much is this down to the pandemic, and particularly 0micron, which has affected many, many people in recent weeks? the affected many, many people in recent weeks? ., . ., . , affected many, many people in recent weeks? ., . ., _ ., affected many, many people in recent weeks? 3 weeks? the vacancy level, about 18% that i'm weeks? the vacancy level, about 18% that l'm talking _ weeks? the vacancy level, about 18% that i'm talking about, _ weeks? the vacancy level, about 18% that i'm talking about, has _ weeks? the vacancy level, about 18% that i'm talking about, has grown - that i'm talking about, has grown significantly in the last six months. this is something we have been raising over and over again with the government. that is compounded by a lot of different situations. 0ne compounded by a lot of different situations. one of those is most definitely pay. currently, a lot of care staff are being paid at the
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national living wage, £8 91 per hour, that absolutely isn't sufficient for the kind of skills and expertise that we need. the rate of pay is determined by the money central government gives to local government, who can then pass it onto care organisations, so we need and we have been saying repeatedly, central government to take much more seriously the level of pay, terms and conditions for those care staff, and conditions for those care staff, and make sure that we pay people appropriately for the kind of work that we want them to do, which is increasing in complexity, and increasing in complexity, and increasing in complexity, and increasing in demand. carers have a great deal of responsibility every single day. we have been hearing this for years. the single day. we have been hearing this foryears— single day. we have been hearing this for ears. ., ., ., ., , this for years. the amount of money that people — this for years. the amount of money that people are _ this for years. the amount of money that people are and _ this for years. the amount of money that people are and has _ this for years. the amount of money that people are and has to _ this for years. the amount of money that people are and has to go - this for years. the amount of money that people are and has to go up - that people are and has to go up because of them work that they do, how and where is the money going to come from and why would it come now? why it would come now is that we have an agenda going forward with the government with a new health and care bill which talks about integration of health and care
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services, so we should not be having the headlines you're discussing about people waiting firstly to get into hospital and people coming out of hospital, we should have an integrated system that says, when people need health care they get it at the right time and when people need social care, they get it at the right time. we are not putting the appropriate level of focus and responsibility on to both of those systems. we have just introduced as health and social care levy coming in april, taking 1.25% from national insurance. the minute it was announced it was clear that rather than being something that was going to address the social care requirements, only a very small proportion, round about 15% of that levy is going to go toward social care so we need that to be rebalanced urgently, in order that both the social care system can deliver what it needs and it frees up deliver what it needs and it frees up their time and space within hospitals for the health system to be able to do what it needs so there is a reason why we need to do it now because if we don't, the demography,
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the challenges within communities, are going to grow and grow, and people who need care will not be able to get it, and that is the thing that i am most worried about, that people who need it cannot get access to it right now and certainly want to be able to in the future unless we deal with this.- want to be able to in the future unless we deal with this. what would ou sa to unless we deal with this. what would you say to attract _ unless we deal with this. what would you say to attract somebody - unless we deal with this. what would you say to attract somebody to - unless we deal with this. what would you say to attract somebody to care i you say to attract somebody to care at work? what are the merits of it was a matter of the hours can be long, the pay is not always great. people who work in care work in care because they love it. where i see fantastic social care, it is absolutely changing the lives of people that you are providing that care and support for. there are so many amazing examples of care workers, who change peoples lives, by enabling them to be independent, by enabling them to be independent, by supporting them to go out to employment, to get involved in education, to do the things they have always wanted to do in later life, to keep connected with family and friends, and to continue to live
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as healthily and well as they can, so it is a really rewarding career. i think what we have got to do is make sure that people are recognised for those fantastic skills and paid properly and to see it as a career, because there are some wonderful examples of people started as care workers and have ended up as chief executives of organisations. it is perfectly possible to do that career path, but we need to set it out for young people, particularly, and make it as an attractive and as aspirational a career as people think about working in health, education or all sorts of other things which change and influence peoples lives. that is what care does and that is what people need to get excited about. belie does and that is what people need to get excited about.— get excited about. vic reina, from the national _ get excited about. vic reina, from the national care _ get excited about. vic reina, from the national care forum, - get excited about. vic reina, from the national care forum, thank. get excited about. vic reina, from i the national care forum, thank you. some more figures coming in regarding the number of people in england awaiting routine hospital treatment, a new record high, 6 million people waiting at the end of november last year, that is the highest since the records began in
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august 2007. the number of people having to wait more than 52 weeks for starting treatment stood at over 300,000 in november, down from 312,000, the previous month. more on those figures throughout the morning. now time for the weather forecast with carol.— morning. now time for the weather | forecast with carol.— forecast with carol. good morning. we can see — forecast with carol. good morning. we can see temperatures - forecast with carol. good morning. we can see temperatures in - we can see temperatures in nottingham around 2 degrees, but looking at a cloud further north, the temperatures have held up. 0ver the temperatures have held up. over the temperatures have held up. over the next few days the weather remains dry and settled. there will be frost and fog for some, some of that fog being slow to clear, and some of that already lifting from this morning but we still have over southern england, the west midlands and south wales. that will lift into low cloud and places and if it happens where you are it will affect temperatures. we are looking at some sunshine and cloud across the pennines today and across northern ireland, and we still have this
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cloud they can afford result in scotland, particularly in the west. pretty windy here, especially in shetland, with temperatures ranging from about five in birmingham, 11 in stornoway. this evening and overnight, a weather front sinking south will bring some rain. a lot of cloud in scotland, temperatures not falling away as much, here, but for northern ireland, england and wales, a cold night and frosty once again, and we will see that fog reforming, some freezing fog as well. high pressure still in charge of the weather tomorrow. this weather front coming in across the north of scotland, bringing in some rain. that rain will not amounted to much, but the fog tomorrow morning will be more widespread than it was last night, and it will take its time to clear, some of it again just lifting into low cloud, but where it does clear, we are in for a dry day with a bit of sunshine. here is the weather front a bit of sunshine. here is the weatherfront dangling a bit of sunshine. here is the weather front dangling across northern scotland, taking some spots of rain with it, and it will not be
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here as windy as it was in the last few days, and we still have the highest temperatures in the north, but in norwich, the top temperature will only be 4 degrees. heading into saturday that high pressure starts to edge away, the isobars open out and will start with some bog. again it will take time to lift. some of it will take time to lift. some of it will take time to lift. some of it will not clear at all. there will be a lot of cloud around on saturday a limited sunshine. we also showers coming in across north—west england, south—west england and also west wales later in the day. as we head on into sunday, on sunday itself there will be some patchy rain around, some bright skies as well, with gales potentially in the north, and something brighter, as we head into monday.
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tim muffett, bbc news. good morning. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire — live in downing street — here are the headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. pressure continues to mount on borisjohnson to resign after he admitted attending a downing street drinks party at the height of lockdown. but cabinet ministers rally round him.... but cabinet ministers rally round him. the fact is we have got an investigation that is doing that work to get the details and the facts about exactly what happened throughout that period, actually, not just that one period on may 20th. we are looking at that period of time as has been outlined. and when we have got those facts then we can have that conversation. the prime minister's behaviour has angered people across the uk — including relatives of people who died during the pandemic.

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