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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  January 13, 2022 5:00am-5:31am GMT

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contact and get a be a close contact and get a negative rat test and then they can go back to work. and also to all freight and logistics employees, notjust those employees, not just those directly employees, notjust those directly involved in food this tribute in, but all of this freight and logistics sector, and that will also include those who work at service stations to ensure that they continue to be staffed and people can get access to those services. we will also be extending it, if it hasn't already been done, and in many cases it has, it will cover all health welfare care and support, emergency services which includes law enforcement, correctional services, energy resources and water and waste management, food, beverage and other critical goods supplies, so that is the food distribution system and production system, i'm not talking about hospitality
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there, communications data, broadcasting —— telecommunications data. it will also extend to education and childcare but i will address that epically now. —— separately now. before i do that, let me note that the commonwealth has already lifted the 20 hour rule on a student these are holders. that decision has orally been taken, it was taken yesterday, after the meetings we had yesterday —— that has already been taken. children will have no restrictions on them available to work in australia if they are already here. i also noted that students can return, that has been in place for some time now is can also come to australia now under those working holiday visas. so they are enabled to come to the country, both students and backpackers, if they are double vaccinated, and that is a necessary condition for entry into australia. moving back to schools, one of the most important ways of assuring our
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workforce is not depleted and we heard today from the treasury secretary that we could be looking up to a 10% absenteeism from our workforce at any one time. 10% of your workforce taken up by covid. that is the impact of a highly contagious infection and that will have an inevitable impact on the workforce and that must be managed. if schools do not open then that can add an additional 5% of the absenteeism in the workforce. so it is absolutely essential for schools to go back safely and to remain safely open. if we are not to see any further exacerbation of the workforce challenges we are currently facing. so schools open means shops open. schools open means hospitals are open. it means aged care facilities are open,
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it means essential services and groceries are on the shelves. that is what schools open means and it is important that they go back. the health advice is that they can go back. we are currently listening into a live press conference coming from canberra, australia, where prime minister scott morrison is updating on the processes in place and the vaccination programmes in australia, the easing of restrictions and various other issues. we are listening in because we are waiting to see if he does say about world number one tennis start novak djokovic and whether he is able to play in the australian open or not. the draw for the open was expected to happenjust draw for the open was expected to happen just over one draw for the open was expected to happenjust over one hour ago. it has been delayed so we expect the draw for the tournament to take place in
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around ten minutes time. scott morrison speaking currently now holding a press conference and if he does take questions from the press he is bound to be asked about novak djokovic and whether the immigration minister is likely to come to a conclusion soon in regard to whether novak djokovic can take part in the tournament or not. that speak to our australia correspondent in melbourne right now keeping across all the latest on this. we are listening closely to scott morrison for any indication as to what could happen next in this saga. the draw has been delayed. talk through the latest developments. through the latest develoments. ~ ., developments. we were waiting for the draw _ developments. we were waiting for the draw today _ developments. we were waiting for the draw today and - developments. we were waiting for the draw today and this - developments. we were waiting for the draw today and this was | for the draw today and this was the set of questions among journalists and everyone, really, this morning, about how the draw would work if novak djokovic would be included in the draw, if he was going to be deported. i'mjust the draw, if he was going to be deported. i'm just looking at the latest lines as well.
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whether he was going to be deported. what that will mean for the draw, who will replace him and then all of a sudden a media room we got an announcement that would be postponed until further notice and then we learned that it was going to be held later. essentially, after the press conference happening right now is scott morrison, the prime minister has been talking about the covid situation in australia. it has changed dramatically and become dramatically and become dramatically worse in the last three weeks and, if you will, this is the background mood to the novak djokovic drama, the fact that there are so many australians already angry about this government and the way they have handled the 0micron wave and you have a world—famous athlete who openly said he did not want a vaccine and then came in and yesterday we learned that he provided false information, that he admitted to breaking isolation rules. the mood of the country, really, around this is rising anger and if he does not discuss this himself, if he
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does not bring this up himself i would be very surprised if he is not asked about this. he i would be very surprised if he is not asked about this.- is not asked about this. he is bound to _ is not asked about this. he is bound to receive _ is not asked about this. he is bound to receive questions. | bound to receive questions. this is the story that, as you say, is dominating entirely and currently but in terms of any decision on the part of the immigration minister, still no word on that? we immigration minister, still no word on that?— immigration minister, still no word on that? we don't have a word on that? we don't have a word on that? we don't have a word on that — word on that? we don't have a word on that but _ word on that? we don't have a word on that but we _ word on that? we don't have a word on that but we do - word on that? we don't have a word on that but we do know. word on that? we don't have a. word on that but we do know he is considering a number of things. remember, those revelations that came out from novak djokovic yesterday he said that his team provided the officials with more information so no doubt they are mulling over that as well. what came out yesterday was quite crucial. it was quite significant because, essentially, we know they are going to be looking at what it means that he broke isolation rules. more importantly, what will mean for him that he provided false information on his travel declaration visa. ia days prior to coming to australia and his previous travel during that time. how will that affect his position and decision. is this a strong
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ground for them to make a decision to deport him? also the procedures if he does get deported, if they decide to re— cancel the visa they have to serve him with the deportation papers wherever he is, here in melbourne park wherever he is staying at the moment and he must return to detention before then being deported. the process of moving him is bound to get messy with his supporters when they find out but everyone here is in a holding pattern now waiting for the immigration minister to make a decision about deporting though that djokovic or letting him take part in the australian open and defend his title. we just don't know at the moment and the closer you get to the tournament, the closer you get tournament, the closer you get to tennis australia wanting to know what will happen and the more tense it becomes. find know what will happen and the more tense it becomes. and you can understand _ more tense it becomes. and you can understand why _ more tense it becomes. and you can understand why they - more tense it becomes. and you can understand why they have i can understand why they have delayed the draw as well because it is very specific rules about the draw ahead of a
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grand slam tournament and he would go in straightaway is the number one seed being the defending champion but of course if he is then deported it complicates matters for those running the australian open quite significantly. it does complicate matters but it is not, it is not something that can't deal with. players drop out all the time itjust means they have to find who goesin means they have to find who goes in his place and as i understand it if he is unable to take part a couple of days before the tournament they can redo the draw and at one point the number five seed redo the draw and at one point the numberfive seed could redo the draw and at one point the number five seed could also take his place. there are procedures in place for that to happen. but theyjust need to know if this is a likely scenario. right now, again, no—one can really plan anything and no—one can anticipate which direction this is going because it is so fluid and because,
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three days before the official start of the australian open, we simplyjust do not have a decision that is extremely consequential for the number one player and, also, for this tournament that is about to go on. �* tournament that is about to go on, �* ., , ., , tournament that is about to go on. ~ ., , ., ., on. and also it is important to oint on. and also it is important to point out _ on. and also it is important to point out that _ on. and also it is important to point out that djokovic - on. and also it is important to point out that djokovic since l point out that djokovic since revealing all the latest detail he said it was important to clarify any misinformation out there about the immigration forms and his travel prior to coming to australia. there has been no further word from him or his legal team.— been no further word from him or his legal team. or his legalteam. remember, he said that this — or his legalteam. remember, he said that this is _ or his legalteam. remember, he said that this is the _ or his legalteam. remember, he said that this is the last _ said that this is the last statement i'm going to make, to make the clarification and though i respect the australian authorities and out of respect for the australian authorities i will not comment any further. from the optics of it he has been getting on with it, as you will, he was training earlier today at rod laver arena. he is getting on with the tennis and it seems
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that despite the upheaval around him the message he wants to send is that he is ready to play and wants to play. this is a crucial crucial tournament for him not least because he is a nine time winner and wants to go for an 10th title. this will be his 21st grand slam and will make him the most successful male tennis player in history as far as his career is concerned this is significant and a lot is riding on it and he wants to fight for it. how much he is going to fight how he is going to respond to the government's decision, well, the government have to make a decision first before we see how he is going to react. tote how he is going to react. we will speak — how he is going to react. we will speak to _ how he is going to react. we will speak to you again soon. keeping across this press conference as it continues and as you can see various different leaders are addressing the press on domestic policy in regard to tackling covid and the spread of the omicron variant in australia. let's now introduce you to abdul
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deputy secretary for the australian department of immigrationjoining us live immigration joining us live from immigrationjoining us live from canberra. abdul, welcome to the programme. i'm sure you have been listening as well to all that has been happening in the last 15 or 20 minutes. can you give us your take on what is likely to happen? could you say whether the immigration minister is going to send djokovic home or will he be able to take part in the tournament?— able to take part in the tournament? , , tournament? just in the very short-term _ tournament? just in the very short-term i _ tournament? just in the very short-term i would - tournament? just in the very short-term i would that - tournament? just in the very - short-term i would that because short—term i would that because the immigration minister is not standing up with the prime minister at this press conference it is highly unlikely the minister, the prime minister will make an announcement at this press conference. he will be asked, i am sure, but at this press conference i don't think he will be making that announcement. �* ., ., announcement. but what do you think the immigration _ announcement. but what do you think the immigration minister l think the immigration minister will decide in the end? it think the immigration minister will decide in the end?- will decide in the end? if you asked me — will decide in the end? if you asked me that _ will decide in the end? if you asked me that question - will decide in the end? if you asked me that question 36 l will decide in the end? if you - asked me that question 36 hours ago i would have said it was
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highly likely that the immigration minister was going to allow mr djokovic to stay but under various conditions. but yesterday the government released material which suggested they were looking to cancel mr djokovic's visa on character grounds. that took me by some surprise because there are not many parts of the character test where you could really cancel mr djokovic's visa. the only part i can think of where it may be used is what is known as a general conduct provision of the character test and that is a provision that is very rarely, if ever, used, if that i can recall. in order to make a decision along those lines the minister would have to effectively establish what the benchmarks of general conduct are in terms of the character test and if that matter was appealed to the courts the court would look
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carefully at the benchmarks the minister has established and whether they were appropriate. and if that were the cause of action they were likely to take and, as you say, they are looking at character grounds would you argue it does not bode well for djokovic given the interview he did when he knew he was positive, et cetera, and various other travel after —— before he entered australia. if they perceive the cancellation on character grounds, the likelihood of mr djokovic being successful at appeal would be greater than if the cancellation was on the basis that mr djokovic provided false information and the cancellation took place under a different segment of the act that did not relate to character. that probably has a greater chance of success and that provision is used more
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frequently than the general conduct provision in the character. iii conduct provision in the character.— conduct provision in the character. , character. if we could pause for a moment _ character. if we could pause for a moment we _ character. if we could pause for a moment we are - character. if we could pause for a moment we are aboutl character. if we could pause l for a moment we are about to listen to scott morrison. tote listen to scott morrison. we are working _ listen to scott morrison. - are working directly with industry and have had major meetings with industry this week that have confirmed back to us again for those large companies that they are sourcing rapid and antigen tests now for some period of time going back many months as indeed the commonwealth has, going back to august last year. before omicron even onset. so the targeted use of rapid antigen tests in the workforce and particularly for health and aged care workforces is very important and the broader testing of the community for those who are symptomatic and those who are symptomatic and those who are close conduct —— contacts and that is where the government is focusing its resources. that is the position we have a dog and we will be taking that position based on medical advice all the way
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through. medical advice all the way throu . h. medical advice all the way through-— medical advice all the way throu:h. �* , through. no audio i will let paul talk about _ through. no audio i will let paul talk about the - through. no audio | will let| paul talk about the incidents. you have many more people and it is 75% less severe and ethically the maths has changed so you have a much bigger number of people with a virus but a small proportion with severe illness well, that number can be bigger. simply because you _ number can be bigger. simply because you have _ number can be bigger. simply because you have more - number can be bigger. simply| because you have more people with the virus but the medical fact remains that the omicron variant is a far less severe form of the virus than delta
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and that is just a medical fact. more people are getting it and so the challenge that it presents is that you get more people furloughed and taken out of the workforce with mild illness. most people in australia now, if not all, we'll know someone who have had the virus and most of these stories are stories of mild illness, a couple of days, you know, pretty unpleasant, with fevers or whatnot but then making a recovery and no need to go to hospital and things of that nature. that's the majority experience. but when it comes to the tally numbers, over 2500, that is obviously devastating but at the same time when you compare that to the rest of the world, australia still has one of the lowest death rates of covid than any country in the world and that is the result of the many practices we have put in place over many years to achieve that outcome so we are simply saying that omicron is very different to delta and we
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have to change how we manage it. the biggest change —— one of the biggest game changers on omicron was when it was determined the vaccines didn't prevent transmission. before omicron we had a double vaccinated population which protected us very strongly against the delta variant which meant we could be moving and opening up and that is exactly what we were doing. then only grey comes along, highly transmissible —— omicron. it does have an effect on reducing the severity of illness, vaccination, which, combined with a less severe strain means it presents a less severe risk to people who contracted but thatis to people who contracted but that is how you manager in this environment and what you might have thought was necessary before, for example before,... before, for example before, . .. we're before, for example before,... we're live in canberra australia listening to prime minister scott morrison responding to press questions
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about omicron and the weight is being handled in the country. so far it is not taking questions about novak djokovic and the controversy over whether he is allowed to remain in the country or whether he will be deported, a decision is waiting and immigrant —— imminent from the immigration minister. we are on in case there questions from the press on this. we have an immigration policy expert with s. abul rizvi. it is unlikely whether he will answer a question about whether novak djokovic can take part but listening in, you get a real sense on the pressure on him and the government as the omicron variant spreads across
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the country. the challenges they are facing very similar to what we are facing in the us and the uk and other countries right now. and the uk and other countries right now-— right now. yes our hospitalisation - right now. yes our. hospitalisation rates right now. yes our- hospitalisation rates have right now. yes our— hospitalisation rates have now reached levels were our system is under severe pressure. and is under severe pressure. and in terms _ is under severe pressure. and in terms of — is under severe pressure. and in terms of how— is under severe pressure. and in terms of how this _ is under severe pressure. and in terms of how this is playing into the controversy surrounding novak djokovic, him coming to australia to take part in the tournament, not having any vaccinations, it is a huge political hot potato for australia with an election not far away at all.— far away at all. there is no easy way _ far away at all. there is no easy way out _ far away at all. there is no easy way out from - far away at all. there is no easy way out from the - easy way out from the government —— for the government. even if djokovic was allowed to play we know that the crowds in at the australian open will be vociferous in his —— in their anger about the fact that novak djokovic is not vaccinated. but when it comes _ djokovic is not vaccinated. but when it comes to alex hawke and his decision as immigration minister on whether he should stay or go, it is just down to
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the facts, isn't it... absolutely.- the facts, isn't it... absolutely. the facts, isn't it... absolutel . ~ . ., ., , , absolutely. what did an happen. and that is _ absolutely. what did an happen. and that is very _ absolutely. what did an happen. and that is very difficult - absolutely. what did an happen. and that is very difficult to - and that is very difficult to tell and predict what the outcome might be, would you say? outcome might be, would you sa ? ., �* , outcome might be, would you sa ? . �* , , say? that's right. the minister essentially _ say? that's right. the minister essentially has _ say? that's right. the minister essentially has three _ say? that's right. the minister essentially has three options, | essentially has three options, three bad options, in terms of how he goes about cancelling, if that is what he wants to do, mr djokovic's these are. as a ready disgust, the character provisions in this space would be very difficult. it would give the government some sort of advantage if they did cancelling character i think mr djokovic would appeal immediately and the matter would then go back to the courts to be dealt with. all that while mr djokovic would be held in detention. find that while mr djokovic would be held in detention.— held in detention. and he will be held in _ held in detention. and he will be held in detention - held in detention. and he will be held in detention when - held in detention. and he will| be held in detention when the australian open actually starts. play starts early next week so time is of the essence here, isn't it. then from alex hawke's point of view, the
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immigration minister, he is very aware of that and has to make a decision fairly soon, doesn't he? i make a decision fairly soon, doesn't he?— doesn't he? i think that moss- -- _ doesn't he? i think that moss... that _ doesn't he? i think that moss... that is - doesn't he? i think that moss... that is right. doesn't he? i think that l moss... that is right but doesn't he? i think that - moss... that is right but then the decision is out of alex hawke's hand and mr djokovic has appealed, then the timetable will be decided by the courts and the courts have their own way of determining how fast or how slow they do things and how they are inclined to manage this issue so it is quite possible that mr djokovic will be in detention when the australian open starts. ~ ~ , starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, thank you — starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, thank you so _ starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, thank you so much - starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, thank you so much for- starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, thank you so much for your | starts. ok. well, abul rizvi, - thank you so much for your time and your expertise stop because we are keeping a very close eye on all events taking place currently with regards to novak djokovic and the draw as we have mentioned has been delayed, so we shall come back to that story as and when we have any new developments. now on to other news. the uk prime minister's political future hangs in the balance as a growing number of conservative mps call
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for him to resign — despite his apology in the house of commons yesterday. it's after borisjohnson admitted attending a party in the downing street garden during the first coronavirus lockdown in 2020. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. the children of the westminster morning, and a prime minister in trouble rush the chill. questioning the cold night in a new day is whether his apology is enough. in the commons yesterday, borisjohnson had finally admitted had been at a party but said his garden was a workspace and technically it was within the rules. i believed implicitly that this was a work event... believed implicitly that this was a work event. . .- was a work event... many watching, — was a work event... many watching, including - was a work event... many i watching, including bereaved families, didn't believe him. it wasn't an apology he didn't say sorry, he basically gasly the entire nation by saying that he thought that the event that he thought that the event that was actually illegal at the time was a work event and
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not a party. we all know that's not a party. we all know that's not true. , , not a party. we all know that's not true. , ., not a party. we all know that's not true. _ ., , not true. one by one, his cabinet — not true. one by one, his cabinet have _ not true. one by one, his cabinet have come - not true. one by one, his. cabinet have come forward not true. one by one, his - cabinet have come forward to back him. the foreign secretary late in the evening... i don't propose to make any further comment at this time. the aged care sector at the moment_ the aged care sector at the moment according to some is in a diabolical shambles in his own— a diabolical shambles in his own words —— in their own words and _ own words —— in their own words and the — own words —— in their own words and the problem is a lack of access— and the problem is a lack of access to _ and the problem is a lack of access to rapid antigen tests. if access to rapid antigen tests. if big — access to rapid antigen tests. if big private retailers have amassed big stockpiles of rapid antigen— amassed big stockpiles of rapid antigen tests is it time for them _ antigen tests is it time for them to— antigen tests is it time for them to either hand them over or to _ them to either hand them over or to have _ them to either hand them over or to have them compulsorily acquired _ or to have them compulsorily acquired by the government for these _ acquired by the government for these vulnerable people? | these vulnerable people? i wouldn't agree with your characterisation of what is held by the supermarkets or retailers. what i said was they had acquired tests to be able to test their workforce in distribution centres which keeps food on the shelves so thatis keeps food on the shelves so that is a very important... important objective and that is a very important objective of all governments. we have
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already had 10 million... you are with _ already had 10 million... you are with bbc _ already had 10 million... you are with bbc news. - already had 10 million... you are with bbc news. we - already had 10 million... you are with bbc news. we are continuing to listen in to australia but prime ministers scott morrison as he addresses the press about the situation in australia with regards to covid, the spread of the omicron variant and the practicalities that presents. he was just us question there as you may have heard by the press about the situation with regards to the number one tennis star novak djokovic and the visa whether it be cancelled, what the immigration department may decide. he said he is choosing not to comment on that at this point, so no update from the prime minister scott morrison on the situation with regards, butjust to say, the draw for the australian open has been delayed. that hasn't happened as yet. alex hawke, the immigration minister, waiting on his decision. he could cancel the visa based on prior covid
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infections, not counting as a medical exemption but also as you were hearing there from the immigration policy expert abul rizvi, that it could also be cancelled on character grounds so that is fairly in usual. huge applications for novak djokovic who is defending champion of the australian open, for him, one of the most successful grand slam titles. it won't —— it would be his 10th win if he were to win and his 21st grand slam which means he would become the most successful tennis player, men's tennis player, in history, so you get a real understanding of why this is so significant and important for him as the world number one tennis player. you are with bbc news. let's bring you some other stories now. the duke of york has failed to get
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a case dismissed in the united states which accuses him of sexually assaulting a teenage girl. virginia giuffre is using prince andrew of abusing her when she was 17 at the homes of geoffrey —— jeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell. the prince has strenuously denied the allegations but the ruling in new york needs a civil trial can now go ahead. 0ur royal corresponded nicholas witchell reports. everything for andrew had rested on this ruling, and it has gone against him. in his a3—page ruling in the case of virginia giuffre, plaintiff, and prince andrew, duke of york, defendant, the judge's conclusion was very straightforward. the possibility of appealing at this stage appears to be remote, so these are andrew's basic options. he can settle out of court. there'd be no admission of liability, but he would pay
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a perhaps substantial sum to virginia giuffre. he can default — that is ignore the court case — and by default, there would be a finding against him. finally, he could fight it out in court. he'd have to give a deposition under oath, the rival stories would be tested, the matter would be decided in open court. lawyers who've been following the case say none of the options will be attractive to him. andrew's got no good options now. he can't make things better, so, essentially, i think he's either going to have to engage in the trial process or he's going to have to settle, and that may well be his least—worst option. but it would be up to virginia giuffre to decide whether to accept any out—of—court settlement. at the moment, she doesn't seem inclined to do so. in a statement, her lawyer said:
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all of which leaves andrew facing the prospect of a bruising court case and the queen, in this, her platinum jubilee year, of enduring months of upset. in his newsnight interview, the one in which he said he couldn't remember meeting the then—17—year—old virginia giuffre, andrew was asked whether he felt his behaviour had damaged the queen and the royal family. i don't believe it's been damaging to the queen at all. it has to me. if i was in a position to be able to answer all these questions in a way that gave sensible answers, other than the ones that i've given that gave closure, then i'd love it. but i'm afraid i can't, because i'm just as much in the dark as many people. if andrew does fight on, he'll have to answer all the other side's questions under oath, and he will be able to declare his innocence and his lawyers will be able to test virginia giuffre's allegations. but at what price
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to the reputation of the royal family? as lawyers are saying, he has no good options. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's bring you some of the day's other news. the united states has announced its first sanctions on north korea over the country's weapons program. north korea has recently launched a series of missiles, including two in the past week. sanctions target a number of north koreans and a russian firm said to be responsible for procuring goods for weapons. talks will resume between britain and the eu in kent today in a further attempt to thrash out post—brexit issues. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is said to want to "reset the relationship" following months of dispute over trade borders in northern ireland. this is bbc news with
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the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. turning eastwards — the uk seeks a new dawn for trade after brexit — as it starts negotiations with india. the soaring cost of living — us prices rise at their fastest rate in four decades. can't get the staff. starting salaries soar as recruiters struggle to fill vacancies. plus — trouble in store. why the boom in online retail means a global squeeze on warehouse space we start in india — where the uk's trade minister is about to launch formal negotiations on a free trade
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agreement between the two countries.

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