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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 12, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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is good news for the red which is good news for the red squirrel. which is good news for the red 5: uirrel. , which is good news for the red s: uirrel. , w which is good news for the red sauirrel. , i, , i, i, squirrel. they are smaller and li . hter squirrel. they are smaller and lighter and — squirrel. they are smaller and lighter and they _ squirrel. they are smaller and lighter and they get _ squirrel. they are smaller and lighter and they get to - squirrel. they are smaller and lighter and they get to placesl squirrel. they are smaller and i lighter and they get to places in the woods where the pine marten cannot follow and so they have a better chance of surviving and keeping things in balance. according to the wildlife _ keeping things in balance. according to the wildlife trust _ keeping things in balance. according to the wildlife trust conifer - to the wildlife trust conifer forests have allowed red squirrel population to grow and thrive and of course provide much—needed timber. the research suggests that the more native broadleaf forest there are the more that we are likely to see red squirrels. time for a look at the weather. here's stav da naos. we are in a quiet weather pattern for the foreseeable future now thanks to high pressure. many places will be dry and settled with some sunshine around. any problems with frost and fog affecting england and wales. further north we have more
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clout around as you can see on the recent satellite picture. plenty of winter sunshine around. and that continues for the rest of the afternoon. always more clout in the north of england and scotland. we do have some spots of light rain. single figures further south. tonight across england and wales are widespread frost and dense fog developing. further north it is going to be less cold as you can see. a widespread frost across the south. high pressure still with us into thursday. england and wales with very little wind and more of a westerly breeze for scotland and northern ireland. so again mainly dry. but further south we start cold
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and frosty with some fog patches that could be stubborn to clear through the day. when you get any sunshine and there will be quite a bit of it around tomorrow, six, 8 degrees. double figure values across northern scotland. the high keeping that very cold at bay. and we have high—pressure bringing light went once again. so a repeat performance for friday. a cold start again with dense fog around. that could be stubborn to clear and lingering in places all day. more breeze across the northern half of scotland. double figure values for most it will be single figures. at the weekend the high—pressure moves away
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and these weather fronts could move in on sunday but most places i think will be dry. quite a bit of clout around and temperatures around the seasonal norm. a reminder of our top story... an apology from boris johnson an apology from borisjohnson who admits attending a work event in the garden of io admits attending a work event in the garden of 10 downing street in may 2020 when the uk was in lockdown. that's all from the bbc news at one — good afternoon, it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. novak djokovic has admitted failing to isolate after finding out he'd tested positive for covid—i9. he called it an "error ofjudgement" in a statement on social media. it's the latest development in his attempts to stay in melbourne to defend his australian open title.
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djokovic said he'd had a negative lateral flow test on december the 16th and did a pcr for confirmation — and didn't know he had the virus when he visited a children's tennis event the following day. he admitted that he shouldn't have gone ahead with an interview and photoshoot with a french sports newspaper two days later. our tennis correspondent russell fuller has more. there is some clarity in that he's admitting what is a breach of serbia's covid regulations by leaving his house to go to this tennis centre in belgrade to conduct this interview and photo shoot with l'equipe. the mask was on for the interview, but he took it off for the photo shoot. he knew he was infectious with covid. the other part of the story, which is probably more emotive, given he was mixing with children and posing for photographs at an awards ceremony the previous day. he says he was not aware he was positive, although the positive test was confirmed at eight o'clock
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the previous evening. and on his sworn affidavit to the court earlier this week, he said that he had been tested and diagnosed with covid on the 16th. but it is very difficult for anyone else to say that he definitely knew the result that very evening. that is what djokovic is saying, "i absolutely did not know i was positive when i mixed with those children". andy murray has produced a brilliant performance to reach the quarterfinals of the sydney international. he came through a really tough three—setter against the second seed nikoloz basilashvili, winning the decider 6—3 after two tie—break sets. british number two dan evans is also through — he continued his winning start to 2022 with a straight sets win over spain's pedro martinez. he'll be looking to carry that form into the australian open, where he's not made it past the second round for five years. some transfer news for you — and aston villa have agreed a fee rising to £25 million with everton, for france defender
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lucas digne. he hasn't played for everton since the merseyside derby defeat at goodison six weeks ago. he's due to have a medial at villa before becoming steven gerrard's second signing. new zealand striker chris wood is having a medical at newcastle to finalise his move from burnley. manager eddie howe needed a forward after callum wilson was ruled out for eight weeks with a calf injury, but it leaves sean dyche with a hole in the burnley squad. you can follow the latest developments in the transfer marked on the bbc sport website. it's the opening fixture in group f at the africa cup of nations england captainjoe root says, despite england's poor performance in the ashes, it's great that a five—match series is going to be completed for the first time during the pandemic. australia lead 3—0, after england managed a draw in the fourth test — and root believes they can build on the determiniation they showed on the final day and get something out of the last match, which starts on friday in hobart.
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i think it would be... a great way to close out what's been a tough... tough series for us. and, again, like i say, it would show the strides forward that the group has made in some quite, at times, challenging circumstances. so, like i say, we know there is a... so much work that has to be done from this group of players and even, you know, below that, as well. but... it's really important that we... we use last week in a really positive manner and leave here 3—1. that's all the sport for now but there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest from the liverpool and arsenal news conferences. i'll be back with more later. back to our main story now, and for the first time borisjohnson has admitted attending a drinks event in the garden of downing street during the first lockdown of the pandemic.
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speaking at prime minister's questions, mrjohnson apologised and acknowledged there were things the government "simply did not get right", but he insisted he thought the gathering in may 2020 was related to work. before the question session got under way, the prime minister made this statement to a packed house: mr speaker, i want to apologise. i know that millions of people across this country have made extraordinary sacrifices over the last 18 months. i know the anguish that they have been through, unable to mourn their relatives, unable to live their lives as they want or to do the things they love. and i know the rage they feel with me, and with the government i lead, when they think that in downing street itself the rules are not being properly followed by the people who make the rules. and though i cannot anticipate the conclusions of the current
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enquiry, i have learned enough to know that there were things we simply did not get right, and i must take responsibility. number 10 is a big department, with the garden as an extension of the office, which has been in constant use because of the role of fresh air in stopping the virus. and when i went into that gardenjust after six on the 20th of may 2020, to thank groups of staff, before going back into my office 25 minutes later to continue working, i believed implicitly that this was a work event. but, mr speaker, with hindsight, i should have sent everyone back inside. i should have found some other way to thank them. and i should have recognised that, even if it could be said technically to fall within the guidance, there would be millions and millions
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of people who simply would not see it that way — people who suffered terribly, people who were forbidden from meeting loved ones at all, inside or outside. and to them, and to this house, i offer my heartfelt apologies. and all i ask is that sue gray be allowed to complete her enquiry into that day and several others, so that the full facts can be established. and i will of course come back to this house and make a statement. in response, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, told the commons that borisjohnson's keir starmer, told the commons that boris johnson's defence keir starmer, told the commons that borisjohnson's defence was ridiculous and he should do the decent thing. mr speaker, so we've got the prime minister attending downing street parties — a clear breach of the rules. we've got the prime minister putting forward a series of ridiculous denials which he knows are untrue — a clear breach of the ministerial code.
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that code says ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. the party is over, prime minister. the only question is will the british public kick him out, will his party kick him out, or will he do the decent thing and resign? mr speaker, ijust want to repeat that i think that the right honourable gentleman — and i know that it is his objective and he is paid to try to remove me from office, mr speaker, and i appreciate that and i accept that — but may i humbly suggest to him that he should wait until the enquiry has concluded and he should study it for himself, and i will certainly respond as appropriate and i hope that he does. but in the meantime, yes, mr speaker, i certainly wish that things had happened differently on the evening of may the 20th, mr speaker, and i apologise for all the misjudgments that have
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been made, for which i take, mr speaker, full responsibility. speaking after prime minister's questions, labour's shadow employment minister echoed his leader is's call for the pie minister to resign. i find this absolutely — minister to resign. i find this absolutely flabbergasted. i minister to resign. i find this| absolutely flabbergasted. we minister to resign. i find this - absolutely flabbergasted. we have -ot a absolutely flabbergasted. we have got a prime minister who has come to the house _ got a prime minister who has come to the house of— got a prime minister who has come to the house of commons and said, yeah, i parted _ the house of commons and said, yeah, i parted whilst everyone else put their_ i parted whilst everyone else put their shoulder to the wheel. and he said _ their shoulder to the wheel. and he said. but. _ their shoulder to the wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details _ said, but, you know, wait for the details on — said, but, you know, wait for the details on all the rest of it... you called for — details on all the rest of it... you called for an _ details on all the rest of it... you called for an enquiry, _ details on all the rest of it... 7m, called for an enquiry, should you wait for the details? {if called for an enquiry, should you wait for the details?— called for an enquiry, should you wait for the details? of course we needn enquiry. — wait for the details? of course we needn enquiry, the _ wait for the details? of course we needn enquiry, the allegations . needn enquiry, the allegations should — needn enquiry, the allegations should be looked into. but the central— should be looked into. but the central point here is that the pie minister— central point here is that the pie minister was asked direct questions by mp5 _ minister was asked direct questions by mps and journalists and would not answeh _ by mps and journalists and would not answeh we _ by mps and journalists and would not answer. we have the absolute farce of yesterday of people not being able to _ of yesterday of people not being able to get clear answers, then today— able to get clear answers, then today he — able to get clear answers, then today he comes to the house of
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commons — today he comes to the house of commons and says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't _ commons and says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise a party when i see one! _ i don't recognise a party when i see one! that_ i don't recognise a party when i see one! that is— i don't recognise a party when i see one! that is absolutely bizarre. so i think_ one! that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that — one! that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that people's rage, as he put it. _ i think that people's rage, as he put it. is— i think that people's rage, as he put it, is more than understandable, and the _ put it, is more than understandable, and the question about apologies is always— and the question about apologies is always not— and the question about apologies is always not if you are sorry, it is what _ always not if you are sorry, it is what do — always not if you are sorry, it is what do you _ always not if you are sorry, it is what do you then do. these actions speak— what do you then do. these actions speak louder than words. he doesn't need to— speak louder than words. he doesn't need to say— speak louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is sorry, he needs to demonstrate — need to say he is sorry, he needs to demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm _ demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry butl— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i thinka and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think a lot of people out there — but i think a lot of people out there are _ but i think a lot of people out there are really, really angry. my my colleague who conducted that interview also spoke to the safeguarding minister. she asked her if lockdown rules had been broken, why the prime minister had not resigned? why the prime minister had not resiined? ., ., ., resigned? the law of the land a- lies resigned? the law of the land applies to _ resigned? the law of the land applies to everybody. - resigned? the law of the land applies to everybody. yes... | applies to everybody. yes... including — applies to everybody. yes... including the _ applies to everybody. yes... including the prime - applies to everybody. yes... | including the prime minister. including the prime minister. including the prime minister. including the pie minister. the people who make the laws are also subject to them. and that's why we have a due process of the enquiry to
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find out exact what went on and if any laws were broken there will be consequences. it is any laws were broken there will be consequences-_ consequences. it is enquiry says that boris _ consequences. it is enquiry says that boris johnson _ consequences. it is enquiry says that boris johnson broke - consequences. it is enquiry says that boris johnson broke the - consequences. it is enquiry says i that boris johnson broke the rules, that borisjohnson broke the rules, he should — that borisjohnson broke the rules, he should resign, then? i�*m that boris johnson broke the rules, he should resign, then?— he should resign, then? i'm not iioin to he should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat _ he should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what _ he should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i _ he should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i just - he should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i just said, going to repeat what ijust said, but clearly there are consequences in the pie minister has been clear that there will be consequences. to be specific for our audience, he said _ be specific for our audience, he said very— be specific for our audience, he said very clearly, if people are found — said very clearly, if people are found to — said very clearly, if people are found to have broken the rules there will be _ found to have broken the rules there will be consequences for them. typically. — will be consequences for them. typically, you include the pie minister— typically, you include the pie minister in that? you are saying to our viewers. — minister in that? you are saying to our viewers, that if the enquiry finds— our viewers, that if the enquiry finds boris— our viewers, that if the enquiry finds borisjohnson broke the rules he should — finds borisjohnson broke the rules he should resign? i�*m finds boris johnson broke the rules he should resign?— he should resign? i'm not going to net into he should resign? i'm not going to get into these _ he should resign? i'm not going to get into these hypotheticals. .. - he should resign? i'm not going to get into these hypotheticals. .. is l get into these hypotheticals... is not hypothetical, and ask you to clarify— not hypothetical, and ask you to clarify what you said. i�*m not hypothetical, and ask you to clarify what you said.— not hypothetical, and ask you to clarify what you said. i'm not going to reeat clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. there - clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. there are - to repeat what i said. there are consequences for people who break the law in this country. the police are looking at the situation, there are looking at the situation, there are a number of individuals involved including senior civil servants, that's why we need the enquiry and then the consequences will follow. that's how we do things in this country. 50 that's how we do things in this count . ,. that's how we do things in this count _ y., that's how we do things in this count . y., , , country. so you can see events unfolding — country. so you can see events unfolding that _ country. so you can see events unfolding that if _ country. so you can see events unfolding that if boris - country. so you can see events unfolding that if boris johnsonl country. so you can see events. unfolding that if boris johnson is unfolding that if borisjohnson is found to have broken covered rules
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in the way the health secretary at the time, matt hancock, dead, and allegra stratton, his former press head of press, they resigned, that borisjohnson could end up resigning? boris johnson could end up resigning?— boris johnson could end up resiiinin? , ,., _., resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and _ resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i _ resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i said _ resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i said what - resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i said what i - resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i said what i said| discussion and i said what i said and i will leave it there.- discussion and i said what i said and i will leave it there. what of the reaction _ and i will leave it there. what of the reaction from _ and i will leave it there. what of the reaction from conservative l the reaction from conservative backbenchers? one said he was relieved to hear the pie minister's statement. it relieved to hear the pie minister's statement. . . relieved to hear the pie minister's statement-— statement. it was certainly an a -iolo . statement. it was certainly an apology- i've _ statement. it was certainly an apology. i've never— statement. it was certainly an apology. i've never had - statement. it was certainly an apology. i've never had such i statement. it was certainly an l apology. i've never had such an abject _ apology. i've never had such an abject apology from a government n1inister— abject apology from a government minister in— abject apology from a government minister in my 30 plus years in this place _ minister in my 30 plus years in this place what— minister in my 30 plus years in this place. what it sincere? yes, i think it place. what it sincere? yes, i think it was— place. what it sincere? yes, i think it was genuinely sincere. and i think— it was genuinely sincere. and i think that _ it was genuinely sincere. and i think that the prime minister showed contrition _ think that the prime minister showed contrition and he realised that he had done — contrition and he realised that he had done the wrong thing and not intervening at the time and all the rest of— intervening at the time and all the rest of it — intervening at the time and all the rest of it. sol intervening at the time and all the rest of it. so i think that when somebody— rest of it. so i think that when somebody makes an apology like that, then reasonable people accept the apology _ then reasonable people accept the apology. obviously with a caveat that this — apology. obviously with a caveat that this is continuing because
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there — that this is continuing because there is— that this is continuing because there is a _ that this is continuing because there is a continuing enquiry. and he has _ there is a continuing enquiry. and he has said — there is a continuing enquiry. and he has said that when that enquiry is concluded, that the findings will be published and there will be an opportunity for a further discussion. but in the short term, i think— discussion. but in the short term, i think that _ discussion. but in the short term, i think that this is a monumental relief— think that this is a monumental relief to— think that this is a monumental relief to myself and lots of other colleagues, because we didn't think he would _ colleagues, because we didn't think he would be able to carry on if he didnt— he would be able to carry on if he didn't answer the basic question as to whether— didn't answer the basic question as to whether or not he was there. and he has _ to whether or not he was there. and he has answered that question now. the headlines on bbc news... pressure is growing on the prime minister after he answered his apology over attending a drinks gathering in the garden at number ten in 2020. more trouble for borisjohnson as the high court rules the government's so called �*vip lane' to award contracts to two companies supply of ppe during the first wave of the covid—i9 pandemic was unlawful. putting the brakes on smart motorways — the government pauses their rollout
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over safety concerns. french police have arrested a man. three members of the family and a passing cyclist was shot dead on a remote mountainside road. it is a read of element in one of france's most notorious unsolved cold cases. our paris conned respondent explained earlier that the news needs to be taken with caution. i should say before we start at this point does not mean there has been a breakthrough, there are words of great caution coming from the french alps about this. it's not the first time there have been arrests, people have been called in for questioning, every now and again, it's a very long drawn—out investigation. possibly this is significant but quite possibly not. let's notjump
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to any conclusions. the background is this puzzling case that goes back ten years nearly, from the little village in the hills where it happened, september 2012, village in the hills where it happened, september2012, if you remember, a carfound on the side of a road, its engine still running, by a road, its engine still running, by a cyclist who was passing, end of the holiday season, and in the car three bodies, this british man of iraqi origin, his wife and her mother. and thereby another body, that of a cyclist who may or may not have been simply chanced upon the scene and got killed by the killer simply to remove him as a witness. ten years of investigation and we are nowhere near knowing why this happened or let alone who did it. so whenever there is news like this of an arrest or questioning it shows the investigation continues but we need to be very careful not to get too excited. on this day in 1970, a british child vanished from a beach in australia and the mystery
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of what happened to three—year—old cheryl grimmer has never been solved. to mark the anniversary of the case, the bbc is launching an eight—part podcast called fairy meadow — let's take a look at the story, told by series presenterjon kay. always live with the hope that we're going to see her smiley face one day, no matter how old she might be. for more than 50 years, ricki has been searching for his sister. the best way to describe cheryl is... ..cheeky and cute. she was very cute, very beautiful. er... but she was a rascal! the grimmer family waved goodbye to bristol in the late 1960s to emigrate down under. they had four children. ricky — holding the koala —
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was the eldest. cheryl, on the right, the youngest. and this was their new home — fairy meadow, an hour south of sydney. but not long after they arrived, on the 12th of january 1970, they were playing on the beach when the wind suddenly changed. people raced to leave and, in the confusion, three—year—old cheryl was taken. if anybody has got my daughter, i would honestly and truly... i would like her back unharmed. as early and as quick as possible. that's about all i can say. cheryl was snatched from the changing rooms at the top of the beach. ricki turned away for just a few seconds. he's lived with that ever since. so, the last time you saw her was just in the doorway?
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that's correct, yeah. just tucked inside. um... here, come on, i'll show you. so, she was just there. just about where that wall ends, just there. she's smiling and giggling and just playing, it was like a...likeajoke. i've got that image all day, every day. i've got it in my nightmares. the images of her running up and down the shoreline. for the last five years, i've been investigating what happened for a bbc podcast called fairy meadow. there were so many of us searching and searching, and turn over every leaf, every reed, everything. we couldn't find a thing. it's a ripple effect. i'm paranoid that someone will take my child. -
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gps: after 150 metres, - turn right towards fairy meadow. decades on, are there new clues? tv reporter: now to a major breakthrough in that cold case | murder we've been telling you about this morning... | among those i've spoken to — the detectives who reopened the case. it's affected me mentally, emotionally. the case... ..broke me. sorry. the new south wales . government is increasing the reward to $1 million. somebody knows something. i mean, you can't hide a secret like this for 50 years. find the courage. tell us the truth. you're still hopeful that she will... very, very hopeful. i never give up hope.
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never. cheryl grimmer�*s parents died without answers. can the mystery of what happened to her now finally be solved? jon kay, bbc news. the first two episodes of fairy meadow are available on bbc sounds now, with new episodes every wednesday, and we'll be talking a teacher has completed his challenge of running every single street and lane in the scottish city of glasgow — more than 6,000 of them in total. michael shanks set himself the goal in march 2020 as a way of making good use of the daily permitted exercise during the first lockdown. he's been telling us what drove him to do it. i think the most common reaction is probably like i'm mad or, you know, kind of wondering why i would do this. so, i'm michael shanks. and since the first lockdown in 2020, i've been running every single street and lane and road in the city of glasgow, 6,500 streets.
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so, the why is a good question. i suppose it started outjust a more kind of useful use of the daily exercise that we had back then. one of the interesting things has been all these little nooks and crannies of the city that i didn't know existed. and, yes, so many lanes. like, in the east end and the south side in particular, just lanes, absolutely everywhere, connecting places. i've kind of picked up different themes, as i've been going along. so, high rise flats all over the city, the ones that are left. the subway route, so, the whole of the glasgow subway. also, "no ball game" signs. the city is littered in these, i've called them "nae fun allowed". and i've probably got the biggest collection of signs welcoming you to the city of glasgow, because every time i cross a border, i've been taking a picture of the signs, as well. there's been a bit of spotting scenes from taggart, from various murder scenes over the years. but a lot of it, i mean, it has been as well a fitness challenge, it's been an adventure exploring your own city, a place you feel like
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you would know quite well. but, actually, when you get in about it, you realise you don't know different streets. the difficulty with this challenge is, if you were to run every single street in glasgow once, it would be about 1,200 kilometres. but, of course, with loads of dead ends and cul de sacs, you've got to run them twice. so it's ended up... i'm just short of 2,500km now in two years. part of this challenge has also been meeting people, as i've been going along. so, usually when i get lost, that sparks a conversation with someone, asking if i know where i'm going. meeting people told me they've lived in the same street for the last 60, 70 years that their parents grew up there, as well. and some of the heritage of glasgow has been a really interesting part of this, as well. glasgow's full of streets that don't exist any more, that are still there. so, the tenements have long been demolished, particularly in easter house. but actually the lamp posts are still there, the street signs are still there, you can still run along the roads. i suppose i feel a mix of... well, i am relieved to be done with it. it's been fun, but i'm also quite glad to see the back of it in a way.
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but it's quite sad, in a way, because i have really, really enjoyed going out on the adventure and finding new places. and i guess there's nowhere left to visit in glasgow now, i've been everywhere, literally everywhere! now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. we are in a pretty quiet, settled weather pattern for the foreseeable future, dominated by high pressure. many places will stay dry. northern areas will see more cloud, a bit more miles across scotland and northern ireland. further south of england and wales, slightly cooler air, frost and fog will be a problem for some during the overnight period. many places will stay dry in a lot of places in the sunshine through this afternoon, much of england and wales of that messy start will see plenty of sun, a bit for eastern scotland and northern ireland. more cloud for the north and west of scotland. here we will
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see milder air of the atlantic. 11 or 12 perhaps the high here. further south a bit chilly, seven to nine. through this evening and overnight it stays largely dry and settled. we start to see fog developing across england and wales, these becoming more extensive than the last few nights. here it will be a cold night to come, a widespread frost particularly out of towns and cities. further north, more cloud, milder air, cities. further north, more cloud, milderair, less cities. further north, more cloud, milder air, less breeze, so less cold. thursday, a big area of high pressure dominating, more weather fronts are nicer buyers across the far north. here, thicker cloud, the odd spot of rain but most places dry. more of a breeze, but elsewhere after that really foggy start across england and wales, we should see sunshine. the fog may linger in places throughout the day, and if it does it will feel chilly, temperatures struggling to get above freezing. if you see the sunshine, six to 8 degrees, a bit milder
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across the north of the uk. a similar pattern to end the week the friday, some of the mildest air will be to the north of the uk. high pressure dominates, a lot of dry unsettled weather. this weather front could bring the odd spot of rain to the north and west of scotland. a bit more of a breeze and cloud again. elsewhere, chilly start, the fog quite extensive and perhaps lingering throughout the day in some places, and again if it does it will feel quite chilly and grey. when you get the sunshine, temperatures pushing up to around six or seven. double figure values for the north west of scotland. very little change into the weekend, most places dominated by high pressure, should be dry and settled, some foggy mornings, the chance of a little light, patchy rain in the north.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown at downing street where pressure is growing on the prime minister after he offered his apology over attending a drinks gathering in the garden at number 10 in may 2020. accused of �*deceit�* and �*betrayal�* by opposition leaders in the commons, the prime minister was under intense pressure to explain himself. i certainly wish that things had happened differently on the evening of may the 20th. and i apologise for all misjudgments that have been made, for which i take full responsibility. despite the apology, the prime minister was urged to resign, while tory backbenchers were called on to remove him.
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when the whole country was locked down, he was hosting

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