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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 12, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson will face mps as pressure mounts for him to say whether he attended a drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. his own mps want answers and the opposition want him to resign if he did. the more that we can get straight answers_ the more that we can get straight answers on— the more that we can get straight answers on this, the more we can then_ answers on this, the more we can then reflect, take action that's needed — then reflect, take action that's needed but also try and move forward with the _ needed but also try and move forward with the public. if he's lied to the british public, he's lied to parliament and he has attended parties during lockdown, then his position is untenable. what do you want hear from borisjohnson at pmqs today? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions.
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double fault for novak djokovic — as the tennis star admits breaking isolation rules when he had covid and says there was an error on his immigration form. nato and russia are to hold their first face—to—face talks in two years in an effort to defuse tensions over russian troops massed near the ukrainian border. putting the brakes on smart motorways — the government pauses their rollout over safety concerns. and the boss of the uk's biggest energy supplier warns that high energy bills will last for two years. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk prime minister,
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borisjohnson, will face mps later, with pressure mounting for him to say whether he attended a �*bring your own booze' drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. witnesses said mrjohnson and his wife were among about 30 people present at the event in may 2020, when outdoor gatherings were banned. conservative mps have joined labour in saying he must explain his actions. backbencher nigel mills said it would be �*utterly untenable' for any senior figure who attended the gathering to be responsible for coronavirus policy. he said he couldn't see how the prime minister could continue in hisjob if he knowingly attended a party. the opposition labour's deputy leader also said borisjohnson�*s position would be �*untenable' if he attended parties during lockdown. angela rayner says if he misled parliament and had not kept to the ministerial code, then he should resign. the prime minister will face questions in parliament at midday
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in the uk and will face the labour leader keir starmer — who is out of isolation. our political correspondent helen catt has the latest. borisjohnson has so far refused to say if he went to a party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown in england or not. number10 has said it won't comment while a senior official investigates. but in a few hours�* time, mrjohnson will be at the dispatch box for prime minister's questions, and able to avoid it no longer. labour has said he must come clean. did he attend the drinks event — yes or no? some conservative mps have made it very clear they want a categoric answer, too. if the prime minister knowingly attended a party, i can't see how he can survive, having accepted resignations for far less, and he accepted the resignation of his spokesperson for not attending a party butjoking about it at a time of much lighter restrictions — and i just think that's untenable. anger has been growing across all
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levels of the conservative party — from mps to party members to a major donor. within government, there's an area of hypocrisy, rule—breaking and arrogance. how can they have a party for a hundred people when other people are told you can only meet one person in a great big park? it doesn't make any sense, and it's just wrong! the snp's westminster leader said the prime minister should resign now. he really needs to understand that he has to go. he should be resigning tonight. and if it doesn't do that, conservative mps need to hold him to account. some conservative mps have said that how mrjohnson performs today will be a key factor in forming their view on his future. that he's under pressure is certain, what happens next is much less so. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent, nick eardley, is at westminster. i suppose the big question that people want to i suppose the big question that people want to know i suppose the big question that people want to know the i suppose the big question that people want to know the answer i suppose the big question that people want to know the answer to i suppose the big question that people want to know the answer to is
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whether boris johnson people want to know the answer to is whether borisjohnson will give a direct yes or no to the question of whether he was at a party in downing street during the first lockdown. yes, good morning. ithink that street during the first lockdown. yes, good morning. i think that is exactly the question that labour will want to know the answer to at pmqs at midday. there is bound to be some pretty intense questioning of borisjohnson�* actions on the 20th of may 2020 about some of the previous comment he has made in the comments about being shocked to find out about allegations of parties, shocked to see the way that some of his aides have talked about them. and this does to me talk —— feel like a serious moment for boris johnson. talking to tory mps over the last 48 hours, there is a feeling of mutiny in the air amongst many of them who are really angry at the fact that this has dragged on, who hoped that it might have gone away after christmas but are worried that there's just been revelation after revelation about goings—on in
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downing street and other government departments and are worried perhaps that there might be more to come. we heard in helen's piece those calls from nigel mills for the prime minister to go, if he did attend that event on the 20th of may, knowing it was a party. i've heard that privately from a number of tory mps who are not quite prepared to say it on air or on camera just yet but who are saying it privately. there are some however who are waiting to hear what the prime minister says when he appears at noon on prime minister's questions. listen to one tory backbencher we spoke to in the last half an hour. we need to see exactly what occurred, what breaches were actually there. and then we can actually make that determination. i just... i can't speculate, because i don't actually know what occurred, what type of rule breach it was, and, therefore, what the sanctions need to be. so, we're putting the cart before
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the horse and that's why i want to hear today, get more clarity so we can start addressing those issues. but, at the moment, ijust don't have the background and the basis to be able to do so, i'm sorry. so that is the view of some tory mps, that it's wait and see. there are some who are defending boris johnson privately are trying to find ways to defend him until he gives his own account. but as i said, it does just feel like a really serious moment for this prime minister, a really dangerous moment for a prime minister who isn't finding mass support on the back benches at the moment and is finding many tory mps are saying, look, you need to sort this out. you need to give us answers and then we will make our minds up. 0pposition mps meanwhile smell blood. they think boris johnson is in real trouble. the snp and the liberal democrats have been saying this morning that they think the prime minister now needs to resign and although that's not an official position of the labour
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partyjust official position of the labour party just yet, official position of the labour partyjust yet, they do seem to be edging towards it. have a listen to the party's deputy leader angela rayner. boris johnson has to account for his actions and the ministerial code is very clear that if he has misled parliament and he's not abided by that code, then he should go. and the frustration for me is that conservative mps have been out on the airways, condemning the prime minister, and saying he does need to come clean on his actions, but, you know, the prime minister is being propped up by his conservative mps at the moment and he's been proven not fit to govern. nobody will be surprised that. i don't believe that borisjohnson was the right prime minister for this country but i think, more importantly now, the british public are now thinking that he is not the right prime minister for this country. if the prime minister says he was at the party and if he perhaps apologises, will that be enough for his mps, do you think, or will the very fact that he was at the party, if that is what he says, would that
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be going too far for some of them? what other action might other parties for example? i what other action might other parties for example?- what other action might other parties for example? i think it is re parties for example? i think it is pretty clear _ parties for example? i think it is pretty clear that _ parties for example? i think it is pretty clear that there _ parties for example? i think it is pretty clear that there are - parties for example? i think it is pretty clear that there are a - pretty clear that there are a significant number of tory mps who wouldn't forgive borisjohnson if he admitted to being at this event. i suspect, and it's a hunch rather than something based on what i've heard from downing street, that borisjohnson might not give as direct an answer as that. but that is the main concern among tory mps, that if he was at that event in may 2020, if it was a party, if it was something that potentially broke the rules, too many tory mps it's indefensible and that is where the potential pitfall for borisjohnson lies. that in the past he has been able to say, i'm confident rules weren't broken, i've been assured they weren't broken, i was angry to see people joking about it as well. this is more serious was that we
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have had tory mps over the last 24—hour saying they think it is more serious because it involves the prime minister being there, it is the first lockdown when nobody really knew exactly where this virus was going. rules were being very, very gradually lifted. remember at the time of this event, you were only allowed one other person, to meet with one other person from outsold your household. so i am not sure an apology in and of itself would cut it with many tory mps. what happens next is a really good question. there is always talk at times like this in the backbenches of the conservative party about whether matters of no confidence, going into the 1922 committee, i think i am right in saying you need 54 letters to go to the chair of that committee, graham brady, to trigger a no—confidence vote in the prime minister. i have no idea how many are in, we neverfind out, it's always a bit of a guessing game with
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that but i have spoken to some tory mps in the past few days who say yes, in the past month or so they have put their letters in. in terms of opposition parties can do, the truth is probably not much. they need a significant rebellion within the conservative party for this to happen, for borisjohnson potentially to be removed from office. it is far from guaranteed that that is going to happen and we shouldn't get ahead of ourselves and assume that this is terminal for borisjohnsonjust assume that this is terminal for boris johnson just yet. but there are a lot of conversations happening about this over the road and that spells danger for the prime minister. . ~ ., ~ spells danger for the prime minister. w ., ~ , ., spells danger for the prime minister. w ., ~' , ., , minister. 0k, nick, thank you very much for that. _ earlier, i spoke to former numberten chief press officer under david cameron, mo hussein, who says the prime minister needs to explain what happened i would say silence and avoiding the questions are really not your friend, right now. and i think it's now the time for some humility, some contrition and just answering the question,
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frankly, being honest about what happened. because the problem here is this has been going on for a few weeks now and we've had "nothing to see here" from number ten and then we have had, "there was no party, no rules were broken" and an investigation. all of which has just made it worse, where if something did happen and it was wrong, then say that and then say what you're going to do about it going forward. we haven't had that and hopefully we will see some of that today, because i think that is certainly needed. does it surprise you that there has been this "let's not be absolutely frank" attitude, "let's be equivocal about answering "questions", when it is quite clear that that ends up putting you in a more difficult position? are you surprised at that approach or do you think that has been the way it has been for some time now, that's just the way it's done? i think that is the way it has been for a while. however, every time that has happened, it hasn't worked out.
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and it has created a bigger mess, frankly, and bigger questions that need to be resolved. so, you would have thought that lessons would have been learned by now. i am also surprised that this e—mail went to 100 people, we are told, and we are only finding out about it now. so, there has been some kind of going to ground, closing of ranks and tin hat time, where people in governmentjust expect there to be a lot of focus groups about bad news and they don't really respond. but the public perception here is really, really important. building confidence in what the government is trying to do, particularly as it's trying to go back to its domestic agenda and it can't really do that until this is resolved. also, as you've been pointing out, the issue with mps. mps, the government needs the support of and with this series of unforced errors, whether it is parties or wallpaper or the loss of north shropshire, all of these are weighing on mps' minds who are really questioning their support now for the prime minister
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and for the government. so, i think doing things differently is certainly the best course of action. yeah, because i guess any group of mps at any particular time will ask whether their prime minister is an electoral asset or an electoral liability. obviously, the conservatives, in the last general election, under borisjohnson's leadership gained a huge majority. i don't know how much that might cushion him from what is happening right now, what are your thoughts on that? two years ago, there was a significant majority. he reached parts of the country that no conservative leader has ever had before. and that has put a lot of currency on him. he has been seen as electoral gold dust. and people do remember that. i think that will serve him well, for a while. however, when there's more allegations and a feeling of different rules
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for different people and when this translates at the ballot box... and if mps see — "we are not winning any more" and this is cutting through, then i think that transactional relationship that some mps have, who may not be fans of the prime minister but have held their nose, almost, for a while because they see him as a winner, that could all change. the former chief press officer at number 10 when david cameron was prime minister. you can get in touch with me. you have been saying what you want to hear from borisjohnson when he speaks at you want to hearfrom borisjohnson when he speaks at prime minister's questions. let mejust when he speaks at prime minister's questions. let me just read when he speaks at prime minister's questions. let mejust read out when he speaks at prime minister's questions. let me just read out if few that you've been sending in. one says, the only thing i want to hear from borisjohnson is his resignation. i couldn't even go to my aunt's funeral service thanks to the lockdown. this one is from zoe, i lost my mother on the 4th of may 2020 but i don't blame borisjohnson and i don't think he should resign.
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scott says "the only thing i want to hear from johnson is scott says "the only thing i want to hearfrom johnson is his resignation speech." another, i also want to hear him say i resign, nothing more. thank you for sending those comments in. keep them coming into us. let's see a couple more perhaps if i can fit them in. on twitter, will boris johnson give a straight yes or no about partying? they think of course he won't. that is their comment. thank you for sending in those comments today. you can get in touch with me on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions and we will try to read out some more of those. and you can see prime minister's questions here on bbc news at midday. in the uk. novak djokovic has admitted breaching isolation rules after testing positive for covid—19 last month, describing it as an "error of judgment". in an instagram post, the 34—year—old admitted meeting a journalist for an interview two
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days after he tested positive on december the 16th. in the post, he also blamed his agent for making a mistake on the travel form he used to enter australia. he wrote: the player is waiting to find out if the australian government will allow him to play in next week's 0pen — or deport him. 0ur tennis correspondent russell fuller is following all the developments from melbourne. we know there were a lot of questions unanswered and he knows he has a realfight on his hands to stay in the country because that immigration minister has not made the decision yet. djokovic's legal team have provided more paperwork, there's a lot of discussions going on behind the scenes and it could be at least another 24 hours
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before we get a result. as to whether this will have a material difference. well, in this statement, as you were saying, he has admitted that he breached covid rules — albeit last month in a different country. so not something that is an immediate concern to the australian government but, at the same time, here is somebody admitting they are breaching guidelines and that may well have an influence on the way the public of australia view novak djokovic. then there's this administrative error and it's actually entirely plausible that that is what happened. that these forms are filled out by all passengers travelling to australia, or in this case their representatives, and djokovic's agent forgot that he'd moved from belgrade to spain before flying out to australia. that in its own probably wouldn't have caused him enormous problems but when you throw it into the mix with everything else, it means that djokovic is still in a very difficult situation and far from guaranteed to start the defence of his title on monday or tuesday of next week. we know he has been practising. we're showing our viewers now pictures of him practising
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in the rod laver arena. what does this mean for the scheduling for the tournament, is everything going ahead on the basis that he will be there, even though we don't have this decision from the immigration minister? it is for now. that practice session was one that went ahead in full view of everybody. yesterday, it was very cloak and dagger, very secretive, nobody was allowed to watch. the screens around melbourne park were blanked out. there were no pictures from the rod laver arena and it was down to the channel 9 drone overhead that we got to see a picture of djokovic in action. but it must be very chaotic, i think, behind the scenes at tennis australia, that theyjust don't quite know what the situation is. the verdict from the minister could come before the draw at 3pm tomorrow but if it doesn't, novak djokovic will take his place in the draw as the defending champion and the number one seed. he'll be drawn again somebody but we won't know for sure if the match will take place or not.
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0ur tennis correspondent russell fuller in melbourne. nato and russia are meeting for their first face—to—face talks in two years — as they try to defuse tension over the build up of russian troops on the ukrainian border. nato members have said they won't accept russian requests to extend. jonathan joins us from brussels. tell us a bit more about what each side is expecting and wanting from this meeting. i side is expecting and wanting from this meeting-— this meeting. i think i would first of all say i _ this meeting. i think i would first of all say i don't _ this meeting. i think i would first of all say i don't think _ this meeting. i think i would first of all say i don't think either - this meeting. i think i would first of all say i don't think either side are hugely optimistic that they are going to get any breakthrough at this meeting. you mentioned some of the red lines for both sides. russia wants an end to nato expansion. nato on its side said it's in the treaty, an open door policy for other countries tojoin. it an open door policy for other countries to join. it is an open door policy for other countries tojoin. it is not an open door policy for other countries to join. it is not going to change that treaty. russia would
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also like to have a veto on the presence of foreign troops in fellow nato countries. in 2014, 5000 troops from countries like britain, the us, france and germany were sent to the baltic states. russia would like those out. there is no sign that nato is going to agree to that. there are some areas where there could be progress but they are really on the margins. those are for example on arms control. i think certainly nato is willing to talk about arms control and wants to and has accused russia in the past are pulling out of discussions on arms control. an transferee —— transparency and risk reduction but i think it is unlikely we will see a massive breakthrough at all in this meeting but they hope as far as the nato january secretary is that this could be other start of the process but has also robbed diplomacy might
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fail. so but has also robbed diplomacy might fail. , but has also robbed diplomacy might fail, , ., but has also robbed diplomacy might fail. , ., , ., ~ fail. so it is about breaking the ice, essentially? _ fail. so it is about breaking the ice, essentially? it— fail. so it is about breaking the ice, essentially? it is. - fail. so it is about breaking the ice, essentially? it is. we - fail. so it is about breaking the | ice, essentially? it is. we know fail. so it is about breaking the - ice, essentially? it is. we know the us has done _ ice, essentially? it is. we know the us has done that _ ice, essentially? it is. we know the us has done that with _ ice, essentially? it is. we know the us has done that with russia - ice, essentially? it is. we know the| us has done that with russia earlier this week in the talks in geneva which lasted eight hours. they were described as useful and professional by the russians but again, no breakthrough and no changes from the us on their position, who are essentially in lockstep with the other nato members, 30 members of the nato alliance here. so i think, you know, trying to diffuse this crisis is going to be very, very difficult. what nato would like to see is the beginning of april out or the withdrawal of those around 100,000 russian troops on ukraine's border and as far as one nato western diplomat told me, it is russia that is making the threats at the moment, while asking for security guarantees. as far as nato is concerned, that is not the right
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way round. is concerned, that is not the right way round-— is concerned, that is not the right wa round. ., ., , , ., way round. jonathan, 'ust before you io, way round. jonathan, 'ust before you no, a line way round. jonathan, 'ust before you go. a line of— way round. jonathan, 'ust before you go. a line of copy — way round. jonathan, 'ust before you go, a line of copy has— way round. jonathan, just before you go, a line of copy hasjust _ way round. jonathan, just before you go, a line of copy hasjust dropped i go, a line of copy has just dropped it was that i want to check whether you have heard this or if it fits with your understanding. the kremlin saying existing agreements on conflict in eastern ukraine must be fulfilled before new negotiations with ukraine can be held.- fulfilled before new negotiations with ukraine can be held. yeah, we know there — with ukraine can be held. yeah, we know there are _ with ukraine can be held. yeah, we know there are talks _ with ukraine can be held. yeah, we know there are talks about - with ukraine can be held. yeah, we know there are talks about trying . with ukraine can be held. yeah, we| know there are talks about trying to end the conflict in eastern ukraine that have been going on. but both sides accusing each other are breaking those agreements. so it is a sticking point. it will be undoubtably one of the issues that is addressed here but again, i do not see any sign of a breakthrough on that. g ., ., ., ., ~ not see any sign of a breakthrough on that. g ., ., ., ., ,, , ., on that. 0k, jonathan, thank you very much- _ the boss of the uk's biggest energy supplier has warned soaring energy prices could last up to two years. chris 0'shea, chief executive of british gas owner, centrica, said there was "no reason" to expect gas prices would come
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down "any time soon". he's been speaking to our business editor, simonjack. when i talk to our customers and i hear how distressed they are at the increases in prices that are coming, then i think it's inconceivable that we don't do something to help those people. but it has to be targeted at those people. it can't be targeted at energy companies. it has to be for the customers who can least afford the increases that are coming. what is the answer, there are a number of options on the table? there are three things that we outlined that you could do which could take away half of this price increase for everybody. one is to defer the cost of the supplierfailure, that's is £100. another is to take vat off the bills, temporarily or permanently, that is another £100. then there are green levies on bills, around £175. those three things together could be enacted very quickly without regret
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and that would target half of the price rise and then you get a further relief targeted at those households that need it most. there has been talk about the warm homes discount. if it is targeted, you like. there are some targeted programmes, that would be one, what you make of that option? the way it works is the cost of that scheme is met by energy customers. so if you increase the warm homes discount, you increase the energy bill. ultimately, everybody in the uk is a taxpayer and an energy consumer. so, the cost of this is going to have to be paid by uk citizens. the question as to whether it is paid through the energy or general taxation is one for government. what about the idea that you need to get money towards the energy companies in some way? what they are saying is "look, we've had one of the biggest energy shocks in history in the last few months. all we need is a chance to be able to smooth that out over a number of years and that could be lending them money, which you pay back over time or a fund where you can draw down on government money when the wholesale prices
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are high and pay it back when wholesale prices are low. what you make of a mechanism like that to try and stretch this shock over a longer period? a fund like that could work if you could guarantee the prices will fall. but nobody knows what energy prices will do in the future. so, therefore, we believe that a fund is not the right solution. there's no need for any support for energy companies. their chief executive of british gas owner centrica chris 0'shea. let's speak tojonny marshall, senior economist at the resolution foundation think tank. would you agree with that assessment that energy prices, really high energy prices, could last for up to two years? i energy prices, could last for up to two years?— energy prices, could last for up to two ears? ., ., . , ., two years? i would agree. when you look at the — two years? i would agree. when you look at the energy _ two years? i would agree. when you look at the energy futures _ two years? i would agree. when you look at the energy futures market, l look at the energy futures market, there is little respite coming in terms of energy costs. it is likely we will see an increase in the price cap of another couple of hundred pounds in october, next winter. after that, the futures markets
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suggest there is no easing in prices coming down the line. so suggest there is no easing in prices coming down the line.— suggest there is no easing in prices coming down the line. so the cost of livin: will coming down the line. so the cost of living will continue _ coming down the line. so the cost of living will continue to _ coming down the line. so the cost of living will continue to exert - living will continue to exert considerable pressure on households? exactly. there is a lot of focus on the moment on april when the cost of living crisis will bite, when fuel prices and national insurance contributions increase. but this increases the impetus on government to do something quickly and also something long lasting to ease the pain on households that will suffer the most. ., , pain on households that will suffer the most. , the most. there has been some ressure the most. there has been some pressure on _ the most. there has been some pressure on the _ the most. there has been some pressure on the government, i the most. there has been some - pressure on the government, hasn't there, to remove environmental levies but the issue for the government there is that these pay for green schemes and therefore there is a direct conflict with the government's net zero strategy. so does the answer lie there or somewhere else, the resolution foundation for example has called for a £300 one—off payment for low income households customer most of the green levies need to be paid for, it's whether they are paid
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through bills or taxation because they are legally binding contracts for renewable energy. you cannot stop paying _ for renewable energy. you cannot stop paying them _ for renewable energy. you cannot stop paying them because - for renewable energy. you cannot stop paying them because you - for renewable energy. you cannot i stop paying them because you don't want to. something that could be cut our war home want to. something that could be cut ourwar home —— warm want to. something that could be cut our war home —— warm homes discount. and also the energy company's obligation which helps customers insulate their homes and protecting them from high energy prices in the long term. cutting these would be bad fast moving on to taxation, that would be a generally progressive move because energy levies make up a higher proportion of household budgets and that would ease pressure is that it would also help the government's net zero agenda in terms of making products for low carbon heat. when we move from gas boilers it would make it more affordable as well so that would be worth exploring by the government. we saw a spate of energy supplies go out of business towards the middle to the end of last year. will there be more pressure on companies
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currently in the market?- be more pressure on companies currently in the market? well, there shouldn't be — currently in the market? well, there shouldn't be because _ currently in the market? well, there shouldn't be because the _ currently in the market? well, there shouldn't be because the way - currently in the market? well, there shouldn't be because the way the i shouldn't be because the way the price cap works is so transparent that any energy company should be able to hedge themselves properly over the period at which the price cap is assessed, so they... the energy prices equal to the charge they can charge. so any that go bust with the next energy cap are those china make fast and loose with the rules. , ., ., china make fast and loose with the rules. ,., ., ., ., china make fast and loose with the rules. ., ., ., ., rules. good to hear from you today. senior economist _ rules. good to hear from you today. senior economist at _ rules. good to hear from you today. senior economist at the _ rules. good to hear from you today. senior economist at the resolution | senior economist at the resolution foundation. the introduction of smart motorways in england, which use the hard shoulder as a permanent lane for traffic, is to be paused while safety concerns are addressed. the move was recommended by a committee of mps in response to a number of accidents. new projects will be put on hold, but, for now, hard shoulders will not be reinstated. here's our transport correspondent katy austin. smart motorways. there are hundreds of miles of them across england, and plans for more. the point of smart motorways
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is to reduce congestion using technology, instead of having to build any new road. but the type that involves permanently removing the hard shoulder to create an extra lane for traffic is controversial. they do have emergency bays, and if a vehicle stops in a live lane, a red x sign can be displayed to close it. but one driver told us he feared for his life when his car developed serious engine problems. people were sounding their horns, there were three near—misses — one of which was an articulated truck, as in nearly rear—ending me. i got out of the car, i got over the crash barrier, i dialled 999 after about five to ten minutes because the lane was still operational — the cameras hadn't picked it up. the government now says it will put the brakes on the hard shoulder being scrapped on any more smart motorways, while more safety data is collected. work already under way will be finished
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with additional safety features. this is one of the control centres where national highways monitors our main roads. it says actions already being taken include rolling out radar technology to detect stranded vehicles. we know that people are legitimately concerned about the safety of using smart motorways. we are convinced that smart motorways are safe, but we know there's more we can do to convince people that they are safe, which is why we've implemented these measures. the government is also providing nearly £400 million for extra emergency bays. it says what's being done should give drivers confidence. but some campaigners don't accept smart motorways without a hard shoulder can ever be safe. katy austin, bbc news. let's return to the talks between nato and russia taking place in brussels, as they try to defuse tensions over russian troops massed
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on the ukrainian border. russia's deputy foreign minister has described it as a moment of truth in relations between the two sides. nato members have repeatedly said they won't accept russian demands, which include a halt to any eastward expansion of the alliance. let's get more on this, now. joining us live now is 0rysia lutsevych who is the head of the ukraine forum at chatham house here in london. thank you forjoining us on bbc news thank you forjoining us on bbc news and bbc world today. on that last point, russia has said it wants nato to firmly say that ukraine cannot be a full member. it wants a legal guarantee on that but there's no way that nato is going to agree to that, is there? ., �* ., , ,., , is there? you're absolutely right. we've heard _ is there? you're absolutely right. we've heard the _ is there? you're absolutely right. we've heard the same _ is there? you're absolutely right. we've heard the same statement yesterday after the negotiations between the us and russia. united states is also rejecting the idea that putin will be shutting the door for nato because nato is the collective defensive alliance where, you know, the sovereign nations who qualify are eligible to join. and it
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is up to nato member states to decide which allies to allow and which not. ukraine clearly stated that, in its constitution, it would like to join nato that, in its constitution, it would like tojoin nato but that, in its constitution, it would like to join nato but its that, in its constitution, it would like tojoin nato but its membership is not so far even on the table on a short—term perspective. that is what i think russia is acting on the false pretext and is pretending that... while moving its own troops closer to native board alike in donbass, crimea, it accuses nato of doing the opposite.— doing the opposite. where is there sco -e for doing the opposite. where is there scope for progress _ doing the opposite. where is there scope for progress to _ doing the opposite. where is there scope for progress to be _ doing the opposite. where is there scope for progress to be made - scope for progress to be made without either side feeling like they are being presented by an ultimatum by the other? —— presented with. ultimatum by the other? -- presented with. ., ., ., ., , ., with. the whole negotiations of those treaties, _ with. the whole negotiations of those treaties, the _ with. the whole negotiations of those treaties, the whole - with. the whole negotiations of. those treaties, the whole process, looks very much like an ultimatum. because russia is not prepared to concede much. itjust requires and
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demands for concessions from the nato member states, from the united states, while keeping over 100,000 contingent on the ukrainian border and threatening an invasion of the sovereign state. find and threatening an invasion of the sovereign state.— sovereign state. and give us an assessment. — sovereign state. and give us an assessment, if _ sovereign state. and give us an assessment, if you _ sovereign state. and give us an assessment, if you would, - sovereign state. and give us an assessment, if you would, of i sovereign state. and give us an i assessment, if you would, of the situation on the ground in ukraine, right now? situation on the ground in ukraine, riaht now? ~ situation on the ground in ukraine, riuhtnow? ., _ situation on the ground in ukraine, riahtnow? ., _ right now? well, obviously, you know, right now? well, obviously, you know. it's _ right now? well, obviously, you know, it's quite _ right now? well, obviously, you know, it's quite a _ right now? well, obviously, you know, it's quite a mixed - right now? well, obviously, you i know, it's quite a mixed situation. there are some sense of anxiety, obviously, because ukraine is so much in the midst of the international news. and, you know, citizens hear all the time about a possible invasion. i was there over new year and christmas at people are living their lives. a lot of people say we've been in this for more than seven years. russia has already invaded us, which, indeed, is the case with over 1 invaded us, which, indeed, is the case with over1 million idp flu and over half a million of war veterans who have direct experience —— idps. they are resolved to defend itself against putin and the recent public
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opinion polls show that every second ukrainian man is prepared to defend ukraine with arms in its hands. basically, to say we will not let putin be the master of our land. thank you very much for your time today, 0rysia lutsevych, head of the ukraine forum at chatham house. more now on our top story. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, will face mps later with pressure mounting for him to say whether he attended a "bring your own booze" drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. witnesses have said that mrjohnson and his wife were among about thirty people present at the event in may 2020, when outdoor gatherings were banned. dominic grieve is the former conservative attorney general. thank you very much forjoining us today. there is what witnesses have said, the prime minister did, namely, that he was at this party, they say. there is the question of
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how he has handled this, refusing to say, so far, whether or not he was there. does he have any option today other than to be absolutely clear on that point? my other than to be absolutely clear on that oint? y ~ other than to be absolutely clear on that oint? y ,, ., , ., that point? my think he has no 0 tion that point? my think he has no option but _ that point? my think he has no option but to _ that point? my think he has no option but to come _ that point? my think he has no option but to come clean - that point? my think he has no option but to come clean as i that point? my think he has no option but to come clean as to | option but to come clean as to whether or not he was present at this party. and the idea he should hide behind sue gray's inquiry in order to avoid explaining that now is complete nonsense. he is under a duty to answer parliament to pass questions and he should answer it. one of the problems he has got is that he has, in the past, said there were no parties taking place. he misled the house of commons. if you looked at his own ministerial code, which he himself reissued when he became prime minister in 2019, with a... a prologue, which he wrote, which endorsed the content 100%, it says that a minister who knowingly mislead the house of commons must resign. mislead the house of commons must resin. ., mislead the house of commons must resi.n_ ., , mislead the house of commons must resin. ., , , resign. so, if, to be absolutely clear, resign. so, if, to be absolutely clear. the _ resign. so, if, to be absolutely clear, the prime _ resign. so, if, to be absolutely
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clear, the prime minister- resign. so, if, to be absolutely clear, the prime minister does| resign. so, if, to be absolutely- clear, the prime minister does say at pmqs today that he was at a party in downing street during that first lockdown, what are the consequences of that stomach both in a legal sense and also what consequences might conservative mps bring to bear on him? —— consequences of that both in. on him? -- consequences of that both in. , ., . _, , . in. there is no direct consequence in. there is no direct consequence in a leual in. there is no direct consequence in a legal sense. _ in. there is no direct consequence in a legal sense. i _ in. there is no direct consequence in a legal sense. i suppose - in. there is no direct consequence in a legal sense. i suppose there i in. there is no direct consequence | in a legal sense. i suppose there is the possibility of a criminal investigation as to how this party took place. but leaving that to one side, it is a breach of his own ministerial code, where he himself saysin ministerial code, where he himself says in the code that a minister who misleads the house of commons should be expected to resign. he should be considering his position. with the prime minister and his remarkable history of telling untruths and trying to avoid consequences of his own actions, it may well be that he will not resign. then the question is going to be well conservative members of parliament to decide that, in fact, members of parliament to decide that, infact, he members of parliament to decide that, in fact, he is a sufficient liability, as his behaviour has been sufficiently bad and in breach of his own rules and those he sets for
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ministers, that they would insist he goes? they have the power to do that. whether they will have the courage to do that and the resolution to do that, i have no idea. �* ., , idea. and, ultimately, given the sizeable majority _ idea. and, ultimately, given the sizeable majority that _ idea. and, ultimately, given the sizeable majority that the - sizeable majority that the conservative party has, does it come down to whether those mps think borisjohnson would be an electoral asset or an electoral liability? it asset or an electoral liability? it may well do. but, in that case, they are going to have to look around and see how the public is reacting to this story. and the evidence is that the public is reacting very badly. they may hope that the story will go away. but, if they do that, they also may wish to factor in that johnson's behaviour has been so consistently bad in this type of respect throughout his period as prime minister, there is no reason to suppose that something like this won't happen again. lip to suppose that something like this won't happen again.— won't happen again. up to this oint, won't happen again. up to this point. the _ won't happen again. up to this point, the prime _ won't happen again. up to this point, the prime minister - won't happen again. up to this point, the prime minister hasl won't happen again. up to this . point, the prime minister has said that it point, the prime minister has said thatitis point, the prime minister has said that it is right to wait for the outcome of the inquiry by the senior civil servant sue gray, who you mentioned a couple of minutes ago. how important is it that when the
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results of that inquiry are made available that they are made available that they are made available in full? that they are full and frank. that there is no redacted? it full and frank. that there is no redacted?— redacted? it is clear that it is essential- — redacted? it is clear that it is essential. and _ redacted? it is clear that it is essential. and i _ redacted? it is clear that it is essential. and i can't - redacted? it is clear that it is essential. and i can't think. redacted? it is clear that it is i essential. and i can't think that there could be any conceivable reason for a reduction. there aren't any national security issues that one could think of. and i would expect sue gray to do a very competentjob. i knew her during my time as attorney general and, indeed, thereafter when i was chair of the intelligence and security committee. i have very high regard for her and for her integrity. considering the recent history you have alluded to in this interview, how important a moment is this for the conservative party? indeed, for parliament? i the conservative party? indeed, for parliament?— parliament? i think it is a defining moment because _ parliament? i think it is a defining moment because either _ parliament? i think it is a definingl moment because either parliament parliament? i think it is a defining - moment because either parliament and the conservative party, which has always said it is an upholder of parliamentary principles wishes to stand up for the parliamentary principle that ministers do not mislead parliament and behave with
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propriety and integrity in their dealings with the public at large or they are willing to tolerate a prime minister who, they are willing to tolerate a prime ministerwho, on they are willing to tolerate a prime minister who, on the face of it, is a dish dishonest charlatan. and has shown this not only on this episode but a number of occasions that he has been holding office —— is a dishonest charlatan. has been holding office -- is a dishonest charlatan.— has been holding office -- is a dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative — dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative mp _ dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative mp who _ dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative mp who i _ dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative mp who i spoke - dishonest charlatan. hugh merryman conservative mp who i spoke to - conservative mp who i spoke to earlier that he had no conservative details what happened on the 20th of may 2020 but he said that boris johnson should bejudged in may 2020 but he said that boris johnson should be judged in the amount —— he had no details about. 0n amount —— he had no details about. on his record notjust on this event whatever the prime minister may say today. what do you say to that defence? i today. what do you say to that defence? ~ . today. what do you say to that defence? ,, ., , ., , . , defence? i think that is a perfectly reasonable — defence? i think that is a perfectly reasonable comment _ defence? i think that is a perfectly reasonable comment for _ defence? i think that is a perfectly reasonable comment for huw - defence? i think that is a perfectly - reasonable comment for huw merriman to make. but if you judge his performance in the round over the last few years he has become prime minister, whilst i accept he has delivered brexit, which some people are very enthusiastic about, the rest of it has been largely chaotic.
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0ne rest of it has been largely chaotic. one of the things people have got to factor in is that his behaviour and reputation are so bad that it's having an adverse impact on our international relations. we are no longer a trusted partner by the key strategic partners we have to work with to try and maintain peace and planet at a time when security is a real issue with russia and at a time when our economic future is in some question when there appears to be a cost of living crisis, and when the disturbances that have been created by brexit are far from resolved. dominic grieve, former attorney general, thank you very much for your thoughts. joining me now is kirsten 0swald, deputy westminster leaderfor the snp. thank you forjoining us, as well, your party's leader at westminster has said that he thinks boris johnson you should be given a chance, first
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of all, to say what happened or did not happen on the 20th of may 2020 in the downing street garden? widnes, hasn't he had so many chances to tell us what has or hasn't happened whether on the 20th of may or on all of these other dates? i am sure, like everyone else, i have lost of which dates there were or were not apparently parties. there has been no shortage of opportunities for the prime minister to come clean and tell us what on earth is going on. and he has not taken that opportunity. i'm sorry, i think time is well and truly up. people have had enough of this. , ., . ., , , . this. does he oh which to the public and to be absolutely _ this. does he oh which to the public and to be absolutely clear - this. does he oh which to the public and to be absolutely clear about. and to be absolutely clear about events on that date? —— does he owe it to the public. edi events on that date? -- does he owe it to the public— it to the public. of course he does. in an it to the public. of course he does. in any other _ it to the public. of course he does. in any other conversation - it to the public. of course he does. in any other conversation about. it to the public. of course he does. | in any other conversation about any other prime minister, it would be given that he would be absolutely clear about what had or hadn't happened. 0f clear about what had or hadn't happened. of course he should be clear today. happened. of course he should be cleartoday. do happened. of course he should be clear today. do i expect him to be clear? well, not on the basis of my past experience. the prime minister
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has said things in the house of commons, he has said thanks to media outlets, that are potently not true. and that really is an incredibly serious issue. people should have the ability to trust and believe the prime minister. whether you are agree or disagree politically. the prime minister has demonstrated by his conduct time and time again whether it be parties in the number ten garden, whether it be people who donate substantial sums to the tory party, then suddenly being elevated to the house of lords, soliciting donations, i could go on and on. his conduct and the way that he has behaved have shown such a lack of integrity and people are so upset by these latest revelations. and it is not hard to understand why. what these latest revelations. and it is not hard to understand why. what is our sense not hard to understand why. what is your sense of _ not hard to understand why. what is your sense of the _ not hard to understand why. what is your sense of the feeling _ not hard to understand why. what is your sense of the feeling among - your sense of the feeling among conservative mps? some of them have expressed very clear and about what
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has happened. that the prime minister hasn't given a straight answer to that particular question about the events on the 20th of may 2020. others are saying this might be survivable for him. what is your sense, from your contacts, of how the mood is amongst conservatives? i think the mood is terrible amongst conservatives. certainly here in westminster. people who i have spoke to this morning, when i was on my way through the building to go to my office, people were deeply, deeply fed up of all of this. i think the patients that some of the conservatives have had with the prime minister has really ebbed away. i would go, again, prime minister has really ebbed away. iwould go, again, to prime minister has really ebbed away. i would go, again, to a prime minister has really ebbed away. iwould go, again, to a point that has been made to tory mps quite often recently that they need to put themselves in all of this. they are themselves in all of this. they are the ones who have the ability to bring this pantomime to an end. i think that, as we look at the situation we are facing now, more
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and more of them are seeing that. and more and more of them have, like absolutely everyone else, had enough. absolutely everyone else, had enou:h. �* , ., ., ., enough. but is not going to translate. _ enough. but is not going to translate, ultimately, - enough. but is not going to translate, ultimately, intol enough. but is not going to - translate, ultimately, into letters to the backbench committee, the 1922 committee that could lead to action been taken against borisjohnson? 0r been taken against borisjohnson? or will they calculate that, with such a big majority, actually, he may still be an electoral asset and, if that was the case, what would you, potentially, and other parties do at westminster, to try to take some action against borisjohnson? i strongly suspect that their e—mail inboxes are probably somewhat similar to inboxes are probably somewhat similarto mine. so, i'm not sure that people will be thinking that borisjohnson is an electoral asset, given the absolute fury and the upset from people who have been unable to see loved ones at the end of their lives. 0r been kept apart, you know, for very legitimate reasons during this pandemic, whilst borisjohnson and those in number ten downing street have followed a very different path. i think that
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the writing is on the wall. i think that tory mps can see that. and if the prime minister had a shred of decency and integrity, then he would see that, as well and resign himself. , , ., , , himself. kirsten oswald deputy westminster _ himself. kirsten oswald deputy westminster leader _ himself. kirsten oswald deputy westminster leader for - himself. kirsten oswald deputy westminster leader for the - himself. kirsten oswald deputy. westminster leader for the snp, thank you very much. four people, including a baby, have survived after the helicopter they were travelling in crash—landed on a residential street in philadelphia. police are calling it a "miracle" that the aircraft managed to avoid power cables and buildings before hitting the ground. mark lobel has the story. this place of worship, scene of a miracle, now the final resting place of a twin—engine medical helicopter after it crashed on the church's front lawn, carrying a two—month—old baby girl. but for her and fellow passengers, it's a story of survival. we hear a crash, and i thought it was a car crash. the pilot weaved his ailing aircraft through this densely populated pennsylvania neighbourhood, dodging power lines and avoiding restaurants and schools, before landing on the ground
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and tumbling over. the best way to describe it is a miracle. obviously, this pilot had a great command of the helicopter, and was able to land it safely, took the best interests of the community at hand to make sure there were no injuries, no property damage. so he did an excellentjob. the pilot is being hailed a hero — notjust for his incredible landing, but for helping his passengers out safely, despite his own injuries, before emergency services came to their rescue. my heart dropped. i was back at police headquarters. we heard the call come out — the first call, i said no way, l and then the second, then the third. - i knew there was a problem. my heartjust dropped. |fire chief and i, we responded here| on location and this is what we saw. . again, it's a true miracle that. everyone was out and they were out prior to us getting here. with the passengers out safely, firefighters worked to contain leaking fuel from entering drexel hill's water supply. as an investigation into the cause
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of the crash gets under way, the lucky baby did finish its intended journey to philadelphia children's hospital — but this time, on the road. mark lobel, bbc news. astonishing. on this day in 1970, a british child vanished from a beach in australia and the mystery of what happened to three year old cheryl grimmer has never been solved. to mark the anniversary of the case, the bbc is launching an eight—part podcast called fairy meadow — let's take a look at the story — told by series presenterjon kay. always live with the hope that we were going to see her smiley face one day, no matter how old she might be. for more than 50 years, ricki has been searching for his sister. the best way to describe cheryl is...cheeky and cute.
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she was very cute, very beautiful. er... but she was a rascal! the grimmer family waved goodbye to bristol in the late 1960s to emigrate down under. to emigrate down under. they had four children. ricky — holding the koala — was the eldest. cheryl, on the right, the youngest. and this was their new home — fairy meadow, an hour south of sydney. but not long after they arrived, on the 12th of january 1970, they were playing on the beach when the wind suddenly changed. people raced to leave and, in the confusion, three—year—old cheryl was taken. if anybody has got my daughter, i would honestly and truly... i would like her back unharmed. as early and as quick as possible.
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that's about all i can say. cheryl was snatched from the changing rooms at the top of the beach. ricki turned away for just a few seconds. he's lived with that ever since. so, the last time you saw her was just in the doorway. that's correct. just tucked inside. um... here, come on, i'll show you. so, she was just there. just about where that wall ends, just there. she's smiling and giggling and just playing, it was like a...like a joke. i've got that image all day, every day. i've got it in my nightmares. the images of her running up and down the shoreline.
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for the last five years, i've been investigating what happened for a bbc podcast called fairy meadow. there were so many of us searching and searching, and turn over every leaf, every reed, everything. we couldn't find a thing. it's a ripple effect. i'm paranoid that someone will take my child. - after 150 metres, turn right towards fairy meadow. decades on, are there new clues? now to a major breakthrough in that |cold case murder we've been tellingj you about this morning... among those i've spoken to — the detectives who reopened the case. it's affected me mentally, emotionally. the case...broke me. sorry.
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the new south wales . government is increasing the reward to $1 million. somebody knows something. i mean, you can't hide a secret like this for 50 years. find the courage. tell us the truth. you're still hopeful that she will... very, very hopeful. i never give up hope. never. cheryl grimmer�*s parents died without answers. can the mystery of what happened to her now finally be solved? jon kay, bbc news. the first two episodes of fairy meadow are available on bbc sounds now, with new episodes every wednesday. a teacher has completed his challenge of running every single street and lane in the scottish city of glasgow — more than 6,000 of them in total. michael shanks set himself the goal in march 2020 as a way of making good use of the daily permitted exercise during the first lockdown. he's been telling us
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what drove him to do it. i think the most common reaction is probably like i'm mad or, you know, kind of wondering why i would do this. so, i'm michael shanks. and since the first lockdown in 2020, i've been running every single street and lane and road in the city of glasgow, 6,500 streets. so, the why is a good question. i suppose it started outjust a more kind of useful use of the daily exercise that we had back then. one of the interesting things has been all these little nooks and crannies of the city that i didn't know existed. and, yes, so many lanes. like, in the east end and the south side in particular, just lanes, absolutely everywhere, connecting places. i've kind of picked up different themes, as i've been going along. so, high rise flats all over the city, the ones that are left. the subway route, so, the whole of the glasgow subway. also, "no ball game" signs. the city is littered in these,
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i've called them "nae fun allowed". and i've probably got the biggest collection of signs welcoming you to the city of glasgow, because every time i cross a border, i've been taking a picture of the signs, as well. there's been a bit of spotting scenes from taggart, from various murder scenes over the years. but a lot of it, i mean, it has been as well a fitness challenge, it's been an adventure exploring your own city, a place you feel like you would know quite well. but, actually, when you get in about it, you realise you don't know different streets. the difficulty with this challenge is, if you were to run every single street in glasgow once, it would be about 1,200 kilometres. but, of course, with loads of dead ends and cul de sacs, you've got to run them twice. so it's ended up... i'm just short of 2,500km now in two years. part of this challenge has also been meeting people, as i've been going along. so, usually when i get lost, that sparks a conversation with someone, asking if i know where i'm going. meeting people told me they've lived in the same street for the last 60, 70 years that their parents grew up there, as well. and some of the heritage of glasgow has been a really interesting part of this, as well.
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glasgow's full of streets that don't exist any more, that are still there. so, the tenements have long been demolished, particularly in easter house. but actually the lamp posts are still there, the street signs are still there, you can still run along the roads. i suppose i feel a mix of... well, i am relieved to be done with it. it's been fun, but i'm also quite glad to see the back of it in a way. but it's quite sad, in a way, because i have really, really enjoyed going out on the adventure and finding new places. and i guess there's nowhere left to visit in glasgow now, i've been everywhere, literally everywhere! efforts to protect britain's red squirrels could be causing more harm than good. at the moment, conifer plantations are encouraged as a healthy habitat. but a study, led by queen's university belfast and the university of st andrews, found it was a far less diverse dwelling than native woodland, and an easier environment for predators to
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target red squirrels. they are rather gorgeous. you're watching bbc news. joe and! joe and i will be here with you next to take you through to one o'clock ——joanna will to take you through to one o'clock —— joanna will be here. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. it's been a frosty and a foggy start across some parts of england, especially this morning. but now things are starting to clear. as we go through the next few days, it's the northern half of the country that will have the mild conditions. it'll be breezy, they'll be some sunshine despite areas of cloud at times. england and wales will be frosty and increasingly foggy, especially by the time we get to friday. so quite a bit of sunshine and dry weather across england, wales and northern ireland today. for western scotland and the north of scotland, there's more cloud, some spots of rain and gusty winds here. but it's the north that's likely to have the highest temperatures today. getting up to 12 degrees in aberdeen, whereas we're
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looking at 6 in birmingham. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we hang onto all this cloud across the north. under clearer skies further south, we'll see fog reform and there'll be a widespread frost, with temperatures falling away quite rapidly under the clear skies. temperatures could dip down as low as —1, for example, in norwich. compare that to the plus 7 we're looking at in stornoway. for tomorrow, we still have high pressure that has been driving our weather all week — not an isobar in sight. so the fog that we start with will be slow to clear and we expect the fog tomorrow morning to be more widespread than it was this morning. but a lot of it will lift, some of itjust into low cloud and if that happens where you are, it will suppress the temperature. once again, a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, but still the north and west of scotland plagued by the cloud with some spots of rain and windy conditions. but also the mildest weather in the north, a bit cooler as we push further south. thursday into friday, you can see how we've got all these yellows in the charts, indicating it is mild,
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coming up around our area of high pressure. on friday, that high pressure starts to slip away, allowing a weather front to drape in across the far north of scotland, bringing in some rain. quite a foggy start to the day during the course of friday, especially across england and wales. some of that will just lift into low cloud. generally, for most, it will be a dull day and, if anything, temperatures will slip a little bit, compared to the next couple of days. you can see that quite nicely here on the chart. then, as we head into the weekend, for saturday, cloudy for most of us, a little rain across north—west scotland and on sunday, again, fairly cloudy for most.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. borisjohnson will face mps as pressure mounts for him to say whether he attended a drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. his own mps want answers and the opposition want him to resign if he did. the more that we can get straight answers on this, the more that we can then reflect, take action that's needed, but also try and move forward with the public. he forward with the public. has lied to the british pub he he has lied to the british public, he has _ he has lied to the british public, he has lied to parliament and attended parties during lockdown, if he has, _ attended parties during lockdown, if he has, then his position is untenable. many mps are desperate for answers. putting the brakes on smart motorways —
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the government pauses their roll—out over safety concerns. nato and russia are to hold their first face—to—face talks in two years in an effort to defuse tensions over russian troops massed near the ukrainian border. and the boss of the uk's biggest energy supplier warns that high energy bills will last for two years. double fault for novak djokovic as the tennis star admits breaking isolation rules when he had covid and says there was an error on his immigration form. borisjohnson will face mps later, with pressure mounting for him to say whether he attended a �*bring your own booze' drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown.
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witnesses have said mrjohnson and his wife were among about thirty people present at the event in may 2020, when outdoor gatherings were banned. conservative mps have joined labour in saying he must explain his actions. backbencher nigel mills said it would be �*utterly untenable�* for any senior figure who attended the gathering to be responsible for coronavirus policy. he said he couldn�*t see how the prime minister could continue in hisjob if he knowingly attended a party. labour�*s deputy leader says borisjohnson�*s position would be �*untenable�* if he attended parties during lockdown. angela rayner says if he misled parliament and had not kept to the ministerial code, then he should go. the prime minister will face questions in parliament in an hour�*s time — facing the labour leader keir starmer, who is out of isolation. 0ur political correspondent helen catt has the latest. borisjohnson has so far refused to say if he went to a party in the downing street garden
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during the first lockdown in england or not. number10 has said it won�*t comment while a senior official investigates. but in a few hours�* time, mrjohnson will be at the dispatch box for prime minister�*s questions, and able to avoid it no longer. labour has said he must come clean. did he attend the drinks event — yes or no? some conservative mps have made it very clear they want a categoric answer, too. if the prime minister knowingly attended a party, i can�*t see how he can survive, having accepted resignations for far less, and he accepted the resignation of his spokesperson for not attending a party butjoking about it at a time of much lighter restrictions — and i just think that�*s untenable. anger has been growing across all levels of the conservative party — from mps to party members to a major donor. within government, there�*s an area of hypocrisy, rule—breaking and arrogance. how can they have a party
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for a hundred people when other people are told you can only meet one person in a great big park? it doesn�*t make any sense, and it�*s just wrong. the snp�*s westminster leader said the prime minister should resign now. he really needs to understand that he has to go. he should be resigning tonight. and if he doesn't do that, conservative mps need to hold him to account. some conservative mps have said that how mrjohnson performs today will be a key factor in forming their view on his future. that he�*s under pressure is certain, what happens next is much less so. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley, is in the houses of parliament. an hour away from prime minister�*s questions, what is the latest on suggestions that the prime minister would make a statement before prime ministers question? it would not be surprising if boris johnson does something that he did just before christmas and prime minister�*s questions and basically tries to address some of this
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growing storm before he is questioned on it by sir keir starmer, perhaps with his opening remarks. he might want to say something. what that something is will be extremely important, because it feels to me like there is a growing anger in the conservative party at the accusations we have seen. there were tory mps that hoped that christmas marked a turning point, that some of the controversies of last year could be left in the past, and who are banging their head as a brick wall this morning because they find themselves embroiled in another scandal, a scandal that some of them think it�*s probably the most serious so far, because it includes the accusation from witnesses at that event that boris johnson himself and his wife were both at that event that involved drinks and snacks in the downing street garden, an invitation that went to around 100
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people who work to number 10. how today plays out is going to be crucial. what the prime minister saysis crucial. what the prime minister says is going to be important as to whether some of those tory mps who have been demanding answers think they have got them. listen first to a senior conservative backbencher. we need to see exactly what occurred, what breaches were actually there. and then we can actually make that determination. i can't speculate, because i don't actually know what occurred, what type of rule breach it was, and, therefore, what the sanctions need to be. so, we're putting the cart before the horse and that's why i want to hear today, get more clarity so we can start addressing those issues. but, at the moment, ijust don't have the background and the basis to be able to do so, i'm sorry. that is one school of thought in the conservative party in parliament. there are many tory mps who have been speaking privately who are
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increasingly pessimistic about boris johnson�*s future, who think the revelations in the last 72 hours could be terminal for the revelations in the last 72 hours could be terminalfor the prime minister and this is a slippery slope which he is quickly sliding down and only has a few days left to try to arrest some of that decline. 0pposition parties as you would expect our sensing that boris johnson is deeply wounded by this and frankly some of them smell blood. the snp and liberal democrats both saying today they think the prime minister is in a position where he has to resign and although thatis where he has to resign and although that is not an official labour policy it is when we hear from senior members of the party. listen to the deputy leader angela rayner. boris johnson has to account for his actions and the ministerial code is very clear that if he has misled parliament and he's not abided by that code, then he should go. and the frustration for me is that conservative mps have been out on the airways, condemning the prime minister,
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and saying he does need to come clean on his actions, but, you know, the prime minister is being propped up by his conservative mps at the moment and he's been proven not fit to govern. nobody will be surprised that. i don't believe that borisjohnson was the right prime minister for this country but i think, more importantly now, the british public are now thinking that he is not the right prime minister for this country. there is an hour to go until boris johnson is forced to address these accusations that have dominated everything in the political world for the last couple of days. a couple of things to watch out for. how packed are the tory benches? are there mps who turn up to publicly show their support for the prime minister? does the prime minister acknowledged he was at that event, expecting to hear the direct question. what answer will heed give? and this might be something we are chasing this afternoon as much as during prime minister�*s
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questions, what is the reaction from backbenchers? if he cannot persuade them he has a way out of this mess, an answer to some accusations he faces, may be some of those privately expressing concern start to do so publicly.— joining me now is amy hessen. her mother died on 20th of may 2020 following two years of cancer treatment and eight weeks of being isolated from her family. welcome. i want to say we are very sorry for your loss. could you take us back, i know it is difficult, to the last weeks and days? and how the impact of lockdown and restrictions affected your mother�*s final days your family? affected your mother�*s final days yourfamily? it affected your mother's final days your family?— your family? it was all very bizarre- — your family? it was all very bizarre. we _ your family? it was all very bizarre. we knew- your family? it was all very bizarre. we knew she - your family? it was all very bizarre. we knew she was l your family? it was all very - bizarre. we knew she was terminal.
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we did not know how long lockdown would last. everything was uncertain. when lockdown first came, it was eight weeks without seeing her and then she started declining. it was very difficult to be so far away from her and not spend those final weeks with her. it was very difficult. �* ., final weeks with her. it was very difficult. . ., :: , difficult. and on the 20th, when she died, she difficult. and on the 20th, when she died. she was _ difficult. and on the 20th, when she died, she was at _ difficult. and on the 20th, when she died, she was at home _ difficult. and on the 20th, when she died, she was at home with - difficult. and on the 20th, when she died, she was at home with your - died, she was at home with your father. can you just tell us what happened, were you able to go? well. happened, were you able to go? well, i was happened, were you able to go? well, i was unsure — happened, were you able to go? well, i was unsure whether _ happened, were you able to go? well, i was unsure whether i _ happened, were you able to go? -ii i was unsure whether i should have because i felt there was not a lot of guidance for people in my situation. i did not know whether i was supposed to. so she died on the morning, the early morning. she collapsed. it was sudden although we
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knew it was coming at some point. my dad phoned me and the first thing in my head was can i go and see him? cani my head was can i go and see him? can i be with him? and that is not something you want to be thinking about when you have lost someone so close. you want to go and be with your loved ones and support each other. i did go. to support him and help organise the funeral. i am not sure i should have done. but i felt it was justified because we had sure i should have done. but i felt it wasjustified because we had both lost somebody very close. from what ou sa , it lost somebody very close. from what you say. it sounds — lost somebody very close. from what you say, it sounds like _ lost somebody very close. from what you say, it sounds like there - lost somebody very close. from what you say, it sounds like there were - you say, it sounds like there were thoughts and feelings going on in you that were causing a conflict that added an extra dimension to the grief? that added an extra dimension to the arief? , that added an extra dimension to the grief? yes. can you tell us more about the _ grief? yes. can you tell us more about the impact _ grief? yes. can you tell us more about the impact of _ grief? jazz can you tell us more about the impact of that on grief? i9; can you tell us more about the impact of that on your family? it about the impact of that on your famil ? :. .
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about the impact of that on your famil ? :, , :, , , family? it was... it was very strange- _ family? it was... it was very strange- i — family? it was... it was very strange. i have _ family? it was... it was very strange. i have lost - family? it was... it was very strange. i have lost peoplel family? it was... it was very - strange. i have lost people before. when you lose someone in your family, you stick together, you talk about them, you surround yourself with people. 0bviously, about them, you surround yourself with people. obviously, i have never lost anybody that close before. there was a time when i thought i needed human contact, needed to be around people. but! needed human contact, needed to be around people. but i could not be. i could not do the normal things you want to do when you are grieving, surrounding yourself with people, go away a few days to recalculate your head, i could not do any of that. it was bizarre. neighbours brought me flowers and cards but they would leave them on the doorstep and stand back. it was bizarre. normally, you would have a cup of tea and chat and hugging. but it was a very strange, lonely, dark place. hose hugging. but it was a very strange, lonely, dark place.— hugging. but it was a very strange, lonely, dark place. how did you feel when ou lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard _ lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard there _ lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard there was _ lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard there was a - lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard there was a party i lonely, dark place. how did you feel when you heard there was a party in the garden of number 10 on the 20th
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of may 2020, the day your mother died? : , ,, of may 2020, the day your mother died? ~ , , , ., died? angry, because, well, all the arties died? angry, because, well, all the parties that— died? angry, because, well, all the parties that have _ died? angry, because, well, all the parties that have been _ died? angry, because, well, all the parties that have been coming - died? angry, because, well, all the parties that have been coming out. | parties that have been coming out. it has been building up to that. it made me angry, the other parties. but with it being on the same day, i suddenly thought, people like me, there will be a lot more like a bee in a similar situation that need to come forward and need to say this is not right. it is the hypocrisy of it, why are they not following rules they set out? why did my mother have to die alone without seeing her grandchildren for the eight weeks? why is it ok for them to have a gathering in the garden? we why is it ok for them to have a gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye — gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye to _ gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye to viewers _ gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye to viewers on _ gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye to viewers on bbc - gathering in the garden? we have to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two | gathering in the garden? we have to l say goodbye to viewers on bbc two in a moment if you do not mind holding on. i will remind viewers that at midday, it is going to be prime minister�*s questions and we will have coverage of that here on the
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bbc news channel. we will also be now, it is time to say goodbye on bbc two. and so, amy, just going back to where you were and how you were feeling about the fact there had been a party on the day your mother passed away, and you said you were angry, what would you like to hear from the prime minister today? i guess i want him to admit it. to admit wrongdoing, to admit, to apologise that he... i don�*t know, there is not much that can be said or done now, it is too late, but people need to come forward. he needs to step down or apologise, he needs to step down or apologise, he
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needs to step down or apologise, he needs to recognise... what needs to recognise... what difference _ needs to recognise... what difference would _ needs to recognise... what difference would it - needs to recognise... what difference would it make i needs to recognise... what difference would it make to needs to recognise... what - difference would it make to you if he apologise? i difference would it make to you if he apologise?— difference would it make to you if he apologise? difference would it make to you if he aoloise? ,, :, :, , he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit, to he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit. to feel— he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit, to feel like _ he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit, to feel like he _ he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit, to feel like he is _ he apologise? i guess to humanise it a bit, to feel like he is actually - a bit, to feel like he is actually seeing the real people in this, which i don�*t feel he is. find seeing the real people in this, which i don't feel he is. and how does that part — which i don't feel he is. and how does that part make _ which i don't feel he is. and how does that part make you - which i don't feel he is. and how does that part make you feel? itj does that part make you feel? it does that part make you feel? it does feel a bit like it is very much us and them. we are beneath them and we don�*t quite matter as much. they are so blase about it. it is just not fair. are so blase about it. it is 'ust not fair. : , :. .. are so blase about it. it is 'ust not fair. : , :, ,, , not fair. amy, thank you. i wish you all the best- — all the best. thank you. we can now speak to peter cardwell, a former conservative government adviser, and now a presenter on talk
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radio. you were an adviser to the government between 2016 and just the start of borisjohnson�*s time as prime minister in 2020. first, just what we were hearing from amy, and she is not alone, we have had lots of messages, e—mails from members of the public about what their experience was on the 20th of may. will the prime minister be listening to this? how will number 10 be responding to this behind closed doors? , , :, , , :, doors? they should be listening to it, listening _ doors? they should be listening to it, listening to _ doors? they should be listening to it, listening to stories _ doors? they should be listening to it, listening to stories like - doors? they should be listening to it, listening to stories like amy's, | it, listening to stories like amy�*s, they should know that is the betrayal people feel and it is not just stories like amy, there are thousands of others, people who feel what she feels, feel the betrayal she feels. i think there are a lot of questions for the prime minister
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to answer on this. this is a scandal. it is understandable for people. political people like me know about things like other scandals but this is so straightforward, that there is only one question keir starmer needs to ask borisjohnson in 45 minutes, in fact if i advised keir starmer, i would say he should ask the prime minister the same question every time, six times, until he gets an answer, which is, was there a party on the 20th of may 2020 that he attended in breach of the rules? that is all he needs to do and until borisjohnson gives an answer on that and apologises, we cannot move on political. amy cannot move on and people like her cannot move on and i do not think we can move on as a country. do not think we can move on as a count . :, :, :, , country. you were an adviser during the beginning _
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country. you were an adviser during the beginning of— country. you were an adviser during the beginning of his _ country. you were an adviser during the beginning of his government. i the beginning of his government. from what you know about him and about how the operation goes on, particularly in the run—up to prime minister�*s questions, when they know the difficult questions that will be posed and this arguably the most difficult question that he has faced, do you think he will be straightforward in his response? i think there are three options in the first is to say yes, i was at the party, i am sorry, i apologise profusely, please forgive me, i will cooperate with any enquiry, lets move on. the second option is to deny he was at the party and given there are so many who have confirmed to the media who was at the party, i think the second is unlikely. the third option is to say i cannot say anything until the enquiry which is the line the government has been saying. i think that is the wrong approach. if i advised him i would say get everything out in the open as soon as possible because it will come out and this willjust ramble on and distract from everything the
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government is doing. i think the government is doing. i think the government is doing good work and it is a shame for those doing the good work that this is distracting from that. i think it would be great if we could talk about the good things the government is doing rather than this scandal, which is a scandal, something borisjohnson needs to own and confessed to and make clear what he did. it is interesting when you hear keir starmer, angela rayner, ed davey and others saying he has lied. that is something political leaders do not usually accuse each other off, lying. they will say miss truth, obfuscated, something like that. and if borisjohnson has misled parliament, that is serious and a resigning matter. you misled parliament, that is serious and a resigning matter.— and a resigning matter. you are sa in: and a resigning matter. you are saying you _ and a resigning matter. you are saying you want _ and a resigning matter. you are saying you want him _ and a resigning matter. you are saying you want him to - and a resigning matter. you are saying you want him to be - saying you want him to be transparent, explain what has happened. because of how long this has gone on and because of things he has gone on and because of things he has said previously in parliament
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that has led to the other political leaders saying he has misled parliament, he has breached the ministerial code, how does he do that, can he do that and survive? ii that, can he do that and survive? if anybody can apologise and survive it is borisjohnson but the apology has to be heartfelt and very soon, ideally it would have been done 24—hour is a go or even before then. i think borisjohnson is the comeback kid of politics, who when i was in government, he resigned as foreign secretary, and people said thatis foreign secretary, and people said that is it, it is over. it is difficult to see how anybody comes back from this. vultures are circling but nobody has stuck the knife in yet, no one from the conservative party has said publicly he must resign and go and that person will take measures to ensure
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that happens perhaps by putting in a letter to the chairman of the 1922 committee. i think we are not quite there yet and i think the power has drained from the prime minister, his cabinet, and the power lies with the backbench conservative mps who will see how he performs today and what happens in the next 24 hours and at the end of the week, when they go to talk to constituents. can they say to constituents they support the prime minister? if they can�*t, we are in perilous waters for boris johnson. :. .. are in perilous waters for boris johnson. :. ~' , :, are in perilous waters for boris johnson. :, ,, , :, , are in perilous waters for boris johnson. :, ,, y:, , : are in perilous waters for boris johnson. :, ,, , :, , : :, johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention — johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention a — johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention a tweet _ johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention a tweet from _ johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention a tweet from rishi - johnson. thank you very much. i want to mention a tweet from rishi sunak, | to mention a tweet from rishi sunak, the chancellor, who will not be at prime minister�*s questions because he has tweeted saying he is excited to be in north devon, ilfracombe, this morning, visiting a pharmaceutical company. we will have
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more reaction to all of those developments, 40 minutes away from prime minister�*s questions. nato and russia are meeting for their first face—to—face talks in two years as they try to defuse tension over the build up of russian troops on the ukrainian border. moscow has described it as a moment of truth in relations between the two sides. nato members have warned they won�*t accept russian demands, which include a halt to any eastward expansion of the alliance. the orthodox holidays are almost over. kyiv�*s festive market in its last days. for now, the party goes on, even as russian troops sit menacingly to the north and east. nervous, always, because today is what we have, and tomorrow we don�*t know what it will be. we have got used to this situation.
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outside the defence ministry, every morning, ukraine�*s fallen soldiers are commemorated. each on the anniversary of their death. the war in the donbass might seem a long way away, the war in the donbas might seem a long way away, but it has left deep scars. there are other memorials, too. since 2014,000 of soldiers have died in a war russia says it is not involved in. viktor is here to remember his colleagues killed in fierce battles viktor is here to remember his colleagues killed in fierce battles in the summer of 2014. what goes through your mind when you see these faces? he says he can barely think about it, let alone speak. viktor still has a helmet and bullet—proof vest at home, just in case.
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translation: my wife says, maybe you shouldn't. - and i say, we need to get ready. no one else can defend our fatherland but us. our fatherland but us. after almost eight years, the war in the east that has claimed all these lives is a kind of frozen reality. people still die, but nothing much changes. the presence of 100,000 troops massed on the country�*s border raises the possibility of something infinitely worse. what can nato do to stop it? the head of today�*s key talks, ukraine�*s deputy prime minister, was in brussels to press her government�*s case for membership. the most principled position for ukraine is that we have inherent sovereign right to choose our own security arrangements, including treaties and allies. and support for membership is growing all the time, especially in recent months.
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we have seen from our studies that the very time when russia starts escalation in the front line, the support for nato membership grows and the readiness to make compromises with russia falls. at the weekend, protesters launched a new hashtag — say no to putin. they don�*t think the russian leader can be trusted and they don�*t think anyone, nato or their own government, should be doing deals. pauladams, bbc news, kyiv. we�*re joined now by tobias ellwood, conservative mp and chair of the commons defence select committee. thanks forjoining us. russia and nato, they are polarised in terms of what russia wants, what nato will agree to. russia says it is a moment of truth. :. , :, , agree to. russia says it is a moment of truth. :, , :, , :, agree to. russia says it is a moment oftruth. :, , :, agree to. russia says it is a moment oftruth. :. , :, :, of truth. can you see a way through this? polarised _ of truth. can you see a way through
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this? polarised is _ of truth. can you see a way through this? polarised is a _ of truth. can you see a way through this? polarised is a great _ this? polarised is a great description. no one is optimistic talks in brussels will lead to anything permanent or any form of agreement. russia was my ultimatum to nato in december demanded an end to nato in december demanded an end to any expansion of the alliance and nato effectively backing away from eastern europe. such conditions are totally unacceptable to nato. therefore giving russia the pretext if you like for invasion. so conflict looks increasingly likely. 0nly putin knows for sure but you have troops massed on the border, the west unwilling to protect ukraine militarily. russia holds the card. there has never been a better time because ukraine will slowly rearm, but the arrival of military aircraft in addition to the hundred thousand troops, field hospitals, special forces, thousand troops, field hospitals, specialforces, suggest thousand troops, field hospitals, special forces, suggest something thousand troops, field hospitals, specialforces, suggest something is likely to happen. ii special forces, suggest something is likely to happen-— likely to happen. if that happens,
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how should _ likely to happen. if that happens, how should nato _ likely to happen. if that happens, how should nato countries, - likely to happen. if that happens, i how should nato countries, britain, respond? it how should nato countries, britain, resond? . , how should nato countries, britain, resond? , , , : respond? it is very difficult. there are options- _ respond? it is very difficult. there are options. russia _ respond? it is very difficult. there are options. russia could - respond? it is very difficult. there are options. russia could have - respond? it is very difficult. there are options. russia could have a l are options. russia could have a limited invasion of a region effectively run by russia anyway through proxies. they could have a deeper incursion into the river line and if they were very ambitious they could claim this land strip by belarus which would cut off the baltics from the rest of europe. what it will show is russia�*s adventurism goes unchecked. we will probably try to retaliate with sanctions, fiscal initiatives, but we also know any of those will affect russia and they are likely to respond and retaliate perhaps with controls over gases. it will push russia increasingly closer to china as well. and don�*t forget what russia is doing on the other side of
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its country, in kazakhstan. this is russian adventurism and the west at the moment is seen to allow it to happen. it the moment is seen to allow it to ha en. . the moment is seen to allow it to ha en. , :, the moment is seen to allow it to ha -en. , :, :, the moment is seen to allow it to hauen. . :, :, :, happen. it is important not to get ahead of ourselves _ happen. it is important not to get ahead of ourselves but _ happen. it is important not to get. ahead of ourselves but potentially, where does that lead in terms of geopolitics and balance of power? this is the big question because it is notjust what russia is doing and pressing and expanding in its sphere of influence. putin sees any area that speaks russian as an area he can venture into. china is expanding its authoritarian influence around the world and iran dominates, interferes with much of what is going on in the middle east. there are philosophical questions for the west in dealing with stability over the next years. we west in dealing with stability over the next years-— the next years. we lost you for moment. _ the next years. we lost you for moment. but _ the next years. we lost you for moment, but you _ the next years. we lost you for moment, but you are - the next years. we lost you for moment, but you are back. - the next years. we lost you for. moment, but you are back. that the next years. we lost you for - moment, but you are back. that is
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maybe a moment to turn attention from what is happening on the international stage and presumably number 10 is paying attention to that, but probably right now as we head to prime minister�*s questions, thoughts are more dominated by what the prime minister will say about the prime minister will say about the party at number 10 on the 20th of may 2020. the party at number 10 on the 20th of may 2020-— the party at number 10 on the 20th of may 2020. what do you think you should say? — of may 2020. what do you think you should say? prime _ of may 2020. what do you think you should say? prime minister's - should say? prime minister�*s questions today does give the opportunity for the prime minister to address these headlines. understandably, what has gone on has generated anger with the british people. i would encourage him to utilise the platform at midday to address this story front and centre, provide clarity, show humility, and apologise. let�*s not forget where we are. today we had two difficult months in november and december and views were expressed that we need to rebuild trust with the nation and
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upgrade number 10�*s bandwidth on situational awareness and here we are again. apologies, the division bell is going on behind me. this tactic that the government uses, not just this, any governments, not explaining or apologising, hoping it will blow over, this will not blow over. not only does this look unfair but we are spilling into that place of in denial, nothing to see here, which is compounding matters. i urge the prime minister, apologise for number 10�*s poorjudgment, let�*s number 10�*s poor judgment, let�*s address number 10�*s poorjudgment, let�*s address serious matters today, do not let it drift.— not let it drift. when you say apologise. — not let it drift. when you say apologise. be _ not let it drift. when you say apologise, be clear, - not let it drift. when you say apologise, be clear, show i not let it drift. when you say - apologise, be clear, show humility, start to rebuild trust, can he do that? when over a period of weeks he has said in the commons there were no parties when the video emerged of
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allegra stratton, role—playing questions and answers, and there was a huge reaction and the prime minister said he was as appalled as everybody else. can he rebuild trust? this isn�*t a complex situation, we are hearing from people what the impact on their lives was of the 20th of may, and they are feeling it deeply. 20th of may, and they are feeling it dee -l . , 20th of may, and they are feeling it deel . , ~ , :, 20th of may, and they are feeling it deel. , ~ , :, :, :, �*, deeply. every member of parliament's inboxes are dominated _ deeply. every member of parliament's inboxes are dominated with _ deeply. every member of parliament's inboxes are dominated with anger, - inboxes are dominated with anger, deep frustration of as to where things have gone, particularly over what happened over the last couple of months. we�*ve actually been distracted by events of our own making, and that�*s why i�*m saying number ten needs an overhaul into how it does business if we are going to attempt to regain that national trust. and crafter policies, exhibit the leadership that we know we are
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capable of producing. it�*s all in the prime minister�*s amms, but he must address it today or, i�*m afraid, the trajectory is going to be very bleak indeed. do afraid, the trajectory is going to be very bleak indeed.— afraid, the trajectory is going to be very bleak indeed. do you think ou will be very bleak indeed. do you think you will be — be very bleak indeed. do you think you will be prime _ be very bleak indeed. do you think you will be prime minister- be very bleak indeed. do you think you will be prime minister by - be very bleak indeed. do you think you will be prime minister by the l you will be prime minister by the end of the year?— you will be prime minister by the end of the ear? ~ :, :, end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves- — end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves. sorry, _ end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves. sorry, do _ end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves. sorry, do you _ end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves. sorry, do you want - end of the year? where getting ahead of ourselves. sorry, do you want him | of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime — of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime minister— of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime minister by _ of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime minister by the - of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime minister by the end - of ourselves. sorry, do you want him to be prime minister by the end of i to be prime minister by the end of the? :. �* . to be prime minister by the end of the? :, �*, :, ., , to be prime minister by the end of the? :, �*, :, :, , , :, the? that's a really good question. i think the majority _ the? that's a really good question. i think the majority of _ i think the majority of parliamentarians want the prime minister with his energy, enthusiasm, determination and vigour to continue, but we can�*t continue under the current guise, we can�*t continue in this particular direction. we need to address the damage that has been done, huge damage that has been done, huge damage that has been done, huge damage that has been done. if we don�*t do that, then he will be out of office. don't do that, then he will be out of office. ~ :. don't do that, then he will be out of office. ~ :, :, , , , of office. what if more stuff comes out? again. _ of office. what if more stuff comes out? again, that's _ of office. what if more stuff comes out? again, that's for _ of office. what if more stuff comes out? again, that's for him - of office. what if more stuff comes out? again, that's for him to - out? again, that's for him to clarify today- _ out? again, that's for him to clarify today. this _ out? again, that's for him to clarify today. this must - out? again, that's for him to clarify today. this must be i clarify today. this must be addressed today. we can�*t wait. it�*s for the prime minister to show the leadership, the courage,
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determination, show what happened and clarify and apologise. thank determination, show what happened and clarify and apologise.— and clarify and apologise. thank you ve much and clarify and apologise. thank you very much for— and clarify and apologise. thank you very much forjoining _ and clarify and apologise. thank you very much forjoining us. _ and clarify and apologise. thank you very much forjoining us. some - very much forjoining us. some breaking news, the high court has just you, the vip lane to award the ppp just you, the vip lane to award the ppp contract was unlawful. let�*s go to a special car abundant. tell us more. . . :. to a special car abundant. tell us more. , , :, :, to a special car abundant. tell us more. , :, :, , more. this is all about the enormous amounts of — more. this is all about the enormous amounts of money _ more. this is all about the enormous amounts of money the _ more. this is all about the enormous amounts of money the government | amounts of money the government spent, especially in the first stage of the pandemic come on things like masks and aprons and overalls for staff in hospitals on the front line. on the bbc and others reported that some of that could not be used, some of it failed safety tests, money was being spent the did not necessarily have to be spent. the government was taken to the high court about, as you say, this vip lane. what this meant was that if
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you had a company that thought you could get masks and other equipment, and if you knew a minister or an mp or and if you knewa minister oran mp ora and if you knew a minister or an mp or a civil servant, they would put you on to essentially what was a fast track lane, and people said that that was unfair, than other companies didn�*t get the same chances. so campaign groups, evry doctor and a good law project that the government the high court about specific contracts that were given to companies. in the high court this morning decided that vip lane was unlawful. they said it had given earlier consideration to some companies, it was better resourced, it was able to respond to offers on the day that they arrived. and that was in breach of the law and it was unlawful. so that�*s not great for the government, and certainly in court there were tales of how some of the equipment couldn�*t be used,
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we understand that still some masks haven�*t been able to be used in the nhs and other pieces of equipment. where it did come down in favour of the government, this ruling, it said that even though this vip lane should not have been used, the two companies would still have got these contracts even if they hadn�*t gone down the vip route, because they were offering so much in terms of volume of ppe equipment, but it�*s not a great result for the government and it again feeds into this idea that if you knew, if you were well connected to the government, then you could get your offer is seen quicker by those who were deciding on these multi—million pound deals. covid cases in the uk are on the way down — at least according to the daily figures released by the government. the number of cases confirmed over
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the past seven days is 13% down on the previous week. but does this mean the 0micron wave has peaked? nick triggle is with me. what you think, what�*s it look like? these are only the people who come forward for testing. and we know the testing system has been under huge pressure, some have been reporting they can�*t get hold of tests. we need to be slightly wary about these, and the daily figures don�*t contain the is, with the exception of people being tested in wales. and we know with 0micron we infections are becoming increasingly common. if we look at the office for national statistics survey data, that estimates the amount of infection in the population, we know the daily testing is picking up a smaller proportion of overall cases. but i think the biggest clue and perhaps more important thing to look at, is hospital admissions. whilst we�*ve seen this drop in detected cases
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being reported, we are also now seeing a plateauing of hospital admissions. there has been on average around 2200 editions a day over the past week, and that is very similar to the week before. but i think the thing we are seeing, if we look regionally between the nations, there are quite a lot of differences. for example, in london where 0micron took off very quickly, admissions are coming down, but in the north—east and yorkshire they are going up, so whilst we have seen hospital admissions plateau and in some areas falling, it�*s not picked everywhere, so i think those areas where it is still going up we need to watch very carefully. hose where it is still going up we need to watch very carefully. how does this square _ to watch very carefully. how does this square with _ to watch very carefully. how does this square with what _ to watch very carefully. how does this square with what the - to watch very carefully. how does this square with what the who i to watch very carefully. how does i this square with what the who was saying yesterday about it is premature to say it�*s going to become endemic? when we look at what happened in south africa, it went up first and then down as fast, and
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potentially it looks like we may be experiencing the same here. but it is still to run, so what does that say about whether ohmic run could be a variant that kind of is the one... leads us to a new world?- leads us to a new world? south africa started _ leads us to a new world? south africa started coming _ leads us to a new world? south africa started coming down - leads us to a new world? south i africa started coming down quickly but those falls have started to slow, and it could be plateauing at quite a high level. so there are some doubts about how quickly, if we have reached a peak, how quickly we will come down in the uk. some experts i�*ve spoken to say we could see quite a long flat peak, which would still keep the nhs under huge pressure for some time to come. to go to the question about is it going to become endemic, it will eventually come and buy endemic we mean the virus is circulating, we will still see waves but they won�*t be waves that threaten or overwhelm health system. they won�*t be waves
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that necessarily we get overly concerned about, and i think that�*s when people talk about the virus becoming endemic is what people mean. now, ithink becoming endemic is what people mean. now, i think we are still some way from that, we�*ve seen a huge peak this winter, but what i think happens during a pandemic, every future wave becomes more and more manageable. so it is a journey we are on, i don�*t think we are at that point yet, but perhaps we�*re getting closer to each time. the boss of the uk�*s biggest energy supplier has warned soaring energy prices could last up to two years. chris 0�*shea, chief executive of british gas owner, centrica, said there was "no reason" to expect gas prices would come down "any time soon". let�*s speak to alex belsham—harris, principal policy manager at the citizens advice service, who works on energy retail policy. there�*s lots of talk about what could potentially be done to mitigate a dramatic increase in
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energy prices once the price cap comes to an end in april. but no concrete news yet. what are you thoughts on that? we concrete news yet. what are you thoughts on that?— thoughts on that? we are really concerned _ thoughts on that? we are really concerned about _ thoughts on that? we are really concerned about the _ thoughts on that? we are really concerned about the rising - thoughts on that? we are really concerned about the rising price thoughts on that? we are really i concerned about the rising price of energy, we are already seeing many households struggling with prices this winter and we are helping one person every 40 seconds with fuel that issues which is a big increase on previous years, so we are really clear something needs to be done by april, and we think the priority really needs to be targeted support for the households who are already struggling most. so we are calling for a few things from government — a one—off grant in april to people on benefits to help them manage this shopin benefits to help them manage this shop in their bills, and then making sure that benefits going forward and keeping pace with the current pace of inflation because we know prices are rising and people are struggling with those. and then also government should look at the schemes it has four fuel poor households already and how those can be adapted next winter to make sure the help more people in the help they are giving is really meaningful for people.
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when you said citizens advice is helping one person every 40 seconds with fuel debt issues, how does that compare with the normal circumstance... the normal numbers, and what are the situations these people are finding themselves in? i think it's around 40% higher than think it�*s around 40% higher than the last year at the same time. it�*s a really big increase. what that means really is people making really difficult decisions about whether they can heat their homes properly, whether they can put food on the table for their children, and having to reach out for emergency support like food banks and fuel vouchers to keep going. like food banks and fuel vouchers to kee ttoin.~ :. like food banks and fuel vouchers to kee ttoin.~ :, :, . like food banks and fuel vouchers to kee ttoin.~ :, :, : ., like food banks and fuel vouchers to kee ttoin.. :, :, : :, like food banks and fuel vouchers to kee ttoin.: :, :, : :, keep going. what advice are you able to tive keep going. what advice are you able to give them? _ keep going. what advice are you able to give them? it's _ keep going. what advice are you able to give them? it's a _ keep going. what advice are you able to give them? it's a really _ to give them? it's a really difficult time. _ to give them? it's a really difficult time. we - to give them? it's a really difficult time. we suggest to give them? it's a really i difficult time. we suggest to people, if you are worried you won�*t be able to pay your energy bill, it is a good idea to speak to your energy supplier in the first instance because they do have support available and they will be able to put a plan in place for you.
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around how to manage your payments. but if you are not getting the support you think you should be from your company, wejust support you think you should be from your company, we just want more advice, then speak to an organisation like citizens advice or other charities that can offer support, and there are schemes in place like the winter fuel payment and the warm home discount which can help you as well, but our real concern with those is most of those schemes only run in the winter and obviously the price rise we are expecting in april, they won�*t be any help when that comes. so. expecting in april, they won't be any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what _ any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what you _ any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what you would _ any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what you would like - any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what you would like to - any help when that comes. so, we've discussed what you would like to see | discussed what you would like to see done to ease the price increases that are anticipated in april. what are your fears around the impact if those price increases to go ahead? i think if we see prices go up by £700, that's the think if we see prices go up by £700, that�*s the current prediction, with no further steps to help people on the lowest incomes, we will see many more people unable to pay their bills, unable to keep their energy
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on, people really struggling next winter particularly to keep their homes warm, that will lead to increases in people having ill—health and really poor impacts for mental health and the children particularly. bud for mental health and the children particularly-— particularly. and you said that the enert particularly. and you said that the energy suppliers _ particularly. and you said that the energy suppliers do _ particularly. and you said that the energy suppliers do have - particularly. and you said that the energy suppliers do have support| energy suppliers do have support available, can you tell us more about that, what can be done if someone really cannot pay their bill? bi]! someone really cannot pay their bill? : , , , , , someone really cannot pay their bill? all energy suppliers are re t uired bill? all energy suppliers are required to — bill? all energy suppliers are required to take _ bill? all energy suppliers are required to take account - bill? all energy suppliers are required to take account of. bill? all energy suppliers are i required to take account of your ability to pay, so what that means is if you are not able to pay your bill, they should set up a payment plan for you that enables you to spread your payments over a longer period, it is based on how much you can actually afford to pay, they should also be able to give you other advice around things like energy efficiency and refer you to more general debt support if that is something that would be helpful for you as a family. something that would be helpful for you as a family-— you as a family. because they can't cut off supplies. — you as a family. because they can't cut off supplies, can _ you as a family. because they can't cut off supplies, can they? - you as a family. because they can't cut off supplies, can they? no, i you as a family. because they can't| cut off supplies, can they? no, they can't, and they've _ cut off supplies, can they? no, they can't, and they've committed i cut off supplies, can they? no, they can't, and they've committed not i cut off supplies, can they? no, they can't, and they've committed not to| can�*t, and they�*ve committed not to this winter. it is the result of
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debt. but what they could do is ask customers to move to a prepayment metre, where you pay for your energy in advance, and that can be difficult to sum households if it�*s not an appropriate solution for them because then what can happen is people run out of money and then they can�*t afford to keep that topped up, so that�*s a real challenge and one we think energy suppliers need to do more to support those people who do pay for their energy in that way.— french police have arrested a man over the killing of a british family in the alps in 2012. three members of the al—hilli family — who are of iraqi origin — and a passing cyclist were shot dead on a remote mountain—side road in the annecy region. it is a rare development in one of france�*s most notorious unsolved cold cases. coming up we are going to be live in
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the commons for prime minister�*s questions, it is still 16 minutes away, and we will have full coverage, we are going to bejoining our colleagues on politics live, who will take us into that coverage. from me, goodbye. it's from me, goodbye. it�*s going to be coming up to 15 minutes until pmqs, i�*d like to welcome viewers on the bbc news channel who arejoining welcome viewers on the bbc news channel who are joining us welcome viewers on the bbc news channel who arejoining us here on politics live ahead of pmqs in about 50 minutes�* time. we will hear boris johnson respond for the first time to allegations that he attended a rule breaking party at number ten during lockdown. i am joined in the studio by conservative mp craig mackinlay, labour mp barry gardner, foreman government special adviser salma shah and the chief executive of a think tank, polly mckenzie. craig, first, if it is the case that borisjohnson has misled parliament on whether or not he was at that party, rule breaking party on the
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20th of may 2020, will he have to resign? i 20th of may 2020, will he have to resitn? :. 20th of may 2020, will he have to resitn? :, :, :, :, , �* resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waitint resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waiting for— resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waiting for the _ resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waiting for the report, _ resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waiting for the report, a _ resign? i am not going into ifs, i'm waiting for the report, a very i resign? i am not going into ifs, i'mj waiting for the report, a very tough woman... i�*m waiting for the report, a very tough woman... �* :, :, :, i. woman... i'm not asking for your verdict. woman... i'm not asking for your verdict- but _ woman. .. i'm not asking for your verdict. but if— woman... i'm not asking for your verdict. but if he _ woman... i'm not asking for your verdict. but if he is _ woman... i'm not asking for your verdict. but if he is found i woman... i'm not asking for your verdict. but if he is found to i woman... i'm not asking for your| verdict. but if he is found to have misled parliament, will he have to go? misled parliament, will he have to to? . misled parliament, will he have to to? : ., :, ., , go? we will have to hear if he is found guilty _ go? we will have to hear if he is found guilty of— go? we will have to hear if he is found guilty of attending i go? we will have to hear if he is found guilty of attending this i found guilty of attending this party. i will have to hear what he has to say about that, whether apology is fulsome enough, what the circumstances are. i want to hear the evidence and i want to hear sue gray�*s report which i will pour over as i�*m sure we�*ll will very carefully. it might not be too far away. carefully. it might not be too far awa . y :, ~ carefully. it might not be too far awa . ~ :, :, away. do you think that line about waitint for away. do you think that line about waiting for the _ away. do you think that line about waiting for the results _ away. do you think that line about waiting for the results of - away. do you think that line about waiting for the results of the i waiting for the results of the enquiry into what went on in terms of all of the parties and gatherings we have evidence for is going to hold, or do you want to hear the prime minister today in 15 minutes�* time, in the house of commons, say whether he attended a party or not and apologise? i
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whether he attended a party or not and apologise?— and apologise? i think when he's been given _ and apologise? i think when he's been given a _ and apologise? i think when he's been given a very _ and apologise? i think when he's been given a very bold _ and apologise? i think when he's been given a very bold question, j been given a very bold question, where you there, i don�*t think it�*s unreasonable now for him to give us a very clear answer. i think that is what he should be doing at pmqs. we will wait to hear what he has to say, but he may surprise us. tbtnd will wait to hear what he has to say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say _ say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say that _ say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say that he _ say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say that he was _ say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say that he was at - say, but he may surprise us. and if he does say that he was at that i he does say that he was at that party, should he apologise there and then or resign? i party, should he apologise there and then or resign?— then or resign? i don't think we are into the realms _ then or resign? i don't think we are into the realms of— then or resign? i don't think we are into the realms of resignation i then or resign? i don't think we are into the realms of resignation yet. | into the realms of resignation yet. i don�*t know how that would interact with the ministerial code. again, thatis with the ministerial code. again, that is the sue grey to come up with the evidence. as i say, i�*ve been a magistrate for ten years, or i was, i look at the evidence, give people the benefit of the doubt until the case is proven. and i think a few days�* to lay on that is not at all and helpful at this time. let days' to lay on that is not at all and helpful at this time. let me 'ust tet a and helpful at this time. let me just get a sense _ and helpful at this time. let me just get a sense from _ and helpful at this time. let me just get a sense from you, i and helpful at this time. let me i just get a sense from you, selma, about what advice you would be giving to the prime minister, what you think has been going on this
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morning. you used to work for a cabinet minister, and we haven�*t heard from anyone in government on the day of pmqs. what you think is going on in what should they be doing? i going on in what should they be doint ? .. going on in what should they be doint ? ~' :, , :, going on in what should they be doint ? ~' :, ,:, i. doing? i think the reason you trobabl doing? i think the reason you probably haven't _ doing? i think the reason you probably haven't heard i doing? i think the reason you probably haven't heard froml doing? i think the reason you i probably haven't heard from other probably haven�*t heard from other cabinet ministers is. me to your leader model of community relations just isn�*t working? i had relations 'ust isn't working? i had to sa relationsjust isn't working? i had to say and _ relationsjust isn't working? i had to say and i— relationsjust isn't working? i had to say and i really _ relationsjust isn't working? i had to say and i really don't _ relationsjust isn't working? i had to say and i really don't say i relationsjust isn't working? i iec to say and i really don't say this to say and i really don�*t say this lightly, but the honourable lady has pretended to the government they are all going into slight self protection mode in that they don�*t want to be seen what is probably happening on number ten is what how the questions are going to be worded, what is the best defence against it. i think there was some sort of talk that the prime minister might offer his own statement, that doesn�*t seem to be happening now. but i think in the way these responses are going to be drafted, i think there has got to be, and my advice would be, to offer a fulsome apology, to show total contrition, and hope that people will give you
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the benefit of the doubt enough if you acknowledge that you�*ve made those mistakes and that you regret them. , . those mistakes and that you regret them. , , , :, those mistakes and that you regret them, , , :, ::, them. just before we continue, i think we can _ them. just before we continue, i think we can dip _ them. just before we continue, i think we can dip into _ them. just before we continue, i think we can dip into the - them. just before we continue, i i think we can dip into the chamber, into the house of commons. 0bviously, into the house of commons. obviously, we have ten minutes or so, we can see the chamber is filling up, unsurprising on a big day like today. i said we haven�*t had many ministers, and we have this morning, we are actually hoping to hearfrom someone after morning, we are actually hoping to hear from someone after pmqs, lucky old them! but we know rishi sunak, the chancellor, won�*t be beside the prime minister today because he is in ilfracombe on business. is that a coincidence, do you think? i don�*t think the chancellor is always next to the pm when there are other things. to the pm when there are other thints. : �* , :, to the pm when there are other thints. : �*, :, :, things. and let's not forget there are other things _ things. and let's not forget there are other things in _ things. and let's not forget there are other things in the _ things. and let's not forget there are other things in the country i are other things in the country willing to talk about. it�*s levelling up, energy costs, the potential constitutional crisis in northern ireland, the gathering of troops on the ukraine border. there is a big world out there. i know
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this is mannerfrom heaven with a lot of gold topping on, and we are enjoying it, but let�*s not forget there is the issue of government... are you enjoying it? if you are enjoying — are you enjoying it? if you are enjoying this, i'm not! in the country— enjoying this, i'm not! in the country certainly is not. the country _ country certainly is not. the country is _ country certainly is not. the country is not enjoying this because they feel— country is not enjoying this because they feel they have been lied to, they feel they have been lied to, they feel— they feel they have been lied to, they feel they have been lied to, they feel they have been treated... they feel— they feel they have been treated... they feel they have been treated with contempt. because it's been one rule for— with contempt. because it's been one rule for borisjohnson with contempt. because it's been one rule for boris johnson and those around — rule for boris johnson and those around him... you know there is... sorry. _ around him... you know there is... sorry. i— around him... you know there is... sorry. i let — around him... you know there is... sorry. i let you _ around him... you know there is... sorry, i let you speak. the country feel sorry, i let you speak. the country feet furious— sorry, i let you speak. the country feel furious about this and it is about— feel furious about this and it is about the _ feel furious about this and it is about the integrity of the government. it's about the integrity of the _ government. it's about the integrity of the prime minister and the integrity— of the prime minister and the integrity of the live were government, and all the sleaze allegations and all the vip routes to ppe _ allegations and all the vip routes to ppe and all that being bundled together— to ppe and all that being bundled together and people are looking at this government and saying, you know what? _ this government and saying, you know what? there _ this government and saying, you know what? there is something really wrong _ what? there is something really wrong here. and we can't get an honest— wrong here. and we can't get an honest word out of this prime
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minister _ honest word out of this prime minister. and that's why he should come _ minister. and that's why he should come to— minister. and that's why he should come to the house of commons today, he should _ come to the house of commons today, he should own up, he should then apologise — he should own up, he should then apologise fulsomely, in my view he should _ apologise fulsomely, in my view he should then resign because that is the sanction of breaking the ministerial code and lying to parliament, and he has repeatedly, in nty— parliament, and he has repeatedly, in my view, — parliament, and he has repeatedly, in my view, done that, he has lied to parliament about these bodies. let's _ to parliament about these bodies. let's wait — to parliament about these bodies. let's wait the sue grey, please. how bit a let's wait the sue grey, please. how big a challenge _ let's wait the sue grey, please. how big a challenge for _ let's wait the sue grey, please. how big a challenge for keir starmer is the leader of the opposition on a big day like this? i the leader of the opposition on a big day like this?— big day like this? i think keir starmer will _ big day like this? i think keir starmer will handle - big day like this? i think keir starmer will handle this i big day like this? i think keir starmer will handle this with big day like this? i think keir. starmer will handle this with his usual— starmer will handle this with his usual forensic skill. he will know that he _ usual forensic skill. he will know that he has— usual forensic skill. he will know that he has to make the question clear. _ that he has to make the question clear. and — that he has to make the question clear, and he will know that he has to make _ clear, and he will know that he has to make sure that the prime minister answered _ to make sure that the prime minister answered it — to make sure that the prime minister answered it. | to make sure that the prime minister answered it— answered it. i trust him to do that. do ou answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think _ answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think he — answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think he will _ answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think he will be _ answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think he will be able i answered it. i trust him to do that. do you think he will be able to i answered it. i trust him to do that. i do you think he will be able to make you answer it?— do you think he will be able to make you answer it? yes. what question has tot to you answer it? yes. what question has got to put _ you answer it? yes. what question has got to put a — you answer it? yes. what question has got to put a boris johnson? i i has got to put a borisjohnson? i have no inside information on that.
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what _ have no inside information on that. what advice — have no inside information on that. what advice would you give the prime minister, can you turn this around? borisjohnson has that grease to boris johnson has that grease to ferret— boris johnson has that grease to ferret sort— boris johnson has that grease to ferret sort of— boris johnson has that grease to ferret sort of ability— boris johnson has that grease to ferret sort of ability to _ boris johnson has that grease to ferret sort of ability to escape i ferret sort of ability to escape from — ferret sort of ability to escape from crises _ ferret sort of ability to escape from crises of _ ferret sort of ability to escape from crises of all _ ferret sort of ability to escape from crises of all kinds. i ferret sort of ability to escape from crises of all kinds. and i| from crises of all kinds. and i think— from crises of all kinds. and i think there _ from crises of all kinds. and i think there is _ from crises of all kinds. and i think there is the _ from crises of all kinds. and i think there is the possibility. from crises of all kinds. and i. think there is the possibility that some _ think there is the possibility that some sincerity— think there is the possibility that some sincerity and _ think there is the possibility that some sincerity and apology i think there is the possibility that some sincerity and apology with| think there is the possibility that i some sincerity and apology with some humanity— some sincerity and apology with some humanity and — some sincerity and apology with some humanity and some _ some sincerity and apology with some humanity and some warmth, - some sincerity and apology with some humanity and some warmth, that i some sincerity and apology with some i humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could _ humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull— humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull that — humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull that off. _ humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull that off. and _ humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull that off. and i— humanity and some warmth, that maybe he could pull that off. and i think- he could pull that off. and i think craig _ he could pull that off. and i think craig and — he could pull that off. and i think craig and barry— he could pull that off. and i think craig and barry were _ he could pull that off. and i think craig and barry were arguing i he could pull that off. and i think craig and barry were arguing the | craig and barry were arguing the same _ craig and barry were arguing the same point, _ craig and barry were arguing the same point, which _ craig and barry were arguing the same point, which is _ craig and barry were arguing the same point, which is there i craig and barry were arguing the same point, which is there is- craig and barry were arguing the same point, which is there is a i same point, which is there is a bigger— same point, which is there is a bigger world _ same point, which is there is a bigger world out _ same point, which is there is a bigger world out there, - same point, which is there is a bigger world out there, there i same point, which is there is a i bigger world out there, there are important — bigger world out there, there are important things. _ bigger world out there, there are important things. there - bigger world out there, there are important things. there is- bigger world out there, there are important things. there is a i bigger world out there, there are| important things. there is a huge agenda _ important things. there is a huge agenda for— important things. there is a huge agenda for this— important things. there is a huge agenda for this government - important things. there is a huge agenda for this government and i important things. there is a huge . agenda for this government and we could _ agenda for this government and we could list_ agenda for this government and we could list it. — agenda for this government and we could list it, but _ agenda for this government and we could list it, but if— agenda for this government and we could list it, but if you _ agenda for this government and we could list it, but if you haven't - could list it, but if you haven't -ot could list it, but if you haven't got trust — could list it, but if you haven't got trust between _ could list it, but if you haven't got trust between citizens - could list it, but if you haven't got trust between citizens in l could list it, but if you haven't got trust between citizens in a democracy— got trust between citizens in a democracy and _ got trust between citizens in a democracy and between - got trust between citizens in a l democracy and between citizens got trust between citizens in a - democracy and between citizens and their government, _ democracy and between citizens and their government, you _ democracy and between citizens and their government, you can't- democracy and between citizens andi their government, you can't address any of— their government, you can't address any of those — their government, you can't address any of those things. _ their government, you can't address any of those things. i've _ their government, you can't address any of those things. i've just - any of those things. i've just published _ any of those things. i've just published a _ any of those things. i've just published a book. _ any of those things. i've just published a book. it's - any of those things. i've just published a book. it's called| any of those things. i've just - published a book. it's called making democracy— published a book. it's called making democracy work _ published a book. it's called making democracy work and _ published a book. it's called making democracy work and it _ published a book. it's called making democracy work and it makes - published a book. it's called making democracy work and it makes the l published a book. it's called making i democracy work and it makes the case if you _ democracy work and it makes the case if you don't— democracy work and it makes the case if you don't have — democracy work and it makes the case if you don't have trust _ democracy work and it makes the case if you don't have trust you _ democracy work and it makes the case if you don't have trust you have - if you don't have trust you have nothing — if you don't have trust you have nothing we _ if you don't have trust you have nothing. we cannot _ if you don't have trust you have nothing. we cannot have - if you don't have trust you have nothing. we cannot have a - if you don't have trust you have i nothing. we cannot have a useless governmenl— nothing. we cannot have a useless government right _ nothing. we cannot have a useless government right now— nothing. we cannot have a useless government right now because - nothing. we cannot have a useless. government right now because there is too _
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government right now because there is too much — government right now because there is too much to— government right now because there is too much to be _ government right now because there is too much to be done, _ government right now because there is too much to be done, i— government right now because there is too much to be done, i think- government right now because there is too much to be done, i think the l is too much to be done, i think the question— is too much to be done, i think the question for— is too much to be done, i think the question for boris _ is too much to be done, i think the question for boris johnson - is too much to be done, i think the question for boris johnson is - question for boris johnson is whether— question for boris johnson is whether he _ question for boris johnson is whether he can _ question for boris johnson is whether he can pivot - question for boris johnson is . whether he can pivot becoming question for boris johnson is - whether he can pivot becoming a prime _ whether he can pivot becoming a prime minister— whether he can pivot becoming a prime minister who— whether he can pivot becoming a prime minister who is— whether he can pivot becoming a prime minister who is actually. prime minister who is actually capable — prime minister who is actually capable of— prime minister who is actually capable of getting _ prime minister who is actually capable of getting things - prime minister who is actually. capable of getting things done, prime minister who is actually- capable of getting things done, not 'ust capable of getting things done, not just distracting _ capable of getting things done, not just distracting everybody- capable of getting things done, not just distracting everybody into - capable of getting things done, not just distracting everybody into this| just distracting everybody into this endless _ just distracting everybody into this endless tedious _ just distracting everybody into this endless tedious warfare _ just distracting everybody into this endless tedious warfare about - just distracting everybody into this| endless tedious warfare about who said what — endless tedious warfare about who said what. , . ., , ., endless tedious warfare about who said what. , . ., , said what. great, do you accept the government — said what. great, do you accept the government can't _ said what. great, do you accept the government can't get _ said what. great, do you accept the government can't get on _ said what. great, do you accept the government can't get on with - said what. great, do you accept the government can't get on with the i said what. great, do you accept the. government can't get on with the big issues you outlined, a few moments ago, untilthis issues you outlined, a few moments ago, until this is sorted out? i agree the relationship between the populace and us mps, barry and i, we do when you have to have trust. and, yes, i can see that trust has been one little thing at the moment. but i am waiting for more information, and i will be as vocal as barry and others once i receive that. we look forward to that. _ others once i receive that. we look forward to that. i'm _ others once i receive that. we look forward to that. i'm just _ others once i receive that. we look forward to that. i'm just going - others once i receive that. we look forward to that. i'm just going to l forward to that. i'm just going to show everybody this tweet from cristian whiteford, conservative mp. how do you defend the indefensible? you can't, it's embarrassing. and
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what's worse it further erodes trust in politics when it is already low. we need openness, trust and honesty in our politics now more than ever and that starts from the top! he is not the only conservative who has said this kind of thing. we heard from douglas ross yesterday, the leader of the tories in scotland, saying that if it is found and established that borisjohnson has misled parliament then he will have to go, and he wasn't alone. is the prime minister losing support across the party? i prime minister losing support across the -a ? ~ prime minister losing support across the -a ? ,, . �*, the party? i think that's undeniable. _ the party? i think that's undeniable. the - the party? i think that's undeniable. the longer| the party? | think that's - undeniable. the longer term the party? | think that's _ undeniable. the longer term question is whether he can stem that and turn it around. at this point in time, it's notjust about constituents and the really tragic stories we are hearing about what people had to go through, especially with losing family members, at that time on lockdown. it is really about how these mps feel themselves and how they feel personally angry about having to go out and defend these
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ridiculous parties and these ridiculous parties and these ridiculous policies when there are bigger things to be dealing with. and just to agree with polly�*s point, actually the trust issue and the erosion of trust means that when it does come round to other big decisions that are notjust it does come round to other big decisions that are not just about people's poor are personal choices, that are about larger policy choices, is whether you are then going to trust the prime minister to do the right thing and have the right balance ofjudgment when those questions come up. sol right balance ofjudgment when those questions come up. so i think there are a lot of people who are just personally furious about this, is not just about the interest do personally furious about this, is notjust about the interest do when structurally from constituents. on a personal, moral basis, they are angry. personal, moral basis, they are an: . r , personal, moral basis, they are an. ,�* , , personal, moral basis, they are an: . . , personal, moral basis, they are an .�* , ., angry. and this is an important moment for— angry. and this is an important moment for boris _ angry. and this is an important moment for boris johnson - angry. and this is an important moment for boris johnson in i angry. and this is an important - moment for boris johnson in terms of moment for borisjohnson in terms of the country, but it's a big parliamentary moment. let's return inside the palace of westminster and talk to a deputy political editor. she is there in central lobby. only
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metres away from the commons chamber. by the prime minister is going to be facing keir starmer, the labour leader, injust going to be facing keir starmer, the labour leader, in just under five minutes' time. just explain for us, vicki, why this is such a massive moment for borisjohnson. i vicki, why this is such a massive moment for boris johnson. i think one of his — moment for boris johnson. i think one of his big _ moment for boris johnson. i think one of his big problems _ moment for boris johnson. i think one of his big problems is - moment for boris johnson. i think one of his big problems is that. moment for boris johnson. i think| one of his big problems is that lots of his mps don't feel like coming out to support him. i know cabinet ministers have been cheated along today to come along, to sit next to him, to show that support. but the problem is what they want to hear from him is some at least clarification, they feel it is no longer possible for him to stand here, facing at least six questions on this issue, and just say, look, i've wants an investigation and that's going to report in due course, because of course the response that is, what you need an investigation to tell you whether you were at this drinks party in own garden? so i think they want may be an apology, but of course he is trying to weigh that up alongside
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the problem of admitting he's done anything wrong, he doesn't think he has. what's also interesting as people haven't really had, set me in public, any kind of defence from downing street about all this. i think some ministers feel it will go along the lines of, it's an office, it's not a normal building, its an office, it's somewhere where people live, yes, the garden is an extension of the office and we've heard that defence before, we went outside to have a meeting and yes we had some wine. but i think the prime minister will have to acknowledge at least the perception that that looks very wrong. whether he will do that or not is another matter, but i cannot see how he can get through the next half—hour without acknowledging something. icraig acknowledging something. craig mackinlay has — acknowledging something. craig mackinlay has been _ acknowledging something. craig mackinlay has been saying continually, amongst other things, that he wants to wait to hear the result of the investigation into a whole string of allegations about parties and gatherings that break lockdown rules. is that really
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sustainable? as you said, it will be difficult for the prime minister to continue as many people feel to hide behind that enquiry as a defence. yeah, and i think actually quite often governments have announced enquiries because every time that you asked about it they can say, this is all being looked at. the problem here is that new things have come to light and what was different about this party on the 20th of may during the first lockdown was that, according to witnesses who have spoken to the bbc, the prime minister and his wife went to it. so thatis minister and his wife went to it. so that is why this is different, there is also the complication for the prime minister that the met police say they are in contact with the cabinet office about it. it takes it to a different level and it means borisjohnson personally is being dragged further into this scandal, so for him it's a more dangerous moment. and i think the other problem he will be worried about is it's notjust his usual critics,
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let's be honest, there are many in his own party who very much dislike him, they are very rude about him, they do want him to go, it's those other ones, some of whom backed him to be their leader, who are now getting a little worried about what all this means, that his grip on downing street, notjust about parties but what this means for other policy areas as well in the way that downing street is run. street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson _ street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson to _ street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson to it _ street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson to it is _ street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson to it is also - street is run. the pressure is clear on boris johnson to it is also on i on borisjohnson to it is also on keir starmer as the leader of the opposition who is going to be asking the all critical questions of boris johnson to date. it is not always as easy as it looks, is it, to actually get the ball in the back of the net. that is true and everyone will be expecting him to land some punches here. of course he hasjust come expecting him to land some punches here. of course he has just come out of isolation having tested positive for covid for the second time, i am sure he has been thinking about this a lot while he has been locked in that room but he will be glad he is out and of course people will say he is a lawyer, the analytical
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approach, he will have to try and pin the prime minister down on all this. of course the issue here is it borisjohnson gets up at the beginning and says something that we are not expecting, then he has to be passed on his feet, keir starmer, and may be adapters questions but it is an opportunity for him, they know the anger amongst many people, not just any conservative party but the public as well, means that he has got an opportunity here to try and expose flaws some people would say and tory he working life was devoted to his trade union members and in recent years his constituents in birmingham, erdington. iwas years his constituents in birmingham, erdington. i was deeply saddened to hear of his death and my thoughts are with harriet and the family and all of those who knew him as a friend. mr speaker, i want to apologise. i know that millions of people across this country have made
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extraordinary sacrifices over the last 18 months. i know the anguish they have been through, unable to mourn their relatives, unable to live their lives as they want or to do the things they love. and i know the rage they feel with me and with the rage they feel with me and with the government i lead when they think that in downing street itself the rules are not being properly followed by the people who make the rules. and though i cannot anticipate the conclusions of the current enquiry, i have learned enough to know that there were things we simply did not get right. and i must take responsibility. number ten is a big department with the garden as an extension of the office. which has been in constant use because of the role of fresh air in stopping the virus and when i
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went into that garden just after 6pm on the 20th of may 2020 to thank groups of staff before going back into my office 25 minutes later to continue working, i believed implicitly that this was a work event. but, mr speaker, with hindsight i should have sent everyone back inside. i should have found some other way to thank them. and i should have recognised that evenif and i should have recognised that even if it could be said technically to fall within the guidance, there would be millions and millions of people who simply would not see it that way. people who suffered terribly. people who were forbidden from eating loved ones at all, inside or outside —— meeting loved ones. and to them and this house i offer my heartfelt apologies. and all i ask is that sue gray be
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allowed to complete her enquiry into that day and several others so that the full facts can be established and i will come back to this house and i will come back to this house and make a statement. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i will have further such meetings later today. my i will have further such meetings later today-— later today. my constituent carol riduwa later today. my constituent carol ridgway faces — later today. my constituent carol ridgway faces eight _ later today. my constituent carol ridgway faces eight weeks - later today. my constituent carol ridgway faces eight weeks of. later today. my constituent carol. ridgway faces eight weeks of stress and worry as she waits for an urgent appointment at the local breast clinic in north wales. yet despite the pandemic, 85% of patients in england wait only two weeks for their urgent suspected cancer referrals. what can my right honourable friend do to ensure the quality of health across britain? i quality of health across britain? i thank my honourable friend for his question and i am sorry about the case that he raises, although healthy is a devolved matter and i thank our nhs colleagues across the
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whole of the uk and i point out that the welsh government will benefit from an additional 3.8 billion funding, plus a further 270 million to support the response to covid. taste to support the response to covid. we come to the leader of the opposition, keir starmer. can come to the leader of the opposition, keir starmer. can i 'oin with the comments i opposition, keir starmer. can i 'oin with the comments about i opposition, keir starmer. can i 'oin with the comments about jack e opposition, keir starmer. can ijoin i with the comments about jack dromey and i think we will be doing tributes in relation to jack in due course. well, there we have it. after months of deceit and deception, the pathetic spectacle of a man who has run out of road. his defence that he didn't realise he was at a party. it is so ridiculous that it's actually offensive to the british public. he's finally been forced to admit what everyone knew, that when the whole country was locked down he was hosting boozy
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parties in downing street. is he now going to do the decent thing and resign? i think somebody will be going for an early— i think somebody will be going for an early cup of tea as well. can i 'ust an early cup of tea as well. can i just say. — an early cup of tea as well. can i just say, the _ an early cup of tea as well. can i just say, the question has been asked. — just say, the question has been asked. i— just say, the question has been asked, i want to know the answer, your— asked, i want to know the answer, your constituents want to know the answer _ your constituents want to know the answer i_ your constituents want to know the answer. i don't need any extra help either _ answer. i don't need any extra help either. please, the prime minister. i either. please, the prime minister. i appreciate — either. please, the prime minister. i appreciate the point he is making about the event that i attended. i want a repeat of that i thought it was a work event and i regret very much that we did not do things differently that evening, as i've
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said. and i take responsibility and i apologise, but as for his political point, i don't think he should pre—empt the outcome of the enquiry. he will have a further opportunity, i hope, to question me as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. well, that a olo: as soon as possible. well, that apology was — as soon as possible. well, that apology was pretty _ as soon as possible. well, that apology was pretty worthless, | as soon as possible. well, that - apology was pretty worthless, wasn't it? let me tell him why this matters. yesterday in this chamber honourable members told heart wrenching stories about the sacrifices people across the country were making. this house and the whole country were moved by the honourable member as he talked about his mother—in—law dying alone. he was following the rules. whilst the prime minister was partying in downing street. is the prime minister really so contemptuous of the british public that he thinks he can just ride this out? mr the british public that he thinks he can just ride this out? can 'ust ride this out? mr speaker, i can just ride this out? mr speaker, i heard can just ride this out? mr speaker,
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i heard the — can just ride this out? mr speaker, i heard the testimony _ can just ride this out? mr speaker, i heard the testimony of— can just ride this out? mr speaker, i heard the testimony of the - i heard the testimony of the honourable member opposite, and i echo his sentiments. it was deeply moving. nobody who heard that could fail to have been moved and i know that people up and down the country made huge sacrifices throughout this pandemic, and i understand the angen pandemic, and i understand the anger, the rage that they feel at the thought that people in downing street were not following those rules. i regret the way the event i have described how it was handled, and i bitterly regret it and i wish we could have done things differently and i have and will continue to apologise for what we did, but mr speaker, continue to apologise for what we did, but mrspeaker, he continue to apologise for what we did, but mr speaker, he must wait for the enquiry which will report as soon as possible.— soon as possible. when the prime minister's former _ soon as possible. when the prime minister's former health - soon as possible. when the prime| minister's former health secretary broke the rules, he resigned. and the prime minister said he was right
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to do so. when the prime minister's spokesperson laughed about rules being broken, she resigned. and the prime minister accepted that resignation. why does the prime minister still think that the rules don't apply to him? mr speaker, that's not what _ don't apply to him? mr speaker, that's not what i've _ don't apply to him? mr speaker, that's not what i've said. - don't apply to him? mr speaker, that's not what i've said. i - that's not what i've said. i understand the point that he makes. as i've said, i regret the way things happened on the evening in question, and i apologise, but if i may say to him, i think it would be better if he waited until the full conclusion of the enquiry, until the full facts are brought before this house and he will then have an opportunity to put his point again. thisjust isn't working, opportunity to put his point again. this just isn't working, prime minister. everyone can see what happened. it started with reports of boozy parties in downing street during lockdown. the prime minister pretended that he had been assured there were no parties. how that fits
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with his defence there, i do not know. then the video landed, blowing the prime minister's verse defence out of the water. so then he pretended, he was sickened and furious about the parties. now it turns out he was at the parties all along. can't the prime minister see why the british public think he is lying through his teeth? it why the british public think he is lying through his teeth?- why the british public think he is lying through his teeth? it was what the ublic lying through his teeth? it was what the public thinks, _ lying through his teeth? it was what the public thinks, not _ lying through his teeth? it was what the public thinks, not what - lying through his teeth? it was what the public thinks, not what the - the public thinks, not what the member— the public thinks, not what the member is saying stop order. and i certainly— member is saying stop order. and i certainly don't need any help from round _ certainly don't need any help from round here — certainly don't need any help from round here. if somebody wants to help me. — round here. if somebody wants to help me, they can help somewhere else _ help me, they can help somewhere else. �* . . help me, they can help somewhere else. �* , , ., else. it's up to the right honourable _ else. it's up to the right honourable gentleman l else. it's up to the right. honourable gentleman to else. it's up to the right - honourable gentleman to choose else. it's up to the right _ honourable gentleman to choose how he conducts himself in this place. he is wrong. i say to him that he is
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wrong. he is wrong and what he has said is wrong in several key respects, but that does not detract from the basic point that i want to make today, which i accept that we should have done things differently on that evening. as i've said to the house, i believe that the events in question were within the guidance and rules and that was certainly the assumption on which i operated, but can i say to him that he should wait, before hejumps to conclusions, and the lawyer should respect the enquiry, and i hope he will wait until the facts are established and brought to this house. mr established and brought to this house. ~ ,,, . ,, established and brought to this house. ~ .~ established and brought to this house. ~ �* ., house. mr speaker, so we've got the prime minister _ house. mr speaker, so we've got the prime minister attending _ house. mr speaker, so we've got the prime minister attending downing i prime minister attending downing street parties, a clear breach of
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the rules. we have the prime minister putting forward a series of ridiculous denials, which he knows are untrue. a clear breach of the ministerial code. that code says ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. the party is over prime minister. the only question is, will the british public to kick him out, will his party kick him out, orwill him out, will his party kick him out, or will he do the decent thing and resign? i out, or will he do the decent thing and resign?— and resign? i 'ust want to repeat that the right— and resign? ijust want to repeat that the right honourable - and resign? i just want to repeat i that the right honourable gentleman, and i know it is his objective and he is paid to try to remove me from office, and i appreciate that and accept that, but may i humbly suggest to him that he should wait until the enquiry has concluded. he should study it for himself, and i will certainly respond as appropriate and i hope that he does, but in the meantime, yes, i
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certainly wish that things had happened differently on the evening of may the 20th, and i apologise for all of the misjudgments that have been made for which i take full responsibility. the been made for which i take full responsibility.— been made for which i take full resonsibili . ~ . responsibility. the prime minister is a man without _ responsibility. the prime minister is a man without shame. - responsibility. the prime minister is a man without shame. the i responsibility. the prime minister i is a man without shame. the public want answers to their questions. hannah brady's father was just 55 when he lost his life to covid. he was a fit and healthy key worker. i spoke to hannah last night, prime minister. herfather died just spoke to hannah last night, prime minister. her father died just days before the drinks trolley was being wheeled through downing street. and last year, hannah met the prime minister in the downing street garden. she looked at the prime minister in the eye and told him of her loss. the prime minister told hannah he had done everything he could to protect her dad. looking
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back, what hannah told me last night was this. she realised that the prime minister had partied in the same garden the very day her dad's death certificate was signed. what hannah wants to know is this, does the prime minister understand why it makes her feel the prime minister understand why it makes herfeel sick to the prime minister understand why it makes her feel sick to think about the way he has behaved? mr speaker, i the way he has behaved? mr speaker, l sympathise — the way he has behaved? mr speaker, l sympathise deeply — the way he has behaved? mr speaker, i sympathise deeply with _ the way he has behaved? mr speaker, i sympathise deeply with hannah, i i sympathise deeply with hannah, with people who have suffered up and down this country during the pandemic, and i repeat that i wish things had been done differently on that evening, and i repeat my apology for all of the misjudgments that may have been made that were made on my watch in number 10 downing street and across the government but i want to reassure the people of this country including hannah and herfamily the people of this country including hannah and her family that we have been working to do everything we can to protect her and herfamily, and
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it is thanks to the efforts of this government that we have the most tested population in europe, with 1.25 million tests being conducted every day. we have been working to ensure this population as the most antivirals of any country in and that is the reason we have driven the fastest vaccine roll—out in europe, one of the fastest in the world and whatever mistakes have been made on my watch, which i apologise and acknowledge, that is the work that has been going on in number 10 downing street.
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thank you, mr speaker. education is one of the biggest factors in levelling up and it is one of the things that ensure people across the country have access to the same opportunities and it is a key part of my mission to transform lives stop will the premiers to work with me to ensure burnaby becomes the best place to study whether in primary or secondary school is looking for an apprenticeship in advanced engineering or undertaking advanced engineering or undertaking a degree in cyber security? taste advanced engineering or undertaking a degree in cyber security?— a degree in cyber security? we are investint a degree in cyber security? we are investing in _ a degree in cyber security? we are investing in education _ a degree in cyber security? we are investing in education up - a degree in cyber security? we are investing in education up and i a degree in cyber security? we are | investing in education up and down the country and i am delighted that burnley college was part of a successful proposal to become an institute of technology and that burnley is home to the growing university of central lancashire campers making it a fantastic place to study in lancashire.— to study in lancashire. leader of the snp, to study in lancashire. leader of the snp. ian _ to study in lancashire. leader of the snp, ian blackford. - to study in lancashire. leader of the snp, ian blackford. can i. to study in lancashire. leader of| the snp, ian blackford. can i add to study in lancashire. leader of i the snp, ian blackford. can i add my remarks on — the snp, ian blackford. can i add my
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remarks on jack _ the snp, ian blackford. can i add my remarks on jack dromey, _ the snp, ian blackford. can i add my remarks on jack dromey, someone l the snp, ian blackford. can i add my i remarks on jack dromey, someone who remarks onjack dromey, someone who was a fighterfor remarks onjack dromey, someone who was a fighter for workers' rights and an inspiration for so many of us across his house for the way he conducted himself. we will miss him and condolences to harriet and the rest of the family. mr speaker, the prime minister stands before us accused of betraying the nation's trust, of treating the public with contempt, of breaking the law is set by his own government. a former member of her majesties armed forces bowl wrote to me this morning. this father died without the support of his full family around him because they follow the regulations. paul said, as an ex soldier, i know how to follow the rules but the prime minister has never followed any rules. he does what he wants and he gets away with it every time. the prime minister can't get away with it again. will the prime minister finally do the decent thing and
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resign or will his tory mps be forced to show him the door? i resign or will his tory mps be forced to show him the door? i think the ritht forced to show him the door? i think the right honourable _ forced to show him the door? i think the right honourable gentleman, i i the right honourable gentleman, i want to offer my condolences to the constituent who wrote to him and just to remind him of what i have said earlier, and with the greatest respect to him i think he should wait until the inquiry has concluded. it wait until the inquiry has concluded.— wait until the inquiry has concluded. . , concluded. it is an open and shut case, an concluded. it is an open and shut case. an event— concluded. it is an open and shut case, an event that _ concluded. it is an open and shut case, an event that should i concluded. it is an open and shut case, an event that should have l case, an event that should have taken place, it broke the law. what is so galling about that response is that the prime minister feels no shame for his actions. the public suffered pain and anguish at being kept apart from their families, all the while the prime minister was drinking and laughing behind the walls of his private garden. the public overwhelmingly think that the prime minister should resign. trust has been lost and the public will not forgive or forget. if the prime
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minister has no sense of shame, then the tory backbenchers must act to remove him. they know the damage done, this week a contemptuous prime minister can no longer live in bonn. the message from the public is clear. remove this unfit prime ministerfrom office and do it now. again ijust want ministerfrom office and do it now. again i just want to thank the right honourable gentleman for his political advice which i will take with a pinch of salt since it comes from the scottish nationalist party, but i think most people looking objectively at what this government has delivered over the last 18 months will agree that, and i renew my contrition for the mistakes that have been made, but we have delivered the fastest vaccine and back seat —— fastest booster roll—out in europe and across the whole of our united kingdom we have
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a record number of people back in work. fin a record number of people back in work. , work. on friday i met with the chief executive of — work. on friday i met with the chief executive of my _ work. on friday i met with the chief executive of my local _ work. on friday i met with the chief executive of my local hospital i work. on friday i met with the chief executive of my local hospital trust| executive of my local hospital trust to university hospitals of morecambe bay to talk about how they were managing covid and the impact it was having on them. the impact is stark. they have got about 12—15% of their workforce isolating and 140 beds, about 20% total blocked because they can't get people back out into social care in the community. with that in mind though i met honourable friend consider reducing the self—isolation period if it is deemed to be safe to do so down to five days, and also accepting any requests that come through to get people back out into the community and into social care? yes. people back out into the community and into social care?— and into social care? yes, we are certainly looking _ and into social care? yes, we are certainly looking at _ and into social care? yes, we are certainly looking at reducing i and into social care? yes, we are certainly looking at reducing the| certainly looking at reducing the isolation period and hope to bring you more about that as fast as possible, more fundamentally what we can do to alleviate the pressures in
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his hospital is to fix the health and social care divide which is what this government is also doing after a generation of neglect.— a generation of neglect. today's a ttolo is a generation of neglect. today's apology is too — a generation of neglect. today's apology is too little _ a generation of neglect. today's apology is too little too - a generation of neglect. today's apology is too little too late. ifl apology is too little too late. if the prime minister was sincere he could have apologised at any stage over the past 18 months. rather than waiting until he was found out. my constituents in north down and people across the uk feel betrayed by the prime minister. we have had over 150,000 deaths from covid over the past couple of years. we have seen standards in public life trashed. so for once, prime minister do the honourable thing and resign, for the sake of the public health message and for standards in our democracy? i message and for standards in our democracy?—
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message and for standards in our democra ? ., , . democracy? i can only repeat what i have said and _ democracy? i can only repeat what i have said and i _ democracy? i can only repeat what i have said and i understand - democracy? i can only repeat what i have said and i understand the i have said and i understand the feelings he has about the effect of this pandemic on this country and i certainly grieve everybody who has died and suffered, but on his political point, can i propose he waits for the inquiry to report? i waits for the inquiry to report? i recently visited my localjob centre and i am pleased to announce that the adult claim account is down 28% and the young adult claim account is down 40%. will the prime minister join me in thanking all the hard work of the stourbridge job centre for their dedication to actually achieve these results and also to contribute to the job survival that is happening across the west midlands, 61,000 newjobs since march 2021. midlands, 61,000 new 'obs since march mt midlands, 61,000 new 'obs since march 2021. , . ., ~ march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank her for march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank herforthat— march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank her for that and _ march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank her for that and it _ march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank her for that and it is _ march 2021. yes, indeed, and i thank her for that and it is noticeable i her for that and it is noticeable that the opposition don't like to dwell on these points but it is an
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astonishing fact that we have 420,000 more people in work now than before the pandemic began and youth unemployment at a record low. mr speaker, another week, another scandal for this speaker, another week, another scandalfor this prime speaker, another week, another scandal for this prime minister and his utterly shameless government. for two years my constituents made sacrifice after sacrifice spending time away from their loved ones, missing out on important life events. some paid the ultimate sacrifice while he partied away. figures released just last week show 97, 70 9% of people in scotland think the prime minister should step down, does the prime minister and now realise it is clear to all that while he may not understand how to be socially distant from others there is no doubt that he is morally distant from the rest of us across these nations and the best thing he can do now is go, resign, prime minister. i can do now is go, resign, prime minister. ~' ., ., ., ,
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minister. i think the honourable memberfor— minister. i think the honourable member for the _ minister. i think the honourable member for the snp _ minister. i think the honourable member for the snp and - minister. i think the honourable member for the snp and i - minister. i think the honourable | member for the snp and i repeat minister. i think the honourable - member for the snp and i repeat the point that i made earlier on, i don't think he should pre—empt or anticipate the inquiry. the don't think he should pre-empt or anticipate the inquiry.— anticipate the inquiry. the cole valley regional _ anticipate the inquiry. the cole valley regional park _ anticipate the inquiry. the cole valley regional park was - anticipate the inquiry. the cole valley regional park was in - anticipate the inquiry. the cole valley regional park was in my| valley regional park was in my constituency and the prime minister's. will my right honourable friend join me in paying tribute to the volunteers who tirelessly work to preserve the precious green space and will he work with me to create better protections for this part moving forward? i better protections for this part moving forward?— better protections for this part moving forward? i certainly will. i 'oin her moving forward? i certainly will. i join her in — moving forward? i certainly will. i join her in thanking _ moving forward? i certainly will. i join her in thanking the _ moving forward? i certainly will. i join her in thanking the wonderful volunteers and i will do what i can to assist her in protecting this beautiful green space. fin to assist her in protecting this beautiful green space.- beautiful green space. on a different topic _ beautiful green space. on a different topic to _ beautiful green space. on a different topic to that - beautiful green space. on a different topic to that of. beautiful green space. on a different topic to that of my right honourable friend is a leader of the opposition but a related one, last week at prime minister's questions the prime minister was asked about his previous claim about inflation being unfounded and his reply he
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told the house he had said no such thing. but within minutes the inevitable happened and people were watching videos on social media saying exactly that. so with the prime minister like to take this opportunity to correct the record and apologising for misleading the house on this matter? that and apologising for misleading the house on this matter?— and apologising for misleading the house on this matter? that would be inadvertently — house on this matter? that would be inadvertently misleading _ house on this matter? that would be inadvertently misleading the - house on this matter? that would be inadvertently misleading the house. | inadvertently misleading the house. no, because i immediately said in my answer to the question that of course we had to be concerned about inflation at all times. what i said i think on tv was that some of the predictions then about inflation had not proved well—founded, but clearly inflation is a serious risk. it is going up and what we need is a strategy to tackle it and that is what we have. my
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strategy to tackle it and that is what we have.— strategy to tackle it and that is what we have. g _, , ., what we have. my constituent grant baile went what we have. my constituent grant bailey went back _ what we have. my constituent grant bailey went back to _ what we have. my constituent grant bailey went back to afghanistan - what we have. my constituent grant bailey went back to afghanistan in i bailey went back to afghanistan in september. he disappeared in september. he disappeared in september around christmas time. we think the taliban have him. can my right honourable friend advise me and his family whether he knows anything about this man, who has him and what is being done to get him home? i and what is being done to get him home? ~ , and what is being done to get him home? ~' , ., ., ., , home? i think my honourable friend for raising the _ home? i think my honourable friend for raising the case _ home? i think my honourable friend for raising the case with _ home? i think my honourable friend for raising the case with me - home? i think my honourable friend for raising the case with me and - home? i think my honourable friend for raising the case with me and i i for raising the case with me and i hope, i will organise a meeting for him with the relevant minister as soon as possible to establish what we can do to help grant. he soon as possible to establish what we can do to help grant.— soon as possible to establish what we can do to help grant. he has not apologised. — we can do to help grant. he has not apologised. mr— we can do to help grant. he has not apologised, mr speaker, _ we can do to help grant. he has not apologised, mr speaker, for - we can do to help grant. he has not i apologised, mr speaker, for breaking the rules and breaking the law. he is sorry because he has been caught. he is bang to rights. so when my constituents were making
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unimaginable, unimaginable decisions, he was hosting a boozy party in downing street. so how does he think he can still maintain the one rule for him and another for the rest of us? he cannot and he must resign. i rest of us? he cannot and he must resin. ., ., , ., resign. i refer to the answer i gave earlier on top-flight. _ resign. i refer to the answer i gave earlier on top-flight. this - resign. i refer to the answer i gave earlier on top-flight. this friday i earlier on top-flight. this friday my private _ earlier on top-flight. this friday my private members' _ earlier on top-flight. this friday my private members' bill, - earlier on top-flight. this friday my private members' bill, bbc i my private members' bill, bbc licence fee abolition, it gets a second reading. it will abolish the bbc licence fee and require the bbc to be funded by subscription. in
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this day and age it is ridiculous to have a state broadcaster. it is ridiculous that people are forced to pay a fee just because they have a television. and what is totally wrong, that people who believe the bbc to be institutionally biased have to subsidise them. will the prime minister, if he is free friday, come along and support the bill? i friday, come along and support the bill? ., , , , . ., bill? i have the highest respect for the immediate _ bill? i have the highest respect for the immediate judgment _ bill? i have the highest respect for the immediate judgment of- bill? i have the highest respect for the immediate judgment of my - the immediate judgment of my honourable friend, i understand some of his strictures about the bbc, i would also say it is a great national institution, but i will study what he has to say with interest. ~ ., ., ., interest. we have all had prime ministers that _ interest. we have all had prime ministers that we _ interest. we have all had prime ministers that we disagreed - interest. we have all had prime| ministers that we disagreed with interest. we have all had prime - ministers that we disagreed with or didn't write but there has never been one that debates the office and
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the way that this prime minister has. he is now forced to lie down in the back of his car to keep away from photographers. we all know the prime minister was sacked from two previous jobs prime minister was sacked from two previousjobs for lying, prime minister was sacked from two previous jobs for lying, so can prime minister was sacked from two previousjobs for lying, so can he explain to the house why he believes that the great office of prime minister can be held to a lower standard than those previous jobs that he was sacked for? i standard than those previous 'obs that he was sacked for? i welcome the oint that he was sacked for? i welcome the point that _ that he was sacked for? i welcome the point that the _ that he was sacked for? i welcome the point that the honourable - the point that the honourable gentleman makes. in the partisan spirit with which i think it was intended. i don't agree with him, but can i suggest him respectfully that he waits until the inquiry is concluded which i hope will be as soon as possible.— concluded which i hope will be as soon as possible. washing machine manufacturers _ soon as possible. washing machine manufacturers are _ soon as possible. washing machine manufacturers are considering - manufacturers are considering installing microfibre filter systems installing microfibre filter systems in all new washing machines. will the prime minister as his
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ministers... will the prime ministers... will the prime ministers ask his ministers... irate ministers ask his ministers... we have a slight problem. some of you want to— have a slight problem. some of you want to catch my eye. the longer this question takes, the less other people _ this question takes, the less other people will get in.— this question takes, the less other people will get in. people laughing at lastic people will get in. people laughing at plastic pollution, _ people will get in. people laughing at plastic pollution, mr _ people will get in. people laughing at plastic pollution, mr speaker. i at plastic pollution, mr speaker. what a disgrace. will the prime minister ask his ministers to look into the viability of my bill which has cross—party support and seeks to introduce inexpensive micro—plastic filters on all new washing machines? i want to thank my honourable friend for his campaign and i believe we should tackle micro—plastic pollution and i am glad that defra are looking at the introduction of legislation for microfibre filters on washing machines and as a cost
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beneficial solution. on washing machines and as a cost beneficialsolution. i on washing machines and as a cost beneficial solution. i will make sure my right honourable friend the secretary of state for the environment will keep informed of how we are doing. i also wish to join colleagues in paying tribute to jack dromey. i knew him first in the early 70s and worked with him and he will be greatly missed. thousands of men and women in afghanistan supported the nato mission and they have been abandoned. in six months, we do not have a credible way to help people out of afghanistan safely. the most recent update from the fcdo is directly contradicted by the un. while the fcdo claimed that they would make referrals to the evacuation scheme, the unhcr website makes clear they make no such
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reference. is the government creating a system to intentionally fail those we owe something to, or is this yet another case of their nepotism and hopelessness that prioritise animals over human beings. i prioritise animals over human beinus. , , ., prioritise animals over human beinus. , ., , beings. i believe it is a serious in'ustice beings. i believe it is a serious injustice to _ beings. i believe it is a serious injustice to the _ beings. i believe it is a serious injustice to the efforts - beings. i believe it is a serious injustice to the efforts of- beings. i believe it is a serious injustice to the efforts of local| injustice to the efforts of local councils up and down the country to look after people coming from afghanistan, and i think he does an injustice to the efforts of the uk. we are proud already under the operation to have evacuated 15,000 people from afghanistan and we have allocated 286 million in aid and assistance for people in afghanistan and we are continuing to offer safe passage to this country from afghanistan.— passage to this country from afr hanistan. ~ , afghanistan. the prime minister will be aware that _ afghanistan. the prime minister will be aware that eastleigh _ afghanistan. the prime minister will be aware that eastleigh was - afghanistan. the prime minister will be aware that eastleigh was formed | be aware that eastleigh was formed as a railway town from producing
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locomotives and carriages and building gliders for the d—day landings. given this pedigree, the excellent transport links and the need to level up in the south, does he agree eastleigh would make the perfect home for the new headquarters of the great british railway square, my honourable friend is a great champion for eastleigh, and as i said. the is a great champion for eastleigh, and as i said-— is a great champion for eastleigh, and as i said. the competition will be announced _ and as i said. the competition will be announced in _ and as i said. the competition will be announced in the _ and as i said. the competition will be announced in the coming - and as i said. the competition will i be announced in the coming weeks. and as i said. the competition will - be announced in the coming weeks. in my constituency of stockport are the average rent for a two—bedroom property is an unaffordable £800 and recently, in the last 13 years, the rents have been significantly increasing. one constituent contacted me recently to explain that she and her husband who are in their 70s and sufferfrom that she and her husband who are in their 70s and suffer from ill health have been served with a section 21 notice after living in the property for almost 20 years. the prime minister's own manifesto promised a better deal for renters which
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included embellishing no fault evictions, so when it will he scrap the practice and will he reintroduce the practice and will he reintroduce the renters reform bill which seems to have been kicked into the long grass? to have been kicked into the long crass? ., , , grass? one of the first things i did when i became — grass? one of the first things i did when i became prime _ grass? one of the first things i did when i became prime minister- grass? one of the first things i did | when i became prime minister was grass? one of the first things i did i when i became prime minister was to operate the local housing allowance so people on social rent would be able to afford where they live more easily as a key component of tackling the cost of living, but what we are also doing is building record numbers of homes and i was very pleased to see a huge increase in the number of people able to get the homes that they need. but the point he makes about renters is very important and which is why we are tackling the rights of renters as well. 56 tackling the rights of renters as well. ~ ., ., well. 56 million through the levellin: well. 56 million through the levelling up _ well. 56 million through the levelling up front, - well. 56 million through the - levelling up front, 40,000,003 transforming cities, this isjust some of the investment we have secured for stoke—on—trent. would my right honourable friend agree that after decades of neglect, this conservative party is the only party
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thatis conservative party is the only party that is levelling up in stoke—on—trent? l that is levelling up in stoke-on-trent? i thank my honourable _ stoke-on-trent? i thank my honourable friend _ stoke-on-trent? i thank my honourable friend and - stoke-on-trent? i thank my honourable friend and he - stoke-on-trent? i thank my honourable friend and he is| stoke-on-trent? i thank my| honourable friend and he is a fantastic champion for stoke—on—trent and in addition to all of the things we are supporting in stoke—on—trent, i'm delighted to say that stoke—on—trent will become the home of the home office. l say that stoke-on-trent will become the home of the home office.- the home of the home office. i think this session — the home of the home office. i think this session shows _ the home of the home office. i think this session shows how _ the home of the home office. i think this session shows how much - the home of the home office. i think this session shows how much of - the home of the home office. i think this session shows how much of a . this session shows how much of a distraction the prime minister's behaviour has been. i want to ask him that after a recent survey showed 37% of small businesses felt totally unprepared for the introduction of import controls, rules of origin and the upcoming sbs checks, so will he listen to the fsb and introduce financial and technical support to those small businesses, or is hejust technical support to those small businesses, or is he just too technical support to those small businesses, or is hejust too busy drinking in his garden? l
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businesses, or is he just too busy drinking in his garden?— businesses, or is he just too busy drinking in his garden? i thank her, but what we _ drinking in his garden? i thank her, but what we are _ drinking in his garden? i thank her, but what we are doing _ drinking in his garden? i thank her, but what we are doing is _ drinking in his garden? i thank her, but what we are doing is offering i but what we are doing is offering financial and technical support to businesses and they are responding magnificently and as we come out of the pandemic, as i said to the house early on, we are seeing record numbers of people in work and youth unemployment at a record low. the motto of england's smallest county in rutland means much in little, never has that been more true in the last two weeks. the greatest roman discovery in 200 years, the greatest fossil discovery and a hundred years, so will he support is to build a new tourism industry and to heritage museums in rutland to preserve these amazing discoveries in our counties? l preserve these amazing discoveries in our counties?— preserve these amazing discoveries in our counties? i am agog and i am lonauin to in our counties? i am agog and i am longing to come _ in our counties? i am agog and i am longing to come and _ in our counties? i am agog and i am longing to come and see _ in our counties? i am agog and i am longing to come and see this - longing to come and see this extraordinary addition to the cultural heritage of rutland and i thank herfor cultural heritage of rutland and i thank her for drawing cultural heritage of rutland and i thank herfor drawing it cultural heritage of rutland and i thank her for drawing it to cultural heritage of rutland and i thank herfor drawing it to my attention and i look forward to
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making a visit as soon as i can. the government — making a visit as soon as i can. the government flagship green homes grant schemes collapsed in a £1.5 billion shamble at the end of last year with just 81 vouchers issued in cambridge and just 85 in the prime minister's constituency. with energy bill is about to go through the roof, what is about this government that makes it so peculiarly unable to run a basic loft lagging scheme? we are supporting measures to retrofit homes up and down the country and in addition in order to improve insulation, and what we are also doing is supporting people with the cost of their fuel and we will continue to do that through the warm homes discount, the winter fuel allowance and all of the other payments we make. we are going to leave pmqs at this point. ls we are going to leave pmqs at this oint. , . , we are going to leave pmqs at this oint. , ., , ., point. is there any important developments _ point. is there any important developments we _ point. is there any important developments we will- point. is there any important
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developments we will bring i point. is there any important - developments we will bring them to you. let me introduce our guests. we have rachel maclean, the safeguarding ministerfor have rachel maclean, the safeguarding minister for the government, alison mcgovern who was shadow employment for labour, the bbc's shadow employment for labour, the bbc�*s political editor laura coombs beggars here. we will start with the extraordinary opening of pmqs. before keir starmer got to poses questions, as expected, we heard from borisjohnson questions, as expected, we heard from boris johnson first, questions, as expected, we heard from borisjohnson first, answering some of the allegations that have been levelled at him. let's listen. i want to apologise. i know that millions of people across this country have made extraordinary sacrifices over the last 18 months. i know the anguish they have been through, unable to more than the relatives, unable to live their lives as they want, all to do the things they love. and i know the
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rage they feel with me and with the government i lead when they think that in downing street itself the rules are not being properly followed. by the people who make the rules. �* ., , followed. by the people who make the rules. 1, _ ., ., rules. boris johnson at the beginning- _ pandemic. we will support disabled people, we will continue to increase our support for families 0f of prime minister's questions. when you take into account the evidence that has been presented in terms of the prime minister and his wife attending a covid breaking event in number ten, will this be enough to turnit number ten, will this be enough to turn it around? l number ten, will this be enough to turn it around?— turn it around? i don't think it will. he tried _ turn it around? i don't think it will. he tried to _ turn it around? i don't think it will. he tried to strike - turn it around? i don't think it will. he tried to strike a - turn it around? i don't think it i will. he tried to strike a different tone, no smirks, no swagger, no usualjohnson gags, he did apologise which many of his colleagues were calling for. he admitted he was there, that the party took place, which until this moment had not actually been something the government was saying with any kind of clarity, though they were not denying it. but he also said that
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technically he still thinks it was within the rules. there is the rub. where did it say in the rules at that time in may 2020 for any of the public, the millions who had to change their behaviour, where did it say it was ok for an e—mail to be sent asking people to go to what was billed clearly as a social event? and that is why the black and wide evidence in the e—mail that shows it was an organised, preplanned thing, not a few people having a meeting in the garden, we know that happened, people use the space to do their job, we know sometimes people had a glass of wine while they were doing it, but the e—mail we saw at the beginning of this week is what has changed the dynamic here. this may well have bought borisjohnson some time, he's basically pleading with his party to say, wait till the enquiry before you make your final mind up. but i think some people will see that as being a non—apology apology, basically saying, it did happen but i think it was ok, and
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somehow it wasn't really my fault. other people may they deliver. ihlar other people may they deliver. nor is riaht other people may they deliver. nor is right that borisjohnson confirmed that the gathering, the drinks event, took place in number ten at the height of lockdown. and you will know that the rules stated very clearly that at that point you could only meet one other person outdoors. this was an event that had at least 30 people outdoors, including the prime minister. i went into the garden at number ten, after 6pm, 25 minutes later i went back inside. he was at this covid rule breaking event for 25 minutes. do you accept that he has broken the rules? t you accept that he has broken the rules? ~ . �* you accept that he has broken the rules? ~ ., �* ., rules? i think what we've heard him sa toda rules? i think what we've heard him say todav verv _ rules? i think what we've heard him say today very clearly _ rules? i think what we've heard him say today very clearly as _ rules? i think what we've heard him say today very clearly as he - say today very clearly as he recognises that anger and that sense of injustice. — recognises that anger and that sense of injustice, and i want to start by saving _ of injustice, and i want to start by saying i_ of injustice, and i want to start by saying i also feel the same, as
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anybody— saying i also feel the same, as anybody would. i was following the rules, _ anybody would. i was following the rules, i_ anybody would. i was following the rules, i could not see my own children. _ rules, i could not see my own children, my own mother was in a nursing _ children, my own mother was in a nursing home, i could not see her. those _ nursing home, i could not see her. those stories— nursing home, i could not see her. those stories of course have been repeated — those stories of course have been repeated by my constituents, by people _ repeated by my constituents, by people up and down the country, and of course _ people up and down the country, and of course other members of parliament. we have all heard that, all been _ parliament. we have all heard that, all been through this. so he is right— all been through this. so he is right to — all been through this. so he is right to address that front and centre — right to address that front and centre. ~ . , right to address that front and centre. ~ ., , ., right to address that front and centre. ~ . , . . i] centre. was the gathering legal? i can't answer _ centre. was the gathering legal? i can't answer that _ centre. was the gathering legal? i can't answer that question. - centre. was the gathering legal? i can't answer that question. the i can't answer that question. the rules said _ can't answer that question. the rules said very _ can't answer that question. the rules said very clearly that you could only meet one other person outdoors. in fact, the cabinet minister oliver durden stated it in a briefing, ithink minister oliver durden stated it in a briefing, i think on the very same day, and yet we now know, we had it confirmed by borisjohnson, that there was a party, in effect, it had booze, people were asked to bring their own, there had been an invitation to 100 or so people in the garden. this was not an extension, as the prime minister tried to say, of a work meeting. it
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was a social event where people could enjoy the lovely weather, always to that effect. was it a legal gathering? l always to that effect. was it a legal gathering?— always to that effect. was it a legal gathering? i think what you are askin: legal gathering? i think what you are asking is _ legal gathering? i think what you are asking is to _ legal gathering? i think what you are asking is to prejudge - legal gathering? i think what you are asking is to prejudge the - are asking is to prejudge the outcome _ are asking is to prejudge the outcome of the... are asking is to pre'udge the outcome of the. . ._ are asking is to pre'udge the outcome of the. .. know, 'ust as an ordinary person. h outcome of the. .. know, 'ust as an ordinary person, that _ outcome of the. .. know, just as an ordinary person, that was - outcome of the. .. know, just as an ordinary person, that was the - outcome of the. .. know, just as an ordinary person, that was the role, we know now what was going on in number ten in the garden which the prime minister attended. looking at the rules, would you say the rules had been broken? istutith the rules, would you say the rules had been broken?— the rules, would you say the rules had been broken? with respect, we don't know- — had been broken? with respect, we don't know- i _ had been broken? with respect, we don't know. i don't _ had been broken? with respect, we don't know. i don't know— had been broken? with respect, we don't know. i don't know what - had been broken? with respect, we don't know. i don't know what was. don't know. i don't know what was going _ don't know. i don't know what was going on. — don't know. i don't know what was going on. i— don't know. i don't know what was going on, i wasn't there, i was in my constituency for that entire period — my constituency for that entire period i— my constituency for that entire period. i don't work in downing street, — period. i don't work in downing street, i— period. i don't work in downing street, i was not invited. this is why we — street, i was not invited. this is why we have appointed a senior civil servant _ why we have appointed a senior civil servant to— why we have appointed a senior civil servant to investigate all those details. — servant to investigate all those details, and you are right to point out that— details, and you are right to point out that this is a place of work as wellr _ out that this is a place of work as well, this— out that this is a place of work as well, this is— out that this is a place of work as well, this is why we have the enquiry— well, this is why we have the enquiry and we must wait for that outcome — enquiry and we must wait for that outcome. , , ., ., ~' enquiry and we must wait for that outcome. , , ., ., ~ ., ., outcome. the enquiry is looking at a whole series — outcome. the enquiry is looking at a whole series of— outcome. the enquiry is looking at a whole series of events, _ outcome. the enquiry is looking at a whole series of events, parties - outcome. the enquiry is looking at a whole series of events, parties and i whole series of events, parties and gatherings. let's focus on this one
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in particular. the prime minister says, with hindsight, i should have sent everyone inside. now, if with hindsight he is saying he should have sent everyone inside, with that in your mind constitute that rules were being broken, it was an illegal party and gathering to which she attended? l party and gathering to which she attended? ~ �* , , attended? i think he's been quite clear in his _ attended? i think he's been quite clear in his comments _ attended? i think he's been quite clear in his comments that - attended? i think he's been quite clear in his comments that he i clear in his comments that he recognises that that particular instance — recognises that that particular instance was a lapse injudgment. and i_ instance was a lapse injudgment. and i think— instance was a lapse injudgment. and i think he's been very clear with— and i think he's been very clear with a _ and i think he's been very clear with a house of commons today, and he's come _ with a house of commons today, and he's come and address that. so, lookr _ he's come and address that. so, look. again. _ he's come and address that. so, look, again, iwill say he's come and address that. so, look, again, i will say what i said before, _ look, again, i will say what i said before, i— look, again, i will say what i said before, i don't know exactly what was going — before, i don't know exactly what was going on, i wasn't there, i can't _ was going on, i wasn't there, i can't possibly know what was going on, can't possibly know what was going on. it— can't possibly know what was going on. it was— can't possibly know what was going on. it was a — can't possibly know what was going on, it was a place of work, there were _ on, it was a place of work, there were people working, and let's remember what we were actually doing is a government — would sign the astrazeneca contract, we were starting _ astrazeneca contract, we were starting to get vaccines... with resect, starting to get vaccines... with respect. what _ starting to get vaccines... with respect, what you _ starting to get vaccines... with respect, what you were - starting to get vaccines... tn respect, what you were doing was telling the rest of the public to stay in their house apart from going to work if they were a key worker or
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meet with one person outdoors. exactly. meet with one person outdoors. exactl . ., , , meet with one person outdoors. exactl. ., , i, ., exactly. that is why people are so am , exactly. that is why people are so angry. that _ exactly. that is why people are so angry. that the — exactly. that is why people are so angry, that the government - exactly. that is why people are so| angry, that the government would doing one thing in telling people to doing one thing in telling people to do another. ., , ., , do another. people were angry because people _ do another. people were angry because people in _ do another. people were angry because people in this - do another. people were angry because people in this country| do another. people were angry - because people in this country have a sense _ because people in this country have a sense of— because people in this country have a sense of fair play, and there is perception— a sense of fair play, and there is perception that people in downing street— perception that people in downing street were doing what they should not have _ street were doing what they should not have been doing what they were following _ not have been doing what they were following the rules, and that's the reason _ following the rules, and that's the reason people are angry. in the prime _ reason people are angry. in the prime minister has been very clear, and he's _ prime minister has been very clear, and he's been very straight with the chamber— and he's been very straight with the chamber today... gk, and he's been very straight with the chamber today. . ._ and he's been very straight with the chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of beinr chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of being straight. _ chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of being straight, people _ chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of being straight, people might - chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of being straight, people might say - chamber today. .. ok, on the basis of being straight, people might say he i being straight, people might say he recognises the anger because he's been found out, that's the only reason! you called it a lapse of judgment. he is the prime minister! he was making these rules! he was telling people what they could and they couldn't do! and yet he thought in that moment that it was absolutely fine to go outside, into absolutely fine to go outside, into a garden, on a lovely summer's
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evening when everyone else was pretty well locked up in their home, look at the party in front of him and stay for 25 minutes and think that was fine. if that was a lapse ofjudgment, do you think he should resign for that lapse ofjudgment, a major error? {lit resign for that lapse of 'udgment, a major error— ma'or error? of course i don't. this is major error? of course i don't. this is clearly a — major error? of course i don't. this is clearly a political _ major error? of course i don't. this is clearly a political and _ is clearly a political and opposition driven campaign... hang on! it's not — opposition driven campaign... hang on! it's not opposition _ opposition driven campaign... hang on! it's not opposition driven. 0bvioustv~ _ on! it's not opposition driven. obviouslvm is— on! it's not opposition driven. obviously... is in _ on! it's not opposition driven. obviously... is in every- on! it's not opposition driven. - obviously... is in every newspaper. we had senior tory mps like the leader of the tories in scotland saying that actually the behaviour, if it is found that he has misled parliament, borisjohnson, and we havejust heard him parliament, borisjohnson, and we have just heard him say he went into this party, when you look at the rules it doesn't look as if that could or should have been allowed, then he will have to resign. it is conservative mps who are furious! not just conservative mps who are furious! notjust opposition. ! conservative mps who are furious! not just opposition.—
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not 'ust opposition. i think there are notjust opposition. i think there are some people _ notjust opposition. i think there are some people who _ notjust opposition. i think there are some people who are - notjust opposition. i think there | are some people who are furious, rightly. _ are some people who are furious, rightly. and — are some people who are furious, rightly, and we'll share that anger on all— rightly, and we'll share that anger on all sides of the house and in the general— on all sides of the house and in the general public. but let's face it, if boris — general public. but let's face it, if borisjohnson general public. but let's face it, if boris johnson resigns, general public. but let's face it, if borisjohnson resigns, the opposition are not going to be happy with any— opposition are not going to be happy with any conservative prime minister~ _ with any conservative prime minister. so with any conservative prime minister. ~' with any conservative prime minister. ~ ., minister. so i think we need to separate--- — minister. so i think we need to separate... that's _ minister. so i think we need to separate... that's completely i separate... that's completely irrelevant.— separate... that's completely irrelevant. ,, ., ., , irrelevant. the issue at hand is this party. _ irrelevant. the issue at hand is this party. this _ irrelevant. the issue at hand is this party, this instance, - irrelevant. the issue at hand is this party, this instance, and il this party, this instance, and i don't — this party, this instance, and i don't think— this party, this instance, and i don't think you should resign. i think— don't think you should resign. i think we — don't think you should resign. i think we should focus on the delivery. _ think we should focus on the delivery, what the government was delivering _ delivery, what the government was delivering at that time, we are the most _ delivering at that time, we are the most open — delivering at that time, we are the most open economy in europe, we have one of— most open economy in europe, we have one of the _ most open economy in europe, we have one of the fastest vaccine roll—outs in europe, — one of the fastest vaccine roll—outs in europe, we are freer and we are better— in europe, we are freer and we are better off— in europe, we are freer and we are better off because we've had boris johnson _ better off because we've had boris johnson as— better off because we've had boris johnson as our prime minister. before — johnson as our prime minister. before i— johnson as our prime minister. before i come to you, alison, and i will let you respond, tell me one thing, you say he's been very candid today, why has it taken him so long today, why has it taken him so long to apologise? he's always known he attended the party! he is what he's has seen, he has been asked to answer whether he attended and repeatedly said to wait for the outcome of the enquiry. why is it
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taken him so long? he outcome of the enquiry. why is it taken him so long?— outcome of the enquiry. why is it taken him so long? he has been to the house number— taken him so long? he has been to the house number of— taken him so long? he has been to the house number of times - taken him so long? he has been to the house number of times an - the house number of times an addressm _ the house number of times an address- - -_ the house number of times an address... a , ., . ., address... why has he waited? what was that he — address... why has he waited? what was that he didn't _ address. .. why has he waited? what was that he didn't know— address... why has he waited? what was that he didn't know that - address... why has he waited? what was that he didn't know that he - address... why has he waited? what| was that he didn't know that he knew today? was that he didn't know that he knew toda ? ., �* ., ,~' ., was that he didn't know that he knew toda ? ., �* ., today? you're asking me to comment on what has — today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone _ today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone on _ today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone on in _ today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone on in his _ today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone on in his mind. - today? you're asking me to comment on what has gone on in his mind. but| on what has gone on in his mind. but what ou on what has gone on in his mind. what you think on what has gone on in his mind. emit what you think is strange about the fact that he's been asked over the last three or four days did he or did he not attend this gathering, and he would not answer. so why wait so long to make the apology? he’s so long to make the apology? he's answered a — so long to make the apology? he's answered a number _ so long to make the apology? he's answered a number of questions about answered a number of questions about a number— answered a number of questions about a number of— answered a number of questions about a number of allegations which have been in _ a number of allegations which have been in the — a number of allegations which have been in the public domain for some time _ been in the public domain for some time and — been in the public domain for some time. and he has come to the house today— time. and he has come to the house today and _ time. and he has come to the house today and he — time. and he has come to the house today and he has clearly apologised, and is _ today and he has clearly apologised, and is apologised for the right reasons _ and is apologised for the right reasons. he and is apologised for the right reasons. ., , ., , . reasons. he obvious he didn't tell michael sujs — reasons. he obvious he didn't tell michael ellis yesterday, _ reasons. he obvious he didn't tell michael ellis yesterday, who - michael ellis yesterday, who absolutely _ michael ellis yesterday, who absolutely stonewalled - michael ellis yesterday, who absolutely stonewalled for. michael ellis yesterday, whol absolutely stonewalled for an michael ellis yesterday, who - absolutely stonewalled for an hour to maps _ absolutely stonewalled for an hour to maps of— absolutely stonewalled for an hour to maps of parliament, _ absolutely stonewalled for an hour to maps of parliament, would - absolutely stonewalled for an hour to maps of parliament, would noti to maps of parliament, would not answer _ to maps of parliament, would not answer a — to maps of parliament, would not answer a question. _ to maps of parliament, would not answer a question. when - to maps of parliament, would not answer a question. when clearlyi to maps of parliament, would not i answer a question. when clearly he could _ answer a question. when clearly he could have — answer a question. when clearly he could have been _ answer a question. when clearly he could have been honest— answer a question. when clearly he could have been honest with - answer a question. when clearly he could have been honest with his- answer a question. when clearly he i could have been honest with his own junior— could have been honest with his own j'unior minister — could have been honest with his own junior minister yesterday _ could have been honest with his own junior minister yesterday and - junior minister yesterday and wasn't — junior minister yesterday and wasn't. . ., ., junior minister yesterday and wasn't. ., ., ., , wasn't. he did come and apologise, the prime minister. _ wasn't. he did come and apologise, the prime minister. he _ wasn't. he did come and apologise, the prime minister. he has - wasn't. he did come and apologise, the prime minister. he has given i wasn't. he did come and apologise, i the prime minister. he has given and confirmed some important information, he regrets that things
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should have been done differently, i think is how he put it. what more do you want him to do?— you want him to do? resign. i find this absolutely _ you want him to do? resign. i find this absolutely flabbergasted. - you want him to do? resign. i find this absolutely flabbergasted. we | this absolutely flabbergasted. we have got — this absolutely flabbergasted. we have got a — this absolutely flabbergasted. we have got a prime _ this absolutely flabbergasted. we have got a prime minister- this absolutely flabbergasted. we have got a prime minister who i this absolutely flabbergasted. we i have got a prime minister who has come _ have got a prime minister who has come to— have got a prime minister who has come to the — have got a prime minister who has come to the house _ have got a prime minister who has come to the house of— have got a prime minister who has come to the house of commons i have got a prime minister who has i come to the house of commons and said. _ come to the house of commons and said. yes. _ come to the house of commons and said. yes. i— come to the house of commons and said. yes. i parted— come to the house of commons and said, yes, i parted whilst— come to the house of commons and said, yes, i parted whilst everyone i said, yes, i parted whilst everyone else but— said, yes, i parted whilst everyone else but their— said, yes, i parted whilst everyone else but their shoulder— said, yes, i parted whilst everyone else but their shoulder to - said, yes, i parted whilst everyone else but their shoulder to the - else but their shoulder to the wheel. — else but their shoulder to the wheel. and _ else but their shoulder to the wheel. and he _ else but their shoulder to the wheel. and he said, - else but their shoulder to the wheel. and he said, but, - else but their shoulder to the wheel. and he said, but, youj else but their shoulder to the - wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for— wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the — wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details _ wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details on _ wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details on all _ wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details on all the - wheel. and he said, but, you know, wait for the details on all the rest i wait for the details on all the rest of it... _ wait for the details on all the rest of it... ., ., ., , of it... you called for an enquiry, should you _ of it... you called for an enquiry, should you wait _ of it... you called for an enquiry, should you wait the _ of it... you called for an enquiry, should you wait the details? - of it... you called for an enquiry, should you wait the details? of i should you wait the details? of course we need an enquiry because allegations — course we need an enquiry because allegations have _ course we need an enquiry because allegations have been— course we need an enquiry because allegations have been made - course we need an enquiry because allegations have been made and i course we need an enquiry because i allegations have been made and they should _ allegations have been made and they should be _ allegations have been made and they should be looked _ allegations have been made and they should be looked into. _ allegations have been made and they should be looked into. but— allegations have been made and they should be looked into. but the - should be looked into. but the central— should be looked into. but the central point _ should be looked into. but the central point here _ should be looked into. but the central point here is— should be looked into. but the central point here is that - should be looked into. but the central point here is that the i should be looked into. but the - central point here is that the prime minister— central point here is that the prime minister was — central point here is that the prime minister was asked _ central point here is that the prime minister was asked direct - central point here is that the prime| minister was asked direct questions by mps _ minister was asked direct questions by mps and — minister was asked direct questions by mps and journalists _ minister was asked direct questions by mps and journalists and - minister was asked direct questions by mps and journalists and would i minister was asked direct questions. by mps and journalists and would not answer. _ by mps and journalists and would not answer. we _ by mps and journalists and would not answer. we had _ by mps and journalists and would not answer. we had the _ by mps and journalists and would not answer. we had the absolute - by mps and journalists and would not answer. we had the absolute farce i answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday — answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday of — answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday of people _ answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday of people not _ answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday of people not being - answer. we had the absolute farce yesterday of people not being able to get _ yesterday of people not being able to get clear — yesterday of people not being able to get clear answers, _ yesterday of people not being able to get clear answers, and - yesterday of people not being able to get clear answers, and then - yesterday of people not being able l to get clear answers, and then today he comes— to get clear answers, and then today he comes to — to get clear answers, and then today he comes to the _ to get clear answers, and then today he comes to the house _ to get clear answers, and then today he comes to the house of _ to get clear answers, and then today he comes to the house of commons| to get clear answers, and then today- he comes to the house of commons and says, he comes to the house of commons and says. im _ he comes to the house of commons and says. i'm awfully— he comes to the house of commons and says, i'm awfully sorry, _ he comes to the house of commons and says, i'm awfully sorry, i— he comes to the house of commons and says, i'm awfully sorry, idon't— says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise _ says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise a _ says, i'm awfully sorry, idon't recognise a party— says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise a party when - says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise a party when i- says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't recognise a party when i see i says, i'm awfully sorry, i don't. recognise a party when i see one! that is— recognise a party when i see one! that is absolutely— recognise a party when i see one! that is absolutely bizarre. - recognise a party when i see one! that is absolutely bizarre. so - recognise a party when i see one! that is absolutely bizarre. so i- that is absolutely bizarre. so i think— that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that _ that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that people's _
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that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that people's rage, - that is absolutely bizarre. so i think that people's rage, as i that is absolutely bizarre. so i| think that people's rage, as he that is absolutely bizarre. so i- think that people's rage, as he put it, think that people's rage, as he put it. is— think that people's rage, as he put it. is more — think that people's rage, as he put it, is more than— think that people's rage, as he put it, is more than understandable. i it, is more than understandable. the question— it, is more than understandable. the question about — it, is more than understandable. the question about apologies _ it, is more than understandable. the question about apologies is - it, is more than understandable. the question about apologies is always i question about apologies is always not if— question about apologies is always not if you — question about apologies is always not if you are — question about apologies is always not if you are sorry— question about apologies is always not if you are sorry it _ question about apologies is always not if you are sorry it is _ question about apologies is always not if you are sorry it is what - question about apologies is always not if you are sorry it is what do i not if you are sorry it is what do you then — not if you are sorry it is what do you then do. _ not if you are sorry it is what do you then do. because _ not if you are sorry it is what do you then do. because actions i not if you are sorry it is what do - you then do. because actions speak louder— you then do. because actions speak louder than — you then do. because actions speak louder than words. _ you then do. because actions speak louder than words. he _ you then do. because actions speak louder than words. he doesn't - you then do. because actions speakj louder than words. he doesn't need to say— louder than words. he doesn't need to say he _ louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is— louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is sorry. _ louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is sorry, you _ louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is sorry, you need - louder than words. he doesn't need to say he is sorry, you need to - to say he is sorry, you need to demonstrate _ to say he is sorry, you need to demonstrate that— to say he is sorry, you need to demonstrate that he _ to say he is sorry, you need to demonstrate that he is- to say he is sorry, you need to - demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm _ demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry— demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry if— demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry if i'm _ demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry if i'm getting - demonstrate that he is accountable, and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry- and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry butt— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i thinka— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think a lot _ and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think a lot of— and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think a lot of people - and i'm sorry if i'm getting angry but i think a lot of people out. but i think a lot of people out there — but i think a lot of people out there are _ but i think a lot of people out there are really, _ there are really, really angry. emotions are running - there are really, really angry. emotions are running high. i there are really, really angry. - emotions are running high. we've seen it from mps from other parties as well. we heard it from the dup mp jim shannon yesterday when he said his mother—in—law was left to die alone at the height of lockdown. and obviously it looks and feels absolutely terrible. but if you are looking at this and calling on the prime minister to resign, do you want him to resign now before the outcome of that enquiry? does want him to resign now before the outcome of that enquiry?- outcome of that enquiry? does he have a sense _ outcome of that enquiry? does he have a sense of _ outcome of that enquiry? does he have a sense of his _ outcome of that enquiry? does he have a sense of his own _ outcome of that enquiry? does he have a sense of his own dignity? i have a sense of his own dignity? matt— have a sense of his own dignity? matt hancock— have a sense of his own dignity? matt hancock went. _ have a sense of his own dignity? matt hancock went. dominic - have a sense of his own dignity? - matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the _ matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the end. _ matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the end. went. — matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the end, went. what— matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the end, went. what does— matt hancock went. dominic cummings, in the end, went. what does he - in the end, went. what does he
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expect— in the end, went. what does he expect that _ in the end, went. what does he expect that other— in the end, went. what does he expect that other people - in the end, went. what does he expect that other people are i expect that other people are supposed _ expect that other people are supposed to— expect that other people are supposed to take _ expect that other people are i supposed to take responsibility expect that other people are - supposed to take responsibility for their actions— supposed to take responsibility for their actions and _ supposed to take responsibility for their actions and he _ supposed to take responsibility for their actions and he doesn't - supposed to take responsibility for their actions and he doesn't have i their actions and he doesn't have to? is _ their actions and he doesn't have to? is that— their actions and he doesn't have to? is that really— their actions and he doesn't have to? is that really the _ their actions and he doesn't have to? is that really the situation i their actions and he doesn't have| to? is that really the situation we are in? _ to? is that really the situation we are in? ., , ., are in? on that basis, you will have heard keir starmer _ are in? on that basis, you will have heard keir starmer outlining - are in? on that basis, you will have heard keir starmer outlining those | heard keir starmer outlining those examples. matt hancock then health secretary did resign when he broke the rules. the former press secretary allegra stratton did the same in that video came to light of that mock press briefing. joking about cheese and wine parties. why have they had to resign but the prime minister hasn't? the have they had to resign but the prime minister hasn't?- have they had to resign but the prime minister hasn't? the law of the land applies _ prime minister hasn't? the law of the land applies to _ prime minister hasn't? the law of the land applies to everybody. i prime minister hasn't? the law of. the land applies to everybody. yes, includinr the land applies to everybody. yes, including the _ the land applies to everybody. yes, including the prime _ the land applies to everybody. 165 including the prime minister. including the prime minister. the people _ including the prime minister. the people who make the laws are also subject _ people who make the laws are also subject to — people who make the laws are also subject to them. that's why we have the due _ subject to them. that's why we have the due process of the enquiry to find out — the due process of the enquiry to find out exact what went on and if any laws — find out exact what went on and if any laws were broken there will be consequences. it is any laws were broken there will be consequences-— consequences. it is enquiry says boris johnson — consequences. it is enquiry says boris johnson broke _ consequences. it is enquiry says boris johnson broke the - consequences. it is enquiry says boris johnson broke the rules, i consequences. it is enquiry says i boris johnson broke the rules, he borisjohnson broke the rules, he should resign, then? l’m boris johnson broke the rules, he should resign, then?— boris johnson broke the rules, he should resign, then? i'm not going to re-eat should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what _ should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i _ should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i said, _ should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i said, but - should resign, then? i'm not going to repeat what i said, but clearly i to repeat what i said, but clearly there _ to repeat what i said, but clearly there are — to repeat what i said, but clearly there are consequences in the prime minister— there are consequences in the prime minister has — there are consequences in the prime minister has been clear that there will be _ minister has been clear that there will be consequences. to minister has been clear that there will be consequences.— minister has been clear that there
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will be consequences. to be specific on this for our— will be consequences. to be specific on this for our audience, _ will be consequences. to be specific on this for our audience, you - will be consequences. to be specific on this for our audience, you said i on this for our audience, you said very clearly, if people are found to have broken the law is to wed rules, there will be consequences. to be clear, you include the promised in that? you are saying to the viewers, if enquiry finds boris johnson that? you are saying to the viewers, if enquiry finds borisjohnson break the rules, he should resign? l’m if enquiry finds boris johnson break the rules, he should resign? i'm not rroin to the rules, he should resign? i'm not going to get — the rules, he should resign? i'm not going to get into _ the rules, he should resign? i'm not going to get into these _ going to get into these hypotheticals.— hypotheticals. it's not hypothetical, - hypotheticals. it's not hypothetical, i'm - hypotheticals. it's not i hypothetical, i'm asking hypotheticals. it's not - hypothetical, i'm asking you to clarify what you said. tim hypothetical, i'm asking you to clarify what you said.— hypothetical, i'm asking you to clarify what you said. i'm not going to re-eat clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. _ clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. there - clarify what you said. i'm not going to repeat what i said. there are i to repeat what i said. there are consequences for people who broke the law— consequences for people who broke the law in— consequences for people who broke the law in this country. we know the police _ the law in this country. we know the police are _ the law in this country. we know the police are looking at the situation, there _ police are looking at the situation, there are — police are looking at the situation, there are a — police are looking at the situation, there are a number of individuals involved — there are a number of individuals involved including senior civil servants. _ involved including senior civil servants, that is why we need to have _ servants, that is why we need to have the — servants, that is why we need to have the enquiry and then the consequences will follow. that is how we _ consequences will follow. that is how we do — consequences will follow. that is how we do things in this country. so how we do things in this country. sc you how we do things in this country. you can see a how we do things in this country. ’ir you can see a sort how we do things in this country. 5r you can see a sort of events unfolding that if borisjohnson is found to have broken code rules on the way the health secretary at the time, matt hancock, dead and allegra stratton, his former press head of press, they resigned, that boris johnson could end up resigning? this is a hypothetical discussion and i said what— is a hypothetical discussion and i said what i've said and i'm going to leave _ said what i've said and i'm going to leave it _ said what i've said and i'm going to leave it there.—
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leave it there. when you look at this enquiry. — leave it there. when you look at this enquiry. we _ leave it there. when you look at this enquiry, we don't _ leave it there. when you look at this enquiry, we don't know - leave it there. when you look at. this enquiry, we don't know when it's going to report, an awful lot is going to hang on the outcome of this investigation for sue gray who is actually carrying it out, but it will in the end come down to work rules broken, did the prime minister attend a lawbreaking gathering, and if he did, will he have to resign? and it will also come down to the narrative we will be presented by the report. sue gray is a list civil servant with an unimpeachable reputation who is known to do their job without fear or favour. and yet, injargon, in technicalities, narratives can emerge about intent, 0k? someone said to me earlier they felt earlier because martin reynolds who organised the party was ironically the person in the building who had taken a lot of responsibility for making sure that meetings were covid compliant, i was told he was someone taking a particular interest in that, they
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suggested the prime minister would have thought if martin has organised this, it must be fine, because it was part of his role to make sure things were following the rules. some of our viewers might hear that and think, hang on, did the prime minister not understand his own rules when he went out into the garden and so these people, shouldn't he have gotten done? reports can temper things deliberately or not, and sometimes official enquiries don't actually point the finger in the way people's political opponents wish they were a wet wood. i think in a way what might be more important is what this does for the mood of the tory backbenches, which right now is toxic. ., ., ., , ., toxic. you mentioned conservative backbenchers. _ toxic. you mentioned conservative backbenchers. let's _ toxic. you mentioned conservative backbenchers. let's return - toxic. you mentioned conservative backbenchers. let's return to - toxic. you mentioned conservative backbenchers. let's return to the i backbenchers. let's return to the house of commons where our deputy political editor is waiting. perhaps you can fill a zen or give us an idea of the sense of feeling amongst the tory backbenchers. ! idea of the sense of feeling amongst the tory backbenchers.— the tory backbenchers. i have someone _ the tory backbenchers. i have someone with _ the tory backbenchers. i have someone with me _ the tory backbenchers. i have someone with me who - the tory backbenchers. i have someone with me who can i the tory backbenchers. i have - someone with me who can hopefully
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help with that. yesterday was an awful lot of anger amongst conservative mps, really worried about this and how it is dominating, how it reflects notjust on boris johnson but the entire government. let's speak to sir christopher chopra. you are worried about all of this, what you make of this apology from the prime minister, do you think it was sincere, was it an apology? it think it was sincere, was it an a orolo ? . . think it was sincere, was it an apology?— apology? it was certainly an apology. — apology? it was certainly an apology. i've _ apology? it was certainly an apology, i've never- apology? it was certainly an apology, i've never had - apology? it was certainly an | apology, i've never had such apology? it was certainly an i apology, i've never had such an abject— apology, i've never had such an abject apology from a government minister— abject apology from a government minister in— abject apology from a government minister in my 30 plus years in this place _ minister in my 30 plus years in this place i_ minister in my 30 plus years in this place iwas— minister in my 30 plus years in this place. i was it sincere? yes, i think— place. i was it sincere? yes, i think it — place. i was it sincere? yes, i think it was. _ place. i was it sincere? yes, i think it was, genuinely sincere. and ithink— think it was, genuinely sincere. and i think the _ think it was, genuinely sincere. and i think the prime minister showed contrition — i think the prime minister showed contrition and he realised that he had done — contrition and he realised that he had done the wrong thing and not intervening at the time and all the rest of— intervening at the time and all the rest of it. — intervening at the time and all the rest of it. so i think when someone makes _ rest of it. so i think when someone makes an— rest of it. so i think when someone makes an apology like that, then reasonable people accept the apology. obviously with a caveat that this — apology. obviously with a caveat that this is continuing because there — that this is continuing because there is— that this is continuing because there is a _ that this is continuing because there is a continuing enquiry. and he has _
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there is a continuing enquiry. and he has said — there is a continuing enquiry. and he has said that when that enquiry is concluded, and the findings will be published and there will be an opportunity for further discussion. but in _ opportunity for further discussion. but in the — opportunity for further discussion. but in the short term, i think that this is— but in the short term, i think that this is a _ but in the short term, i think that this is a monumental relief to myself— this is a monumental relief to myself and lots of other colleagues because _ myself and lots of other colleagues because we didn't think he would be able to— because we didn't think he would be able to carry on if he didn't answer the basic— able to carry on if he didn't answer the basic question as to whether or not he _ the basic question as to whether or not he was — the basic question as to whether or not he was there. and he has answered _ not he was there. and he has answered that question now. but he su~ rests answered that question now. but he suggests he — answered that question now. but he suggests he thinks _ answered that question now. but he suggests he thinks it _ answered that question now. but he suggests he thinks it was _ answered that question now. but he suggests he thinks it was within - answered that question now. but he suggests he thinks it was within the | suggests he thinks it was within the guidelines. he's not saying he's sorry he did anything wrong, he is saying others might have been doing something wrong and he should have sent them back indoors. was it actually an apology about what he himself had done? it actually an apology about what he himself had done?— actually an apology about what he himself had done? it was, there is no doubt about _ himself had done? it was, there is no doubt about that. _ himself had done? it was, there is no doubt about that. you - himself had done? it was, there is no doubt about that. you are - himself had done? it was, there is i no doubt about that. you are asking should _ no doubt about that. you are asking should he _ no doubt about that. you are asking should he have gone on to self incriminate. and i think the answer to that _ incriminate. and i think the answer to that lies— incriminate. and i think the answer to that lies in the know, what he should _ to that lies in the know, what he should do— to that lies in the know, what he should do is wait and see the outcome _ should do is wait and see the outcome of the enquiry. but this is a really— outcome of the enquiry. but this is a really serious problem before, i think. _ a really serious problem before, i think. our— a really serious problem before, i think, our governance in this country. _ think, our governance in this country, because what it seems to
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show— country, because what it seems to show is _ country, because what it seems to show is that— country, because what it seems to show is that there is a feeling amongst _ show is that there is a feeling amongst the civil service and ministers _ amongst the civil service and ministers that at the top you can behave _ ministers that at the top you can behave in— ministers that at the top you can behave in a _ ministers that at the top you can behave in a completely different way from the _ behave in a completely different way from the people to whom you should be responsible. and it is that arrogance of the establishment which in a sense _ arrogance of the establishment which in a sense was what got boris to where _ in a sense was what got boris to where he — in a sense was what got boris to where he is, because he capitalised on that— where he is, because he capitalised on that and — where he is, because he capitalised on that and said, is the arrogance of the _ on that and said, is the arrogance of the establishment... is on that and said, is the arrogance of the establishment... is a on that and said, is the arrogance of the establishment. . ._ on that and said, is the arrogance of the establishment... is a part of that? that — of the establishment... is a part of that? that is _ of the establishment... is a part of that? that is what _ of the establishment... is a part of that? that is what is _ of the establishment... is a part of that? that is what is so _ that? that is what is so disappointing. - that? that is what is so disappointing. he - that? that is what is so disappointing. he won i that? that is what is so - disappointing. he won support that? that is what is so _ disappointing. he won support from the public— disappointing. he won support from the public on the basis that the remain — the public on the basis that the remain establishment of the islington men and women, and now he has almost _ islington men and women, and now he has almost sort of got caught up in it, has almost sort of got caught up in it. and _ has almost sort of got caught up in it. and did — has almost sort of got caught up in it, and did he do it deliberately or was it— it, and did he do it deliberately or was it because he took his eye off the ball? — was it because he took his eye off the ball? we will have to find out on that. — the ball? we will have to find out on that. but if we are able to see in the _ on that. but if we are able to see in the next — on that. but if we are able to see in the next few weeks the boris of old, in the next few weeks the boris of old. then— in the next few weeks the boris of old, then those who are writing his early— old, then those who are writing his early obituaries will need to think again. _ early obituaries will need to think arain. �* , ., early obituaries will need to think arain. . ,~. ., early obituaries will need to think arain. . .,
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again. are you worried about the attacks on _ again. are you worried about the attacks on his — again. are you worried about the attacks on his character? - again. are you worried about the attacks on his character? not i again. are you worried about the | attacks on his character? notjust from keir starmer, they are from some of your colleagues who have openly said he lies to get out of things. that's a problem, isn't it? i thought it was interesting that the leader of the opposition was not able to— the leader of the opposition was not able to press home his suggestion that the _ able to press home his suggestion that the prime minister had lied to parliament. which, as you surmised, would _ parliament. which, as you surmised, would be _ parliament. which, as you surmised, would be a _ parliament. which, as you surmised, would be a really serious issue. there _ would be a really serious issue. there is— would be a really serious issue. there is a — would be a really serious issue. there is a serious issue anyway about his character. hf there is a serious issue anyway about his character.— about his character. if you call somebody _ about his character. if you call somebody a — about his character. if you call somebody a liar _ about his character. if you call somebody a liar you _ about his character. if you call somebody a liar you need - about his character. if you call somebody a liar you need to i about his character. if you call. somebody a liar you need to have some _ somebody a liar you need to have some evidence, and keir starmer was effectively _ some evidence, and keir starmer was effectively calling him a liar but without — effectively calling him a liar but without producing any evidence. thank— without producing any evidence. thank you. _ without producing any evidence. thank you. it is now all up to that sue gray report on what that finds. listening to that, the prime minister showed contrition, he's never heard such an abject apology! that sounds like at least christopher chopra is satisfied with
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what he heard. l’m christopher chopra is satisfied with what he heard.— christopher chopra is satisfied with what he heard. i'm not sure what he meant by abject- — what he heard. i'm not sure what he meant by abject. i _ what he heard. i'm not sure what he meant by abject. i think— what he heard. i'm not sure what he meant by abject. i think he - what he heard. i'm not sure what he meant by abject. i think he might i meant by abject. i think he might have _ meant by abject. ! think he might have meant— meant by abject. i think he might have meant pathetic? _ meant by abject. i think he might have meant pathetic? rubbish i have meant pathetic? rubbish apology? _ have meant pathetic? rubbish apology? i_ have meant pathetic? rubbish apology? ithink— have meant pathetic? rubbish apology? i think the _ have meant pathetic? rubbish apology? i think the prime - have meant pathetic? rubbish - apology? i think the prime minister has apology? ! think the prime minister has really— apology? i think the prime minister has really not — apology? i think the prime minister has really not accepted _ has really not accepted fundamentally - has really not accepted fundamentally what - has really not accepted fundamentally what he | has really not accepted i fundamentally what he did has really not accepted _ fundamentally what he did wrong. with hindsight, — fundamentally what he did wrong. with hindsight, and _ fundamentally what he did wrong. with hindsight, and all— fundamentally what he did wrong. with hindsight, and all of- fundamentally what he did wrong. with hindsight, and all of those i with hindsight, and all of those words. — with hindsight, and all of those words. as— with hindsight, and all of those words. as i_ with hindsight, and all of those words. as i said _ with hindsight, and all of those words. as i said before, - with hindsight, and all of those words. as i said before, the - with hindsight, and all of those i words. as i said before, the truth of the _ words. as i said before, the truth of the matter— words. as i said before, the truth of the matter is _ words. as i said before, the truth of the matter is that _ words. as i said before, the truth of the matter is that apologies i of the matter is that apologies count— of the matter is that apologies count for— of the matter is that apologies count for something _ of the matter is that apologies count for something when - of the matter is that apologies count for something when you| of the matter is that apologies i count for something when you act of the matter is that apologies - count for something when you act to demonstrate — count for something when you act to demonstrate you _ count for something when you act to demonstrate you are _ count for something when you act to demonstrate you are taking - demonstrate you are taking accountability. _ demonstrate you are taking accountability. and - demonstrate you are taking accountability. and the - demonstrate you are taking accountability. and the piei demonstrate you are taking - accountability. and the pie minister has singularly — accountability. and the pie minister has singularly failed _ accountability. and the pie minister has singularly failed to _ accountability. and the pie minister has singularly failed to do - accountability. and the pie minister has singularly failed to do that - has singularly failed to do that today. — has singularly failed to do that toda . ~ ., , , ., has singularly failed to do that toda .~ ., , , ., ., i] today. where does this go now? i think what — today. where does this go now? i think what the _ today. where does this go now? i think what the pie _ today. where does this go now? i think what the pie minister - today. where does this go now? i think what the pie minister was i think what the pie minister was trying to do, and may have had some success with, by admitting he was there, addressing the issue, is to buy himself some time to accept that he had to face up to a certain extent about things that had gone on, but i think it will make it easierfor on, but i think it will make it easier for conservative mps like christopher chopra who are naturally loyal to borisjohnson, but yesterday were thinking what is going on, it gives him a bit of a chance but this enquiry is hanging on in the mood in the tory party is
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toxic. . �* . . on in the mood in the tory party is toxic, ., �*, ., ., on in the mood in the tory party is toxic. ., �* , ., ., ., toxic. that's all we have time for. thank you — toxic. that's all we have time for. thank you to _ toxic. that's all we have time for. thank you to all _ toxic. that's all we have time for. thank you to all my _ toxic. that's all we have time for. thank you to all my guests. -
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an apology from borisjohnson — who breaks his silence to admit attending a work event in the number ten garden in may 2020 — when the uk was in lockdown. did you lie about the parties, prime minister? accused of deceit and betrayal by opposition leaders in the commons, the prime minister was under intense pressure to explain himself. i regret the way the event i have described was handled. i bitterly regret it and wish that we could have done things differently and i will continue to apologise for what we did. after months of deceit and deception, a pathetic spectacle of a man who _ deception, a pathetic spectacle of a man who has run out of road. with opposition calls for borisjohnson to resign,
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we'll bring you all the details and reaction, and be asking if he's

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