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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 12, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. borisjohnson will face mps as pressure mounts for him to say whether he attended a drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown and calls for him to resign if he did. if he's lied to the british public, he's lied to parliament and he has attended parties during lockdown, then his position is untenable. so if he was at the party, and it looks very clear that he was, he must now go — he must resign. and if he won't resign, it's the duty of conservative mps to do the right thing. what do you want hear from borisjohnson at pmqs today? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions. double fault for novak djokovic —
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as the tennis star admits breaking isolation rules when he had covid and says there was an error on his immigration form. putting the brakes on smart motorways — the government pauses their rollout over safety concerns. and the boss of the uk's biggest energy supplier warns that high energy bills will last for two years. hello and welcome to bbc news this morning. borisjohnson will face mps later, with pressure mounting for him to say whether he attended a �*bring your own booze�* drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. witnesses have said that mrjohnson and his wife were among about thirty people present at the event in may
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2020, when outdoor gatherings were banned. conservative mps have joined labour in saying he must explain his actions. backbencher nigel mills said it would be �*utterly untenable�* for any senior figure who attended the gathering to be responsible for coronavirus policy. he said he couldn�*t see how the prime minister could continue in hisjob if he knowingly attended a party. labour�*s deputy leader has said borisjohnson�*s position would be �*untenable�* if he attended parties during lockdown. angela rayner says if he misled parliament and had not kept to the ministerial code, then he should go. the prime minister will face questions in parliament at midday — and will face the labour leader keir starmer — who is out of isolation. our political correspondent helen catt has the latest. borisjohnson has so far refused to say if he went to a party
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in the downing street garden during the first lockdown in england or not. number10 has said it won�*t comment while a senior official investigates. but in a few hours�* time, mrjohnson will be at the dispatch box for prime minister�*s questions, and able to avoid it no longer. labour has said he must come clean. did he attend the drinks event — yes or no? some conservative mps have made it very clear they want a categoric answer, too. if the prime minister knowingly attended a party, i can�*t see how he can survive, having accepted resignations for far less, and he accepted resignation of his spokesperson for not attending a party butjoking about it at a time of much lighter restrictions — and i just think that�*s untenable. anger has been growing across all levels of the conservative party — from mps to party members to a major donor. within government, there�*s an area of hypocrisy, rule—breaking and arrogance. how can they have a party for a hundred people when other
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people are told you can only meet one person in a great big park? it doesn�*t make any sense, and it�*s just wrong! the snp�*s westminster leader said the prime minister should resign now. he really needs to understand that he has to go. he should be resigning tonight. and if it doesn't do that, conservative mps need to hold him to account. some conservative mps have said that how mrjohnson performs today will be a key factor in forming their view on his future. that he�*s under pressure is certain, what happens next is much less so. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let�*s talk to our chief political correspondent adam fleming, who�*s in downing street. adam, it has been notable so far this morning there has been no minister available for the usual round of interviews so all eyes on the prime minister in the commons at noon. with the anger, including in his own party, is it tenable for him
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to stick with not commenting on the events of may 2020 and say he won�*t comment whilst an investigation takes place?— comment whilst an investigation takeslace? ,, ., ., ., , ~ , takes place? quite a lot of his mps think that isn't _ takes place? quite a lot of his mps think that isn't tenable _ takes place? quite a lot of his mps think that isn't tenable and - takes place? quite a lot of his mps think that isn't tenable and they i think that isn�*t tenable and they would like to add some kind of explanation from the prime minister today at the very least about what happened in the downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020. an acknowledgement of whether he was there or not, which we have not had yet. an explanation. some i�*d like him to go further and maybe even offer an apology. the opposition parties going further than that, the liberal democrat leader ed davey saying if the prime minister attended that party unknowingly broke the rules, he should resign. labour also upping the ante. here is their deputy leader angela rayner. boris johnson has to account for his actions and the ministerial code is very clear that if he has misled parliament and he's not abided by that code, then he should go. and the frustration for me is that
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conservative mps have been out on the airways, condemning the prime minister, and saying he does need to come clean on his actions, but, you know, the prime minister is being propped up by his conservative mps at the moment and he's been proven not fit to govern. nobody will be surprised that. i don't believe that borisjohnson was the right prime minister for this country but i think, more importantly now, the british public are now thinking that he is not the right prime minister for this country. soi so i suppose the big question, one of the big questions today is how much political capital does boris johnson have left with his own mps and how much does that depend on what he says and does today? the? what he says and does today? they fall into different _ what he says and does today? tie: fall into different categories, people who have always been opposed to borisjohnson who now see this as an opportunity to get rid of him. you get people who are supporters of borisjohnson, some of whom are rapidly becoming former supporters are borisjohnson and this isjust the are borisjohnson and this is just the last straw for them. then there is quite a big group of conservative mps, i get the sense there is, who
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think he can survive this, may be permanent damage to borisjohnson and the conservative brand as a result but they think the party and the government can survive it. in the government can survive it. in the words of one of those mps, they said that the mood is really sullen but no one is in the mood for regicide yet, in other words getting rid of the prime minister. a lot will hinge on what happens today. what details does he give, what justification or otherwise does he provide, does he apologise, what is his tone? what is the mood of parliament? we got a preview yesterday of what the atmosphere might be like because labour asked what�*s known as an urgent question and a junior minister came to answer questions about this. he could only say wait for the inquiry. i can understand why people might be annoyed. 0pposition mps were standing up and talking about what it was like for them in may 2020 when they couldn�*t say goodbye to dying loved ones and some mps were in tears. this is going to be an incredibly, incredibly tense prime
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minister�*s questions. incredibly, incredibly tense prime minister's questions.— incredibly, incredibly tense prime minister's questions. adam, thank ou ve minister's questions. adam, thank you very much- _ minister's questions. adam, thank you very much. adam _ minister's questions. adam, thank you very much. adam fleming - minister's questions. adam, thank you very much. adam fleming in i you very much. adam fleming in downing street. joining me now is the shadow levelling up minister, labour mp alex norris. good morning to you. thank you for your time. what do you want to hear from the prime minister today? it is time for him — from the prime minister today? it is time for him to _ from the prime minister today? it 3 time for him to come clean, isn't time for him to come clean, isn�*t it? no more hiding behind junior ministers or smoking his way through interviews, hiding behind whatever inquiry. hejust needs interviews, hiding behind whatever inquiry. he just needs to answer some questions. was there a party at number 10 downing street on the 20th of may 2020 and did he go to it? those answers he has tried to avoid and i don�*t think he can avoid them today. 50 and i don't think he can avoid them toda . and i don't think he can avoid them toda _ ., and i don't think he can avoid them toda . ., ., , and i don't think he can avoid them toda. ., ., , , today. so it would not be acceptable today. so it would not be acceptable to ou for today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him _ today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him to _ today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him to continue _ today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him to continue to - today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him to continue to say - today. so it would not be acceptable to you for him to continue to say he | to you for him to continue to say he won�*t comment on it while an investigation takes place, led by senior civil servant sue gray? at senior civil servant sue gray? at the senior civil servant sue gray? git the end of the day, they are simple yes or no questions. the british public has a right to expect not only the prime minister is honest
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and candid with the truth as well. so to hide and hope it goes away i don�*t think is acceptable. he has to show some honesty. you don't think is acceptable. he has to show some honesty.— don't think is acceptable. he has to show some honesty. you may have “ust heard adam fleming i show some honesty. you may have “ust heard adam fleming say i show some honesty. you may have “ust heard adam fleming say there is h show some honesty. you may have “ust heard adam fleming say there is a h heard adam fleming say there is a group of conservative mps who think this is survivable for boris johnson. the lib dems leader ed davey this morning was calling on conservative mps in his words to do the right thing and get rid of boris johnson. he said it was their duty to make him go for the good of the country. is labour or will labour talk to the lib dems, snp and others about a potential vote of no—confidence in borisjohnson? no—confidence in boris johnson? well, no—confidence in borisjohnson? well, we will have to see what is said today. i think what it is clear what angela rayner said on the bbc earlier, if borisjohnson broke these rules, and the british people have missed funerals, missed the last days of their loved ones who have died, have missed the births of nieces or nephews or grandchildren,
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missed weddings and things of their own children following the rules, if the person who set those rules did not follow those rules, then his position becomes untenable. the mechanism for that, half a dozen different ways you could go about that. but i would say to your point about conservative mps who thinks this is survivable, i would say they are answering the wrong question. the question is not how can we get borisjohnson through these next days as prime minister but how do we best lead this country question at this pandemic is not over. we will be asking the british public to make sacrifices in the coming days, weeks and months. the only question is how can we do that the best way possible? if they are answering another question, that shows just how badly wrong they are getting it. just to go back to the point i was asking about, if enough conservative mps don�*t do that, will labour, in conjunction with other parties, look at a vote of no confidence, even if you think perhaps initially you don�*t have the numbers? i don�*t know what your calculations are on that
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now. , ., , ., ., now. there is a question a parliamentary _ now. there is a question a parliamentary strategy. i now. there is a question a l parliamentary strategy. that now. there is a question a - parliamentary strategy. that comes after what we see today. we want to see the prime minister come clean and then we will know the facts of what we are working with and get into the parliamentary strategy of it. ithink into the parliamentary strategy of it. i think that is a question from perhaps later this afternoon than this morning. we perhaps later this afternoon than this morning-— perhaps later this afternoon than this morning. we are still waiting on that report — this morning. we are still waiting on that report by _ this morning. we are still waiting on that report by sue _ this morning. we are still waiting on that report by sue gray. - this morning. we are still waiting on that report by sue gray. howl on that report by sue gray. how important is it that there is full disclosure of that report, that none of it is redacted, for example? that is exceptionally _ of it is redacted, for example? “twat is exceptionally important. we have to build public confidence in this process. let�*s not forget who the report goes too fast we have confidence in sue gray, she has a long expanse of doing these sorts of things. the report goes to the prime minister, who we have a lot less confident in his ability to be a fairjudge of his own conduct so it will be vital that we see the evidence and that people are able to form their own opinions on it. mex. form their own opinions on it. alex norris, shadow _ form their own opinions on it. alex norris, shadow minister for norris, shadow ministerfor levelling up, thank you very much
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for your time today. nobody from the government was offered for interview this morning — but tory mps have been expressing their views. nigel mills said: "he knows whether he was there or not. "just come out and say what happened". charles walker told channel 4 news: caroline nokes said: and robbie moore says: i�*m joined now by mo hussein, the former number ten chief press officer under david cameron. good morning to you. if you are advising borisjohnson this morning,
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what would you be saying? t advising boris johnson this morning, what would you be saying?— what would you be saying? i would say silence — what would you be saying? i would say silence and _ what would you be saying? i would say silence and avoiding _ what would you be saying? i would say silence and avoiding the - say silence and avoiding the questions are really not your friend right now. i think it is now the time for humility, some contrition and just answering the question, frankly, being honest about what happened. the problem here is this has been going on for a few weeks now and we have had nothing to see here from number 10 and then we have had there was no party, no rules were broken and an investigation. all of which hasjust were broken and an investigation. all of which has just made were broken and an investigation. all of which hasjust made it were broken and an investigation. all of which has just made it worse, where if something did happen and it was wrong, then say that and then say what you are going to do about it going forward. we haven�*t had that and hopefully we will see some of that today because i think that is certainly needed.— is certainly needed. does it surprise — is certainly needed. does it surprise you _ is certainly needed. does it surprise you that _ is certainly needed. does it surprise you that there - is certainly needed. does it surprise you that there has| is certainly needed. does it - surprise you that there has been this let�*s not be absolutely frank attitude, let�*s be equivocal about answering questions, when it is quite clear that that ends up putting you in a more difficult
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position? are you surprised that that approach or do you think that has been the way it has been for some time now, that�*sjust has been the way it has been for some time now, that�*s just the way it�*s done? t some time now, that's “ust the way it's done? g some time now, that's “ust the way it's done? ~ ., , some time now, that's “ust the way it's done? ~ . , ., , it's done? i think that is the way it's done? i think that is the way it has been _ it's done? i think that is the way it has been for— it's done? i think that is the way it has been for a _ it's done? i think that is the way it has been for a while. - it's done? i think that is the way| it has been for a while. however, every time that has happened, it hasn�*t worked out and it has created a bigger mess, frankly, and bigger questions that need to be resolved. you would have thought that lessons would have been learned by now. i am also surprised at this e—mail went to 100 people, we are told, and we are only finding out about it now. so there has been some going to ground, closing of ranks and ten had to time, where people in government just expect there to be a lot of focus groups about bad news and they don�*t really respond. the public perception here is really, really important. building confidence in what the government is trying to do, particularly as it�*s trying to go back to its domestic agenda round it can�*t really do that until this is a result. also, as you�*ve been pointing out, the issue with mps. mps, the government needs them to
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support them and with this series of unforced errors, whether it is parties or wallpaper or the loss of north shropshire, all of these are weighing on mps�* mines who are really questioning their support now for the prime minister and for the government. so i think doing things differently is certainly the best course of action. t differently is certainly the best course of action.— differently is certainly the best course of action. i guess any group of mps are — course of action. i guess any group of mps are any _ course of action. i guess any group of mps are any particular _ course of action. i guess any group of mps are any particular time - course of action. i guess any group of mps are any particular time will| of mps are any particular time will ask whether their prime minister is an electoral asset or an electoral liability. 0bviously an electoral asset or an electoral liability. obviously the conservatives in the last general election under borisjohnson�*s election under boris johnson�*s leadership election under borisjohnson�*s leadership gained a huge majority. i don�*t know how much that might cushion him from what is happening to him right now, what are your thoughts on that? tom to him right now, what are your thoughts on that?— to him right now, what are your thoughts on that? two years ago, there was a _ thoughts on that? two years ago, there was a significant _ thoughts on that? two years ago, there was a significant majority. l thoughts on that? two years ago, | there was a significant majority. he reached parts of the country that no conservative leader has ever had before. that has put a lot of currency on him. he has been seen as
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electoral gold dust. people do remember that. electoral gold dust. people do rememberthat. i electoral gold dust. people do remember that. i think that will serve him well for a while. however, when more of and feelings of different rules for different people and when this translates at the ballot box and we have seen that now in chesham and amersham, north shropshire, all eyes will be on the local elections in may, where the conservative start from a high bar. if mps say we are not winning any more and this is cutting through, then i think that transactional relationship that some mps have come who may not be fans of the prime minister but have held their nose almost for a while because they see him as a winner, that could all change. so i think he is in quite a serious and precarious position now. there are things that that are not within his control. so what he says and does today is really important. but there�*s also the possibility the met police will
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investigate, which is embarrassing that the met police are thinking of looking into the prime ministerial office and the sue gray investigation, both of which he cannot control. that does not make things easy for him going forward. of course there are many of course there are many commentators and observers of boris johnson who will say this is a prime minister who often relies on the sheer force of his personality to make his point. do you think on this occasion he can talk his way out of what is undoubtably an incredibly serious situation? t what is undoubtably an incredibly serious situation?— what is undoubtably an incredibly serious situation? i don't think he can. i serious situation? i don't think he can- i think— serious situation? i don't think he can. i think certainly _ serious situation? i don't think he can. i think certainly there - serious situation? i don't think he can. i think certainly there will. serious situation? i don't think he can. i think certainly there will be j can. i think certainly there will be that as part of the strategy and there will still be an element of, that boris and that goodwill and that boris and that goodwill and that remembering the 2019 victory. however, reading the room now is really, really important. particularly if the line from number
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10 has been changing over the last few weeks and there is still no clarity on what has actually happened and people will remember their own sacrifice and sacrifice of others around them and mps will be getting letters from their constituents and the pressure will be on. so i�*m just not sure that anything that is vague or not really answering the question or kind of mealy mouth, i�*m not sure that will work. mealy mouth, i'm not sure that will work. ~ ., mealy mouth, i'm not sure that will work. a, , , mealy mouth, i'm not sure that will work. a, ,, ., , , work. mo hussein, really interesting to net our work. mo hussein, really interesting to get your thoughts _ work. mo hussein, really interesting to get your thoughts on _ work. mo hussein, really interesting to get your thoughts on events - to get your thoughts on events unfolding and that is mo hussein, former number 10 chief press officer under david cameron. thank you very much. let me tell you some of you have been getting in touch with me to respond to that question, what do you want to hear from the prime minister today at pmst? julie says my question is, why didn�*t he stop the garden party when he found out about it? of course you will know
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the prime minister hasn�*t actually said that there was a garden party. he has not said whether or not he was there but that is the question from julie. if you would like to get in touch with me and say what you would like to hearfrom in touch with me and say what you would like to hear from the in touch with me and say what you would like to hearfrom the prime minister today, you can do that on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions. and you can see prime minister�*s questions here on the bbc news channel at midday. keir starmer out of covid isolation to ask the questions for labour. novak djokovic has admitted breaching isolation rules after testing positive for covid—i9 last month, describing it as an "error ofjudgement". in an instagram post, the 34—year—old admitted meeting a journalist for an interview two days after he tested positive on december the 16th — saying he accepted that he should have rescheduled. in the post, he also blamed his agent for making a mistake on the travel form he used to enter australia. he wrote:
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his admission comes as he continues to wait to find out if the australian government will allow him to play in next week�*s 0pen event or if he�*ll be deported. 0ur tennis correspondent, russell fuller, is following all the developments and joins us live now from melbourne. i suppose the big question is whether any of these revelations on instagram will have an impact either on the decision that was made in the court earlier this week or in fact on the decision of the immigration minister who has it in his gift to counsel novak djokovicvisa? that minister who has it in his gift to counsel novak djokovicvisa? counsel novak d'okovicvisa? that is ve much counsel novak d'okovicvisa? that is very much the — counsel novak djokovicvisa? that is very much the reason _ counsel novak djokovicvisa? that is very much the reason why _ counsel novak djokovicvisa? that is very much the reason why novak- very much the reason why novak djokovic release this quite lengthy statement on instagram. we know there were a lot of questions unanswered and he knows he has a real fight on its unanswered and he knows he has a realfight on its hands unanswered and he knows he has a
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real fight on its hands to stay in the country because that immigration minister has not made decision yet. novak djokovic�*s team have provided more paperwork, there is discussion behind the scenes and it could be at least another 2a hours before we get a result. as to whether this will have a material difference, in this statement he has admitted he breached covid rules. albeit last month in a different country. so not something that is an immediate concern to the australian government but at the same time, here is somebody admitting they are breaching guidelines and that may well have an influence on the way the public of australia view novak djokovic. then there is this administrative error and it�*s entirely plausible that that is what happened. that these forms are filled out by all passengers travelling to australia, or in this case their representatives and his agent forgot that he moved from belgrade to spain before flying out to australia. that in its own probably wouldn�*t have caused an enormous problem but when you throw it into the mix with everything else, it means that djokovic is
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still in a very difficult situation and farfrom still in a very difficult situation and far from guaranteed to start the defence of his title on monday or tuesday next week. we defence of his title on monday or tuesday next week.— defence of his title on monday or tuesday next week. we know he has been practising. _ tuesday next week. we know he has been practising, we _ tuesday next week. we know he has been practising, we are _ tuesday next week. we know he has been practising, we are showing - tuesday next week. we know he has been practising, we are showing our| been practising, we are showing our viewers pictures of him practising in the rod to labour arena. what does it mean for the scheduling for the tournament, is everything going ahead on the basis of that he will be there, even though we don�*t have this decision from the immigration minister? it this decision from the immigration minister? , ., ., ., minister? it is for now. that ractice minister? it is for now. that practice session _ minister? it is for now. that practice session was - minister? it is for now. that practice session was one - minister? it is for now. that. practice session was one that minister? it is for now. that - practice session was one that went ahead in full view of everybody. yesterday was very cloak and dagger, secretive, nobody was allowed to watch. the screens around melbourne park were blanked out. there were no pictures from the arena and it was down to the channel nine drone overhead that we got to see a picture of djokovic in action. but it must be very chaotic scenes at tennis australia. they don�*t quite know what the situation is. the verdict from the minister could come before the draw at 3pm tomorrow but
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if it doesn�*t, novak djokovic will take his place in the draw is the defending champion and number one seed. he will be drawn again somebody but we won�*t know for sure if the match will take place or not. ok, we will watch that very closely. 0k, we will watch that very closely. i know you certainly will be doing that for us in melbourne. russell fuller, thank you very much. the expansion of some smart motorways which use the hard shoulder as a permanent lane has been temporarily halted. the goverment has announced the move while their safety is assessed. it�*s follows the recommendations of a committee of mps, who had concerns about the safety of the roads because of a number of fatal crashes. here�*s our transport correspondent, katy austin. smart motorways. there are hundreds of miles of them across england, and plans for more. the point of smart motorways is to reduce congestion using technology, instead of having to build any new road. but the type that involves permanently removing the hard shoulder to create an extra lane for traffic is controversial.
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they do have emergency bays, and if a vehicle stops in a live lane, a red x sign can be displayed to close it. but one driver told us he feared for his life when his car developed serious engine problems. people were sounding their horns, there were three near—misses — one of which was an articulated truck, as in nearly rear—ending me. i got out of the car, i got over the crash barrier, i dialled 999 after about five to ten minutes because the lane was still operational — the cameras hadn�*t picked it up. the government now says it will put the brakes on the hard shoulder being scrapped on any more smart motorways, while more safety data is collected. work already under way will be finished with additional safety features. this is one of the control centres where national highways monitors our main roads. it says actions already being taken include rolling out radar technology to detect stranded vehicles.
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we know that people are legitimately concerned about the safety of using smart motorways. we are convinced that smart motorways are safe, but we know there�*s more we can do to convince people that they are safe, which is why we�*ve implemented these measures. the government is also providing nearly £400 million for extra emergency bays. it says what�*s being done should give drivers confidence. but some campaigners don�*t accept smart motorways without a hard shoulder can ever be safe. katy austin, bbc news. the boss of the uk�*s biggest energy supplier says soaring energy prices which threaten the living standards of millions could last up to two years. chris 0�*shea, chief executive of british gas owner centrica, said there was "no reason" to expect gas prices would come down "any time soon". he�*s been speaking to our business editor simonjack. when i talk to our customers and i
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hear how distressed they are at the increasing prices that are coming, then i think it is inconceivable that we don�*t do something to help those people. but it has to be targeted at those people. it can�*t be targeted at energy companies but the customers who can least afford the customers who can least afford the increases that are coming. what the increases that are coming. what is the answer. _ the increases that are coming. what is the answer, there _ the increases that are coming. what is the answer, there are _ the increases that are coming. what is the answer, there are a _ the increases that are coming. what is the answer, there are a number of options on the table? the is the answer, there are a number of options on the table?— options on the table? the three thins we options on the table? the three things we outlined _ options on the table? the three things we outlined we _ options on the table? the three things we outlined we could - options on the table? the three things we outlined we could do | options on the table? the three - things we outlined we could do which could take half way is defer the supply fee, which is £100. another is to take vat of the bills, temporarily or permanently, that is another £100. then there are green levies on bills, around £175. those three things together could be enacted very quickly and that would take half of the price rise and then you get a further relief targeted at those households that need it most. there has been talk about the warm homes discount. if it is targeted, you like. there are some targeted programmes, that would be one, what you make of that option? the
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programmes, that would be one, what you make of that option?— you make of that option? the way it works is the — you make of that option? the way it works is the cost _ you make of that option? the way it works is the cost of _ you make of that option? the way it works is the cost of that _ you make of that option? the way it works is the cost of that scheme - you make of that option? the way it works is the cost of that scheme is l works is the cost of that scheme is met by energy customers. so if you increase the warm homes discount, you increase the energy bill. ultimately everybody in the uk is a taxpayer and an energy consumer. so the cost of this is going to have to be paid by uk citizens. the question as to whether it is paid through the energy would be built with general taxation is one for the government. what about the idea we need to get money towards the energy companies in some way customer what they are saying is look, we�*ve had one of the biggest energy shocks in history in the last few months. we need is a chance to be able to smooth that out over a number of years and that could be lending the money which you pay back over time or a fund where you can draw down on government money when the wholesale prices high and pay it back when they are low. what you make of a mechanism like that to try and stretch this shock over a longer period? that that to try and stretch this shock over a longer period?— over a longer period? that could work if you _ over a longer period? that could work if you could _
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over a longer period? that could work if you could guarantee - over a longer period? that could work if you could guarantee the l work if you could guarantee the prices will fall. but nobody knows what energy prices will do in the future. so therefore, we believe that a fund is not the right solution. there is no need for any support for energy companies. sainsbury�*s has announced that its sales fell by 1.1% during the three months to the 8th of january, compared with the year before. the supermarket�*s performance over the christmas period remained stable in comparison with 2020. the company has raised its profits forecast due to cost savings. parents are being warned to be vigilant for signs of a common winter virus that can cause breathing problems in very young children. the british lung foundation says respiratory syncytial virus, or rsv, could rebound injanuary after few cases last winter, when lockdowns were in place and there was very little mixing. the charity says because of this, children have much lower immunity. during the past three months, more than 1,000 children have been admitted to hospital with rsv in england. efforts to protect britain�*s red
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squirrels could be causing more harm than good. at the moment, conifer plantations are encouraged as a healthy habitat. but a study led by queen�*s university belfast and the university of st andrews indicates that this offers a far less diverse dwelling than native woodland and is an easier environment for predators to target red squirrels. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. as we go through the next few days, we�*ve got a north—south divide in the weather, as we have today. it�*s been a frosty start and a foggy one in southern areas — that lifting to allow a lot of dry weather with some sunshine. but across the northern half of the country, there�*s a bit more cloud. and in the north west, we are looking at some spots of rain and windy conditions here, all the way up towards the northern isles. but the mildest conditions will be in the north of the country, with highs up to 12 degrees. now, as we head on through the evening and overnight, we hang on to the cloud and the breezy conditions in the north.
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under clear skies further south, well, we�*ll see fog reform and also a widespread frost. so, that�*s how we start tomorrow. the fog, if anything, more widespread than last night, and it will also take its time to clear, some of itjust lifting into low cloud. but where it does clear, once again, we�*ll see the sunshine. whereas for northern ireland and also for the north west of scotland and parts of northern england, there�*ll be a bit more cloud around. in the north west, there�*ll also be some spots of rain. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson will face mps as pressure mounts for him to say whether he attended a drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown and calls for him to resign if he did. double fault for novak djokovic as the tennis star admits breaking isolation rules when he had covid and says there was an error on his immigration form. putting the brakes on smart motorways — the government pauses their rollout
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over safety concerns. and the boss of the uk�*s biggest energy supplier warns that high energy bills will last for two years. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s jane. still more questions about novak djokovic prompted by his latest instagram post.— djokovic prompted by his latest instagram post. djokovic prompted by his latest instaaram ost. , , , , ., instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling — instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling on _ instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling on and _ instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling on and on, _ instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling on and on, it's- instagram post. yes, this seems to be rambling on and on, it's not - be rambling on and on, it�*s not going away any time soon. novak djokovic has admitted failing to isolate immediately, despite knowing he had coronavirus. he called it an "error ofjudgment" in a statement on social media. it�*s the latest development in his attempts to stay in australia to play in the open. djokovic said he�*d had a negative lateral flow test on december the 16th and did a pcr for confirmation — and didn�*t know he�*d tested positive when he visited a children�*s tennis event the following day.
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he did admit, though, that he shouldn�*t have gone ahead with an interview and photoshoot with a french sports newspaper two days later. 0ur tennis correspondent, russell fuller, has more. there is some clarity in that he�*s admitting what is a breach of serbia�*s covid regulations by leaving his house to go to this tennis centre in belgrade to conduct this interview and photo shoot with l�*equipe. the mask was on for the interview but took off for the photo shoot. he knew he was infectious with covid. the other part of the story, which is properly more emotive, given he was mixing with children and posing for photographs at an awards ceremony the previous day. he says he was not aware he was positive although the positive test was confirmed at eight o�*clock the previous evening. and on his sworn affidavit to the court earlier this
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week, he said that he had been tested and diagnosed with covid on the 16th. but it is very difficult for anyone else to say that he definitely knew the result that very evening. that is what djokovic is saying, "i absolutely did not know i was positive when i mixed with those children". russell fuller in melbourne. southampton�*s new owner dragan solak watched on as they enjoyed their biggest win of the season. jan bednarek scored in the fifth minute, to send them on their way to a 4—1 win over brentford. that takes southampton up into 11th in the premier league table. in the big game of the day at the africa cup of nations, three—time champions nigeria got the better of the most successful team in the history of the tournament, seven—time winners egypt. liverpool�*s mo salah was kept quiet by nigeria, who were the better side throughout and scored the only goal of the game, a superb strike from leicester�*s kelechi iheanacho. there was a comical penalty miss by guinea—bissau against sudan. pele saw his kick saved, then the follow—up hit the bar,
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before eventually being buried in the side netting. it finished 0—0. england captainjoe root says, despite england�*s poor performance in the ashes, it�*s great that a five—match series is going to be completed for the first time during the pandemic. australia lead 3—0, after england managed a draw in the fourth test — and root believes they can build on the determiniation they showed on the final day and get something out of the last match, which starts on friday. i think it would be... a great way to close out what�*s been a tough... tough series for us. and, again, like i say, it would show the strides forward that the group has made in some quite, at times, challenging circumstances. so, like i say, we know there is a... so much work that has to be done from this group of players and even, you know,
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below that, as well. but... it�*s really important that we... we use last week in a really positive manner and leave here 3—1. ronnie 0�*sullivan said he was looking forward to "the ashes" of snooker, after setting up a meeting with australia�*s neil robertson in the quarter—finals of the masters at alexandra palace. 0�*sullivan was roared on by a boisterous crowd in london, as he outclassed jack lisowski to win 6—1. of his meeting with robertson he said, "this is the ashes, here we go. it is coming back to britain". the ashes of snooker, let�*s hope the performances in the snooker are better than the ones we�*ve seen so far in cricket. that�*s all the sport for now. more now on our top story, and borisjohnson will face mps later with pressure mounting for him to say whether he attended
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a "bring your own booze" drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. witnesses have said that mrjohnson and his wife were among about 30 people present at the event in may 2020, when outdoor gatherings were banned. joining me now is wendy chamberlain mp, chief whip for the liberal democrats. thank you very much for your time, this morning. what do you want to hearfrom the prime minister? t this morning. what do you want to hear from the prime minister? i want to hear from — hear from the prime minister? i want to hear from the _ hear from the prime minister? i want to hear from the prime _ hear from the prime minister? i want to hear from the prime minister, - hear from the prime minister? i want to hear from the prime minister, forl to hearfrom the prime minister, for a start! there was an urgent question in the house yesterday on this very issue directed to the prime minister and he chose not to attend. it is prime minister�*s questions today and i expect him to be asked about this and i expect him to be answering. and if you can�*t answer, we shouldn�*t have to wait for an answer, we shouldn�*t have to wait foran inquiry fora answer, we shouldn�*t have to wait for an inquiry for a person to tell you whether or not they were at a party. i think he needs to step down. because he clearly cannot command the confidence of the government, of parliament, and the
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wider public. i have heard from lots of people, constituents and elsewhere, who lost loved ones over that first wave of covid and since, made sacrifices, followed the rules, and are, frankly, disgusted at the behaviour of the pm and the government. xtet behaviour of the pm and the government.— behaviour of the pm and the government. behaviour of the pm and the rovernment. ., , ~ , ., government. yet some of his mps are sa in: if he government. yet some of his mps are saying if he apologises, _ government. yet some of his mps are saying if he apologises, if— government. yet some of his mps are saying if he apologises, if he - saying if he apologises, if he says... gives a straight answer as to whether or not he was at the party and witnesses are certainly place him at the made be 20th 2020, if he apologises and refocuses and sets a new town —— may 20th. that he can go on. some of his mps are saying that, aren�*t they? t can go on. some of his mps are saying that, aren't they? i disagree with that. from _ saying that, aren't they? i disagree with that. from the _ saying that, aren't they? i disagree with that. from the perspective - saying that, aren't they? i disagree with that. from the perspective ofl with that. from the perspective of this downing street party saga has been ongoing for some time. i was in north shropshire when we won the by—election last month and there was palpable anger on the doorsteps from people around the downing street parties. what is different now is that the prime minister has stood up in parliament previously and said that he had no knowledge of any parties and that he was going to
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ensure that investigations were carried out. how could he have no knowledge of parties that he was present at? ijust knowledge of parties that he was present at? i just don�*t think that�*s good enough. present at? i just don't think that's good enough.- present at? i just don't think that's good enough. your party leader sir _ that's good enough. your party leader sir ed _ that's good enough. your party leader sir ed davey _ that's good enough. your party leader sir ed davey spoke - that's good enough. your party leader sir ed davey spoke to i that's good enough. your party | leader sir ed davey spoke to my colleagues on bbc breakfast early and he said the conservative mps had and he said the conservative mps had a duty" for the good of the country" to do the right thing and get rid of borisjohnson as prime minister. if his own mps are not minded to do that, to go through the process that would lead to him being removed, will the lib dems, along with labour and other parties, other mps, look at putting together a vote of no confidence? t at putting together a vote of no confidence?— confidence? i think at an early stare confidence? i think at an early stage but _ confidence? i think at an early stage but what _ confidence? i think at an early stage but what i _ confidence? i think at an early stage but what i would - confidence? i think at an early stage but what i would say - confidence? i think at an early stage but what i would say is i confidence? i think at an early| stage but what i would say is if borisjohnson himself doesn�*t choose to stand down, it is for conservative mps to make the decision. i would conservative mps to make the decision. iwould be conservative mps to make the decision. i would be very interested to know how many letters of no confidence in the chair of the 1922 committee, sir graham brady, has had. the other thing i have asked for is for is for the chair of the
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liaison committee, the most powerful committee in parliament, to call the prime minister to go into more detail. clearly, pmqs is the opportunity to question the prime minister today but not necessarily the best forum to get to the bottom of things. tt the best forum to get to the bottom of thin . s. , , the best forum to get to the bottom of thins. , , i. of things. it is interesting you make that — of things. it is interesting you make that point _ of things. it is interesting you make that point because - of things. it is interesting you make that point because that| of things. it is interesting you l make that point because that is often a source of frustration for people, isn�*t it? that, perhaps, questions that are asked are not answered directly. does the prime minister really have that option, today, given the outcry from, indeed, his own party and many others, to avoid giving a straight yes or no answer to that question about whether he attended the party? he is very good at not giving a yes or no answer usually but my understanding is he may make a brief statement before pmqs today, which he has done before in relation to downing street parties before christmas. i would expect and hope that he did that. i don�*t necessarily expect that he will give a direct answer because this line
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that they are waiting for the outcome of the soo great enquiry is clearly unsustainable. they realise that 0wen paterson, it was unsustainable and owen paterson resigned. —— sue gray. it is the right time for boris to be doing likewise. let right time for boris to be doing likewise. ., ,~' , ., right time for boris to be doing likewise. ., ., likewise. let me ask you about something _ likewise. let me ask you about something you _ likewise. let me ask you about something you just _ likewise. let me ask you about| something you just mentioned. likewise. let me ask you about - something you just mentioned. you understand the prime minister may make a short statement before pmqs, how certain are you that that is happening? we had some reports yesterday evening that that might be and then this morning that that wasn�*t the case. are you hearing that he will make a statement? we are that he will make a statement? - are hearing various things. i would say it is not going to be a full statement but potentially opening remarks prior to pmqs. i very much hope he does so. i expect a lot of the questions today to be focused on this issue. i think that is incredibly depressing for parliamentarians and the public. we are still facing a huge challenge from the 0micron variant of the
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coronavirus and that is what we should be focused on, how we help people in support of cost of living. but here we are talking about the behaviour and conduct of the prime minister, yet again. tqm. behaviour and conduct of the prime minister, yet again.— minister, yet again. 0k, wendy chamberlain — minister, yet again. 0k, wendy chamberlain mp, _ minister, yet again. 0k, wendy chamberlain mp, chief - minister, yet again. 0k, wendy chamberlain mp, chief whip . minister, yet again. 0k, wendyj chamberlain mp, chief whip for minister, yet again. 0k, wendy - chamberlain mp, chief whip for the liberal democrats, thank you very much. we put that question to you earlier, what do you want to hear from the prime minister at pmqs? let me read some of your responses. andy back on twitter says i have a question forjohnson, when are you going to resign? francesca says i am fed up of the latest focus, i wish the opposition gave up the fight and let this government get on with the important stuff! i understand people�*s anger but these guys have worked their backs off says francesca. this one from liz, the only thing i want to hear is his resignation. andy up north on twitter says the same thing, the only thing i want to hear from johnson is his resignation. you can keep those comments coming in, what do you want to hear, what do you expect to hear from the prime
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minister at pmqs today at noon? get in touch with me on twitter and you can use the hashtag bbc your questions. around 500 former teachers have signed up to return to school in england to help tackle staff shortages caused by covid according to the government. it comes after an appeal by the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, urging people with teaching experience to temporarily return to the profession. here�*s our education correspondent elaine dunkley. phones ringing
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it�*s 7am and the phones haven�*t stopped ringing. it�*s just to let you know, we�*ve got some work — tuesday, thursday. schools across the midlands desperate for supply staff. i'll have a look for a cover and i'll ring you back in five. we�*re the busiest we�*ve ever been. if you�*re a headteacher calling us at seven o�*clock, you�*re going to struggle. and that�*s just... that�*s just the reality that we�*re faced with. from caretakers through to teachers, this recruitment agency has supplied staff to 700 schools — and the bookings are still coming in. there�*s just not enough teachers out there, and teaching assistants out there. a good day for me is when we�*re able to fill all our requirements. we pride ourselves on long—term relationships, we pride ourselves on how good we are at matching candidates to schools. a bad day is your 7:30, 8:00 calls come in, schools — "we need this, we need that," and you�*re having to say, "0h, we�*ve got no—one on our availability." this is mayfield school in birmingham. staffing is in crisis because of covid. all the children here have special educational needs. every class has at least, i would say, two to three agency members of staff. we�*ve had to shut classrooms. young people have got very complex medical needs, very complex learning presentations and styles. so, you can�*tjust find an agency memberjust to cover them — that has a massive impact on the young person.
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i can�*t see us getting through sort of this term without any more class closures. i think the worst bit for me is coming into a new class, like, every day and just trying to get to grips with how each child is. so, it hasn't fully gone hard, . but you can see the difference. we have agency staff in here now and she is a nice teacher, and once you get to know the person, they�*re... it�*s nice to hear their story, from where they come from, what other school they might have come from. meanwhile, back at aspire people recruitment, retired headteacher paul mcintyre, and former teacher neelam raju have come in to talk to staff. so what sort of thing are you...are you sort of looking at? the agency signing up retired teachers. it follows an appeal from the government to help deal with staff absences. neelam is keen to get started. i think more so, it was really to help and to support my colleagues and reallyjust make...make a difference. i think once you�*re in a classroom, i think it�*sjust a bit of a natural instinct — things do come back to you. but for paul, it�*s a no. i think it's more...there's a bit
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of anxiety, there would be anxiety amongst particularly older professionals about going into schools again when they see the headlines about lack of ventilation which they'd have to endure. supply staff have helped ensure schools can stay open, and in—class learning continues. atjudgemeadow community college in leicester, it�*s maths teacher bhavesh�*s second day. i think the challenge has always been the behaviour aspect of it. cos i�*m sure when i was younger, as well, when you know there�*s a supply teacher coming in, it�*s how much can you get away with in terms of your behaviour and stuff? so, that�*s always going to be a challenge. i believe 12 members of staff that have currently tested positive, potentially collapse some classes and also use some senior leaders to cover those classes, as well... the government says schools can apply for additional funding to cover the cost of supply staff. but for pupils, it�*s more disruption. ifeel like i�*m missing out on my education if perhaps i do have a supply teacher, and it�*s that uncertainty with what�*s going to
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happen with our gcses. having a lot of supply teachers kind of takes a chunk out of the learning of our subjects. the supply teachers that i've had, they give us the work— and theyjust leave us to it, rather than the teachers . that we normally have — they give us the work, l they explain it, 'cos they know... they teach the subject. for many schools, it�*s been a stressful start of term. back at the agency, more challenges to deal with. some of our supply staff themselves are calling us back up and saying they�*ve done a lateral flow test in the morning and they themselves are positive. you can imagine the pressure that that�*s putting on an already pressurised system that was creaking before. good afternoon. demand for emergency cover is increasing, with supply staff in very short supply. elaine dunkley, bbc news. more now on the pausing of smart motorways, which use the hard shoulder as a permanent lane for traffic. it�*s due to safety concerns. new projects will be put on hold but — for now —
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hard shoulders will not be reinstated. of the transport committee. thank you very much forjoining us. campaigners who have been concerned about the safety of these so—called smart motorways, they say that hard shoulder absolutely should be reinstated. is that one of your concerns in this pause? t reinstated. is that one of your concerns in this pause? i think the main concern _ concerns in this pause? i think the main concern the _ concerns in this pause? i think the main concern the reason - concerns in this pause? i think the main concern the reason why - concerns in this pause? i think the main concern the reason why the i main concern the reason why the select committee called for the pores and we are pleased the government are doing so, is to collect more data —— called for the pause. to make sure a smart motorway is as safe as a conventional motorway. take 2019�*s figure, they appear to be less safe. it is a relatively new concept and we need a longer period of time to address it. not building any more as the right thing until we know. crucially, retrofitting the safety measures onto the existing smart motorway network that should have been there
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in the first place but were not is what now needs to occur. the government have accepted that recommendation. that government have accepted that recommendation.— recommendation. that is an additional _ recommendation. that is an additional £319 _ recommendation. that is an additional £319 million - recommendation. that is an| additional £319 million public money. could some of that money had been saved if these measures were fitted in the first instance? that�*s a huge concern, isn�*t it, but whether public money is being wasted? tt whether public money is being wasted? , ., , whether public money is being wasted? , . wasted? it is a big concern. i was art of wasted? it is a big concern. i was part of the _ wasted? it is a big concern. i was part of the select _ wasted? it is a big concern. i was part of the select committee - wasted? it is a big concern. i was part of the select committee in l wasted? it is a big concern. i was i part of the select committee in 2016 that called for those measures to be brought in. we were given assurances by national highways or highways england as it then was that they would deliver those. they haven�*t. there has been a regime change now and ifirmly there has been a regime change now and i firmly believe that they are focused on the safety aspects as well as the capacity needs. crucially, one of our cause was to have the office of rail and road, the regulator, have more of an inspection duty so that they hold the body to account and make sure these matters are delivered. if that had been in place earlier it wouldn�*t have just been left to
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national highways. it is crucial to give people confidence to use these motorways. give people confidence to use these motorwa s. , , , ., motorways. during this pause, what is the key criteria, _ motorways. during this pause, what is the key criteria, the _ motorways. during this pause, what is the key criteria, the key _ is the key criteria, the key questions that he would want to see the answers to, to determine whether it is safe to do a wider roll—out of these motorways. it is safe to do a wider roll-out of these motorways.— it is safe to do a wider roll-out of these motorways. over a four-year eriod, these motorways. over a four-year period. we — these motorways. over a four-year period. we can _ these motorways. over a four-year period, we can see _ these motorways. over a four-year period, we can see that _ these motorways. over a four-year period, we can see that smart i period, we can see that smart motorways appear to actually have a better fatality rate than existing motorways with a conventional hard shoulder. as i say, for one year�*s data of 2019, the reverse is true. we need a longer period of time to study it and that is crucial. during that time, all of the work that is undertaken to make the existing smart motorway network safe and must be monitored by the office of rail and road and that will occur. £390 million, we will start to see the emergency refuge areas, where the drivers crawl into when their cars break down, they will be brought closer together. we will also have more stop vehicle detection
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technology to instantly close a lane as soon as a driver is stranded. 40% of all breakdowns on a smart motorway occur on the live lane because they can�*t get to the emergency refuge area. they should have been narrowed in the first place and that hasn�*t been. that work has to be done and monitored. 0ur committee will be looking at all of this to make it dull —— make sure it does occur. of this to make it dull -- make sure it does occur-— it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to _ it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to talk _ it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to talk to _ it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to talk to you _ it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to talk to you about i it does occur. you are aware that i am keen to talk to you about the l am keen to talk to you about the situation that the prime minister finds himself in and ahead of pmqs, lots of conservative mps are saying he needs to give direct answer, yes or no, as to whether he attended a party in downing street the 20th of may 2020 during the first lockdown. i would like to ask you, first of all, what have your constituents been saying to you about all of this? t been saying to you about all of this? g been saying to you about all of this? ~ , ., ., , this? i think it is a really important _ this? i think it is a really important for _ this? i think it is a really important for all - this? i think it is a really important for all of i this? i think it is a really important for all of us i this? i think it is a really l important for all of us who implement the rules when it comes to lockdown, to be abiding by them, as well, that is not only fair, that is also what ensures that people do the right thing. and that doesn�*t stop
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at any level. it is important that we know what occurred. it is also important that we judge people in the round and that includes the prime minister. there have been great successes that he has been responsible for during the pandemic, the vaccine roll—out, the booster roll—out comedy holding the nerve on plan b and support for businesses and people —— holding the nerve of. i hope people willjudge the prime minister in the round. and he has that ability to connect to people and speak directly in a manner that i don�*t and many politicians don�*t either. we now need to know what has occurred. 50. either. we now need to know what has occurred. , ., ., ., either. we now need to know what has occurred. ., ., , ., occurred. so, you want a straight answer from _ occurred. so, you want a straight answer from him. _ occurred. so, you want a straight answer from him. does _ occurred. so, you want a straight answer from him. does he i occurred. so, you want a straight answer from him. does he owe i occurred. so, you want a straight answer from him. does he owe itj occurred. so, you want a straight i answer from him. does he owe it to answerfrom him. does he owe it to the public and to parliament today to give an absolutely straight answer, yes or no, when he was at that party?— that party? yes, i believe so. because _ that party? yes, i believe so. because it — that party? yes, i believe so. because it is _ that party? yes, i believe so. because it is stopping - that party? yes, i believe so. because it is stopping the i because it is stopping the business... i am because it is stopping the business... iam here because it is stopping the business... i am here to talk about smart motorways and some of the great changes we will see that i�*m not talking about policy, i�*m talking about a party that i don�*t know anything about. the more that we can get straight answers on this,
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the more that we can then reflect, take action that is needed, but also trying to move forward with the public and to try and focus on the real crucial needs that people have right now. not least the cost of living. right now. not least the cost of livina. �* . ,, .., right now. not least the cost of livina. ~ . ,, .. , ., living. and i appreciate it is not exactly an _ living. and i appreciate it is not exactly an enviable _ living. and i appreciate it is not exactly an enviable patient i living. and i appreciate it is not exactly an enviable patient to l living. and i appreciate it is not. exactly an enviable patient to be living. and i appreciate it is not i exactly an enviable patient to be in to be asked questions about it on the bbc today. that is one else from your party was made available for the round, the normal round of morning interviews on breakfast news this morning. nonetheless, you are here. i have obviously asked you about smart motorways but clearly the public will expect these questions, as well. if the prime minister said he was at a party on the 20th of may 2020 and there are witnesses who say he was there, would you be clear that he broke the law, given that we were in the first lockdown, given what the government were saying at that time? or could there be in your mind any other defence? t�*m that time? or could there be in your mind any other defence?— mind any other defence? i'm always ha - to mind any other defence? i'm always happy to answer _ mind any other defence? i'm always happy to answer a — mind any other defence? i'm always happy to answer a direct _ mind any other defence? i'm always happy to answer a direct question, | happy to answer a direct question, you are right, picked the wrong day for the smart motorway changes that
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we have campaigned for full so long to actually come out because nobody else seems to be talking about it! i am a lawyer by training. to me, look at what has occurred, look at what the regulations say you can or can�*t do and then you make thatjudgment. the number ten garden is a private garden, the prime minister was also overspill garden for those that work in it. it seems to be quite complex. the person you really need to hear from and i need to hearfrom is the prime minister. all i can do is comment and talk about potential law issues. i don�*t really know enough. i am doing my best with the material i am doing my best with the material i actually have and i am sorry it is not better. i actually have and i am sorry it is not better-— not better. there was an e-mail, brin: not better. there was an e-mail, bring your— not better. there was an e-mail, bring your own — not better. there was an e-mail, bring your own booze _ not better. there was an e-mail, bring your own booze e-mail. itl bring your own booze e—mail. it clearly didn�*t sound like anything to do with work, did it? you say that the prime minister does have to bejudged in the round. at that time, those were the rules. police were taking action against other people who are breaking the rules.
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is it fair to say there should be the various highest expectation of the various highest expectation of the prime minister that they should follow their own rules. it comes into the category of one rule for him and one rule for everyone else. 0f him and one rule for everyone else. of course we have to ensure that those who implement rules, who legislate on them, when it comes to covid restrictions, because they were draconian rules, abide by them, as well. i absolutely get that. the reason why there is an independent inquiry launched is because there are other people because my careers, you talked about the person who sent the e—mail app, that is a civil servant. that individual deserves a fair hearing and for the... sam; servant. that individual deserves a fair hearing and for the. . .- fair hearing and for the. .. sorry to interru -t fair hearing and for the. .. sorry to interrupt you _ fair hearing and for the. .. sorry to interrupt you but _ fair hearing and for the. .. sorry to interrupt you but should _ fair hearing and for the. .. sorry to interrupt you but should boris i interrupt you but should boris johnson resign if he broke the law? again, we need to see exactly what occurred. what breaches were actually there. and then we can actually there. and then we can actually make that determination. i just... i can�*t speculate because i don�*t know what occurred, what type of rule breach it was. and therefore what the sanctions need to be. we are putting the cart before the
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horse. that is what i want to hear today and get more clarity so we can start addressing those issues. i just don�*t have the background and bases to be able to do so, i am sorry. tt bases to be able to do so, i am sor . , , �* sorry. it is something, isn't it, when the _ sorry. it is something, isn't it, when the prime _ sorry. it is something, isn't it, when the prime minister i sorry. it is something, isn't it, when the prime minister who l sorry. it is something, isn't it, i when the prime minister who leads the party of which you are a member, you as an mp are not aware of the facts. presumably, you would be in a much more comfortable position... if thatis much more comfortable position... if that is the right terminology. if you are appraised of the facts, would you at least expect your leader to be telling you, as one of his mps, what happened, what did not happen? {lit his mps, what happened, what did not ha en? .., , his mps, what happened, what did not hauen? , ., his mps, what happened, what did not hauen? , . ., ~' ., happen? of course i want to know what occurred _ happen? of course i want to know what occurred so _ happen? of course i want to know what occurred so i _ happen? of course i want to know what occurred so i can _ happen? of course i want to know what occurred so i can give - happen? of course i want to know what occurred so i can give my i what occurred so i can give my constituents that contact me and ask what did occur a very straight answer because i have always been in the business of giving straight answers. as i say, there are lots of careers that are being judged. it is right there is an inquiry but the aspects that relate to the prime minister, i hope later on today during prime minister�*s questions, he can give more clarity as to what occurred with regard to his own role in it and then we will all have a
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better basis to huw merriman discuss. ~ . ., ., ., discuss. mp, chair of the transport select committee, _ discuss. mp, chair of the transport select committee, thank _ discuss. mp, chair of the transport select committee, thank you i discuss. mp, chair of the transport select committee, thank you very l select committee, thank you very much for your time today. —— better basis to discuss. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. frosty and foggy especially this morning. now things are starting to clear. as we go through the next few days, the northern half of the country will have the mild conditions. breezy. england and wales will be frosty and increasingly foggy by the time we get to friday. quite a bit of sunshine and dry weather across england, wales and northern ireland today. western scotland and the north of scotland, more cloud. spots of rain and gusty winds. it is the north that is likely to have the highest temperatures. getting up to 12 degrees in aberdeen. 6 in birmingham. as we head through the evening and overnight, we hang onto
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this cloud across the north under clear skies further south we will see fog reform and widespread frost with temperatures falling away quite rapidly under the clear skies. temperatures could dip down as low as —1, for example, in norwich. compare that to plus 7 in stornoway. tomorrow, we still have high pressure that has been driving our weather all week. pressure that has been driving our weatherall week. not pressure that has been driving our weather all week. not an ice about insight. the fog that we start with will be slow to clear and we expect the fog tomorrow morning to be more widespread than it was this morning. a lot of it will lift, some of it into low cloud and if that happens where you are, it will suppress the temperature. 0nce where you are, it will suppress the temperature. once again, a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine but still the north and west of scotland plagued by the cloud with some spots of rain and windy conditions. also the mildest weather in the north and bit a cooler as we push further south. thursday into friday, you can see how we�*ve got all these yellows in the chart, indicating mild air coming up around our area of high
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pressure. 0n coming up around our area of high pressure. on friday, that high pressure. on friday, that high pressure starts to slip away, allowing a weather front to drape in across the far north of scotland, bringing in some rain. quite a foggy start during the course of friday especially across england and wales. some of that will lift into low cloud. generally, for most, it will be a dull day and if anything temperatures will slip a little bit compared to the next couple of days. you can see that quite nicely here on the chart. as we head the weekend, saturday, cloudy for most of us, some rain across north—west scotland and on sunday, again, fairly cloudy for most.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson will face mps as pressure mounts for him to say whether he attended a drinks party in the downing street garden during the first lockdown. his own mps want answers and the opposition want him to resign if he did. the more that we can get straight answers— the more that we can get straight answers on— the more that we can get straight answers on this, the more we can then_ answers on this, the more we can then reflect, take action that's needed — then reflect, take action that's needed but also try and move forward with the _ needed but also try and move forward with the public. if he�*s lied to the british public, he�*s lied to parliament and he has attended parties during lockdown, then his position is untenable. what do you want hear from borisjohnson at pmqs today? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions.
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double fault for novak djokovic — as the tennis star admits breaking

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