Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 12, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

2:00 am
welcome to bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: president biden makes a passionate plea for reform of voting rights describing it as a defining moment for us democracy. us covid infections reach an all—time high with hospitalisations doubling in just two weeks — a stark warning is issued to the unvaccinated. about a 20 times likelihood that you would be dead if you were unvaccinated. the british prime minister under growing pressure over a downing street drinks party at a time when large gatherings were banned at the height of a covid lockdown. more than half of afghanistan's population has too little to eat. the un calls for billions of dollars in aid —
2:01 am
the bbc�*s quinten sommerville reports on a growing crisis. a medical helicopter crashes in phildalephia, narrowly missing a church and power lines. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. president biden is calling it a defining moment for us democracy. he was in georgia today, calling on the us senate to create national rules for early voting and voting by mail, and to restore state voting laws meant to prevent discrimination. this is one of the big drives of the biden administration after many republican controlled states introduced tighter voting regulations after the last presidential election. jim crow 2.0 is about two insidious things —
2:02 am
voter suppression and election subversion. it's no longer about who gets to vote, it's about making it harder to vote. it's about who gets to count the vote — and whether your vote counts at all. it's not hyperbole, this is a fact. look, this matters to all of us. the goal of the former president's allies is to disenfranchise anyone who votes against them. simple as that. steve simon is secretary of state for minnesota, the state's chief election official. thank you forjoining us. can i just start from the point of view of your role within the state. you have a role to play for your state, don't you want to hold those powers?- for your state, don't you want to hold those powers? yes, it's alwa s a to hold those powers? yes, it's always a balance _ to hold those powers? yes, it's always a balance in _ to hold those powers? yes, it's always a balance in our - always a balance in our country. on the one hand, congress, the federal
2:03 am
government should set floors under which no—one should go under which no—one should go under with standards but in our state of minnesota it is about us getting to those objectives and setting those standards. there are always republican voters and democrats and it's very clear there are many voters, largely republican, who do fear that people are voting or casting ballots illegally. how do you address that ifjoe biden�*s drive for these federal measures do go through? we biden's drive for these federal measures do go through? we want eve one, measures do go through? we want everyone, regardless _ measures do go through? we want everyone, regardless of— measures do go through? we want everyone, regardless of party, - everyone, regardless of party, to have confidence in the system, that is true. one of the ways we bridge the gap is focusing on actual facts and reasonable people can disagree on policy, they can disagree with me or anyone of my colleagues around the united states, but at some point facts are facts and the fact is, the verifiable fact is that the
2:04 am
2020 us election was fundamentally fair, honest and secured. it was the most watched and scrutinised election probably in the history of the country and the facts are that it was clean. wouldn't make some sense to have some of the regulations and conditions that republicans are keen on, such as photo id, things like that, also to be brought into the picture here? i think there's room for negotiation and at one point there was that provision in one of the federal bills here that there would be some limited, mandatory, federal voter id and thatis mandatory, federal voter id and that is something the republicans and democrats could buy into. clearly, there has to be some compromise, things we can agree on to tighten the system and make shore that we have voter integrity without cutting off access, that is the age—old debate, you don't want to cut off access to eligible voters. ., ., ., ~ ., , voters. you are making a very reasonable — voters. you are making a very reasonable proposition - voters. you are making a very reasonable proposition there. | reasonable proposition there. as you know, there are many of your colleagues within the democrats movement who feel
2:05 am
thatjoe biden has been soft pedalling on this. they want more and they wanted quicker, what you say to them? is always slow, especially _ what you say to them? is always slow, especially something - what you say to them? is always slow, especially something as i slow, especially something as big and controversial as voting rights. i think he has done the rights. i think he has done the right thing at the right time. remember, this is a creature of the us senate, joe biden, he has been there for decades and now the time for maximum impact is finally saying, as i think you should, there is time for rules reform in the united states senate that would enable the majority to rule so we can have majority rule, notjust in that body but in the country. briefly, can you see him getting this through? i think an hinu getting this through? i think anything is _ getting this through? i think anything is possible. - getting this through? i think anything is possible. i - getting this through? i think anything is possible. i don't| anything is possible. i don't think anyone really knows. there is very little room for error, 50—50 in the united states senate and i think the next few days will be very critical. ., ~' , ., next few days will be very critical. ., ~ ,, . ., , critical. thank you, secretary of state, _ critical. thank you, secretary of state. of _ critical. thank you, secretary of state, of minnesota. - italy has reported more than 220,000 new covid infections — that's more than double the number on monday. records are also tumbling
2:06 am
in other european countries. the world health organisation's director for europe says more than half the continent's population will catch covid in the next two months if infections continue at current rates. experts say vaccines still provide good protection against omicron, but because of the unprecedented scale of transmission, we're now seeing rising numbers going into hospital across europe. at this rate, the institute for health metrics and evaluation forecasts that more than 50% of the population in the region will be infected with omicron in the next 6—8 weeks. data collated in recent weeks confirms that omicron is highly transmissible, because the mutations it has enable it to adhere to human cells more easily, and it can infect even those who have been previously infected or vaccinated. in the united states,
2:07 am
the number of patients in hospital with covid—i9 hit a record high on tuesday. just shy of 146,000 people are in hospitals with covid—i9, surpassing the previous peak set in january 2021 — that's twice as many as were in hospital two weeks ago. not all of them were admitted for covid, a proportion of these people went in for other ailments, then tested positive while in hospital but the vast majority are the unvaccinated. a little earlier, the us chief medical advisor anthony fauci was giving evidence to a congressional commitee on the current state of play. here's his response to a question on the importance of vaccinations. if you look at vaccinated verses unvaccinated, there is a ten times chance that you would be infected and 17 times greater chance that you will be hospitalised if you are unvaccinated and about a 20 times likelihood that
2:08 am
that you would be dead if you were unvaccinated. when you look at every parameter, ten times, 17 times, 20 times, infection, hospitalisation, death. the familiarfigure the familiar figure and message from doctor anthony fauci. the us has promised more than three hundred million dollars in new aid to afghanistan, and has urged the taliban to give unhindered access to all aid workers. earlier, the united nations appealed for $5 billion to tackle a spiralling humanitarian crisis in the country, where aid has mostly dried up since the taliban takeover in august. the onset of a harsh winter is deepening the crisis. from kabul, our corrspondent, quentin sommerville, sent this report. after 20 years of war, afghanistan faces a long, harsh winter and a cold and hungry peace. victorious, the taliban now guard food queues.
2:09 am
more than half the country is going hungry. women, barred from work and education, have lost another fundamental right — the ability to feed their families. here in wardak province, we meet pari. as a second wife, she supports a family of six alone. this wheelbarrow of basics is meant to last them 17 days, but maybe less. there was no rice today. translation: winter is very difficult. - we don't have money to buy food or firewood. we just fill the room with smoke to feel warm, but still, it's cold. her granddaughter is always hungry. the baby's mother can't produce milk. baby formula is beyond the reach of almost everyone here. the taliban are international pariahs, so the economy
2:10 am
is being crushed by sanctions. only humanitarian aid is allowed. so, in kabul, even the well—to—do are queueing for world food programme hand—outs. these wheelbarrows are full of the very basics — salt, rice, peanuts, cooking oil —— and for many of the people here, it's the first time they've had food in days. the interesting thing is, though, that the bazaars, the markets in central kabul are full of produce, but no—one here has any money. and this isn'tjust the case here in kabul, it's the same situation across afghanistan. this should be the time when afghanistan stops and catches its breath. instead, its poorest are sinking deeper into poverty. ajhar moved here from nangarhar province. this house is home to fourfamilies.
2:11 am
they can't afford soap to wash the kids' faces. they burn plastic to keep warm. it still isn't safe for them to return, he says. "we would have moved to pakistan, but pakistan closed its borders to us." this is a cascading crisis, touching every part of society. three—and—a—half—year—old abdul is doing much better now. "you should have seen weeks ago", his mum says. a million afghan kids will be severely malnourished this year. much of afghanistan's health care system is close to collapse. soraya is a year and a half. her big, bright eyes don't miss a trick. she was severely malnourished. hertummy and her limbs are still swollen. translation: when we came here, her situation was very bad, - and she needed a blood transfusion.
2:12 am
thank god she's so much better than she was. the doctor has said we should wait here until the swelling goes down. ten years ago, i lived next door to this hospital. it was a time of a great surge of men, material and billions of dollars into afghanistan. western diplomats would say they weren't trying to build perfection here, they weren't trying to create switzerland. who knows what they were trying to create, but it wasn't this. it wasn't a country where half the people, more than half the people are going hungry and babies like soraya are near starvation. should afghanistan now be left to struggle alone? for two decades, afghans of all ages were trapped in a tempest of violence between western forces and the taliban. those battles are now over, but the afghan people's suffering endures. for them, there's no respite. quentin sommerville, bbc news, kabul. here in the uk prime
2:13 am
minister borisjohnson is facing increasing pressure over allegations that he attended a garden party for staff at 10 downing street during the first lockdown in may 2020. the government is refusing to either confirm or deny eyewitnesses' accounts that he and his wife were at the gathering of 30 people, which appeared to contravene covid restrictions in england at the time. here's bbc�*s deputy political editor vicki young. amongst tory mps there are a range of opinion, today i spoke to some of his long—time critics who are absolutely furious, incredibly rude about him and think you should go. more worrying for the prime minister though is amongst some of those who previously backed him. they really think there is a lack of grip in downing street, the hate the way these stories keep coming out and they feel they should have been more transparency from the beginning but do not forget of
2:14 am
course, borisjohnson have an 80 seat majority and there is a lot of anger but what i do not detect at this point at least is any kind of advanced, organised plan to try to get rid of him. what many tory mps do want is firstly an apology and they do want a better explanation of exactly what was going on in number 10 downing st. preferably, they wanted before 12 noon tomorrow which is when borisjohnson gets up to and star prime minister's questions. —answer. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the prince is back and this time he's fresher than ever — the �*90s tv programme that launched the career of global superstar will smith has been given a gritty reboot. day one of operation desert storm to force the iraqis out of kuwait has seen the most intense air attacks since the second world war. tobacco is america's oldest industry,
2:15 am
and it's one of its biggest, but the industry is nervous of this report. this may tend to make people want to stop smoking cigarettes. there is not a street that is unaffected. l huge parts of kobe were simplyl demolished as buildings crashed into one another. this woman said she'd been given no help _ and no advice - by the authorities. she stood outside the ruins of her business. j tens of thousands of black children in south africa have taken advantage of laws, passed by the country's new multiracial government, and enrolled at formerly white schools. tonight sees the 9,610th performance of her long—running play, the mousetrap. when they heard of her death today, the management considered whether to cancel tonight's performance, but agatha christie would have been the last person to want such a thing. this is bbc news.
2:16 am
i'm david eades. the latest headlines: president biden has made a passionate plea for reform of voting rights in the united states, describing this as a defining moment for democracy. new warnings that the pandemic is still gathering pace, as the us suffers a new world record for daily covid cases and record numbers in hospital. that saga with novak djokovic goes on and on, doesn't it, in australia. the australian government is still deciding whether to cancel his visa. on top of that, questions are being raised about whether novak djokovic made a false declaration on his border entry form. as we discovered yesterday, it appears he ticked a box to say he had not travelled in the two weeks before arriving in melbourne on 5january. on christmas day, he was in belgrade. and yet, this picture tweeted by a portuguese journalist shows novak djokovic posing with a serbian handball player. a few days later he was in spain. this video shows djokovic training in marbella on 2 january. he also signed autographs
2:17 am
there forfans. tennis commentator craig gabriel joins me live now from sydney. there is so much to chew over here. and obviously a big decision for the immigration minister to take. where does the biggest element of this must line now, do you think was yellow i think it is really between the two governments, you have to take tennis australia out of it. it comes down to _ australia out of it. it comes down to guidelines - australia out of it. it comes down to guidelines and - australia out of it. it comes l down to guidelines and rules. that is where it sits. if alex hawke, the immigration minister, decides to cancel the visa for a second time, no doubt this is going to go back into the courts, because his lawyers, djokovic's lawyers will ask for an injunction. he could very well, and more likely, is the feeling, you would get a temporary injunction that would take him through to the end of the
2:18 am
australian open, allowing him to play at the australian open. there is still a way to go on this whole matter, but it is an absolute mess. we this whole matter, but it is an absolute mess.— this whole matter, but it is an absolute mess. we keep hearing that, for the _ absolute mess. we keep hearing that, for the organisers - absolute mess. we keep hearing that, for the organisers of - absolute mess. we keep hearing that, for the organisers of the i that, for the organisers of the event, of course, they have got to lay out the seedings, who is playing who, and there is a time limit on that. is it a fixed one, do you think, or if this drags on, if there is another chapter, can they put that back was yellow no. the seating is already out. obviously the seedings follow the world rankings, that is djokovic number one, on the women's aid ash barty is the number one seed. the draw for the australian open is tomorrow. we're wednesday afternoon here in sydney, here in melbourne, the draw is tomorrow so you would want to have, if anything is going to happen you would want it finished and sorted out by later today at the absolute latest. �* .., , . later today at the absolute latest. �* , ., , latest. because if the draw is done and _ latest. because if the draw is done and then _ latest. because if the draw is done and then something - done and then something happens, it is definitely going to make an even greater mess of
2:19 am
things. to make an even greater mess of thins. �* ., ., ., ,~' to make an even greater mess of thins. �* ., ., ., i. things. i've got to ask you also, it — things. i've got to ask you also. it is _ things. i've got to ask you also, it is such _ things. i've got to ask you also, it is such a - things. i've got to ask you also, it is such a big - things. i've got to ask you also, it is such a big issue j also, it is such a big issue and we understand that, politically it is so difficult, for many people in australia djokovic does not really fit the bill at the moment, given his views on vaccination and what of a lot of australians have gone through, particularly in victoria, of course, but what would the event to be like without djokovic? i mean, he is such a draw, isn't it? he without djokovic? i mean, he is such a draw, isn't it?— such a draw, isn't it? he is a hue such a draw, isn't it? he is a huge draw- _ such a draw, isn't it? he is a huge draw. there's - such a draw, isn't it? he is a huge draw. there's no - such a draw, isn't it? he is a i huge draw. there's no escaping that. he is the world number one. he is the defending champion going free 10th australian title. he is trying to break the record he currently holds for the most majors in the men's game at 20, there is obviously a stack of things at stake over here, but theissue things at stake over here, but the issue also is that no—one player is bigger than the game or the australian open. and that's the crucial thing. and while every tournament wants to have the best players in the
2:20 am
world, to be part of the draw, you know, that is the other side of the matter. no player is bigger than the game all one of the four majors, which the australian is. of the four ma'ors, which the australian is.— australian is. indeed, craig gabriel, — australian is. indeed, craig gabriel, thank _ australian is. indeed, craig gabriel, thank you - australian is. indeed, craig gabriel, thank you very - australian is. indeed, craig l gabriel, thank you very much indeed. once again, we wait to see where this story goes next. it's being hailed as a miracle. a helicopter carrying four people, including an infant, to the children's hospital of philadelphia has crashed in a residential neighbourhood. thankfully, all of the passengers aboard avoided life—threatening injuries. mark lobel reports. this place of worship, the scene of a miracle. now the final resting place of a twin—engine medical helicopter after it crashed on the church's front lawn, carrying a tim macrow —month—old baby girl. but for her and fellow passengers it is a story of survival. passengers it is a story of survival-— passengers it is a story of survival. ~ . ., . ~ survival. we hear a crash. and i survival. we hear a crash. and i thought _ survival. we hear a crash. and i thought it — survival. we hear a crash. and i thought it was _ survival. we hear a crash. and i thought it was a _ survival. we hear a crash. and i thought it was a car - survival. we hear a crash. and i thought it was a car crash. i i thought it was a car crash. the pilot weaved his ailing
2:21 am
aircraft through this densely populated pennsylvania neighbourhood, dodging powerlines, and avoiding restaurants and schools, before landing on the ground and tumbling over.— landing on the ground and tumbling over. landing on the ground and tumblin: over. , , ., tumbling over. the best way to describe it _ tumbling over. the best way to describe it is _ tumbling over. the best way to describe it is a _ tumbling over. the best way to describe it is a miracle. - tumbling over. the best way to describe it is a miracle. i - describe it is a miracle. i honestly, just, the pilot had a great command of the helicopter was able to land it safely. we took the best interests of the community at hand to make sure there were no injuries, no property damage. so he did an excellentjob. the property damage. so he did an excellent job.— excellent “0b. the pilot is beint excellent job. the pilot is being hailed _ excellent job. the pilot is being hailed a _ excellent job. the pilot is being hailed a hero, - excellent job. the pilot is being hailed a hero, notl excellent job. the pilot is i being hailed a hero, notjust for his incredible landing, but for his incredible landing, but for helping his passengers out safely, despite his own injuries, before emergency services came to their rescue. with the passengers out safely, firefighters worked to contain leaking fuel from entering drexel hill's waterline. mt; drexel hill's waterline. my heart drexel hill's waterline. ij�*i heart dropped. drexel hill's waterline. m heart dropped. i was drexel hill's waterline. m1 heart dropped. i was back at police headquarters in we heard come out. in the first i said no way, the second and third, knew there was a problem. we
2:22 am
responded on occasion and this is what we saw. again, it was a true miracle that everyone was out. and they will out prior to us getting here. the out. and they will out prior to us getting here.— out. and they will out prior to us getting here. the baby then continued her _ us getting here. the baby then continued herjourney - us getting here. the baby then continued herjourney from - continued herjourney from pennsylvania to the philadelphia children's hospital, but this time on the road after her miracle escape. the remaining three passengers take into an acute care hospital. none with life—threatening injuries. as an investigator gets under way as the crash of this privately owned and medical transport service which, thankfully, did deliver and ultimately save, if unexpected did, landing. mark lobel, bbc news. nbc�*s hit show the fresh prince of bel—air, which ran for 148 episodes over six seasons in the �*90s, is back, although this time it's not a laugh a minute. far from it. a trailer for a reboot of the show, titled �*bel—air�* has been released, which, like the original show, is based around a street smart teenager born and raised in west philadelphia who is set to live with his wealthy uncle and aunt in bel—air.
2:23 am
let us have a look. geoffrey thompson, _ let us have a look. geoffrey thompson, past _ let us have a look. geoffrey thompson, past manager. i let us have a look. geoffrey i thompson, past manager. ten ears as thompson, past manager. ten years as a — thompson, past manager. ten years as a long — thompson, past manager. ten years as a long time. - thompson, past manager. ten years as a long time. let - thompson, past manager. ten years as a long time. let me i years as a long time. let me show you — years as a long time. let me show you around. _ years as a long time. let me show you around. hilary! - years as a long time. let me i show you around. hilary! will! let's to show you around. hilary! will! let's go find — show you around. hilary! will! let's go find you _ show you around. hilary! will! let's go find you something i show you around. hilary! will! j let's go find you something fit for a _ let's go find you something fit for a prince _ let's go find you something fit for a prince.— for a prince. what did you think? on, _ for a prince. what did you think? 0h, mate, - for a prince. what did you think? 0h, mate, you - for a prince. what did you - think? 0h, mate, you look... that is a _ think? 0h, mate, you look... that is a little _ think? oh, mate, you look... that is a little flavour- think? 0h, mate, you look... that is a little flavour for - that is a little flavour for you. we can now speak to valerie complex, who is an associate editor and film writer at deadline, which focusses on film, tv, and entertainment news. thank you very much indeed for joining us. this is extraordinary on a number of levels, it seems to me, but turning what was a usually successful comedy, sitcom, basically, into a serious drama, that is a challenge and a half, isn't it? valerie, bear
2:24 am
with us a second, we cannot hear you at the moment. we have a slight problem with the sound. i think we have got you now. excellent.— sound. i think we have got you now. excellent. technology. to answer your — now. excellent. technology. to answer your question, - now. excellent. technology. to answer your question, it - now. excellent. technology. to answer your question, it is - now. excellent. technology. to answer your question, it is a i answer your question, it is a 180 degrees trajectory of change for this show, but it is what reboots should do, it should be something completely different, offerfans something different, offer fans something completely different, offerfans something completely new and i think it will be something great forjen z as well as something for someone like me who grew up with the show to see it materialise in a different way. we are told and we can see from the trailer there, it is going to be gritty, issues of race and class are coming to the fore, a bit more sophisticated perhaps, in the treatment of those issues, which presumably fits the time, which is the point, isn't it? i fits the time, which is the point, isn't it?— fits the time, which is the point, isn't it? i think that eve point, isn't it? ithink that every time _
2:25 am
point, isn't it? ithink that every time period - point, isn't it? ithink that every time period has - point, isn't it? ithinkthatl every time period has their point, isn't it? ithinkthat- every time period has their way of addressing some sociopolitical issues that exist for that time, but i think addressing the effects of social media, that has an influence on life now, is a really great way to sort of connect difference, you know, types of people and bring new and old people, viewers, rather, back to the showstopper very briefly, we are low on time, morgan cooper came from nowhere and pitched the idea, and will smith has picked it up and will smith has picked it up and run with it. it is amazing what can be done. i think, you know, every part comes from somewhere. and it wouldn't necessarily say it came from nowhere, it came from his imagination and he definitely put something together and that is the testament to his talent, but also to social media and how social media sort of takes down the barrier a bit and connects people who would not normally connect... it’s
2:26 am
connects people who would not normally connect. . ._ normally connect... it's the democratic _ normally connect... it's the democratic side _ normally connect... it's the democratic side of - normally connect... it's the democratic side of social i normally connect... it's the - democratic side of social media we often talk about, don't we? we will have to leave it there. we will have to leave it there. we look forward to the series and thanks forjoining us. that is valerie complex. and thank you for being with us and bbc news. hello there. on tuesday, sunshine returned to the northern half of the uk. and through the rest of this week, we'll continue to see differences north—south. but we've got a milder, stronger breeze picking up across scotland and northern ireland. england and wales, the winds are going to be much lighter, so we're more likely to have some frost here and increasing amounts of mist and fog too. now, it was pretty damp and grey for many southern parts of the uk on tuesday, but all that low cloud and damp weather is heading out into the english channel, so clearer skies are following on behind. and whilst it's chilly across parts of scotland and northern ireland, a frost more likely in england and wales. not just that, but we're seeing some mist and fog developing, particularly in this area where we have the yellow warning from the met office. and within that area, there are some very busy roads. so with some dense patches of fog, driving conditions could be tricky in the morning. that's when we'll still have some fog around,
2:27 am
but it should gradually lift through the day, and for many parts, we should see some sunshine coming through. some sunshine across northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland, much more cloud across the north—west of scotland, although it should be largely dry. quite windy, mind you, and temperatures probably reaching double figures in the north of scotland, nearer 7 or 8 degrees, i think, for england and wales, even with some sunshine. and we've got milder conditions across northern areas because we've got these strong winds coming all the way across the atlantic, around the top of this area of high pressure. and underneath that area of high pressure, this is where we're seeing the frost and the fog. so we start with another frost again on thursday morning, we may well find the fog a little more widespread, not just across some southern parts of england and the midlands, maybe into parts of wales and across northern england for a while. some of that could linger into the afternoon, but for many places, again, we should see some sunshine coming out. and it's a similar story again across scotland and northern ireland — cloudier weather in the north—west of scotland, a little bit damp, as well. still, those temperature contrasts really north—south across the uk. where that fog is slow to lift, it will be quite a cold day. all that cold air is stuck underneath this area of high pressure. stagnant air, really, so fog is tending to
2:28 am
become more widespread. and it may well drift its way up into parts of northern ireland and southern scotland. most of the fog, though, on friday will be across england and wales, and it could linger into the afternoon. some sunshine away from that fog and low cloud. and again, it'll always be milder across more northern parts of scotland.
2:29 am
2:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines: president biden is calling it a defining moment for us democracy. he was in georgia, calling on the us senate to create national rules for early voting and voting by mail, and to restore state voting laws meant to prevent discrimination. the us has recorded more than one million new covid cases as officials warn the peak of a fast—spreading omicron surge is still to come and there are currently more people in us hospitals with covid than at any point during the pandemic. uk prime minister borisjohnson is facing increasing pressure after accusations he attended a garden party during the first lockdown in may 2020. the government is neither confirming or denying that he and his wife were at the gathering.

24 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on