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tv   Context  BBC News  January 11, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. welcome to context — on tonight's show. pressure piling on boris johnson as british police say they're in contact with the government after the leak of an invite to a downing street garden party during the first lockdown. there has been no confirmation from the prime minister but it is thought that he and his wife are at the party in may 2020 at which up to a0 people reportedly attended. joe biden tells america there is nothing more fundamental than the right to vote. he says it is a defining moment for us democracy. teaching in a pandemic — 1 in 12 teachers are off sick in england, but in chicago teachers reach a deal to reopen schools
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tonight with the context, ruth smeeth who was a labour mp until the last election making her debut with us and a familiar face to many of you ron christie, former advisor to george w bush good evening. we will be bringing you the best analysis of all the top stories with our panel. analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay with analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay with us analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay with us for analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay with us for the analysis of all the top stories with our panel. stay with us for the next hour to get their insights of what is happening around the world. we will start with party gait. make no mistake, the british prime minister is in peril, in greater political danger than he's been at any point in this pandemic. the latest partygate revelation, an email from principal private secretary, martin reynolds to number 10 staff, inviting them to a downing street garden party, appears to flout in every rule the government had set down for the rest of us. (00v) "make the most of the lovely weather," it said, "socially distanced drinks" "make the most of the lovely weather," it
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said, "socially distanced drinks" "bring your own booze." we well remember where we were at the time. families divided, the elderly locked up in care homes. weddings, funerals cancelled. this afternoon, facing an urgent question from the oppostion, it fell to the paymaster general to issue the governments holding statement. i apologise again, unreservedly, for the upset that these allegations have caused. there is no need for an investigation into the symbol, central questions today. did the prime minister attend the event in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020? so far — mrjohnson has refused to give an answer to that key question. was he himself at the party? the prime minister says he's waiting until an internal inquiry led by senior civil servant sue grey is completed. but it may have already tipped the balance of the public opinion. according to savanta comres�*s snap poll out today, two—thirds of uk voters think it's
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time for borisjohnson to resign his position. greg baker is the former chair of the canterbury conservative association and he resigned over the handling of the pandemic. good evening. the opposition benches today were packed. the conservative backbenchers were empty as the paymaster general read his statement. do you suspect those mps that were absent today are taking soundings on whether borisjohnson is the right person to lead the party? i is the right person to lead the .a ? ., i, , is the right person to lead the party? i am absolutely sure they are caettin an party? i am absolutely sure they are getting an earful— party? i am absolutely sure they are getting an earful from _ party? i am absolutely sure they are getting an earful from their - party? i am absolutely sure they are getting an earful from their party . getting an earful from their party members, their local party members. i worked for the party and supported them over 20 years and i left over them over 20 years and i left over the way they have been handling covid over the past two years and if you look at the by—elections in the likes of shropshire i am definitely
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not the only one. i think that former conservative supporters like me who have left the party have done it for three reasons, the first is the whole approach to covid, it has not been what we voted for. it has not been what we voted for. it has not been what we voted for. it has not been a conservative approach. they have been spending money like water, accruing massive debt, a00 billion across the whole economy. they have been refusing to let people exercise their personal responsibility, which i thought they would have done and instead try to take away liberties. the downing street parties are just the icing on the cake. it is the rank hypocrisy of having spent two years telling people to stay at home whilst they were having a bring your own bottle parties. were having a bring your own bottle arties. . , , parties. that is the interesting oint, parties. that is the interesting point. clearly _ parties. that is the interesting point, clearly there _ parties. that is the interesting point, clearly there were - parties. that is the interesting i point, clearly there were number parties. that is the interesting - point, clearly there were number 10 staff members who saw that hypocrisy, because according to
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laura kuenssberg, there were internal e—mails and one response was, is this for real? another one was, is this for real? another one was, why is martin encouraging a mass gathering in the garden? yet they went ahead with it anyway! exactly. there are two ways that the number 10 staff and their knowledge of the situation and how wrong it was is the worst aspect. the first one you just described, the second is that these people were spending every hour of the working day immersed in the data around covid and they had a real appreciation, a true appreciation of the actual risk of covid to most people, but at the same time they were going out and trying to scare the public absolutely silly. i think it is that rank hypocrisy and that almost unethical approach to telling the public there is one level of risk while they appreciated it was
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entirely different. you put that on top of how they addressed the past two years of covid and how they try to approach it and ijust two years of covid and how they try to approach it and i just wish that this conservative government would realise that to address a major health problem, you do not prescribe a massive die —— dose of socialism. ruth, cannot point you to timeline, i want you to see this, the power day in downing street was on may the 20th, five days later, from that party, we have dominic cummings in the downing street garden, addressing the press on his trip to barnard castle. questions were asked why the government did not take a harder line on my trip. maybe this is the context, that in fact he had an e—mail in his inbox, inviting him toa drinks an e—mail in his inbox, inviting him to a drinks partyjust five days earlier? to a drinks party 'ust five days earlier? , ., , ., ., , earlier? everyone seem to have been breakin: earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the — earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the rules _
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earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the rules and _ earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the rules and if _ earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the rules and if you - earlier? everyone seem to have been breaking the rules and if you think i breaking the rules and if you think about_ breaking the rules and if you think about the — breaking the rules and if you think about the context you have just said, _ about the context you have just said. you — about the context you have just said, you will remember that every single _ said, you will remember that every singie day— said, you will remember that every single day in the wake running up to the dominit— single day in the wake running up to the dominic cummings statement, the newspapers were grim for the prime minister. _ newspapers were grim for the prime minister, talking about how it was one rule _ minister, talking about how it was one rule for them and one rule for everyone — one rule for them and one rule for everyone else, highlighting the fact that everyone was meant to be in it together— that everyone was meant to be in it together and they were not and at the same — together and they were not and at the same time, we now know that that was definitely an absolutely true, they were — was definitely an absolutely true, they were having parties and we have no idea _ they were having parties and we have no idea how— they were having parties and we have no idea how many, but at least two. this was— no idea how many, but at least two. this was becoming more commonplace and from _ this was becoming more commonplace and from the excuses we have seen, it is extraordinary, it was not uncommon— it is extraordinary, it was not uncommon for people to be in the garden _ uncommon for people to be in the garden with wine and beer. i was not getting _ garden with wine and beer. i was not getting to _ garden with wine and beer. i was not getting to see anyone i worked with, never— getting to see anyone i worked with, never mind _ getting to see anyone i worked with, never mind the people i love on a day-to-day— never mind the people i love on a day—to—day basis, even for a cup of coffee, _ day—to—day basis, even for a cup of coffee, never— day—to—day basis, even for a cup of coffee, never mind wine or beer. it is extraordinary that this betrayal of the _ is extraordinary that this betrayal of the general public, of every single — of the general public, of every single one of us who experienced
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awtui— single one of us who experienced awful things during the last couple of years. _ awful things during the last couple of years, while other people got to socialise _ of years, while other people got to socialise lt— of years, while other people got to socialise. . . , of years, while other people got to socialise. , ., , �* , socialise. it is a very british sto , socialise. it is a very british story. but _ socialise. it is a very british story. but i _ socialise. it is a very british story, but i wonder - socialise. it is a very british story, but i wonder if - socialise. it is a very british story, but i wonder if there| socialise. it is a very british i story, but i wonder if there is socialise. it is a very british - story, but i wonder if there is a parallel. we know at the time that in september, when president trump, then president trump was heading to then president trump was heading to the first presidential debate, he tested positive and all his staff knew and the issue here is that we treat it as the norm, but it should not be. if you are lying to the public, first of all people within your own administration know it and your own administration know it and you are weaker as a politician and secondly, you undermine trust with the public at a time when you're asking them to make sacrifices. goad asking them to make sacrifices. good evenina. i asking them to make sacrifices. good evening. i think— asking them to make sacrifices. good evening. i think the _ asking them to make sacrifices. good evening. i think the two _ asking them to make sacrifices. good evening. i think the two really important _ evening. i think the two really important aspects _ evening. i think the two really important aspects to - evening. i think the two really important aspects to look- evening. i think the two really important aspects to look at, i evening. i think the two really. important aspects to look at, the parallels— important aspects to look at, the parallels in— important aspects to look at, the parallels in the _ important aspects to look at, the parallels in the us _ important aspects to look at, the parallels in the us with _ important aspects to look at, the parallels in the us with what - important aspects to look at, the parallels in the us with what the| parallels in the us with what the prime _ parallels in the us with what the prime minister— parallels in the us with what the prime minister is _ parallels in the us with what the prime minister is dealing - parallels in the us with what the prime minister is dealing with i parallels in the us with what the prime minister is dealing with inj prime minister is dealing with in the uk — prime minister is dealing with in the uk first— prime minister is dealing with in the uk. first of— prime minister is dealing with in the uk. first of all, _ prime minister is dealing with in the uk. first of all, you - prime minister is dealing with in the uk. first of all, you cannot. prime minister is dealing with in i the uk. first of all, you cannot put people _ the uk. first of all, you cannot put people in— the uk. first of all, you cannot put people in lockdown, _ the uk. first of all, you cannot put people in lockdown, you _ the uk. first of all, you cannot put people in lockdown, you cannot i the uk. first of all, you cannot puti people in lockdown, you cannot tell people _ people in lockdown, you cannot tell people they — people in lockdown, you cannot tell people they cannot _ people in lockdown, you cannot tell people they cannot leave _ people in lockdown, you cannot tell people they cannot leave their- people they cannot leave their homes. — people they cannot leave their homes. they— people they cannot leave their homes, they must— people they cannot leave their homes, they must wear-
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people they cannot leave their homes, they must wear a i people they cannot leave their. homes, they must wear a mask, people they cannot leave their- homes, they must wear a mask, they must _ homes, they must wear a mask, they must socially — homes, they must wear a mask, they must socially distance _ homes, they must wear a mask, they must socially distance and _ homes, they must wear a mask, they must socially distance and then i homes, they must wear a mask, they must socially distance and then you l must socially distance and then you test positive — must socially distance and then you test positive for— must socially distance and then you test positive for coronavirus - must socially distance and then you test positive for coronavirus and i test positive for coronavirus and you do _ test positive for coronavirus and you do not — test positive for coronavirus and you do not wear— test positive for coronavirus and you do not wear a _ test positive for coronavirus and you do not wear a mask- test positive for coronavirus and you do not wear a mask and i test positive for coronavirus and i you do not wear a mask and you're in a social— you do not wear a mask and you're in a social setting _ you do not wear a mask and you're in a social setting. it— you do not wear a mask and you're in a social setting. it gives _ you do not wear a mask and you're in a social setting. it gives people i you do not wear a mask and you're in a social setting. it gives people a i a social setting. it gives people a lot of— a social setting. it gives people a lot of reasons _ a social setting. it gives people a lot of reasons to _ a social setting. it gives people a lot of reasons to distrust - a social setting. it gives people a lot of reasons to distrust the i lot of reasons to distrust the information— lot of reasons to distrust the information they— lot of reasons to distrust the information they are - lot of reasons to distrust the | information they are hearing. lot of reasons to distrust the i information they are hearing. just lot of reasons to distrust the information they are hearing. just a ruick information they are hearing. just a . uick final information they are hearing. just a quick final one _ information they are hearing. just a quick final one for _ information they are hearing. just a quick final one for you, _ information they are hearing. just a quick final one for you, greg. it i information they are hearing. just a quick final one for you, greg. it is l quick final one for you, greg. it is a brave decision for conservatives to ditch the prime minister who has just delivered the first landslide victory since the 1980s. i’m just delivered the first landslide victory since the 1980s.- victory since the 1980s. i'm not sure they _ victory since the 1980s. i'm not sure they will. _ victory since the 1980s. i'm not sure they will. look _ victory since the 1980s. i'm not sure they will. look across i victory since the 1980s. i'm not sure they will. look across the | sure they will. look across the cabinet, every viable candidate to replace him, they have all been voting for this stuff for the past two years, they will all be tarred with the same brush. the important question is what happens with the police, this government gave the police, this government gave the police extraordinary powers over the lives of people and i hope that the people from the very top of government all the way down are given exactly the same treatment as all those people who were arrested for having coffees in the park with friends while being followed by a police drone and threatened with
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prison or £10,000 fines. if it is one rule for us, it has to be one rule for them as well. the prime minister at _ rule for them as well. the prime minister at pm _ rule for them as well. the prime minister at pm cues _ rule for them as well. the prime minister at pm cues tomorrow i rule for them as well. the prime i minister at pm cues tomorrow should be interesting. grieg becker, thank you forjoining us. in the united states, the number of patients in hospital with covid—19 has hit a record high. just shy of 1a6000 people are in hospitals with covid—19 surpassing the previous peak set injanuary 2021, as that is twice as many as were in hospital two weeks ago. important qualifier, they weren't all admitted for covid, a proportion of those were people who went in for other ailments, and tested positive while in hospital. but the vast majority are the unvaccinated. have a look at this the bottom line those who have had jabs, the top line those who have not. a little earlier, the us chief medical advisor anthony fauci was giving evidence to a congressional commitee on the current state of play. here's his repsonse to a question on vaccines. if you look at vaccinated versus unvaccinated, there is about a ten times greater chance that you will be infected
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if you were unvaccinated. about a 17 times greater chance that she would be hospitalised, if you were unvaccinated and about a 20 times likelihood that you would be dead if you were unvaccinated. so, when you look at every parameter, ten times, 17 times, 20 times, infection, hospitalisation, death. wrong, every parameter points to a value of vaccination. we are in the midterms like, how are the republicans going to deal with this, how they're going to walk back donald trump is micro—messaging on vaccinations? i donald trump is micro-messaging on vaccinations?— vaccinations? i think republican of concress, vaccinations? i think republican of congress. need — vaccinations? i think republican of congress, need to _ vaccinations? i think republican of congress, need to talk— vaccinations? i think republican of congress, need to talk very - vaccinations? i think republican ofj congress, need to talk very clearly with their— congress, need to talk very clearly with their constituents _ congress, need to talk very clearly with their constituents and - congress, need to talk very clearly with their constituents and explainj with their constituents and explain their position _ with their constituents and explain their position on _ with their constituents and explain their position on vaccination, i with their constituents and explain their position on vaccination, not i their position on vaccination, not what _ their position on vaccination, not what the — their position on vaccination, not what the former— their position on vaccination, not what the former president - their position on vaccination, not what the former president has i their position on vaccination, not . what the former president has said or done _ what the former president has said or done. president _ what the former president has said or done. president trump - what the former president has said or done. president trump however| what the former president has said i or done. president trump however has done a _ or done. president trump however has done a great _ or done. president trump however has done a great disservice _ or done. president trump however has done a great disservice to _ or done. president trump however has done a great disservice to those - or done. president trump however has done a great disservice to those who .
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done a great disservice to those who followed _ done a great disservice to those who followed him. — done a great disservice to those who followed him, many— done a great disservice to those who followed him, many blindly, - done a great disservice to those who followed him, many blindly, first i followed him, many blindly, first being _ followed him, many blindly, first heing against— followed him, many blindly, first being against vaccination - followed him, many blindly, first being against vaccination and i followed him, many blindly, first. being against vaccination and then the former— being against vaccination and then the former president _ being against vaccination and then the former president came - being against vaccination and then the former president came out i being against vaccination and thenl the former president came out and said he _ the former president came out and said he is— the former president came out and said he is for— the former president came out and said he is for the _ the former president came out and said he is for the vaccination. i the former president came out and said he is for the vaccination. 0ncej said he is for the vaccination. once again. _ said he is for the vaccination. once again. it _ said he is for the vaccination. once again. it gives— said he is for the vaccination. once again. it givesa— said he is for the vaccination. once again, it gives a certain _ said he is for the vaccination. once again, it gives a certain element i said he is for the vaccination. oncej again, it gives a certain element of people _ again, it gives a certain element of people saying. _ again, it gives a certain element of people saying. do _ again, it gives a certain element of people saying. do as— again, it gives a certain element of people saying, do as i— again, it gives a certain element of people saying, do as i say, - again, it gives a certain element of people saying, do as i say, not- again, it gives a certain element of people saying, do as i say, not as. again, it gives a certain element of people saying, do as i say, not as i do and _ people saying, do as i say, not as i do and it— people saying, do as i say, not as i do and it exposes _ people saying, do as i say, not as i do and it exposes him _ people saying, do as i say, not as i do and it exposes him in— people saying, do as i say, not as i do and it exposes him in the - do and it exposes him in the position— do and it exposes him in the position of— do and it exposes him in the position of being _ do and it exposes him in thel position of being hypocritical. do and it exposes him in the i position of being hypocritical. we have position of being hypocritical. have got staff shortages in hospital, a similar picture on either side of the pond, staff shortages in school. staff shortages in hospitals, staff shortages in schools. in england, one in 12 teachers were absent last week, during the first week of term. more than 300,000 students were off because of covid. it's a fine balance keeping staff and students safe. and in chicago the the third largest school district in the united states, it led to a walk out last week. teachers unhappy with the safety protocols in place. around 3a0,000 students were denied four days of school. an agreement has finally been reached — they return to class on wednesday. the democratic mayor of chicago laurie lightfoot was embarrased and not a little bit angry at what has unfolded.
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someone at will ask who won and who lost? no one wins when our students are out of the place where they can learn the best and where they are safest. after being out of school forfour days in a row, i am sure many students will be excited to get back into the classroom, with their teachers and peers and their parents and guardians can now breathe a much deserved sigh of relief. ruth, iam ruth, i am interested to know your thoughts, you are a trade unionist. which comes first, the physical and mental well—being of children in school and of course that has taken a real toll through the pandemic or the interests of the teachers who have real concerns about the safety protocols? i have real concerns about the safety rotocols? ~ . have real concerns about the safety rotocols? .. . ~. protocols? i think it is one in the same and _ protocols? i think it is one in the same and if _ protocols? i think it is one in the same and if you _ protocols? i think it is one in the same and if you look _ protocols? i think it is one in the same and if you look to - protocols? i think it is one in the same and if you look to see i protocols? i think it is one in the j same and if you look to see what protocols? i think it is one in the i same and if you look to see what the trade unionists and what the teachers were asking what the unions were trying to negotiate, it is things that were already in place in the uk, they were asking for
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children to do a lateral flow test before they entered school, asking to make sure that they were safe and that their students were safe as well and that they were not becoming super spreaders. that is not an unreasonable thing to asked to make sure that your work place is safe, so that the children you're working with our say. i think anyone on either side of the atlantic would suggest that teachers do not care about their students and that teachers do not know about ultimate responsibility, the responsibility is to make sure that the students are getting an education and are in are getting an education and are in a safe environment. there is a responsibility on politicians to make sure that happens and we have not got that right on many occasions in the uk, but we do not have to pay for lateral flow tests in the uk, they are $10 for every two in the us and it is only recently that they have been able to get it mandated, test sent to people's homes and it
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is not the same as here. it is almost impossible to compare the uk to the us. what we have seen, even in the uk, is that teachers have not had the resources they needed and that we have had ridiculous examples of schools with doors and windows being kept open when it is freezing and kids having to sit with their coats on. we have not got it right here either but everyone is doing their best, i think, within the compliance of an extra ordinary pandemic. i compliance of an extra ordinary pandemic-— compliance of an extra ordinary andemic. ., , , ., ,. pandemic. i have 'ust put on screen this tweet from i pandemic. i have just put on screen this tweet from cynthia _ pandemic. i have just put on screen this tweet from cynthia nixon i pandemic. i have just put on screen this tweet from cynthia nixon who i this tweet from cynthia nixon who lives in new york and she has become quite political. she compares it to squid games. it is like russian roulette. there is a real difference in attitude between the teachers in england and the teachers in chicago.
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i understand what ruth said, but one of the things i was looking at today, there is a group called 0ak national academy and they provide lesson plans for teachers. for those teachers who are filling gaps all over the curriculum at the moment, they have had a massive increase in downloads for the classes, you have english teacher standing tall, doing what they can and chicago teachers walking off with the job, what do you make of it? i walking off with the “ob, what do you make of it?— you make of it? i think it is a disgrace _ you make of it? i think it is a disgrace and _ you make of it? i think it is a disgrace and first _ you make of it? i think it is a disgrace and first and - you make of it? i think it is a i disgrace and first and foremost as an educator your obligation is to your— an educator your obligation is to your students. i agree with ruth, your students. i agree with ruth, you need — your students. i agree with ruth, you need to make sure the students and the _ you need to make sure the students and the educators are in a safe environment, we are required to be tested _ environment, we are required to be tested weekly and the students have to be tested weekly and there is a way to— to be tested weekly and there is a way to do— to be tested weekly and there is a way to do it, you can have the testing — way to do it, you can have the testing capabilities to get both in the classroom, but to walk out the way they _ the classroom, but to walk out the way they did in chicago, you're talking — way they did in chicago, you're talking about 300 plus thousand students who are primarily students of colour, _ students who are primarily students of colour, the majority are poor, what _
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of colour, the majority are poor, what other— of colour, the majority are poor, what other parents supposed to do? stay home, — what other parents supposed to do? stay home, not go to theirjob? it is more _ stay home, not go to theirjob? it is more than _ stay home, not go to theirjob? it is more thanjust students and teachers — is more thanjust students and teachers being in classroom, it is a disruption — teachers being in classroom, it is a disruption to— teachers being in classroom, it is a disruption to the economy and most the emotional and mental toll this is taking _ the emotional and mental toll this is taking on families in cities like chicago — is taking on families in cities like chicago and across the us, we can and must — chicago and across the us, we can and must do — chicago and across the us, we can and must do a betterjob. does chicago and across the us, we can and must do a betterjob.- and must do a better “ob. does it become an t and must do a better 'ob. does it become an electoral _ and must do a betterjob. does it become an electoral issue? - and must do a betterjob. does it. become an electoral issue? 100%, this become an electoral issue? 10096, this was a sleeper _ become an electoral issue? 10096, this was a sleeper issue _ become an electoral issue? 10096, this was a sleeper issue in - become an electoral issue? 10096, this was a sleeper issue in virginia j this was a sleeper issue in virginia which _ this was a sleeper issue in virginia which elected a republican for the first time — which elected a republican for the first time in a decade. he ran on education — first time in a decade. he ran on education and covid and reopening the schools. i think you will see a lot of— the schools. i think you will see a lot of surprises of members of congress — lot of surprises of members of congress and the senate losing their bed because an upstart candidate is running _ bed because an upstart candidate is running on — bed because an upstart candidate is running on education and covid. this is context on the bbc. still to come president biden... he is in georgia appealing to fellow
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lawmakers to shun autocracy in favour of democracy. we will bring you more on that story developing in atlanta. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines today fans will be able to return to scotland's stadiums next week after the first minister announced that covid restrictions are being lifted on large outdoor events from monday. since boxing day no more than 500 people have been allowed to attend. nicola sturgeon says there are some signs that scotland is "starting to turn the corner" with omicron. from today— if you test positive for covid on a lateralflow test in england but don't have symptoms — you no longer need to have a pcr test as well. the rules are being relaxed to try to ease pressure on supplies. it comes as the government considers whether to shorten the quarantine time for those infected from 7 to 5 days. two men have been arrested in connection with the disappearance of a teenager who has been missing for 15 years. andrew gosden, from doncaster, was iii when he was last seen in september 2007 apparently
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travelling to london. the two men, aged 38 and a5, who were arrested in london on suspicion of kidnap and human trafficking, have both been released under investigation. when the united states withdrew from afghanistan in the summer, there was a decision to make: should the administration allow the collapse of a state that had been mostly been kept afloat by foreign aid. or should they work with the taliban, the sworn enemy, to prevent the country's implosion? five months on and the biden administration is yet to set out a clear path. today, the un launched its biggest ever appeal. it says it needs at least five billion dollars, half of itjust for food. to feed more than 22 million people on the brink of starvation — that's more than half the entire population. the money is also needed to help some 6 million afghans who have already fled to neighbouring countries. many of the public sector workers
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have not been since august. our middle east correspondent has returned to afghanistan and visited a hospital in the capital, kabul. ten years ago, i lived next door to this hospital. it was a time of a great surge of men, material and billions of dollars into afghanistan. western diplomats would say, don't try and build perfection here, they were not trying to create switzerland. who knows what they were trying to create, but it wasn't theirs. it wasn't a country where half the people, more than half the people are going hungry and babies like this one are near starvation. a regular feature of this programme will be to dive into the debate in the us congress. suzanne kianpour is going to be our ears on capitol hill. i know you have been speaking today to republicans on the senate foreign relations committee. how are they going to deal with this? how are they going to get money to those who need it in afghanistan?
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like many things in american politics unfortunately afghanistan is also divided on party lines. the republicans that i spoke to kind of range, there was senator rand paul who said that he was totally opposed to any aid actually going to afghanistan and said perhaps this would make the afghan people, he said, good and hopping mad and overthrow them. now, other republicans i spoke to were tempered and recognised the humanitarian situation but they also were uncomfortable about having aid money fall into the hands of the taliban because they believed that the taliban would not actually get this aid money and they said it would lead to it not been delivered to the people. one senator, who is a senior republican, said he does not even trust the united nations and the key word here is mistrust towards the avenues where this aid would be used
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to get to the afghan people. senator graham walked past me and said i want to avoid the people of afghanistan dying a horrible death and count me in for helping them. this is all words, but in practice how does that happen? there is no policy, it remains to be seen right now. , , ., ~' , policy, it remains to be seen right now. , g ,, policy, it remains to be seen right now. this is a key issue, because there is a — now. this is a key issue, because there is a good — now. this is a key issue, because there is a good chance _ now. this is a key issue, because there is a good chance that - now. this is a key issue, because there is a good chance that the l there is a good chance that the republicans take over the senate and in the house later this year, are you hearing similar messages to those that suzanne is picking up? how are republicans going to deal with this? i how are republicans going to deal with this? . ., how are republicans going to deal with this? . . . . with this? i am hearing identical messaging _ with this? i am hearing identical messaging. there _ with this? i am hearing identical messaging. there is _ with this? i am hearing identical messaging. there is a _ with this? i am hearing identical messaging. there is a strong . with this? i am hearing identical- messaging. there is a strong degree of distrust— messaging. there is a strong degree of distrust among republican politicians, not only in afghanistan but what is — politicians, not only in afghanistan but what is going on with american foreign _ but what is going on with american foreign policy over the last 20 years — foreign policy over the last 20 years. there's very little appetite for trying — years. there's very little appetite for trying to put more money into that region — for trying to put more money into that region of the world, given how
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we have _ that region of the world, given how we have spent billions and billions... if we have spent billions and billions. . ._ we have spent billions and billions... . . . billions... if there is mistrust in the un, how — billions... if there is mistrust in the un, how can _ billions... if there is mistrust in the un, how can you _ billions... if there is mistrust in the un, how can you even - billions... if there is mistrust in the un, how can you even get i billions... if there is mistrust in - the un, how can you even get money in? i the un, how can you even get money in? ., ., ., the un, how can you even get money in? . ., ., , , the un, how can you even get money in? ., ., ., , , , ., ., in? i am more on the lindsey graham side of the equation, we _ in? i am more on the lindsey graham side of the equation, we need - in? i am more on the lindsey graham side of the equation, we need to - in? i am more on the lindsey graham side of the equation, we need to be l side of the equation, we need to be a beacon _ side of the equation, we need to be a beacon of— side of the equation, we need to be a beacon of humanitarian relief, but there _ a beacon of humanitarian relief, but there is— a beacon of humanitarian relief, but there is strong mistrust when you have _ there is strong mistrust when you have libya — there is strong mistrust when you have libya and other nations that are not— have libya and other nations that are not what we will call democratic institution _ are not what we will call democratic institution sitting on key committees that republicans throw their hands up in the air and say whyshoutd— their hands up in the air and say why should we trust the un when they stack some _ why should we trust the un when they stack some of these committees with people _ stack some of these committees with people who do not have our best interest? — people who do not have our best interest? ~ . . interest? what will irritate eur0peans _ interest? what will irritate europeans is _ interest? what will irritate europeans is we _ interest? what will irritate europeans is we all- interest? what will irritate - europeans is we all remember what happened after syria, it is a long way from the united states, they come flooding over european borders, people in desperate need of help and mixed in with them, there was, as we saw with the bataclan incident, the jihadists, there is a security and refugee issue of the americans do not free up money. it is
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refugee issue of the americans do not free up money.— not free up money. it is not 'ust the americans, i not free up money. it is not 'ust the americans, we i not free up money. it is not 'ust the americans, we also i not free up money. it is notjust the americans, we also have i not free up money. it is notjust the americans, we also have a l the americans, we also have a responsibility— the americans, we also have a responsibility and _ the americans, we also have a responsibility and it _ the americans, we also have a responsibility and it is - responsibility and it is collectively— responsibility and it is collectively how - responsibility and it is collectively how those responsibility and it is - collectively how those people responsibility and it is _ collectively how those people who were involved _ collectively how those people who were involved in _ collectively how those people who were involved in afghanistan - were involved in afghanistan and left so _ were involved in afghanistan and left so quickly _ were involved in afghanistan and left so quickly and _ were involved in afghanistan and left so quickly and abandoned . left so quickly and abandoned people. — left so quickly and abandoned people. now— left so quickly and abandoned people. now d_ left so quickly and abandoned people, now d the _ left so quickly and abandonedl people, now d the responsible left so quickly and abandoned - people, now d the responsible thing and that— people, now d the responsible thing and that includes _ people, now d the responsible thing and that includes in— people, now d the responsible thing and that includes in a _ people, now d the responsible thing and that includes in a british - and that includes in a british contacts. _ and that includes in a british contacts, who _ and that includes in a british contacts, who we _ and that includes in a british contacts, who we are - and that includes in a british| contacts, who we are taking, and that includes in a british - contacts, who we are taking, who we are supporting, — contacts, who we are taking, who we are supporting, we _ contacts, who we are taking, who we are supporting, we have _ contacts, who we are taking, who we are supporting, we have not - contacts, who we are taking, who we are supporting, we have not got - are supporting, we have not got the systems— are supporting, we have not got the systems and — are supporting, we have not got the systems and programmes _ are supporting, we have not got the systems and programmes that - are supporting, we have not got the systems and programmes that we . systems and programmes that we promised — systems and programmes that we promised people _ systems and programmes that we promised people would _ systems and programmes that we promised people would be - systems and programmes that we promised people would be up- systems and programmes that we promised people would be up andj promised people would be up and working — promised people would be up and working we _ promised people would be up and working. we still— promised people would be up and working. we still have _ promised people would be up and working. we still have not- promised people would be up and working. we still have not got - promised people would be up andj working. we still have not got the number— working. we still have not got the number of— working. we still have not got the number of refugees— working. we still have not got the number of refugees that - working. we still have not got the number of refugees that we - working. we still have not got the - number of refugees that we promised we would _ number of refugees that we promised we would have — number of refugees that we promised we would have. there _ number of refugees that we promised we would have. there is— number of refugees that we promised we would have. there is always - number of refugees that we promised we would have. there is always a - we would have. there is always a security issue, it _ we would have. there is always a security issue, it is— we would have. there is always a security issue, it is why - we would have. there is always a security issue, it is why it - we would have. there is always a security issue, it is why it is- we would have. there is always a security issue, it is why it is so i security issue, it is why it is so important _ security issue, it is why it is so important we _ security issue, it is why it is so important we have _ security issue, it is why it is so. important we have international development _ important we have international development budget— important we have international development budget so - important we have international development budget so that - important we have international development budget so that we j important we have international- development budget so that we can work to— development budget so that we can work to support _ development budget so that we can work to support people. _ development budget so that we can work to support people. [it - development budget so that we can work to support people. [it is - development budget so that we can work to support people.— work to support people. it is truly heartbreaking... _ work to support people. it is truly heartbreaking... don't _ work to support people. it is truly heartbreaking... don't the - work to support people. it is truly - heartbreaking... don't the americans have some onus for this? they were the majority partner in afghanistan. isn't there a greater, don't they see that, that after the withdrawal and the chaotic withdrawal, they are, afghanistan is beholden to
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america and in some ways they have a responsibility to find a way. yes. responsibility to find a way. yes, but ou responsibility to find a way. yes, but you would — responsibility to find a way. yes, but you would see _ responsibility to find a way. yes, but you would see that _ responsibility to find a way. is: but you would see that reflected more so in the conversations that i have had with democrats today. just like the republicans, they also have concerns about where aid money will go and getting into the wrong hands and they also recognise that they have a responsibility towards people, senator chris murphy, another senior republican, told me, i am not saying this is not a tough call, i see both sides, but there is good reason to not do business with the taliban and even better reason not to let people die. yes, of course, it is a difficult situation for the american politicians right now. mi for the american politicians right now. �* .,, for the american politicians right now. . .,, , ., , for the american politicians right now. , . now. all those people you have soken now. all those people you have spoken to. _ now. all those people you have spoken to. l— now. all those people you have spoken to, i will— now. all those people you have spoken to, i will call— now. all those people you have i spoken to, i will call you triple-a, spoken to, i will call you triple—a, access all areas. coming up next — as president biden visits georgia to hammer home his fears for the future of american democracy.
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we speak to the man who president trump called and suggested he 'find' more republican votes in georgia after he lost the state byjust over 11,000 votes. hello. the south of the uk has had grey and drizzly weather through the course of today and the skies will slowly clear over the next few hours and with all of that moisture we will see dense fog forming particularly in southern parts of the uk and the dense fog could linger through tomorrow morning and even into the afternoon. you can see the weather from three today across the weather from three today across the south of the country, that is where we have the light rain and drizzle, but it is in the process of clearing away and behind at the skies are clearing, and the greatest risk of dense fog across parts of the country here. a clear night in the country here. a clear night in the west of scotland, fairly cloudy and damp, these are the temperatures in the morning, 5 degrees in
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stornoway but for many of us it is around freezing or below first thing on wednesday. the weather map for wednesday shows high pressure centred in england and wales and this is where it will stick around for most of the week. around the high pressure you can see some slightly milder air pivoting around and spreading across scotland and thatis and spreading across scotland and that is where we will have the mildest conditions, but with that also some cloud and bits and pieces of drizzle, some showers in the west, here is that fog lingering for a time across southern parts of the uk, but for the vast majority of us, it will not be foggy, it will be mostly bright and sunny with temperatures getting up to around seven and 10 celsius. the fog returns later in the way, this is early on thursday, it seems like it is the southern part of the uk that will get most of the fog. sunshine a bit further north but once again in the west it is more cloudy with that ocean breeze. where the fog lingers and sticks around into the afternoon
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it will be cold, temperatures may not rise higher than 0 degrees but under the sunnier skies, the clear whether it will be around 8 degrees for most of us. the highest temperatures in the north west of scotland, around 11. the same pattern repeats on friday morning, fog forming in the early hours and sticking around in some spots in the afternoon and where it does, it will be quite cold and quite a raw feel. the outlook over the next few days, very little change with that high pressure sticking around and these are very much average temperatures for the time of year but cold where the fog hangs around. goodbye.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. president biden is in georgia and pushing for voting rights reforms that he says are crucial to saving democracy in the us. it's to saving democracy in the us. about the people, i america. it's about the people, it's about america. the battle for the soul of america. the battle for the soul of america is not over. a new left—wing movement could be coming to the uk, after reports thatjeremy corbyn, former leader of the labour party, is thinking of establishing his own party. and could this spell the end for the open plan office?
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president biden has started the year with a renewed focus on voting rights. today he is in georgia, where he has been speaking in the last hour, imploring the us senate to pass new voting rights legislation. georgia is one of 19 states that passed new voting laws since the 2020 election. a 90—page bill supported by republicans in march, ends voting hours early, which means working people can't cast their vote when a shift is over. it adds rigid restrictions on absentee ballots. and it makes it a crime to provide water to voters while they wait in line. mr biden says the us senate needs to defend the right to vote and should pass two democratic bills that would restore voting rights in republican led states. the issue is the fillibuster. a tool the opposition has employed
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in the senate to talk out a bill, before it can be voted on. four times, in recent months, republicans have used it. mr biden, has said in the last hour, that it should be set aside, a so—called "carve out", so that voting rights legislation can progress. jim crow 2.0 is about two insidious things. voter suppression and election subversion. it is no longer about who gets to vote, it is about making it harder to vote. it is about who gets to count the vote, and whether your vote counts at all. it is not hyperbole, this is a fact. this matters to all of us. the goal of the former president's allies is to disenfranchise anyone who votes against them. simple as that. the facts won't matter. your vote won't matter. they willjust decide what
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they want and then do it. with us tonight is georgia's republican secretary of state, brad raffensperger. to remind you, he was the man who resisted president trump, when he was asked to "find 11,780 votes" in a statejoe biden won by 11,779 votes. mr raffensperger, good evening. you are currently up for re—election by a republican congressman who objected to you certifying the president's victory. do you worry that, one day, republican officials in your state might try to change the outcome of an election for political purposes? hie. the outcome of an election for political purposes?— the outcome of an election for political purposes? no, when it was ut into political purposes? no, when it was put into law — political purposes? no, when it was put into law last _ political purposes? no, when it was put into law last year, _ political purposes? no, when it was put into law last year, we _ political purposes? no, when it was put into law last year, we have - political purposes? no, when it was put into law last year, we have an i put into law last year, we have an accountability measure that the board can fire a board and replace it and then that new election board will hire a new election director. that is only after you do a thoughtful, thorough process where you have counties that habitually fail. we have one which has failed
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its voters since 1993, as far back as we could find. that is nearly 30 years. so something needs to change. we need accountability if people can get things done. president biden came here and he said it wasn't hyperbole, but it was. we have increased the numbers of days for early voting. we have photo id for early voting. we have photo id for early —— for absentee voting. it is early -- for absentee voting. it is illeial early -- for absentee voting. it is illegal now _ early -- for absentee voting. it is illegal now in _ early —— for absentee voting. it is illegal now in georgia for somebody to drop off your ballot for you, called ballot harvesting. have you ever seen evidence in georgia that those ballots dropped off were fraudulent or cast by ineligible voters? ., ,., , fraudulent or cast by ineligible voters? ., , , fraudulent or cast by ineligible voters? , ., ., ., . voters? nobody is allowed to touch the voter's ballot _ voters? nobody is allowed to touch the voter's ballot apart _ voters? nobody is allowed to touch the voter's ballot apart from - voters? nobody is allowed to touch the voter's ballot apart from the i the voter's ballot apart from the vote and the workers. we have an
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ongoing investigation into ballot harvesting. they have been charges in other states, such as newjersey and north carolina. i believe we should have a national ban on ballot harvesting. i don't thing any american buddies —— any american believes that partisan people should believes that partisan people should be touching your ballot. but believes that partisan people should be touching your ballot.— be touching your ballot. but by questioning — be touching your ballot. but by questioning the _ be touching your ballot. but by questioning the trust _ be touching your ballot. but by questioning the trust in - be touching your ballot. but by questioning the trust in the - be touching your ballot. but by - questioning the trust in the ballot, by putting forward new measures to control how people vote, you are playing into the big lie that the president is still campaigning on. that's not true, because we have kept all forms of voting open for voters. we increase the number of days for early voting, 17 days early voting, including two saturdays in that 17 days. there is more early
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voting that there is a newjersey, new york and delaware. we have election day voting as well. ron. election day voting as well. ron, let me bring _ election day voting as well. ron, let me bring you _ election day voting as well. ron, let me bring you in _ election day voting as well. ron, let me bring you in on _ election day voting as well. ron, let me bring you in on this - let me bring you in on this conversation. i want to talk about the filibuster, since that is the elephant in the room here. there is a contradiction here forjoe biden, because he is talking today about democracy. if you take away the minorities option to participate in the debate, that is a power grab. 100%. the senate democrats do not have a _ 100%. the senate democrats do not have a majority. they have 50 votes or stop _ have a majority. they have 50 votes or stop it _ have a majority. they have 50 votes or stop it is — have a majority. they have 50 votes or stop it is the vice president that— or stop it is the vice president that has— or stop it is the vice president that has the vote to break the tie and get _ that has the vote to break the tie and get a — that has the vote to break the tie and get a majority vote. the idea that you — and get a majority vote. the idea that you will have a process that has been — that you will have a process that has been in place for over 200 years in the _
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has been in place for over 200 years in the united states to ensure the i’ili'it in the united states to ensure the right of— in the united states to ensure the right of the minority party to participate and have their voices heard _ participate and have their voices heard be — participate and have their voices heard be carved out is an affront to democracy — heard be carved out is an affront to democracy i— heard be carved out is an affront to democracy. i have to tell you, it is notjust— democracy. i have to tell you, it is notiustjoe — democracy. i have to tell you, it is notjustjoe mansion. you have the senator— notjustjoe mansion. you have the senator from arizona who also indicated — senator from arizona who also indicated they don't want this carveout~ _ indicated they don't want this carveout. it is notjust one senator, _ carveout. it is notjust one senator, but a lot who are concerned about _ senator, but a lot who are concerned about the preservation of rights. | about the preservation of rights. [ was about the preservation of rights. i was looking at the cases of alleged electoral fraud was looking at the cases of alleged electoralfraud here in the uk. there were 595 cases in our last general election. of those, four led to a conviction and two were given a police caution. yet there is a big debate here about the integrity of the ballot. now we are trialling in different parts of the country voters turning up with voter id. what would that mean for your voters
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in stoke—on—trent? i what would that mean for your voters in stoke-on-trent?_ in stoke-on-trent? i think some of this is ludicrous. _ in stoke-on-trent? i think some of this is ludicrous. you _ in stoke-on-trent? i think some of this is ludicrous. you have - this is ludicrous. you have highlighted _ this is ludicrous. you have highlighted the _ this is ludicrous. you have highlighted the scale, - this is ludicrous. you have highlighted the scale, or. this is ludicrous. you have - highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there _ highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there is — highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there is hardly— highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there is hardly any— highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there is hardly any cases - highlighted the scale, or rather the fact there is hardly any cases at - fact there is hardly any cases at all across— fact there is hardly any cases at all across the _ fact there is hardly any cases at all across the country. - fact there is hardly any cases at all across the country. 2 - fact there is hardly any cases at all across the country. 2 million voters — all across the country. 2 million voters don't _ all across the country. 2 million voters don't have _ all across the country. 2 million voters don't have the _ all across the country. 2 million voters don't have the required i all across the country. 2 million . voters don't have the required id. in stoke—on—trent, _ voters don't have the required id. in stoke—on—trent, it— voters don't have the required id. in stoke—on—trent, it would - voters don't have the required id. | in stoke—on—trent, it would mean those _ in stoke—on—trent, it would mean those people _ in stoke—on—trent, it would mean those people who _ in stoke—on—trent, it would mean those people who are _ in stoke—on—trent, it would mean those people who are typically- in stoke—on—trent, it would mean. those people who are typically older or very— those people who are typically older or very young, — those people who are typically older or very young, often _ those people who are typically older or very young, often ethnic- or very young, often ethnic minorities, _ or very young, often ethnic minorities, who _ or very young, often ethnic minorities, who are - or very young, often ethnic minorities, who are less i or very young, often ethnic. minorities, who are less likely or very young, often ethnic- minorities, who are less likely to have _ minorities, who are less likely to have the — minorities, who are less likely to have the required _ minorities, who are less likely to have the required id, _ minorities, who are less likely to have the required id, may- minorities, who are less likely to have the required id, may not. minorities, who are less likely toj have the required id, may not go minorities, who are less likely to - have the required id, may not go and vote _ have the required id, may not go and vote for— have the required id, may not go and vote for me. — have the required id, may not go and vote. for me, every— have the required id, may not go and vote. for me, every obstacle - have the required id, may not go and vote. for me, every obstacle to - vote. for me, every obstacle to someone — vote. for me, every obstacle to someone voting _ vote. for me, every obstacle to someone voting is _ vote. for me, every obstacle to someone voting is having - vote. for me, every obstacle to someone voting is having theirl vote. for me, every obstacle to - someone voting is having their voice silenced _ someone voting is having their voice silenced at — someone voting is having their voice silenced. at this _ someone voting is having their voice silenced. at this point, _ someone voting is having their voice silenced. at this point, especially. silenced. at this point, especially in a context— silenced. at this point, especially in a context where _ silenced. at this point, especially in a context where we _ silenced. at this point, especially in a context where we started - silenced. at this point, especiallyj in a context where we started the programme, _ in a context where we started the programme, talking _ in a context where we started the programme, talking about - in a context where we started the programme, talking about trust l in a context where we started the | programme, talking about trust in politicians — programme, talking about trust in politicians and _ programme, talking about trust in politicians and whether _ programme, talking about trust in politicians and whether we - programme, talking about trust in politicians and whether we can - programme, talking about trust in i politicians and whether we can trust our leaders. — politicians and whether we can trust our leaders, surely— politicians and whether we can trust our leaders, surely we _ politicians and whether we can trust our leaders, surely we want - politicians and whether we can trust our leaders, surely we want as - politicians and whether we can trusti our leaders, surely we want as many people _ our leaders, surely we want as many people as _ our leaders, surely we want as many people as possible _ our leaders, surely we want as many people as possible to _ our leaders, surely we want as many people as possible to vote? - our leaders, surely we want as many people as possible to vote? any - people as possible to vote? any action— people as possible to vote? any action to — people as possible to vote? any action to restrict _ people as possible to vote? any action to restrict that _ people as possible to vote? any action to restrict that is - people as possible to vote? any action to restrict that is not - people as possible to vote? any action to restrict that is not only disproportionate _ action to restrict that is not only disproportionate but— action to restrict that is not only disproportionate but an - action to restrict that is not only disproportionate but an effort. action to restrict that is not onlyj disproportionate but an effort to silence — disproportionate but an effort to silence those _ disproportionate but an effort to silence those people _ disproportionate but an effort to silence those people whose - disproportionate but an effort to . silence those people whose voices should _ silence those people whose voices should be — silence those people whose voices should be heard. _ silence those people whose voices should be heard. everyone - silence those people whose voices should be heard. everyone of- silence those people whose voices should be heard. everyone of us . silence those people whose voices i should be heard. everyone of us who believes— should be heard. everyone of us who believes in— should be heard. everyone of us who believes in the — should be heard. everyone of us who believes in the democratic— should be heard. everyone of us who believes in the democratic process . believes in the democratic process should _ believes in the democratic process should be — believes in the democratic process should be opposed _ believes in the democratic process should be opposed to— believes in the democratic process should be opposed to that. - believes in the democratic process should be opposed to that. we - believes in the democratic process - should be opposed to that. we should always _ should be opposed to that. we should always start _ should be opposed to that. we should always start from _ should be opposed to that. we should always start from a _ should be opposed to that. we should always start from a place _
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should be opposed to that. we should always start from a place of, - should be opposed to that. we should always start from a place of, how- always start from a place of, how can we _ always start from a place of, how can we get — always start from a place of, how can we get more _ always start from a place of, how can we get more people - always start from a place of, how can we get more people to- always start from a place of, how can we get more people to vote? so you might think that those campaiging for voting rights in georgia would be in thrall to the president today. well, you'd be wrong. in fact, several prominent groups who previously supported joe biden's bid for the white house, boycotted the speech. cliff albright is the co—founder of black votes matter. nice to have you on the programme. i should get the title right. why were you not there today? why would you boycott a speech on which you were campaigning?— boycott a speech on which you were campaigning? thanks for having me. we don't necessarily _ campaigning? thanks for having me. we don't necessarily use _ campaigning? thanks for having me. we don't necessarily use the - campaigning? thanks for having me. we don't necessarily use the word i we don't necessarily use the word boycott, but we did decide we were not going to attend because we thought this could have been given in washington dc, it could have been delivered to the democratic caucus at congress. if you did that in congress, they could have gone to work and started the vote, which is
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part of what our understanding was they were planning on doing, which was to reintroduce these bills for another vote. they will be doing that tomorrow. we decided that we felt it would be better suited for us to not attend the speech. we did not know what he was going to say, we didn't want to be used as props. we wanted to make sure that he would have enough incentive to give a strong speech, to do a strong call—out for the filibuster to be reformed, to change the rules will stop it as appears that that is what he has done. let stop it as appears that that is what he has done-— he has done. let me pick that up. the realities _ he has done. let me pick that up. the realities are, _ he has done. let me pick that up. the realities are, he _ he has done. let me pick that up. the realities are, he doesn't - he has done. let me pick that up. the realities are, he doesn't have| the realities are, he doesn't have the votes. he doesn't have the votes in the senate, so what is this all about today? you say you want him to go back to washington and do something concrete, what can he possibly do if two senior senators
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decide they will not vote for it? keepin decide they will not vote for it? keep in mind that two months ago, when he didn't have the votes on infra structure, what did he do? you went to congress, met with the house, met with regressive democrats, who were withholding their votes, democrats, who were withholding theirvotes, he democrats, who were withholding their votes, he told them what he wanted and when he wanted it. as a result, what did they do? they passed infrastructure despite the reservations and in spite of the fact that several people said they wouldn't. at the end of the day, he doesn't have the votes because he hasn't worked hard to get the votes in regard to voting rights. he gave dozens of speeches on every structure across the country during 2021. the speech he has given tonight is now his second speech since he has been in office, and the last one he gave was injuly of last yearin last one he gave was injuly of last year in philadelphia. we say he doesn't have the votes, we have to acknowledge that part of the reason
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is he hasn't done what he is doing today, which is saying, i want filibuster reform. he is still talking, i think, filibuster reform. he is still talking, ithink, so filibuster reform. he is still talking, i think, so i don't know if he has mentioned the senators by name. but part of what we need to see is that he will actually lean into the words of the speech and work the same way that other presidents have. he has to switch over some votes. this beach is a good start and if he follows up these words with actions that we believe he has the skills to do, then we will see movement on these bills, hopefully by monday. i then we will see movement on these bills, hopefully by monday.— bills, hopefully by monday. i want to talk to you _ bills, hopefully by monday. i want to talk to you about _ bills, hopefully by monday. i want to talk to you about stacey - to talk to you about stacey abrahams, she is not there either today. someone with immense name recognition across the country. this is what the president said about her.
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i spoke to stacey this morning, we have _ i spoke to stacey this morning, we have a _ i spoke to stacey this morning, we have a great relationship, got our scheduling mixed up. we are all on the same _ scheduling mixed up. we are all on the same page. it is fine. what _ the same page. it is fine. what does this mean for the president, written large? we have the congress and from south carolina who came in behind him during the presidential campaign, a black voters who came out and supported joe biden. now you have very prominent black democrats who are boycotting a speech. what does this mean for him? i boycotting a speech. what does this mean for him?— boycotting a speech. what does this mean for him? i don't think she said she was boycotting _ mean for him? i don't think she said she was boycotting him. _ mean for him? i don't think she said she was boycotting him. she - mean for him? i don't think she said she was boycotting him. she said it| she was boycotting him. she said it was a scheduling conflict and i have no choice but to take the truth of her words. the truth is, you have people who have been disillusioned, notjust people who have been disillusioned, not just elected people who have been disillusioned, notjust elected officials but voters who we talk to everyday who
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are disillusioned and frustrated. they have been waiting for a speech closer to what he has talked about today. this will be a step towards mending some of those relationships and getting back some of that support. at the end of the day, it will how he follows up this speech with actions, whether we get those votes that are holding out and what role he plays in making that happen. that will have a lot to do with whether or not he maintains the black support that he previously had and whether that will carry over into black turnout in 2022, the like of which we saw in 2020.— into black turnout in 2022, the like of which we saw in 2020. thank you for 'oinin: of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us- _ of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us. it _ of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us. it will— of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us. it will be _ of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us. it will be a _ of which we saw in 2020. thank you forjoining us. it will be a big - forjoining us. it will be a big issue going into the midterm cycle. what do you make of what you heard there? . . ., ., ~ ,
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there? there are a lot of americans around the — there? there are a lot of americans around the country _ there? there are a lot of americans around the country who _ there? there are a lot of americans around the country who were - there? there are a lot of americansl around the country who were looking at this— around the country who were looking at this and _ around the country who were looking at this and seeing racism is edge that races— at this and seeing racism is edge that races are being minnock elated. the president says it isjim crow 20 _ the president says it isjim crow 20 my— the president says it isjim crow 2.0. my parents had to deal with poll taxes — 2.0. my parents had to deal with poll taxes and literacy taxes. i look _ poll taxes and literacy taxes. i look at — poll taxes and literacy taxes. i look at this and say, this is not 1960s. — look at this and say, this is not 1960s. we _ look at this and say, this is not 1960s, we are in 2022 and we need to stop trying _ 1960s, we are in 2022 and we need to stop trying to divide the country on the issue _ stop trying to divide the country on the issue of— stop trying to divide the country on the issue of race. that will be a bil the issue of race. that will be a big issue — the issue of race. that will be a big issue in _ the issue of race. that will be a big issue in the mid—term election. we will— big issue in the mid—term election. we will know —— we will no doubt return to it many times throughout the year.
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it is the high—speed line which divides opinion, the remains of a wealthy roman trading town have been unearthed in a remote field in northamptonshire by archaeologists working on the construction of the hs2 rail network. a team of 80 archaeologists have been working on the site for a year and discovered numerous artefacts, including more than 300 roman coins. they say it's one of the most impressive sites they've found so far. our correspondent, jo black, has been looking at what they've uncovered. it is the high—speed line which divides opinion, but as hs2 develops, some of the excavations along the route have provided opportunities for us to see how we used to live. this i2—hectare site in northamptonshire has not only revealed an iron age settlement, but also a roman town. it's not thought to be a story of roman invasion, but more a progression between the two eras. i've been working for ten years now and never come across anything of this scale or even this quality. we will be working incredibly hard to understand what we have on—site and to tell that story. archaeology is telling stories, it's pulling together the physical evidence on the ground, the finds, and the teams in the office are then
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pulling together their expertise to understand exactly what we have. here in a warehouse miles from the site, thousands of priceless artefacts. the majority are animal bone and pottery, including a sophisticated piece from france. also among the finds is this — a lead die presumably from some sort of game, this highly decorative and rare scale weight showing the importance of trade on the site, and then this — part of a leg shackle thought to relate to a prisoner or some sort of enslaved person. while the site and its findings helps to transform our understanding of roman times and beyond, its future involves high—speed rail. jo black, bbc news.
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this weekend, there were reports thatjeremy corbyn, the former leader of the labour party, is thinking of establishing his own party here in the uk. supporters says he has realised that his suspension from the labour party is never going to be revoked. and apperently some of them "in his inner circle" have urged him to turn his charity, the peace and justice project, into a new political movement to the left of the labour party. what would happen ifjeremy corbyn coughed off part of the labour party and moved left? trier? coughed off part of the labour party and moved left?— coughed off part of the labour party and moved left? very little. we have seen with every _ and moved left? very little. we have seen with every attempt _ and moved left? very little. we have seen with every attempt to _ and moved left? very little. we have seen with every attempt to split - seen with every attempt to split from the labour party, what it has damaged the labour party in specific areas, actually whether it was the sdp, respects, orany other iteration, every time someone has left, it hasn't worked. there is no,
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especially on the far left, in this country for a far left little party. where would it leave so keir starmer? would it pull the labour party further left or would it give him the space to move the rump of the labour party more to the centre? you mean the majority.— you mean the ma'ority. what's left. it is a you mean the ma'ority. what's left. it is a badly — you mean the ma'ority. what's left. it is a badly used — you mean the majority. what's left. it is a badly used phrase, _ you mean the majority. what's left. it is a badly used phrase, they - it is a badly used phrase, they move? .,, . it is a badly used phrase, they move? . . ., , move? those that choose to be in the labour move? those that choose to be in the labour party — move? those that choose to be in the labour party is _ move? those that choose to be in the labour party is because _ move? those that choose to be in the labour party is because of _ move? those that choose to be in the labour party is because of his - labour party is because of his leadership and they want to provide a decent opposition and an eternity of government. i don't think that would change ifjeremy corbyn setup is own political party. candidly, this may have an impact in islington, but even there, he has got elected repeatedly as a labour
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party candidate. anywhere else, we are talking about the labour party and most people in terms of what we had talking about tonight, they want rid of this government. they want a labour government. those people that are on the centre—left, that are in the centre, they want something else other than a borisjohnson other than a boris johnson government. other than a borisjohnson government. the only option that is viable and realistic and that would deliver for this country is a keir starmer labour party.- starmer labour party. similar arallels starmer labour party. similar parallels to — starmer labour party. similar parallels to the _ starmer labour party. similar parallels to the republicans l starmer labour party. similar. parallels to the republicans who wanted to pull away from the trump base. , . . wanted to pull away from the trump base. , ,, . ., , wanted to pull away from the trump base. , ,, . . , . base. they split away and they are talkin: base. they split away and they are talking amongst _ base. they split away and they are talking amongst themselves - base. they split away and they are talking amongst themselves but . base. they split away and they are i talking amongst themselves but they have not— talking amongst themselves but they have not organised in a viable manner— have not organised in a viable manner to _ have not organised in a viable manner to be a political force here in the _ manner to be a political force here in the united states. we have similar— in the united states. we have similar issues on either side of the pond _ similar issues on either side of the pond i_ similar issues on either side of the pond i look— similar issues on either side of the pond. i look back to the last third—party bid we had in the united states in— third—party bid we had in the united states in the 90s, with ross perot
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pulling _ states in the 90s, with ross perot pulling votes away from george bush to give _ pulling votes away from george bush to give the _ pulling votes away from george bush to give the win to bill clinton. they— to give the win to bill clinton. they could really hand the democrats the potential of maintaining a majority— the potential of maintaining a majority hold on the presidency should — majority hold on the presidency should enough of them decide to stay at home _ should enough of them decide to stay at home or— should enough of them decide to stay at home or siphon off votes from the eventual— at home or siphon off votes from the eventual republican nominee. the news editor of the ft, matthew garrahan, posted a photo on twitter yesterday that grabbed nationwide attention. it is a small box that has been placed in their newsroom. "is it," he asked, "a tardis, a covid isolation unit, or a glass changing room?" in fact, it is a "quiet space", which i think is a tacit acknowledgement that the experiment with open plan offices has failed. it has, it has failed. i am prepared to die on this hill. this is the bbc news room, we have high—sided armchairs to sit in, from which you can stare
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into the newsroom abyss six floors below and contemplate your insanity. or these equally, claustrophobic "meeting spaces", from which oxygen is sucked out the longer your meeting goes on. where are you on the labour hours that are lost in open plan offices? i have worked in an open plan office in my firstjob. i think the reality is that work is changing. i work fully remote now, i work from home, we shut our office. i work from my study and my commute takes 30 seconds. but you are surrounded by people! i seconds. but you are surrounded by --eole! ., ., , seconds. but you are surrounded by --eole! . ., , . , ., seconds. but you are surrounded by neale! ., ., , ., , ., ., people! i have to try and try to hot desk computer _ people! i have to try and try to hot desk computer which _ people! i have to try and try to hot desk computer which i _ people! i have to try and try to hot desk computer which i can - people! i have to try and try to hot desk computer which i can login i people! i have to try and try to hot| desk computer which i can login to, which takes an hour of my day. why can i not have my own office? the breakfast show on apple tv have
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their own suite, i could move in with a television. why am i denied this? ., , . , with a television. why am i denied this? ., , ., , . this? your star continues to rise at the bbc, this? your star continues to rise at the sac, so _ this? your star continues to rise at the sac, so i _ this? your star continues to rise at the bbc, so i think— this? your star continues to rise at the no so i think a _ this? your star continues to rise at the bbc, so i think a suite - this? your star continues to rise at the bbc, so i think a suite is - the bbc, so i think a suite is coming _ the bbc, so i think a suite is coming i_ the bbc, so i think a suite is coming. i am on the hill, the bbc, so i think a suite is coming. iam on the hill, i the bbc, so i think a suite is coming. i am on the hill, i love working — coming. i am on the hill, i love working on— coming. i am on the hill, i love working on my own office. i love having _ working on my own office. i love having my — working on my own office. i love having my own space was top i love new broadcasting house, but i don't want to— new broadcasting house, but i don't want to be _ new broadcasting house, but i don't want to be sitting in one of those chairs— want to be sitting in one of those chairs next— want to be sitting in one of those chairs next to somebody. we all know how suffocating it can be. people need _ how suffocating it can be. people need their— how suffocating it can be. people need their own space. i am with you on that— need their own space. i am with you on that hill, — need their own space. i am with you on that hill, we need our own space. it is on that hill, we need our own space. it is about— on that hill, we need our own space. it is about equality, we all have to sit together. the accountants love it, save money. sit together. the accountants love it. save money-— sit together. the accountants love it, save money. arguably, you should let the it, save money. arguably, you should get the union — it, save money. arguably, you should get the union involved. _ it, save money. arguably, you should get the union involved. there - it, save money. arguably, you should get the union involved. there is - it, save money. arguably, you should get the union involved. there is an i get the union involved. there is an issue about if it is safe to be sharing desks. that would be the best argument. i do sharing desks. that would be the best argument.—
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sharing desks. that would be the best argument. i do honestly find that the issue _ best argument. i do honestly find that the issue of _ best argument. i do honestly find that the issue of sitting _ best argument. i do honestly find | that the issue of sitting altogether and all talking over one another, i just cannot concentrate. is this the reason why more and more people decide that they want to work from home? has the pandemic been the deathknell for the open plan office? i think it is. deathknell for the open plan office? ithink it is. if deathknell for the open plan office? i think it is. if you want to come over— i think it is. if you want to come over here — i think it is. if you want to come over here and come to the states, the bbc_ over here and come to the states, the bbc washington, dc bureau has several— the bbc washington, dc bureau has several offices and we can find an office _ several offices and we can find an office to — several offices and we can find an office to put you in so you can have that tranquillity. the more serious nature _ that tranquillity. the more serious nature of— that tranquillity. the more serious nature of your question is a serious onei _ nature of your question is a serious one. the _ nature of your question is a serious one. the fear— nature of your question is a serious one, the fear of contracting the virus. _ one, the fear of contracting the virus. the — one, the fear of contracting the virus, the fear of being in large crowds — virus, the fear of being in large crowds with large groups, people prefer _ crowds with large groups, people prefer to — crowds with large groups, people prefer to stay out of large office settings — prefer to stay out of large office settings or if they do, they try to seclude — settings or if they do, they try to seclude themselves and avoid sitting next to— seclude themselves and avoid sitting next to someone shoulder to shoulder _ next to someone shoulder to shoulder. in next to someone shoulder to shoulder-— next to someone shoulder to shoulder. . . , ., , . shoulder. in the washington bureau, the did shoulder. in the washington bureau, they did give — shoulder. in the washington bureau, they did give catty — shoulder. in the washington bureau, they did give catty k _ shoulder. in the washington bureau, they did give catty k a _ shoulder. in the washington bureau, they did give catty k a bureau. i they did give catty k a bureau. lovely to see you. we will be back
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at the same time tomorrow. i guess tomorrow night —— my guest tomorrow, maybe we will talk about party gates. —— party gate some more. hello. time for our long—term weather outlook and the picture behind me already gives it away. having said that, not foggy everywhere. some sunshine around as well, but the fog that does develop in the coming days could be pretty stubborn to clear, especially during the afternoon. let's look at the forecast for wednesday. broadly speaking, high pressure sitting on top of the uk. that means often like winds, settled weather, clear skies. where the fog lingers, it will not be clear at all. it will be great and cold. early on wednesday morning, there will be some fog around four southern parts of the uk. for most of us, it should be
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fine with some wintry sunshine. temperatures will be around seven to 10 degrees, milder in western scotland with some showers. that is because we have an atlantic breeze. that will continue into wednesday night. once again under the clear skies and with the clear weather, we will see more fog forming. the high pressure is not budging and it looks very much the same for thursday, high pressure across the south of the uk, where the lightest of the winds will be and where most of the fog will form. thursday into friday, some really dense fog forming, especially in southern parts of englert and southern wales. this is an example of thursday morning. you can see the dense patches of fog early on, some of it very slow to clear. it will linger into the afternoon, and where it does, it really will feel very cold. temperatures will struggle to get above freezing in one or two spots. this will be the exception, not the
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rule, but for many it will clear and temperatures will be closer to around eight or 9 degrees and once again in parts of scotland, with the ocean breeze, temperatures up to ii celsius. on friday, the high pressure is still with us. there will be very little change in our weather pattern. look how dense that fog is, a lot of it across parts of southern england. they could be fog elsewhere to the north as well. where it clears, changes will reach maybe 80 degrees, butjust the indication in some spots where it is cloudy and murky, only four degrees. saturday and sunday, not much changes. high pressure dominating much of the weather, just a week weather front moving into much of the weather, just a week weatherfront moving into northern parts of the country, which means more of a breeze and maybe some spots of rain for the north of scotland. but the vast majority of us, saturday into sunday, dry weather but obviously misty and foggy once again. this calm, foggy
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wintry weather continues into the weekend with similar temperatures. once again, where the fog lingers, it will be very cold during the day. the outlook into next week, so the high pressure has a different shape here, but more or less it is right across us, which means little change. just a hint that things turn more unsettled later next week. notice the temperature of the atmosphere in the yellow, it is warmer. we are in that in between zone, so temperatures were not very much. they are more or less the same for most major towns and cities and i'm sure you will discover that on your app as well. goodbye.
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tonight at ten — borisjohnson under growing pressure, after that drinks gathering at the height of lockdown. it happened when large gatherings were illegal, conservative and labour argue about the consequences. i apologise again unreservedly for the upset that these allegations have caused. there's no need for an investigation into the simple central question today — did the prime minister attend the event in the downing street garden? but from families who were unable to be with loved ones when they died, there's little patience. people died sticking to the rules, and they broke those rules to have a bottle of wine.

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