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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 11, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. pressure mounts on borisjohnson over the downing street bring your own booze party during the first covid lockdown. borisjohnson, having survived covid himself, thought it was appropriate to host a party where you could bring your own booze, sit in the garden at downing street, were borisjohnson met me and four other grieving families and told us, to our faces, after listening to my dad's story, i did everything i could to save him. if he has broken the law, that is serious — if he has broken the law, that is serious and _ if he has broken the law, that is serious and if he has misled parliament, i have been clear, anyone — parliament, i have been clear, anyone that misleads parliament cannot_ anyone that misleads parliament cannot continue and therefore he would _ cannot continue and therefore he would have to resign. one in twelve teachers was absent from england's schools last week, as the omicron variant of covid continues to spread a medicalfirst in america,
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where doctors transplant a genetically modified pig's heart, into a human patient. and he is back and fresher than ever, three decades after he first left west philadelphia, the fresh prince of bel air returns. good evening and welcome to bbc news. there is mounting pressure on the prime minister to explain why a party took place in the downing street garden in may 2020 — during the first covid lockdown. around 100 people were invited by email by one of the prime minister's senior staff. it's understood around 30 people attended the gathering; eye witnesses have said
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the prime minister and his wife were among them. labour has called on borisjohnson to "come clean" about what happened. the police say they have contacted downing street over the issue. at the time of the party in may 2020 across the uk people could only leave home for work, exercise or essential supplies. you could only meet one person from another household outside — and that had to be socially distanced. schools were closed for most. hairdressers and nonessential shops were also shut. weddings were banned and only close family members could attend funerals. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young. plenty of questions. the prime minister was at the party, should he come clean? but not many answers. borisjohnson wasn't out for the cameras today. did you attend any parties? but the prime minister is being drawn further into this scandal.
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during the first lockdown in may 2020 and e—mailfrom senior official martin reynolds seen by itv news invited 100 staff to make the most of the lovely weather and bring their own booze to the downing street garden. witnesses have told the bbc mr johnson and his wife were among 30 people who went along. inside no 10 just an hour before a cabinet minister was telling the country this. you can meet one person outside your household in an outdoor public place provided that you stay two metres apart. i can confirm to the house... so what is the explanation? well, for now there isn't one. ministers say we must wait for an official investigation launched after allegations of other parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is established, there will be requisite disciplinary action taken. as with all internal investigations, if evidence emerges of what was potentially
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a criminal offence, the _ matter would be referred to the metropolitan police. did the prime minister| attend the event in the downing street garden - on the 20th of may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, - to blame this on a fewjunior civil servants. the prime minister sets the tone. 0thers remembered the lives lost during the pandemic. 3000 people who followed the rules and. including my mother—in—law who died alone. and the pain of separation from loved ones. it is what has happened to lisa's family. her brother graham was in intensive care on the date the downing street party took place. he died a few days later but relatives could not be with him all grieve together. instead of holding my mum
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i was holding my phone filming my brother dying. people sacrificed so much. people died, sticking to the rules, and they broke those rules to have a bottle of wine. very few conservative mps have been willing to defend the prime minister over all of this. 0ne former cabinet minister said to me, "the problem is borisjohnson just says what he has to say to get through the day. he tries to lie his way out of everything." another told the bbc, "he has to go, he has run out of road." all eyes now are on the independent report and whether it finds that the prime minister has broken the rules. senior conservatives are angry too. if he has broken the law that is serious and if he has misled parliament i've been very clear
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before, notjust the prime minister, but anyone who misleads parliament cannot continue and therefore he would have to resign. there were no excuses for breaking lockdown restrictions and we were constantly reminded what they were. any suggestion that those in power thought that they were above the rules will cause enormous political damage. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. there's been a furious reaction to news of the party from people who stuck rigidly to the rules during lockdown — particularly from those who lost family members. our home editor mark easton reports. as the prime minister and his staff were apparently partying in the garden at no 10, police squads were in public parks threatening to fine anyone breaching lockdown rules and there were roadblocks set up. more than 4000 people died from covid in britain that week and polls from the time is just around 85% of voters supported the restrictions or wanted them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others.
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0n the day in question, borisjohnson was in the commons telling mps of his plans for the day. he didn't mention the party he had been invited to at his home that evening. at the time the country was generally supportive of the pm who had only recently been in hospital with covid himself. mrjohnson appeared almost immune to political challenges that might have proved terminal for some of his predecessors. just before that downing street garden party, polls showed that around two thirds of voters thought he was doing well, just a quarter thought he was doing badly. despite being blamed for some of the worst covid death rates in the world his approval ratings bounced back, helping the conservatives make significant gains in the local elections last year. however, since then the gap between those thinking he's done badly and those thinking he's done well has been widening. there isn't anybody out there who believes that the rules should be bent in order to enable people working in and around 10 downing street to have a party.
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so the style that has often worked for him is now working against him. the day of the downing street party, no family attended the funeral of 75—year—old lelito. lockdown meant her daughter was never able to say goodbye. we went there, there was just a coffin. what do you think about the prime minister having a party? i'll be honest with you, i really hate him, i'm sorry to say it because my mum wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace, he has not said sorry, he doesn't acknowledge what he has done, he lies and lies and lies and you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain can forgive and forget mistakes made by their leader on that sunny day in may, but boris johnson's remarkable resilience and charisma can see him through. but if his party became convinced he is a liability rather than a vote winner they have a reputation of being ruthless.
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0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. there were empty seats on the government pensions, there was no sign of the prime minister, am i right in saying he has to appear tomorrow in the commons. so right in saying he has to appear tomorrow in the commons. so far he has been able _ tomorrow in the commons. so far he has been able to _ tomorrow in the commons. so far he has been able to not _ tomorrow in the commons. so far he has been able to not address - tomorrow in the commons. so far he has been able to not address some l tomorrow in the commons. so far he | has been able to not address some of these questions that have been raised today when he has been asked about this gathering, yesterday on a visit, he said that sue gray the senior official was looking into this and other allegations and he would not comment while it was happening. what happens on a wednesday in the uk parliament, it is prime minister's questions where he turns up to face questions from the leader of the opposition and also from backbenchers and given the level of anger that there is amongst backbenchers, even on his own side actually this evening, as well as those in the opposition, it seems inconceivable he will be able to get through half an hour of questioning
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tomorrow holding that line of saying you have to wait until the enquiry reports back. the expectation is that he will need to address this and the issue of his own attendance or not at this event and also the other thing to bear in mind, you heard douglas ross, the leader of the scottish conservative saying, there are serious consequences for misleading parliament. there will be some direct questions put to the prime minister which i think he will be forced to answer. is prime minister which i think he will be forced to answer.— be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker. _ be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker, we _ be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker, we might _ be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker, we might we - be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker, we might we see - be forced to answer. is sue gray a fast worker, we might we see the| fast worker, we might we see the report? we fast worker, we might we see the reort? ~ ., ., ., ., report? we do not have a timescale and the minister— report? we do not have a timescale and the minister who _ report? we do not have a timescale and the minister who was _ report? we do not have a timescale l and the minister who was addressing questions earlier in the commons suggested that this enquiry would be swift. the longer it has gone on the more claims of party she has had to investigate and we do not yet have a timescale of when she might report back, but i think it will certainly be in the interests of downing street that it is concluded swiftly. thank you. the leader of the conservatives on sunderland council —
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antony mullen — spoke to bbc radio 5—live this afternoon. here's what the councillor had to say when asked about the fresh allegations of parties being held in downing street. i think the problem is that the rest of us who were also working at the time were not allowed to go out and have drinks after work in gardens. the problem here i think is not where they or were they not spreading covid in downing street, the question is did those people take part in setting rules that they then did not follow and it seems clear to me that they did not. i clear to me that they did not. i know you have gone on record today, but it bears repeating for listeners who may not have heard you earlier, but i will let you explain, in essence, you basically want martin rattle is sacked, the person who put the e—mail out and you want boris johnson to step down as well —— martin reynolds. in johnson to step down as well -- martin reynolds.— johnson to step down as well -- martin reynolds. in short, i find it difficult to defend _ martin reynolds. in short, i find it difficult to defend either _ martin reynolds. in short, i find it difficult to defend either position l difficult to defend either position and as i said, i will not defend the
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indefensible. martin reynolds has to 90, indefensible. martin reynolds has to go, i do not know how he can stay when his name is on the e—mail and it was so casual inviting people out for something that the rest of us could not do because of rules he was involved in setting for the rest of us. if sue gray's investigation finds that borisjohnson was a part of that, he will obviously have to go as well. of that, he will obviously have to go as well-— of that, he will obviously have to aoaswell.�* ., , ~ . go as well. anthony mullen. we can seak to go as well. anthony mullen. we can speak to anthony _ go as well. anthony mullen. we can speak to anthony seldon _ go as well. anthony mullen. we can speak to anthony seldon who - go as well. anthony mullen. we can speak to anthony seldon who has i go as well. anthony mullen. we can i speak to anthony seldon who has been the biographer of several prime ministers. thank you so much for joining us. is the prime minister holed below the water line? he has moved from — holed below the water line? he has moved from the _ holed below the water line? he has moved from the amber _ holed below the water line? he has moved from the amber to - holed below the water line? he has moved from the amber to the - holed below the water line? he has moved from the amber to the red l moved from the amber to the red area. it is difficult to see how he can possibly recover and come back from this. it is also almost impossible to imagine exactly how he
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can go. it is very difficult to get rid of a prime minister, theresa may clung on despite losing the majority for two years. it is an impossible object meeting an irresistible force and it is difficult to see what will happen, but he is indeed peril. looking back at the prime minister is you have written about, how have prime minister is gotten themselves out of problems like this one? well. out of problems like this one? well, there is a suggestion _ out of problems like this one? well, there is a suggestion that _ out of problems like this one? well, there is a suggestion that it - out of problems like this one? -ii there is a suggestion that it is common to be in this degree of difficulty. this is about personal authority and credibility and the prime minister, as a national leader, needs to be able to show judgment, gravitas, they might make policy errors and decisions which prove to be wrong, but when their
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judgment, rememberwith prove to be wrong, but when their judgment, remember with tony blair, it was whether he had told the truth over the iraq war, rather than the iraq war itself that undid him. the credibility of a prime minister is and that is exactly what is in jeopardy at the moment and it is hard see a prime minister since anthony eden in 1956, who has had his personaljudgment and his personal judgment and trustworthiness his personaljudgment and trustworthiness so called into question as borisjohnson has done now. that said, there could be a way back for him, out of that red zone, but he needs to act very smartly and very quickly and do the right things. if very quickly and do the right thins. . . very quickly and do the right thins. .. ., ., things. if he came out and apologised _ things. if he came out and apologised and _ things. if he came out and apologised and even - things. if he came out and | apologised and even paid a things. if he came out and - apologised and even paid a fine, would that be enough for the british public or is what happened beyond
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that? ., ., ., , that? there are only so many apologies _ that? there are only so many apologies that _ that? there are only so many apologies that you _ that? there are only so many apologies that you can - that? there are only so many apologies that you can give . that? there are only so many l apologies that you can give and still have credibility for doing so. at the same time, it is difficult to imagine what more he can do. he famously went up to a northern city when he insulted them earlier in his career and apologised. is he going to go around every town and city in britain, apologising to all those bereaved families? it is difficult to know and yet his best chance is to know and yet his best chance is to show genuine remorse and then to start behaving like a proper prime minister, doing what people like me, who have studied the prime minister over many years, have been saying, which is that you have to have cabinet government, which he does not have. you have to have a proper tour —— a proper deputy prime
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minister, which he does not have, and you have to have a much stronger, more capable number 10 than he has at the moment. if he does those things, and there are people out there whom he could bring in. if this was england football and gareth southgate was excluding some of his best players, harry kane, jack grealish, from the team, there would be an outcry, yet he has people of that calibre, jeremy hunt, amber rudd, who he is not bringing into his top team at this time of grave national crisis over covid. he has to get his best team, his best players on the pitch and start listening to them and to provide a consistent strategy. if he was england manager, he was changing the tactics every two minutes and the spectators, let alone the players on the pitch would be fed up. it is
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about consistency, maturity and not promising to be all things to all people, which is what he does. if he does not change, he will be out within three months.— does not change, he will be out within three months. very briefly, is it too late _ within three months. very briefly, is it too late for _ within three months. very briefly, is it too late for an _ within three months. very briefly, is it too late for an apology? - within three months. very briefly, is it too late for an apology? it - is it too late for an apology? it might be. nobody knows until he does apologise and the mood of the country and his mps, but if he rapidly doubles down, fortifies himself, brings in a figure like michael gove or sajid javid as deputy prime minister, and restores his credibility and the confidence of his cabinet, which is missing at the moment, and his parliamentary party, then there is a chance. but it is a chance and i don't know. i it is a chance and i don't know. i just do not know. thank you so much forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news...
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pressure mounts on borisjohnson over the downing street bring your own booze party during the first covered lockdown. 0ne own booze party during the first covered lockdown. one in 12 teachers was absent from england's schools last week as the omicron variant continued to spread. a medicalfirst in america were doctors transplant a genetically modified pigs heart into a human patient. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's tulsen tollett. good evening.... stadiums in scotland will be retuning to full capacity next week after the country's first minister announced limits on outdoor crowds will be removed. last month the scottish premiership brought foward its winter break after the government capped attendances at 500 while other leagues continued with restricted numbers. rugby fans will be happy with this news — with the six nations starting next month. nicola sturgeon also added that organisers of events will have to check the certification status of at least 50% of attendees. spl side livingston have welcomed the news ahead of their game at home
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to dundee next week. from our perspective as a football club it was a positive announcement and a few weeks ago when we decided to move the existing date forward, this is why we wanted to do it. i think over the past couple of years, fans have had a rough deal throughout the pandemic and the little things that we can do to help and moving the winter break was one is good and we will be back here at full capacity which is what the goal was a couple of weeks ago. 0ne game in the premier league tonight, as southampton host brenford. . .. the saints got on the scoresheet early. branford then equalised 50 minutes later and that is still at 1-1. the game between everton and leicester city was postponed — with brendan rodgers side unable to field a team due to a combination of covid cases, injuries and players
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being at the africa cup of nations. and one game in the championship, reading hosting fulham. victory for fulham would take them back into the automatic promotion spots while the royals sitjust above the relegation zone having been deducted six points. fulham are currently leading 1—0, harry wilson with the opener. it's ben another busy day at the africa cup of nations, the 3 time champions nigeria were up against the most successful nation in the history of the tournament, 7 time winners egypt. liverpool's mo salah was kept quiet by nigeria who were the better side throughout and scored the only goal of the game— a superb strike from leicester's kelechi iheanacho. algeria began the defence of the title with a disappointing goalless draw against sierra leone, missing a host of chances — particularly in the second half including this from riyad mahrez. it does mean algeria's unbeaten run stretches to 35 matches but this was a great result for the leone stars, a clean sheet on their first nations cup appearance since 1996. in the late match in
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group d sudan are up against guinea bissau where it's currently goalless. novak djokovic has been back out on the court in his prepartions for next week's australian 0pen.. with no decision from the country's immigration officer on his visa. border control are also investigating whether the world number one made a false declaration on his immigration form over his travel history immediately before arriving in melbourne. the draw for the tournament takes place on thursday. lewis hamilton will not decide whether to return to formula 1 this season until he sees the results of an enquiry into the abu dhabi grand prix. the mercedes team boss said hamilton has become disillusioned with formula 1 as a result of the title deciding race last year. he lost the championship to max verstappen after the race director did not apply the rules correctly in a late safety car period. at the masters snooker, ronnie 0'sullivan lived up to his nickname of the rocket
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by beating jack lisowski 6frames to1. the number 4 seed was in good form, finishing with a break of 125 to comfortably make it through to the next round. world number one mark selby is currently taking on stephen maguire... and finally, some big transfer news injapan, that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. the humanitarian crisis in afghanistan continues to worsen since the taliban takeover last august another country is in the grip of a bitterly cold winter. the united nations has appealed for more than £3.5 billion in aid to try and help avert catastrophe. afghans are facing soaring unemployment and many are unable to feed their families or heat their homes. the un says that nearly 24.4 million people are in need of humanitarian help. 1 million
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children are thought to be at risk of severe form —— malnourishment. quentin somerville sent this report. the taliban now guard food queues and more than half the country is in need. these wheelbarrows are full of the very basic, salt, rice, peanuts, cooking oil and for many of the people here, it is the first time they have had food in days and the interesting thing is that the bazaars, the markets in central cobble are full of produce, but no one here has any money and this is notjust one here has any money and this is not just the case one here has any money and this is notjust the case here in kabul, it is the same situation across afghanistan. the taliban are international priors, so the economy is being crushed by sanctions. 0nly humanitarian aid is allowed in. women are banned from work and education but have also lost another fundamental right, the ability to feed theirfamilies. has kabul ever
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been this hungry before? no, never, i think. what is the message to the rest of the world?— rest of the world? they should see how we are — rest of the world? they should see how we are going _ rest of the world? they should see how we are going to _ rest of the world? they should see how we are going to live _ rest of the world? they should see how we are going to live here. - rest of the world? they should see | how we are going to live here. they should see our challenges, see our problems and the problems are increasing day by day here. living costs are increasing day by day, new rules and new challenges which makes our lives harsher than at any other time. that is not fairfor us. this time. that is not fair for us. this woman cannot — time. that is not fair for us. this woman cannot afford _ time. that is not fair for us. this woman cannot afford the - time. that is not fair for us. this woman cannot afford the dollar cab fare to take her home, but she has just enough to hire a wheelbarrow. translation: what can we do? there is no money — translation: what can we do? there is no money to — translation: what can we do? there is no money to buy _ translation: what can we do? there is no money to buy food, _ translation: what can we do? there is no money to buy food, all _ translation: what can we do? ii—ii” is no money to buy food, all the men arejobless, they do not is no money to buy food, all the men are jobless, they do not have work. there is nothing to eat and no firewood to warm our homes. fin
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there is nothing to eat and no firewood to warm our homes. on the ed . es of firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the — firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the city _ firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the city it _ firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the city it is _ firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the city it is even _ firewood to warm our homes. on the edges of the city it is even worse. . edges of the city it is even worse. the poorest are sinking deeper into poverty. this man moved here from nangarhar province. this house is home to four families. he cannot afford to wash the faces of the children and they burn plastic to keep warm and the air is thick and accurate. translation: it still is not safe for them to return, he says. we would have moved to pakistan but pakistan closed its borders. afghanistan's low moor may be over, but the afghan people suffering in jurors. quentin somerville, bbc news, carpal. this activist arrived in the uk in 2004 after fleeing the talibanjoins us now. how are many afghans going to eat and heat their
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homes this winter? it is afghans going to eat and heat their homes this winter?— homes this winter? it is incredibly difficult and _ homes this winter? it is incredibly difficult and you _ homes this winter? it is incredibly difficult and you speak _ homes this winter? it is incredibly difficult and you speak to - homes this winter? it is incredibly difficult and you speak to people, | homes this winter? it is incredibly | difficult and you speak to people, i do that daily, and sometimes words fail to convey how difficult it is for the people. the people of afghanistan are facing two immense tragedies, one is hunger and the other is the taliban persecution. you go around afghanistan, you will see the catastrophe that has been unfolding, but sadly, for the people i talk to, they know too well that it was all avoidable. it did not have to be this way and it should not be the way it is. is have to be this way and it should not be the way it is.— not be the way it is. is there any kind of communication - not be the way it is. is there any kind of communication between | kind of communication between international agencies and the taliban to ensure that humanitarian supplies are delivered, despite the huge differences between the taliban and the outside world? i huge differences between the taliban and the outside world?— and the outside world? i suppose there is inevitably _ and the outside world? i suppose there is inevitably going - and the outside world? i suppose there is inevitably going to - and the outside world? i suppose there is inevitably going to be - and the outside world? i suppose i there is inevitably going to be some because without the taliban cooperation, aid agencies would find
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it difficult to get into. there is an immense amount of political difficulties on the ground for the taliban used aid as an instrument to pressurise communities that it sees inherently against its values. you see across afghanistan, the likes of the uzbeks are not getting aid delivered to them, in a sense aid has become a mechanism by which to buy acquiescence. the international community and the agencies have a responsibility to make sure, as the taliban, we see more evidence of, is diverting aid because it is unable to pay foot soldiers and they have their own families. the aid delivered for the afghan people are being diverted and handed to taliban foot soldiers and of course there is an ongoing systemic persecution of some communities in the central and north western afghanistan, where in
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my community, the community i came from in the village i came from, and the surrounding areas, for example, people have been asked to give back of the aid they were given by the international aid agencies because the taliban do not want them to have it and also in the part of the country that i come from again, the taliban, the communities are not just facing hunger, they are also facing land confiscation by the taliban, we have seen some of my relatives being told, they have been kidnapped and held for a few days in return for money. you can see that there are two macro levels of immense tragedies playing at the same time. . ~ immense tragedies playing at the same time. ., ~ , ., immense tragedies playing at the same time-— immense tragedies playing at the same time. ., ~ . ., same time. thank you so much for “oininu same time. thank you so much for joining us- — now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. settled weather over the next few days, but it does not necessarily mean sunshine for
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everyone. in fact, we are expecting fog to form and it could be really dense and stubborn to clear by the time we get to thursday and friday. we are expecting fog to form tonight in the south of the country, in particular, once the stamp drizzly weather clears away and the skies open up, the winds will fall light and we have got the temperature is dropping away to freezing or below and that will allow dense fog to form. further north, milderand in the western isles 8 degrees and the ocean breeze blowing here and that will continue through tomorrow and cloudy with showers. plenty of sunshine for most of us, but a few patches of stubborn fog. it should clear by the time we get to lunchtime and certainly there are early or middle of the afternoon. temperatures typically around seven or 8 degrees and milder in the western isles of scotland. hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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pressure mounts on borisjohnson over the downing street bring your own booze party during the first lockdown. one in 12 teachers was absent from england's schools last week as the omicron variant continued to spread. a medicalfirst in america, where doctors transplanted a genitally modified pig heart into a patient. —— a genetically modified pig heart. and bel—air's prince returns, but it is no laughing matter. let's return to the mounting controversy over the partying downing street's garden. it fell to the paymaster general to
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defend the prime and repeat that the whole issue was currently being investigated. they will be provided in the normal way. the terms of reference set out that while there are credible allegations relating to other gatherings, it is open for those to be investigated. i can confirm to the house that this includes the allegations relating to the 15th of may 2020. it will establish the facts and if wrongdoing is established, there will be requisite disciplinary action taken. as with all internal investigations, if evidence emerges of what was potentially a criminal offence, the matter would be referred to the
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metropolitan police. borisjohnson was not in the commons himself. labour's deputy leader, angela rayner, told mps that his absence "speaks volumes". the minister quite frankly hides behind the gray investigation. there is no need for an investigation into the simple central question today — did the prime minister attend the event in the downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on a few junior civil servants. the prime minister sets the tone. if the prime minister was there, surely he knew. the invitation was sent to 100 staff. many of them his own most personal senior appointees. this was organised in advance, mr speaker, so did the prime minister know about the event beforehand and did he give his permission
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for it to go ahead? it is not just it is notjust be the opposition parties calling for borisjohnson's role in the affair into question. douglas ross says borisjohnson has to come forward to answer a simple question. was he at the party in downing street in may 2020? because we've seen from an e—mail from someone very close to him in his private office, that over 100 people were invited to enjoy the warm weather and bring their own booze. at the exact same moment, people in scotland and across the uk were living in the most difficult and challenging of restrictions, that people had not been with a loved one when they passed away, couldn't mourn together at a funeral, maybe missed the birth of their child. people gave up so much and they are now seeing, at the same time, those at the top at number 10 were enjoying the weather and having a drink in the garden. you spoke about your frustration last month at the allegations there was a party. you were convinced there was another party. seeing this e—mail come out last
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night, what was your reaction? well, it makes it clear beyond doubt that there was a party. i mean, you don't bring your own booze to any other type of work event or anything like that. it was very clear from the way it was written, it was for colleagues to have a bit of downtime and enjoy the garden at number 10. but nhs staff didn't get to enjoy that down time with friends and family, nobody else was able to mix in groupings apart from one other person from another household. we know there's maybe 30, 40, 50 people at this party, and more than 100 were invited. so i was furious when i saw it last night, and i understand and agree with the fury and anger that people are expressing today as they learn more about it. there are reports of growing disquiet among backbenchers. one told our political correspondence that he would have no option but to
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resign. this policy was more sick than the ones held around christmas time. , , ., than the ones held around christmas time. ,, ., , .,, ., time. this is more serious than the revious time. this is more serious than the previous ones- _ time. this is more serious than the previous ones. it _ time. this is more serious than the previous ones. it is _ time. this is more serious than the previous ones. it is a _ time. this is more serious than the previous ones. it is a senior- time. this is more serious than the i previous ones. it is a senior member of the _ previous ones. it is a senior member of the team — previous ones. it is a senior member of the team e—mailing invites in advance — of the team e—mailing invites in advance to— of the team e—mailing invites in advance to a party in the number ten garden— advance to a party in the number ten gardenat— advance to a party in the number ten garden at the height of the worst of covid _ garden at the height of the worst of covid and _ garden at the height of the worst of covid and the strictest lockdown. this is— covid and the strictest lockdown. this is a — covid and the strictest lockdown. this is a serious matter. the whole country _ this is a serious matter. the whole country was — this is a serious matter. the whole country was following these rules and the _ country was following these rules and the idea that they were planning not to— and the idea that they were planning not to another ten is unacceptable. what _ not to another ten is unacceptable. what do _ not to another ten is unacceptable. what do you want to see happen? this clearl was what do you want to see happen? this clearly was a — what do you want to see happen? this clearly was a party. there is no need _ clearly was a party. there is no need for— clearly was a party. there is no need for an— clearly was a party. there is no need for an enquiry about that situation _ need for an enquiry about that situation. we need to know who we organised _ situation. we need to know who we organised it — situation. we need to know who we organised it and he was there. if anybody— organised it and he was there. if anybody went there in any kind of senior capacity who thought it was i’ili'it senior capacity who thought it was right to _ senior capacity who thought it was right to attend the party while announcing rules that you could not have parties, they cannot have a position— have parties, they cannot have a position of— have parties, they cannot have a position of setting covid policy. we have seen — position of setting covid policy. we have seen people resign for less than _ have seen people resign for less than that — have seen people resign for less than that. if anyone there was
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senior, — than that. if anyone there was senior, they cannot continue. including _ senior, they cannot continue. including the prime minister? if the prime _ including the prime minister? if the prime minister knowingly attended a party, _ prime minister knowingly attended a party, i_ prime minister knowingly attended a party, i don't know how he can survive — party, i don't know how he can survive having called for resignations for less. it would be untenable. we don't know we he was there _ untenable. we don't know we he was there or— untenable. we don't know we he was there or if— untenable. we don't know we he was there or if he — untenable. we don't know we he was there or if he knew it was happening. conceivably he saw it and wandered _ happening. conceivably he saw it and wandered around and left pretty guicklv — wandered around and left pretty quickly. we don't know the facts. we don't _ quickly. we don't know the facts. we don't need _ quickly. we don't know the facts. we don't need an enquiry to say whether he was _ don't need an enquiry to say whether he was there or not. well, in may 2020, the same month as the party took place, hannah brady lost her father to covid. last year, she met mrjohnson in the very same garden. this was her response earlier today. i think this pandemic, for me, is a story of two men.
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so one is my 55—year—old dad, who is dead, having spent 42 nights on a ventilator fighting covid, with no other illnesses. the other is a man who was 55 at time of this party, borisjohnson, having survived covid himself, who thought it was appropriate to host a party where you could bring your own booze and sit in the garden at downing street, where borisjohnson met me and four other bereaved families and told us to our faces, after listening to my dad's story, so what does the wider public make of all of this question marco polo published earlier today makes disturbing reading for the prime minister. 66% of those polled thought that he should resign and only 25% thought the tory leader remained a political asset to his party. chris hopkins is the research lead on that poll. the party. chris hopkins is the research lead on that poll.—
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lead on that poll. the key finding here is that _ lead on that poll. the key finding here is that 66% say _ lead on that poll. the key finding here is that 66% say that - lead on that poll. the key finding here is that 66% say that he - lead on that poll. the key finding i here is that 66% say that he should resign now and that was only 54% when we asked a similar question backin when we asked a similar question back in december over the christmas party scandal. that 12 point increase is the real key thing here. it might not all be down to this. there has been the attrition of his writings over the last month since the christmas party scandal came about. it is another straw, another one that could break the camel's back for the pm. he does not have the support of the british public any more. it is a significant proportion of those that voted for him last time thinking that he should resign. it is clear that, backin should resign. it is clear that, back in 2019, at the last election, he did incredibly well and won a
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large majority. that is ebbing away and what will be key in the coming weeks or at least the next few days, we will have an opinion poll where will be asking how they would vote if there was another general election tomorrow, to see what size the labour lead is. when the christmas party scandal broke, they were still enjoying a lead which has all but disappeared, the conservative party. borisjohnson's value is an asset seems to be disappearing and it begs the question whether conservative mps will keep him around for much longer. will keep him around for much loner. �* ., will keep him around for much loner. . ., , ., , longer. among these latest... less discussed _ longer. among these latest... less discussed this _ longer. among these latest... less discussed this with - longer. among these latest... less discussed this with a - less discussed this with a behavioural scientist at swansea university. does the behaviour of those who set the rules influence how the public follows the rules? i the rules influence how the public follows the rules?— follows the rules? i can probably answer that _ follows the rules? i can probably answer that in _ follows the rules? i can probably answer that in a _ follows the rules? i can probably answer that in a word, _ follows the rules? i can probably answer that in a word, yes. - follows the rules? i can probably answer that in a word, yes. then follows the rules? i can probably i answer that in a word, yes. then a
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negative impact —— the negative impact of these scandals can have cannot be understated. one of the key features is trusting government when following these rules. around this time was the barnard castle dominic cummings scandal was breaking. it is important to mention that the vast majority of people have don the right thing throughout the pandemic, they followed the rules. forthose the pandemic, they followed the rules. for those people who are a bit more inclined to perhaps not follow the rules, these things can have a big negative impact. some --eole have a big negative impact. some people might _ have a big negative impact. some people might say _ have a big negative impact. some people might say that _ have a big negative impact. some people might say that even - have a big negative impact. some people might say that even though they are disappointed by politicians volley behaviour, they still want to follow rules to protect the
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vulnerable. what leaders do is almost irrelevant to them, they have to follow the rules, they have no other choice.— to follow the rules, they have no other choice. that accounts for the outra . e. other choice. that accounts for the outrage- we _ other choice. that accounts for the outrage. we might _ other choice. that accounts for the outrage. we might have _ other choice. that accounts for the outrage. we might have seen - other choice. that accounts for the outrage. we might have seen a - other choice. that accounts for the outrage. we might have seen a lot other choice. that accounts for the i outrage. we might have seen a lot of criticism and potentially noncompliance at the time. it is now perhaps worse that transparency is another big thing that helps to instill a sense of confidence in government's handling of the pandemic. it is important that the facts get out there. but you are right, a lot of people have sacrificed so much for so long, which makes it more difficult for people to see instances where those setting the rules may not have been following them. taste setting the rules may not have been following them.— setting the rules may not have been following them. we are 22 months in now. what have _ following them. we are 22 months in now. what have you _ following them. we are 22 months in now. what have you learned - following them. we are 22 months in now. what have you learned about i now. what have you learned about human behaviour in that time? taste human behaviour in that time? we have human behaviour in that time? - have learned a fantastic amount. we have learned a fantastic amount. we have learned a lot about resilience. we were told at the start of the pandemic that people would not last the course, there would be fatigue.
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that has not set in. we are turning a corner now and hopefully, with the pandemic. compliance has been remarkably high. there has been a lot of inequality around behaviour and we need to still support those people have been most affected, whether with mental health or inability to financially cope with the pandemic. but i think when we look back at the pandemic, the big story is one of compliance, but certainly again we are not out of the woods yet. we still need booster rates to beehive. we know vaccine uptake is influenced by public trust, so it is important we do not see these scandals continue. but we will look back in future and say, what a remarkable sense of sacrifice the british public have made. thank ou. you. the number of pupils and teachers of
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school in england because a coronavirus has risen. the latest figures show that one in 12 teachers was off work at the beginning of last week. what than 300,000 children were at home. numerous schools have told the bbc that they have not been able to find people to cover. how are we doing this morning? this is how the school day starts in rochdale. there's 32 staff absent at the moment, 20 staff need covering. checking how many staff are off, 32 this morning, including 11 teachers. how many supply have we got in? five supply. five supply? morning, everybody! chris, the head teacher, is just trying to keep it normal for pupils. but it's a constantjuggling act. ladies, mask on properly, please. it's becoming increasingly more challenging, even though we plan ahead and we try and book as many supply teachers as we think we need for the week, the changes in absence on a day by day basis change so quickly that we have to try and be one step ahead. so they are merging some lessons today.
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the head of maths, fran ashraf, took a double class. 50 year nine pupils learning together. the two points that it crosses, draw a straight line through. i so, they get specialist teaching. this kind of contingency planning shows the lengths schools are willing to go to to keep pupils learning in school. but also how worried they are about this extra disruption after two years of the pandemic, especially for teenagers facing exams this summer. hoping this latest covid wave passes quickly, year—11s looking forward to gcse exams. it's my year 11 year, i've worked my whole school life towards sitting gcses and i want to do the best i possibly can. i wouldn't say i'm actually hoping to actually do the exams, but i think it's actually important because for me if we actually go to another lockdown, we're going to get teachers' assessed grades. i've got your cold writing tasks. 100 miles away in birmingham, this primary has bought air purifier machines for every class. last term, the autumn term,
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we were very fortunate. we had less than ten children off with covid. we only had a couple of members of staff, and none of those were teachers. very, very different. we've got more children cases than we had during the whole of the autumn term just in this last week, the same for staff. parents here do voluntary lateral flow tests with their children. i want to keep life as normal as it possibly can be, really. i don't want any more disruption, anyways. if he brings it home, _ i've got an elderly mother—in—law, he's going to pass it on to her, so again, i test my— kids every other day. the government has appealed to former teachers to return. details of how that's gone are expected tomorrow. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. two men have been arrested in connection with the disappearance of a teenager who has been missing for
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15 years. he was apparently travelling to london. the case became one of the most high—profile missing person investigations. the two men who were arrested in london on suspicion of kidnap and human traffic have both been released under investigation. surgeons in america have made history after a pig's heart has been successfully transplanted into a human for the first time. the 57—year—old man is said to be doing well, four days after the surgery. if it does prove to be successful, it could mean animal organs are used more frequently in human transplants. this report from our medical editor, fergus walsh, contains pictures of the operation. this is the gene edited pig heart ready for transplant into a human. the organ looks perfect, a good size and the extraction of the organ went routinely. surgeons in maryland spent eight
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hours performing the world first. scientists had spent decades building to this moment, which some believe could revolutionise transplantation. the recipient was david bennett, seen here with his son and daughter. he was dying of heart failure and too ill to be considered for a human organ. and here is david with his surgeon. he's said to be doing well, although it's unclear how long his new heart will last. we've never done this in a human, and i like to think that we have given him a better option than what continuing his therapy would have been. but whether it's a day, week, month, year, i don't know. the science involved gene editing pig embryos. four pig genes were deactivated, knocked out, this included one to stop the heart from growing too large once transplanted. six human genes were added
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to try to prevent the immune system from immediately rejecting it. the gene—altered embryo was then transferred into a sow with the subsequent litter grown for potential human transplant. i visited a research farms in the us breeding gene—edited pigs. the hope is they could solve the organ donor shortage. in the uk, around 500 patients die each year while on the transplant waiting list. some will object to animals being bred as spare parts, but the number needed would be dwarfed by the millions bred for meat. fergus walsh, bbc news. the latest government figures show that almost 121,000 new infections in the latest 24—hour period have been recorded. on average, there
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were 157,600 new cases per day over the last week. the number of people in hospital is rising, almost 20,000. there have been more deaths. on average in the last week, there were 237 deaths per day. on two vaccinations now. 36 million people have had their boosterjab, meaning that more than 62.3% of those aged 12 or above have had three doses of the vaccine. anyone who records a positive lateral flow test but doesn't have symptoms no longer needs to take a pcr test. it is hoped that easing this role will free up testing capacity for key workers amid concerns over staff shortages.
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restrictions on large outdoor events in scotland, including football matches and concerts, are to be lifted from next monday. the move allow fans to return to stadiums when the scottish premiership's winter break ends. it also means that scott's six nations rugby matches won't have to be played behind closed doors. the fresh prince of bel air, which ran fourth hundreds of episodes over six seasons in the 90s is back, but this time without a laugh track. yesterday, a trailer for the this time without a laugh track. yesterday, a trailerfor the reboot of the show with released. it is based on the life of a streetwise teenager who was sent to live with his wealthy uncle and aunt in bel—air. this time, will smith, who played the protagonists, will be producing the show. let's take a look.
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geoffrey thompson. house manager. ten years is a long time. let’s geoffrey thompson. house manager. ten years is a long time.— ten years is a long time. let's go find ou ten years is a long time. let's go find you something _ ten years is a long time. let's go find you something fit _ ten years is a long time. let's go find you something fit for - ten years is a long time. let's go find you something fit for a - ten years is a long time. let's go | find you something fit for a prince. what do you think of the trailer? it is different from the show that everyone was expecting. fresh prince of bel—air was one of the most iconic shows of the 90s, but what this is really indicating is a shift in direction at a time when there has been so many reboots, revivals. the reason why there are so many at the moment is primarily down to the fact that at a time when competition between streaming services has been so fierce, it is easier to get publicity and subscribers to show with something that has been rebooted, something people are with, rather than having a whole new show. although we do have some great new
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drama as well. the difficulty with a reboot is bringing something to the modern age which doesn't feel like it isjust a modern age which doesn't feel like it is just a tired carbon copy of the old version with nothing new to say. what is really interesting here is they have kept the basic framework of what made the show so successful and have taken the most basic conceits of the plot from the opening titles and then taken it in a totally different, new direction, providing a lot of originality and reflecting a lot of what makes modern telly so great. part of the success of — modern telly so great. part of the success of the original _ modern telly so great. part of the success of the original was - modern telly so great. part of the success of the original was the i success of the original was the on—screen charm of will smith himself, the star. he is now a producer. how will it cope without him on screen? the producer. how will it cope without him on screen?— him on screen? the fact he is producing _ him on screen? the fact he is producing gives _ him on screen? the fact he is producing gives it _ him on screen? the fact he is producing gives it a _ him on screen? the fact he is producing gives it a lot - him on screen? the fact he is producing gives it a lot of - producing gives it a lot of credibility and it seems he has been involved in moulding the show in the way he would want. what is fascinating is that instead of
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replicating bill smith on screen and trying to be like him, they have cast an unknown tv actor, which allows him to take the role in his own direction, rather than having something that might be a bad copy and paste. but this is the thing with so many trailers, we only see snippets. we only saw two or three minutes. what i also find fascinating is that, two years ago, there was a homage that was uploaded by a film—maker. will smith was so impressed by this, and so were different streaming networks, they were bidding wars for this. that has turned into this reboot and this revival. the fact they have taken something that is essentially a fan
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video, and turned it into some thing that has such appeal, is then able to turn it into a big tv show. it is something different impaired to a lot of revivals at the moment. briefly, any other shows you would like to see revived? golden girls? family ties? golden girls, you would have to do that... uk —wise, they would have to bring back brainiac science abuse which was on sky tv. it got me interested in tv in the first place. thank you. the remains of a wealthy roman trading town have been unearthed in a remote field in northamptonshire by archaeologists working on the construction of the hs2 rail network. they say it's one of the most impressive sites they've found so far. our correspondent, jo black, has been looking
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at what they've uncovered. it is the high—speed line which divides opinion, but as hs2 develops, some of the excavations along the route have provided opportunities for us to see how we used to live. this 12—hectare site in northamptonshire has not only revealed an iron age settlement, but also a roman town. it's not thought to be a story of roman invasion, but more a progression between the two eras. i've been working for ten years now and never come across anything of this scale or even this quality. we will be working incredibly hard to understand what we have on—site and to tell that story. archaeology is telling stories, it's pulling together the physical evidence on the ground, the finds, and the teams in the office are then pulling together their expertise to understand exactly what we have. here in a warehouse miles from the site, thousands of priceless artefacts. the majority are animal bone and pottery, including a sophisticated piece from france. also among the finds is this — lead dye presumably from some sort of game, this highly decorative and rare
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scale weight showing the importance of trade on the site, and then this — part of a leg shackle thought to relate to a prisoner or some sort of enslaved person. while the site and its findings helps to transform our understanding of roman times and beyond, its future involves high—speed rail. jo black, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. the south of the uk has had some very grey, drizzly weather through today. the skies will clear in the next two hours, we will see dense fog forming across southern parts of the uk. that could linger through tomorrow morning and even into the afternoon. you can see the weather front through today in the south of the country, which is where we had that lightweight and drizzle. it is in the process of clearing away. behind it, the skies are
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clearing so that risk of dense fog across this part of the country. elsewhere, a clear night and across western parts of scotland, fairly cloudy and damp. these are the temperatures in the morning. for many of us, around freezing or below first thing. the weather map for wednesday shows high pressure centred across england and wales. this is where it will stick around for most of the week. around the high pressure, you can see some slightly milder air pivoting around. that is spreading across scotland. so that is where we will have the mildest conditions. also some cloud and bits and pieces of drizzle. here is the fog again, lingering for a time across southern parts of the uk. forthe time across southern parts of the uk. for the vast majority of us, it will not be foggy, but rather bright or sunny, with temperatures reaching between seven and 10 degrees. the fog returns later in the week. this is early on thursday and once again it seems like it is the southern
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parts of the uk that get most of the fog. sunshine further north, but once again in the western isles it is more cloudy with the ocean breeze. where the fog lingers and sticks around into the afternoon, it will be cold, with temperatures not rising any higher than 0 degrees. under the clear skies, around 8 degrees for many of us. the same pattern repeats itself on friday morning, fog forming by the early hours and sticking around in some spots during the afternoon. where it does, it will be quite cold with a raw feel to things. the outlook over the next you days sees very little change come with high pressure sticking around. these are very much average averages for the time of year, but cold weather fog hangs around. goodbye.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. welcome to context — on tonight's show. pressure piling on boris johnson as british police say they're in contact with the government after the leak of an invite to a downing street garden party during the first lockdown. there has been no confirmation from the prime minister but it is thought that he and his wife are at the party in may 2020 at which up to 40 people reportedly attended. joe biden tells america there is nothing more fundamental than the right to vote. he says it is a defining moment for us democracy. teaching in a pandemic — 1 in 12 teachers are off sick in england, but in chicago teachers reach a deal to reopen schools
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tonight with the context, ruth smeeth who was a labour mp

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