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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 11, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins. welcome to outside source. another downing street party comes under question, as british police investigate after 100 people were invited for drinks at the prime minister's residence, at a time of strict covid rules. the serbian prime minister speaks to the bbc about novak djokovic�*s vaccine row with australia, as the tennis star we are hoping that novak will be able to stay in australia and play the australian open. and presidentjoe biden�*s battle over voting rights which he says are crucial to saving democracy in the us.
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we start in the uk. borisjohnson has faced many questions about whether covid rules were observed in downing street. it's understood around 30 people gathered for this event. labour has called on borisjohnson to call come clean. borisjohnson has faced many questions of about whether covid rules were observed. i can rules were observed. i can understand _ rules were observed. i can understand how _ rules were observed. i can| understand how infuriating rules were observed. i can i understand how infuriating it rules were observed. ice�*i understand how infuriating it must be to think that the people who have been setting the rules have not been following the rules. that was december 2021. 19 months earlier — in may 2020, england was in its first lockdown. there were already over 30,000 covid deaths. 20th may was the hottest day of the year so far. and at 5pm, culture secretary 0liver dowden led the government's daily covid update — and reiterated the rules. you can meet one person outside your household in an outdoor public place, provided that you stay two metres apart.
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also, boris johnson's also, borisjohnson�*s staff also, boris johnson's staff at work. among them was martin reynolds. we know that on the 20th of may, martin reynolds sent an e—mail to around 100 downing st staff. ever since, no one has leaked it until this week. but not everyone wanted to. the bbc has seen a message from one staffer to another, which reads... another asked... it was. here is laura kuenssberg. here is laura kuenssberg. we're told around 30 people attended, including, - according to two eyewitnesses, i the prime minister and his wife, with a long table set out in the garden . for drinks and snacks. the daily mirror also spoke to
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witnesses about what happened. 0ne says... on monday, the prime minister was asked about all of this. did you and carrie attend a downing street party that was organised on the 20th of may? all that, as you know, is the subject of a proper investigation by sue gray. indeed it is. sue gray is investigated whether there were parties that broke the rules. the former leader of the goddess conservatives isn't in the mood to wait. she tweeted... there are plenty of my colleagues who have no idea what anyone in that was thinking. this is utterly indefensible. the opposition party also wants answers. there is no need for
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an investigation into the simple central question today — did the prime minister attend the event in the downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? the prime minister has declined to say, pointing each time to the investigation. in december, mr johnson did repeatedly offer reassurances. all guidance was followed completely during number ten... we followed the guidance throughout and continue to follow the guidance. what i can tell you is that all the guidelines were observed. were they though? we know there was a christmas party and downing street on the 18th of december 2020. the prime minister said rules weren't broken without explaining. as for the 20th of may, a conservative mp says there's no problem. the? the 20th of may, a conservative mp says there's no problem.— says there's no problem. they were s - illin: says there's no problem. they were spilling out — says there's no problem. they were spilling out into _ says there's no problem. they were spilling out into their _ says there's no problem. they were spilling out into their own _ says there's no problem. they were spilling out into their own offices. l spilling out into their own offices. here's _ spilling out into their own offices. here's another view. at that time, it was illegal for -
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a person to be outside of the place they were living without a reasonable excuse, i and that reasonable excuse could include where - they needed to work. but as we can see from the e—mail, i this doesn't look a lot like work. i that will be for sue gray's investigation, but there's also the question of whether borisjohnson knew about the e—mail. i think it's true to say that it's extremely unlikely he could've invited 100 people to a party in the downing street garden without the assent of the prime minister. unlikely, may be, it is possible mr johnson ventured into his garden and found 30 people there to his surprise. we don't know, but the chair of the committee has seen enough party allegations to draw this conclusion. there is at least a carelessness amongst people in government over standards issues and possibly more than that. lord evans is watching. the metropolitan police is watching. it
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says... it is also presumably aware of its own tweet on the same day. in december, the met office did against further investigation. we'll see if it draws the same conclusion. while sue gray, the police and others consider the legal dimensions, there's a human dimensions, there's a human dimension too. think back to that clip of borisjohnson. ican i can understand how infuriating it must be to think that the people who have been setting the rules have not been following the rules. so it is proving. jean adamson because my father died of covid—19. to think that downing street were planning a jolly and breaking their own rules at that time, itjust beggars belief.
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——jean —— jean adamson�*s father. this upset is registering. beth rigby reports... political pressure is growing, and after weeks of reports and denials, jim picard share this exchange on tuesday. but while the prime minister has replied, he hasn't addressed the substance. mrjohnson won't say if he was there on may the 20th, or whether the december party broke the rules. 0n whether the december party broke the rules. on tuesday, this was the government's message. the prime
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minister is going _ government's message. the prime minister is going nowhere. - government's message. the prime minister is going nowhere. he - minister is going nowhere. he retains — minister is going nowhere. he retains the _ minister is going nowhere. he retains the competence - minister is going nowhere. he retains the competence of - minister is going nowhere. hei retains the competence of the minister is going nowhere. he - retains the competence of the people of this— retains the competence of the people of this country — retains the competence of the people of this country. that— retains the competence of the people of this country-— of this country. that is difficult to gauge- _ of this country. that is difficult to gauge- what _ of this country. that is difficult to gauge. what i do - of this country. that is difficult to gauge. what i do know. of this country. that is difficult to gauge. what i do know is| of this country. that is difficult i to gauge. what i do know is on to gauge. what we do know is on may the 20th, the gathering in the garden was byob. during the lockdown, you can't bring your own rules, and soon enough, sue gray will tell us if the prime minister broke them on may the 20th. let's get the latest on novak djokovic in australia. the australian government is still deciding whether to cancel his visa. new questions have emerged about the player's travel history prior to arriving in australia, which could be a new issue for him. but first, the serbian prime minister has told the bbc�*s balkans correspondent, guy de launey, she is hopeful djokovic will be allowed to defend his singles title at the australian open. from what i understand right now, the minister of immigration is
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basically— the minister of immigration is basically checking novak's medical exemption in the final decision is yet to— exemption in the final decision is yet to he — exemption in the final decision is yet to be brought. i don't think this is— yet to be brought. i don't think this is the _ yet to be brought. i don't think this is the end of the whole saga, but i'm _ this is the end of the whole saga, but i'm hoping that novak will be allowed — but i'm hoping that novak will be allowed to stay in australia and play in — allowed to stay in australia and play in the australian open. both ou and play in the australian open. both you and the _ play in the australian open. exit? you and the president of talk play in the australian open. ifizfrii�*u you and the president of talk about the atmosphere with election coming up the atmosphere with election coming up and question whether that's coming to play over the decisions. having spoken to scott morrison, have you changed any views? how do you feel about how he will approach the issue? i you feel about how he will approach the issue? ., ., _ you feel about how he will approach the issue? ., ., ., ., the issue? i have to say that i had the issue? i have to say that i had the very positive _ the issue? i have to say that i had the very positive constructive i the very positive constructive conversations with both of the mihister— conversations with both of the minister of foreign affairs, whom i spoke _ minister of foreign affairs, whom i spoke to— minister of foreign affairs, whom i spoke to on saturday morning, and the prime — spoke to on saturday morning, and the prime minister morrison, whom i spoke _ the prime minister morrison, whom i
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spoke to— the prime minister morrison, whom i spoke to last night. so, both very positive, — spoke to last night. so, both very positive, very constructive and appreciative. i'm very thankful for them _ appreciative. i'm very thankful for them. whether it is a political issue — them. whether it is a political issue within australia, i don't know. — issue within australia, i don't know. to _ issue within australia, i don't know, to be honest. but it was important _ know, to be honest. but it was important for me and for the serbian public— important for me and for the serbian public to— important for me and for the serbian public to say that it has nothing to do with— public to say that it has nothing to do with australia and 's public to say that it has nothing to do with australia and '5 serbian relationship. guy delauneyjoins me now from the serbian capital, belgrade. we've been hearing in the last 48 hours about this positive test and seeing all this evidence that novak djokovic wasn't isolating, is that getting attention? hat djokovic wasn't isolating, is that getting attention?— djokovic wasn't isolating, is that getting attention? not as much as ou getting attention? not as much as you perhaps _ getting attention? not as much as you perhaps would _ getting attention? not as much as you perhaps would think. - getting attention? not as much as you perhaps would think. it's i getting attention? not as much as you perhaps would think. it's not i you perhaps would think. it's not something which has been foregrounded in the serbian media, let's put it that way. all the way along the serbian press has been really partisan about this. when we had the court verdict yesterday, the
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headline was, "novak beats australia." so, of course, anything which will show their icon in a bad light has been further down the page. but to be fair, they have also been doing things like printing his negative test results and his positive test results in full on the page for everyone to see. and also talking about the question about whether he knew that he tested positive on the 16th of december when he went out on the 17th to present... limited coverage perhaps less prominent, but it has to be fair to the serbian media. find less prominent, but it has to be fair to the serbian media.- less prominent, but it has to be fair to the serbian media. and i was interesting listening _ fair to the serbian media. and i was interesting listening to _ fair to the serbian media. and i was interesting listening to the - interesting listening to the interview that this is now a complete intertwining of sport and politics with serbia's leader very clean for this not to impact. is a clean for this not to impact. is a very large _ clean for this not to impact. is a very large diaspora _ clean for this not to impact. is —. very large diaspora in australia. as
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you will see by the people dancing outside novak djokovic�*s quarantine hotel. they were very strong links between this region, and until very recently, the australian football league was organised along ethnic grounds, including at the cities from this reason. although i heard they felt sometimes really they didn't have a stronger relationship with australia as they would like to, given those links, and perhaps this might be an opportunity in a crisis to have something good come out of it and strengthen those ties. stay there, guy. novak djokovic is getting ready to play. here he is practising earlier. lots of people are speculating what kind of reaction he might get. it's not certain he will play.
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sure we can handle that. we're really excited _ sure we can handle that. we're really excited that _ sure we can handle that. we're really excited that he's - sure we can handle that. we're really excited that he's here. i sure we can handle that. we're. really excited that he's here. it's cool to _ really excited that he's here. it's cool to have all those top players, and we _ cool to have all those top players, and we are — cool to have all those top players, and we are super excited for him. if and we are super excited for him. he plays, i and we are super excited for him. if he plays, iwill and we are super excited for him. if he plays, i will not watch him because _ he plays, i will not watch him because he's— he plays, i will not watch him because he's not— he plays, i will not watch him because he's not vaccinated. | because he's not vaccinated. people have been through _ because he's not vaccinated. people have been through so _ because he's not vaccinated. people have been through so much. - because he's not vaccinated. people have been through so much. to i because he's not vaccinated. people have been through so much. to be i because he's not vaccinated. people i have been through so much. to be the most lockdown city in the world, it's completely understandable that they can be as angry as they are. however, he's past those measures, then i think he's done what he had to do. djokovic�*s former coach boris becker says the tennis star may have a rough reception if he plays at the open. well, i'm sure there will be a coupte — well, i'm sure there will be a coupte of— well, i'm sure there will be a couple of booze, but he's used to that _ couple of booze, but he's used to that he — couple of booze, but he's used to that. he was never... —— boos. he
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had to— that. he was never... —— boos. he had to wirr— that. he was never... —— boos. he had towih over— that. he was never... —— boos. he had to win over the crowd, and i thought— had to win over the crowd, and i thought it — had to win over the crowd, and i thought it was fascinating when he finally _ thought it was fascinating when he finally embraced him. he couldn't handle _ finally embraced him. he couldn't handle it— finally embraced him. he couldn't handle it either. he started crying in the _ handle it either. he started crying in the changing rooms. the crowd will he _ in the changing rooms. the crowd will be difficult with him, but with each match he wins, the crowd will embrace _ each match he wins, the crowd will embrace him again. but it's going to be a difficult week. questions are now being raised about whether he made a false declaration when he arrived in australia. the media is reporting he ticked the box to say he had not travelled in the weeks before arriving on melbourne, but we know some of the places where he'd been. on christmas, he was in belgrade. a few days later, he was in spain, and here he is training on the 2nd ofjanuary. he also signed autographs for some of the fans there. these questions are not going
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away, particularly with the focus on the last two weeks of december. indeed. i asked the prime minister about this and about novak djokovic�*s mum as well. both of them said to me they were questions that only novak himself could answer. deanna said to me he's a grown man. i don't genuinely know what he's been doing. novak will have to answer those questions for himself. this is the problem, speculating about what's going on, speculating about what's going on, speculating about what's going on, speculating about what could happen with any possible ministerial intervention in australia. it would help everyone an awful lot if novak djokovic himself came out and was 100% straight about what he'd been doing, times of tests, when he knew about results, where he'd been going. we could all have a much better picture of this, and i think people would think
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better of novak djokovic for it. just finally, a little bit of contact. just how big a star is he in serbia compared with other public figures? in serbia compared with other public fiaures? ~ ., r' in serbia compared with other public fiaures? ~ . ,~ ~ ., in serbia compared with other public fiaures? ~ . ~ ., ., figures? well, i asked anna about this, about... _ figures? well, i asked anna about this, about... she _ figures? well, i asked anna about this, about... she said _ figures? well, i asked anna about this, about... she said it - figures? well, i asked anna about this, about... she said it is - this, about... she said it is unusual, but this is novak. they wouldn't do this for anybody else. but novak is so important for serbia, he's the greatest ambassador for the country, is what she said. i think that's a fair reflection. thank you very much indeed. world health organization has described the omicron variant is a tidal wave spreading across the continent. in france, there will more than... that's a record for single day. single
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more than... that's a record for single day. there was another record in italy. doctor daniel lopez is an epidemiologist based in spain. thank you forjoining us. how concerned are you by the speed of the spread of omicron?— are you by the speed of the spread of omicron? , . _, . of omicron? very much concerned. i share completely _ of omicron? very much concerned. i share completely the _ of omicron? very much concerned. i share completely the concerns i share completely the concerns expressed. i think we need to take omicron seriously. we have a real tidal wave, a tsunami of cases, because omicron is highly contagious. it may be less severe, but the sheer amount of cases that is producing is huge pressure in the hospital care, and producing sick leaves and great amount in the workforce. leaves and great amount in the workforce-— workforce. tell us about the situation — workforce. tell us about the situation in _ workforce. tell us about the situation in spain. _ workforce. tell us about the situation in spain. well, i workforce. tell us about the l situation in spain. well, spain workforce. tell us about the i situation in spain. well, spain has an incidence _ situation in spain. well, spain has an incidence that _ situation in spain. well, spain has an incidence that is _ situation in spain. well, spain has an incidence that is approaching i
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situation in spain. well, spain has i an incidence that is approaching the one you have in the uk. you have over 3000 cases per 100,000. 2900, very close. i think all in all, larger number in cases is the uk. france is second. then we have three countries with seven and a half million cases — germany, italy and spain. we are calculating the 100,000 population. follow them by france and spain is approaching. what do you suggest these countries should do now? they have very high case numbers. do you advocate more restrictions on what people can do in their lives?— in their lives? yes, i think it's very important _ in their lives? yes, i think it's very important to _ in their lives? yes, i think it's very important to understand | in their lives? yes, i think it's i very important to understand that vaccination is extreme the important. but it's not everything and it's not enough. we need to complete the cycles for those who
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are unvaccinated, but we need to move into a clear notion of use of the masks, of distancing, no gatherings and introducing address pins —— restrictions. not in the way of lockdowns, but in the way of limiting the unprotected social interaction. but limiting the unprotected social interaction-— interaction. but if we do what ou're interaction. but if we do what you're suggesting _ interaction. but if we do what you're suggesting and - interaction. but if we do what you're suggesting and there's interaction. but if we do what i you're suggesting and there's no reason to think that vaccination rates will reach 90 or 95%, aren't we looking at an endless series of variants and restrictions? i we looking at an endless series of variants and restrictions?- variants and restrictions? i don't think it's in _ variants and restrictions? i don't think it's in list. _ variants and restrictions? i don't think it's in list. -- _ variants and restrictions? i don't think it's in list. -- endless. in i think it's in list. —— endless. in the extent that we move all over the world, insufficient coverage of the vaccination campaigns. reviews the incidents, we will have a decreasing
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likelihood of having greater number of variants that can escape the vaccines. restrictions are necessary. we reach high levels of contagious... especially when we create pressure in hospital infrastructure and health care that threatens the regular functioning, not only for covid, but other diseases. not only for covid, but other diseases-— not only for covid, but other diseases. ., a ., not only for covid, but other diseases. ., n ., ., ,, diseases. doctor lopez acuna, thank ou ve diseases. doctor lopez acuna, thank you very much _ diseases. doctor lopez acuna, thank you very much for — diseases. doctor lopez acuna, thank you very much forjoining _ diseases. doctor lopez acuna, thank you very much forjoining us. - president biden is in atlanta to drum up support for his party's legislation on voting rights, which he says are crucial to saving us democracy. he's expected to back ending the filibuster rule, which currently allows senators to block legislation simply by running down the clock. this was what president biden told reporters, moments before
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departing for georgia. this is one of those defining moments. people will be judged. where were they before and where were they after the boat? history willjudge. the risk is making sure people understand it —— the vote. two pieces of legislation are key here — the freedom to vote act, which addresses topics such as voter id laws and make election day a holiday, and thejohn lewis voting rights act would restore anti—discrimination components of the voting rights act that were stripped away by the supreme court. the problem for the democrats is that whilst most bills, once they get to a vote on the senate floor, require a simple majority of 51 votes to pass after debate has ended.
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coding short a debate requires a super majority of 60 votes out of 100. gary o'donoghue is in washington. there may be viewers just watching scratching their heads, that this is some sort of system that senators can run down the clock if they don't like a particular piece of legislation.— like a particular piece of legislation. yeah, and it's certainly _ legislation. yeah, and it's certainly been _ legislation. yeah, and it's certainly been used i legislation. yeah, and it's certainly been used in i legislation. yeah, and it's| certainly been used in that legislation. yeah, and it's- certainly been used in that way, legislation. yeah, and it's— certainly been used in that way, and tjy certainly been used in that way, and by both sides. it's originally designed to ensure that there wasn't the sort of tyranny of the majority, it was designed to make the majority persuade other people to their point of view. it had in some ways those good intentions, but it has been used more and more recently to block things. because with the electoral map of the way things are drawn, you don't really get 60 senators from one party elected any more. it's pretty much anything between 45—55.
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you don't really get to that 60 point of being able break that filibuster. that's the problem the democrats have at the moment. there's no sense in which they can get the votes really to change that rule at the moment. truth? get the votes really to change that rule at the moment.— rule at the moment. why is the president making _ rule at the moment. why is the president making this - rule at the moment. why is the president making this a - rule at the moment. why is the i president making this a priority? because he's had to, because of the pressure from below, from some of the russia groups, members of congress, the left of the party. —— lesser groups. democratic voters believe there is a process going on across the country of republicans dates instituting new laws making it harderfor dates instituting new laws making it harder for people to vote —— republican states. particularly people of colour. they believe it's on picking the whole progress that was made in the 1960s with the voting rights legislation, and taking parts of the country back to
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a form ofjim crow. that's as strong as some people are putting this, creating a two tier system. it's a difficult one to argue because some parts of voting laws are very restrictive, and very restrictive in democrat areas as well, like new york. but they are trying to point out that these things do seem to be aimed at mainly democratic voters, things like in georgia, where you cannot give anyone in the queue to vote anything to drink or eat for some reason.— but there will be some notable absences from the president's visit. stacey abrams, the democratic candidate for governor, won't be there. a scheduling conflict. but others have been more critical. cliff albright, the co—founder of black voters matter, says, of black voters matter, says... while james woodall, the former president of the naacp of georgia, said...
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doesn't sound like it will be that warm a welcome.— doesn't sound like it will be that warm a welcome. there will be some ke civil warm a welcome. there will be some key civil rights _ warm a welcome. there will be some key civil rights leaders _ warm a welcome. there will be some key civil rights leaders there. - warm a welcome. there will be some key civil rights leaders there. al i key civil rights leaders there. al sharpton will be there, jesse jackson will be there, others from other groups, but you're right. i think this is an indication that the reality of what's happening and that this thing will not get through in the senate, means that some of these groups and individuals don't want to be part of that failure. they don't want to be part of that process that has a big jamboree in atlanta and a big speech, and then it all comes crashing down in the senate. i suspect that's what's going on, the reality of the electoral and mass of this. ., ~ reality of the electoral and mass of this. . ,, , ., reality of the electoral and mass of this. ., ~' , ., , reality of the electoral and mass of this. . ,, i. , . reality of the electoral and mass of this. . ,, , . , reality of the electoral and mass of this. . , . . this. thank you very much, gary. we have to see — this. thank you very much, gary. we have to see how _ this. thank you very much, gary. we have to see how that _ this. thank you very much, gary. we have to see how that evolves. - in the next half an hour, we will
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turn back to these questions about that gathering in downing street on may the 20th. the south of the uk has some gray, drizzly weather through the course of day. the skies will clear and we will see dense fog forming particularly on the part of the uk the dense fog could linger through tomorrow morning and even into the afternoon. you can see the weather fronts through today, across other part of the country. that's what we had all light rain and drizzle. it is in a process of clearing away. behind it, the skies are clearing so the greatest risk of dense fog across this part of the country. elsewhere, i think a clear night and actually across western parts of scotland, fairly cloudy and damp. temperatures early in the morning, 5 degrees, but for many of us it's actually around freezing
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or below first thing on wednesday. the weather map for wednesday shows high pressure centred across england and wales. this is where it will stick around for most of the week. around the high pressure, you can see some slightly milder air pivoting around and spreading across scotland. that's where we will have the mildest conditions was with that also some clo there's fog again lingering for a time across southern part of the uk. for the vast majority of us it won't be foggy, in fact, it will be a mostly bright or sunny day with temperatures getting up to around 7—10 celsius with up to the fog returns later in the week, this is early on thursday morning and once again it seems like it's the southern part of the uk that will get most of the fog. sunshine a little further north, but once again, here in the western aisles, it's more cloudy with that ocean breeze. where the fog does linger on thursday and sticks around to the afternoon, it will be cold, temperatures may not rise any higher than 0 degrees.
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but under the sunnier skies, it will be around 8 degrees for most of us. again, the highest temperatures in northwest parts of scotland around 11 or so. the same pattern repeats itself into friday morning. fog forming by the early hours and sticking around in some spots during the afternoon. where it does, it is going to be quite cold. quite a raw feel to things. the outlook of the next few days, very little change with high pressure sticking around. these are very much average temperatures for the time of the air. obviously cold with fog hangs around. bye— bye.
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air. obviously cold with fog hangs around. bye—bye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. another downing street party coming into question after 100 people were invited for drinks at the prime ministers residents during a strict covid lockdown. millions on the march to starvation, that is what the un is warning for afghanistan as a calls for billions in its biggest ever aid appeal. the interesting thin . ever aid appeal. the interesting thin is ever aid appeal. the interesting thing is though _ ever aid appeal. the interesting thing is though the _ ever aid appeal. the interesting thing is though the bazaars, i ever aid appeal. the interestingj thing is though the bazaars, the markets are full of produce. but no one here has any money. and this isn'tjust a case here in kabul, it's the same situation across afghanistan. ads, it's the same situation across afghanistan.— it's the same situation across afuhanistan. . ,, ., afghanistan. a special report on the illeual dark afghanistan. a special report on the illegal dark web _ afghanistan. a special report on the illegal dark web and _ afghanistan. a special report on the illegal dark web and we _ afghanistan. a special report on the illegal dark web and we will- afghanistan. a special report on the illegal dark web and we will hear- illegal dark web and we will hear attributes to the heroic rat who
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helped locate man eight landmines in cambodia. he has died at the age of eight. millions of people in afghanistan are now �*on a march to starvation'. that's the un's assessment of the humanitarian crisis there. it's calling on international donors to dig deep to fund life—saving assistance for the people of afghanistan. the un says it needs at least five billion dollars. half of that is desperately needed just to provide enough food. it's the un's biggest ever appeal for aid in a single country. here's the un making that announcement. this is a stopgap, and absolutely essential stopgap measure that we are putting in front of the international community today. without this being funded there will be a future, we need this to be done otherwise there will be outflow, there will be suffering. a food crisis —
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and an economy in freefall. let's take a look at the harsh conditions in afghanistan. more than half of afghanistan's population is facing starvation. that's over 22 million people. the prediction is that1 in 2 children under five will be acutely malnourished this year. it's also estimated that 97% of afghans could plunge into poverty by mid 2022. our reporter quentin sommerville sent us this report from kabul. after 20 years of war, afghanistan faces a long, harsh winter and a cold and hungry peace. victorious, the taliban now guard food queues. more than half the country is going hungry. women, barred from work and education, have lost another fundamental right — the ability to feed their families. here in wardak province, we meet pari. as a second wife, she supports
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a family of six alone. this wheelbarrow of basics is meant to last them 17 days, but maybe less. there was no rice today. winter is very difficult. translation: we don't have money to buy food and firewood. _ we feel the room with smoke to feel warm, but still it is cold. her granddaughter is always hungry. the baby's mother cannot produce milk. baby formula is beyond the reach of almost everyone here. the taliban are international pariahs, so the economy is being crushed by sanctions. only humanitarian aid is allowed. so in kabul, even the well—to—do are queueing for world food programme hand—outs. these wheelbarrows are full of the very basics — salt, rice, peanuts, cooking oil — and for many of the people here,
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it's the first time they've had food in days. the interesting thing is, though, the bazaars, the markets in central kabul are full of produce but no—one here has any money. and this isn'tjust the case here in kabul, it's the same situation across afghanistan. this should be the time when afghanistan stops and catches its breath. instead, its poorest are sinking deeper into poverty. ajhar moved here from nangarhar province. this house is home to fourfamilies. they cannot afford soap to wash the kids' faces. they burn plastic to keep warm. it still is not safe for them to return, he says. we would have moved to pakistan, but pakistan closed its borders to us. a million afghan kids will be
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severely malnourished this year. much of afghanistan's health care system is close to collapse. soraya is a year and a half. her big, bright eyes don't miss a trick. she was severely malnourished. hertummy and her limbs are still swollen. translation: when we came here, her situation was very bad, - and she needed a blood transfusion. thank god she is so much better than she was. the doctor has said we should wait here until the swelling goes down. ten years ago, i lived next door to this hospital. it was a time of a great surge of men, material and billions of dollars into afghanistan. western diplomats would say we were not trying to build perfection here, they weren't trying to create switzerland. who knows what they were trying to create? but it wasn't this. it wasn't a country where half the people, more than half the people are going hungry, and babies like soraya are near starvation.
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should afghanistan now be left to struggle alone? for two decades, afghans of all ages were trapped in a tempest of violence between western forces and the taliban. those battles are now over, but the afghan people's suffering endures. for them there is no respite. quentin sommerville, bbc news, kabul. it's notjust food insecurity that has caused problems. there's also mass displacement, with refugees seeking safety and asylum across borders. as you can see, afghanistan shares a border with iran and pakistan. these two countries have taken in around 2.5 million refugees — and are struggling to cope with the influx. these pictures are from a refugee camp on the border with pakistan. here's the un refugee agency. the key here is to stabilise the situation inside afghanistan. including that of displaced people who are displaced inside their country.
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also, to prevent a larger refugee crisis, a larger crisis of external displacement. christian jepsen is from the norwegian refugee council and joins me now from kabul. tell us more. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us more about the scale of the challenge you are facing. the scale of the challenge you are facina. , ., ~ the scale of the challenge you are facina. , ., ,, i. the scale of the challenge you are facina. , . ~' ,, ~ the scale of the challenge you are facina. , ., ,, i. . ., the scale of the challenge you are facina. , ., ,, . ., ., facing. yes, thank you. we had a bitterly cold _ facing. yes, thank you. we had a bitterly cold winter _ facing. yes, thank you. we had a bitterly cold winter here in - bitterly cold winter here in afghanistan. as you just heard, we have millions of people starving including up to 9 million on the brink of famine. the big problem here is the economy. people simply don't have any money to buy food. i've met lots of displaced people this week. and they are telling me that before the economic crisis, before the sanctions they could rely on going out in the street to work
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as casual labourers, moving things around, cleaning houses and collect plastic and metal scrap for recycling. they could usually make two or $3, enough to feed a family with basic food. but now they often come home empty—handed. what with basic food. but now they often come home empty-handed. what is the answer here? — come home empty-handed. what is the answer here? there _ come home empty-handed. what is the answer here? there will _ come home empty-handed. what is the answer here? there will be _ come home empty-handed. what is the answer here? there will be some - answer here? there will be some viewers who are concerned that if their country offers money to help people in afghanistan that money will simply end up with the taliban. yes, i can say that this is not can happen. first of all, the un has made a decision, the un security council about humanitarian exemptions to the sanctions. un and financial institutions, they are doing the best they can to make these channels in a way so that they bypass the current government and go directly to humanitarian agencies and to the people that the problem
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however is the funds are not reaching us and they are not reaching us and they are not reaching the people who needed. what reaching the people who needed. what about the fact — reaching the people who needed. what about the fact that this appeal from the un is coming now injanuary but evenif the un is coming now injanuary but even if those funds are promised, they won't arrive immediately, won't that help arrived too late for this winter anyway?— that help arrived too late for this winter anyway? yes, that's the big roblem. winter anyway? yes, that's the big problem- we _ winter anyway? yes, that's the big problem. we are _ winter anyway? yes, that's the big problem. we are trying _ winter anyway? yes, that's the big problem. we are trying all - winter anyway? yes, that's the big | problem. we are trying all weekend through different channels to get just a little bit of funding through to take us through the winter. my organisation and have carried out a winterisation package where we distribute blankets and warm close for the we had to purchase these items in pakistan where normally we would buy it here in afghanistan to support the local economy. so these things... we have reached a few thousand people, maybe up to hundred thousand people, maybe up to hundred thousand people, maybe up to hundred thousand people actually but this is much too little, the need as much,
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much too little, the need as much, much bigger. much too little, the need as much, much bigger-— much bigger. that is the problem. finall , much bigger. that is the problem. finally. let — much bigger. that is the problem. finally. let me _ much bigger. that is the problem. finally, let me ask _ much bigger. that is the problem. finally, let me ask you _ much bigger. that is the problem. finally, let me ask you about i finally, let me ask you about security. while there was a conflict between the government and the taliban, clearly security was a major factor for aid agency. taliban, clearly security was a majorfactorfor aid agency. now taliban, clearly security was a major factor for aid agency. now the taliban is in charge. as i got easier? ,, ., , taliban is in charge. as i got easier? , , ., , . ., easier? so, this is the one piece of aood easier? so, this is the one piece of good news- — easier? so, this is the one piece of good news- my _ easier? so, this is the one piece of good news. my organisation - easier? so, this is the one piece of good news. my organisation we i easier? so, this is the one piece of| good news. my organisation we are working in 14 provinces and we are able to work throughout these provinces in the situation for us is a bit better than it was before. this is the one piece of good news was up the security has improved dramatically. we are seeing some tendencies to criminalisty going up but for now the overall security picture is much better.- but for now the overall security picture is much better. thank you very much — picture is much better. thank you very much for— picture is much better. thank you very much for speaking _ picture is much better. thank you very much for speaking to - picture is much better. thank you very much for speaking to us. i let's go straight from afghanistan to atlanta. here are like pictures
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coming in from georgia. president biden with vice president kamala harris. they are about to lay a wreath at the crypt of martin luther king junior and caretta scott king, his wife. president biden will be giving a speech in a short time... i apologise. the vice president is on the left in great, not the red. the president will be talking later about new legislation which he says is crucial to saving us democracy. he is also expected to back a senate change to get his legislation through. that changes the removal of the filibuster which allows senators to block legislation by talking on till time runs out. president biden is looking to make voting rights a top priority for the us and the republicans are continuing to vote, past voting restrictions at the same level at which he is critical. office up to remind all of this is in the context of the november midterms which are crucial politically. democrats are under
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intense pressure to get this voting legislation through because they believe its key priority for many of their voters was up as ever with american politics it's notjust about winning people around it's about winning people around it's about getting the people to support you to turn out and vote. president biden and kamala harris they are about to lay a wreath. but we think after that the president will be saying a few words. there have been some criticisms for him from local activists who say look, the visit isn't what we need, we need further action to provide job opportunities for african—americans and better opportunities more broadly. nonetheless, as you can see, and as you can expect people have come out to see the president. there you can see the two names reverend martin luther king jr. and caretta scott king as well because of this is where the president and vice president will be laying a read.
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let's turn back to our top story here in the uk. there is mounting pressure on the prime minister to explain why a party took place in the garden at may 2020 at the height of lockdown. around 100 people were invited. around 30 people were of understood to attended including borisjohnson. according to eyewitnesses. helen, this story is not going anywhere. helen, this story is not going anywhere-— helen, this story is not going an here. ~ . . , , , helen, this story is not going an here. ~ ., ., ,, , . ., anywhere. what happens next? what ha--ens anywhere. what happens next? what happens immediately _ anywhere. what happens next? what happens immediately next _ anywhere. what happens next? what happens immediately next is - anywhere. what happens next? what happens immediately next is that - happens immediately next is that borisjohnson will have to face mps on this directly tomorrow. so far what you've been asked about the string scattering that was arranged for the 20th of may 2020 by his private secretary, he has said that he wouldn't be commenting because it was an investigation into this and other gatherings were allegedly held at downing street during the pandemic being done by in official
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called sue gray. there's been a lot of pressure him today to say whether he was at this event or not. one of the most senior conservative figures, the leader of the scottish conservatives, douglas ross said he couldn't see any reason why the prime minister couldn'tjust say couldn't see any reason why the prime minister couldn't just say as he put it, will go into this very simple question,". there's no reason why they wouldn't impact on the inquiry being laid out. the opposition of said that there shouldn't need to be an investigation to find out if the prime minister went to a party and the number ten back garden. there's certainly a lot of pressure on him to at least explain bit, whether he intended or not. i think it's inconceivable that he won't be asked about that at prime ministers question tomorrow when he faces mps and they will be expecting an answer. , . , , and they will be expecting an answer. , . , y . and they will be expecting an answer. , ., , , i i, answer. presumably the concern for downin: answer. presumably the concern for downing street _ answer. presumably the concern for downing street as _ answer. presumably the concern for downing street as if _ answer. presumably the concern for downing street as if an _ answer. presumably the concern for downing street as if an e-mail- answer. presumably the concern for downing street as if an e-mail get l downing street as if an e—mail get sent to a hundred people and 30 attend, there's every chance that whoever gets the story next will bring yet more details into the
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public domain.— public domain. yes. also they worried from _ public domain. yes. also they worried from a _ public domain. yes. also they worried from a lot _ public domain. yes. also they worried from a lot of - public domain. yes. also they - worried from a lot of conservative mps that what if there are other events that they don't know about? we know initially they started before christmas, there were allegations of christmas parties that were organised later on in the pandemic. this is a mergejust last week i think there's certainly some nerves among conservative mps whether there is anything else to come out. a lot of frustration that there does seem to be this constant drip, drip of allegations coming out of downing street. and it doesn't seem to be... the prime minister and the team around him don't seem to be able to get a grip on that to stop at drip of that. there are certainly a lot of concerns around that. the other issue is that the metropolitan police has confirmed that it is in contact with the cabinet office about this event on the 20th of may 2020. we will have to wait and see what happens there, if the metropolitan police decide that they want to launch any investigation
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than there's internal inquiry would have to pause. you than there's internal inquiry would have to pause-— than there's internal inquiry would havetoause. ., ., ., ., . have to pause. you lead me onto what else can ask — have to pause. you lead me onto what else can ask mask _ have to pause. you lead me onto what else can ask mask there's _ have to pause. you lead me onto what else can ask mask there's lots - have to pause. you lead me onto what else can ask mask there's lots of- else can ask mask there's lots of people saying this looks like it's against the rules, maybe it isn't against the rules, maybe it isn't against the rules, who will decide that, who will take a position on that, who will take a position on that, is it sue grey civil servant with our investigation is not a matter for the police? with our investigation is not a matterfor the police? epic with our investigation is not a matter for the police?- with our investigation is not a matter for the police? epic in the moment it's _ matter for the police? epic in the moment it's not _ matter for the police? epic in the moment it's not entirely - matter for the police? epic in the moment it's not entirely clear - matter for the police? epic in the l moment it's not entirely clear who would make that call that this was against the rules are not. what sue gray's investigation is designed to do is to find out the detail of this, if you live. i'm not sure that you would necessarily be in the position to make a call and say this was against the rules. if there is a police investigation of course there were laws in place at the time. that gatherings on social restrictions and the police would be able to make and the police would be able to make a call at one way or the other. but at the moment there is no investigation. i think it's going to be very interesting. you could end “p be very interesting. you could end up with a scenario where you got a report from sue grey that details
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what happened but then you are in a position of, well, who decides if that's against the rules?- position of, well, who decides if that's against the rules? thank you very much- — inafew in a few minutes on outside source. we've got to talk about the heroic rat. this is a rat which help locate landmines in cambodia. i'm afraid he's died at the age of eight. read and hear the tributes to him. fans get to be able to turn to read scotland stadiums after nicola sturgeon announced that restrictions are be lifted on large events from monday. boxing day no more than 500 people have been allowed to attend. not the best start to 2022 as a new year celebrations were scaled back.
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theatres went dark with performances canceled. and football stadiums felt silent as matches were postponed. with cautious optimism the first minister announced a relaxation to some of the restrictions. the attendance — some of the restrictions. the attendance limit _ some of the restrictions. the attendance limit of _ some of the restrictions. iuéi attendance limit of 500 some of the restrictions. iue: attendance limit of 500 at large—scale outdoor events will be lifted from monday at 17 january. for example spectators will be permitted again at major outdoor sporting events including football fixtures scheduled for early next week and the forthcoming six nations rugby matches. the week and the forthcoming six nations rugby matchm— week and the forthcoming six nations rugby matches. the scottish tory say this was possible _ rugby matches. the scottish tory say this was possible due _ rugby matches. the scottish tory say this was possible due to _ rugby matches. the scottish tory say this was possible due to the - rugby matches. the scottish tory say this was possible due to the uk - this was possible due to the uk vaccination programme and the public. vaccination programme and the ublic. ., , . , public. the outlook is much better out not because _ public. the outlook is much better out not because of— public. the outlook is much better out not because of government i out not because of government restrictions but because of peoples -ood restrictions but because of peoples good sense. the people of scotland -ot good sense. the people of scotland got this _ good sense. the people of scotland got this right, not the government. we will_ got this right, not the government. we will have our first game here on tuesday. we will have our first game here on tuesda . , ., . , tuesday. livingston football club sa the tuesday. livingston football club
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say they are _ tuesday. livingston football club say they are delighted _ tuesday. livingston football club say they are delighted that - tuesday. livingston football club say they are delighted that next | say they are delighted that next week's game against dundee to go ahead as normal. fans arriving here on tuesday will need to show their vaccine passport and for many that will now include the booster. people can also show evidence of a recent negative lateral flow test. the annual celtic connections festival begins later this month. it's hoped that in easing of restrictions on such indoor events will be confirmed next week. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... the uk's prime minister boris johnson is facing fresh questions after a 100 people were invited for drinks at downing street during strict covid lockdown rules in 2020.
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one of the biggest illegal darknet has gone off—line as the selling counterfeit cash and malware used to hack and disabled computers. the administrations shut it down over christmas but new illegal sites are pepping up christmas but new illegal sites are popping up all the time. research by the bbc highlights the success of the bbc highlights the success of the all my drug stray. our cyber reporter has more. i come up here and tell him off. clear campbell i6—year—old son died after taking a strong ecstasy tablets at a youth disco. ~ . . , strong ecstasy tablets at a youth disco. ~ ., .,, ., ., ~' strong ecstasy tablets at a youth disco. ~ ., ~' strong ecstasy tablets at a youth disco. ~ ., ~ ., disco. what was look like as a erson? disco. what was look like as a person? he — disco. what was look like as a person? he didn't have - disco. what was look like as a person? he didn't have a bad | disco. what was look like as a - person? he didn't have a bad bone in his body. he was naughty and cheeky but there was nothing nasty about him, no maliciousness.— but there was nothing nasty about him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bouuht him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bou . ht the him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bought the pills _ him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bought the pills from _ him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bought the pills from a _ him, no maliciousness. luke's friend bought the pills from a marketplace | bought the pills from a marketplace on the darknet. darknet markets are a small and often overlooked part of the drugs economy. these sites only
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accessible through special internet browsing software have been a thorn in the side of police for a decade now. over christmas in interesting development... tour is one of the largest marketplaces in the world closed down after nearly two years. a polite notice was posted to customers and sellers. torrez is the latest to close down before police can take action. but even when the authorities do take down the effect on the drug trade is often short—lived as bbc research highlights without we started the activity of darknet dealers, at least 150 have survived multiple police takedowns. in fact, one dealer perhaps the uk's most prolific has now appeared on 21 different marketplaces over six years. we ordered some drugs from this criminal, it was complicated and time—consuming but it highlighted the complex tactics the sellers use to protect themselves. interesting. so if you did open this box it would look like some sort of
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a herbal treatment. of course we know that's not what's in this little silver packet, this is cocaine. little silver packet, this is cocaine-— little silver packet, this is cocaine. ., ., ~ cocaine. it's a low risk market, deals with _ cocaine. it's a low risk market, deals with a — cocaine. it's a low risk market, deals with a vendor _ cocaine. it's a low risk market, deals with a vendor on - cocaine. it's a low risk market, deals with a vendor on the - cocaine. it's a low risk market, | deals with a vendor on the dark well. in deals with a vendor on the dark well. . ., , ' :: deals with a vendor on the dark well. . ' :: , well. in october 150 people were arrested in multiple countries . arrested in multiple countries including 2a in the uk. a major dark market was also close down. the uk's ncaa size is determined to turn the tide on darknet markets and has developed new cyber policing techniques to help protect the public. people hear your story might be confused as to why. mini; public. people hear your story might be confused as to why.— be confused as to why. why not anti-drugs _ be confused as to why. why not anti-drugs and _ be confused as to why. why not anti-drugs and angry? - be confused as to why. why not anti-drugs and angry? there's i be confused as to why. why not i anti-drugs and angry? there's no anti—drugs and angry? there's no point with being angry with the people because the people and angry with all the lawmakers, not lou, not his friends. hat with all the lawmakers, not lou, not his friends-— his friends. not the dark web. clear is now calling _ his friends. not the dark web. clear is now calling for _ his friends. not the dark web. clear is now calling for the _ is now calling for the decriminalisation and regulation of all areas of the drug trade including the darknet. we will
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finish this addition of outside source by talking about a rat. but not any ordinary rat. a special one which managed to locate a hundred landmines in cambodia. unfortunately, it is died. the heroic rodent — who was known as magawa — died at the weekend at the age of eight. he had been bred in tanzania before starting work in cambodia. his efforts even earned him a medal for gallantry from a british or animal rights group. here's a ceo on white rats are so good at finding atfinding landmines. magawa has always been one of our best—performing rats. he lived to the age of eight years, we trained him here, they are too late to settle for landmines. and they are really like people and the specific rat also lives up to eight years as an example. 50 lives up to eight years as an example-—
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lives up to eight years as an examle. ., ., example. so the return on training investment — example. so the return on training investment is _ example. so the return on training investment is big. _ example. so the return on training investment is big. we _ example. so the return on training investment is big. we only - example. so the return on training investment is big. we only use - investment is big. we only use positive reinforcement. we start with socialising the rat, after that is click training, you click the rack banana, click, banana. they associate click with food and then we learn it to do something in order to receive this click. it will have to receive this click. it will have to indicate something with it are filled with explosives compared to others. that's how they learn to distinguish the order of explosives. it gets more and more difficult was that we have a big training field and the university in tanzania but we are more than a thousand minds. and the training process takes about ten months. after which we exploit them and arrives in cambodia, the national authorities will test with it 400% of the landmines before they can be qualified as a
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full mining tax. farewell. a life well lived, no doubt. you full mining tax. farewell. a life well lived, no doubt.— full mining tax. farewell. a life well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports _ well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports for _ well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports for me _ well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports for me on _ well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports for me on the - well lived, no doubt. you can find more reports for me on the bbc. well lived, no doubt. you can find - more reports for me on the bbc news website was of you can also find that you're watching in the uk on iplayer too. that you're watching in the uk on iplayertoo. if that you're watching in the uk on iplayer too. if you prefer do you can listen to audio versions of our explainers on the bbc sounds out. or if you're particularly keen and you have a smart speaker you can also hear them that way. lots of different places. wherever you are in the world he won you get definitely access is bbc .com/ news, the bbc news website. a quick reminder of our top stories. the uk's prime minister borisjohnson is being pressured to reveal whether him and his wife carrie attended a drinks party in the downing street got into locked down in may 2020. minister say they're waiting for an outcome of an official investigation and mrjohnson has declined to comment. the opposition labour party has said the public is already drawn its own conclusions. that is it for this hour of outside source. thanks
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as ever for watching. this hour of outside source. thanks as everfor watching. see this hour of outside source. thanks as ever for watching. see you soon, bye—bye. the south of the uk has some gray, drizzly weather through the course of day. the skies will clear and we will see dense fog forming particularly on the part of the uk the dense fog could linger through tomorrow morning and even into the afternoon. you can see the weather fronts through today, across south of the country. that's what we had all light rain and drizzle. it is in a process of clearing away. behind it, the skies are clearing so the greatest risk of dense fog across this part of the country. elsewhere, i think a clear night and actually across western parts of scotland, fairly cloudy and damp. temperatures early in the morning, 5 degrees, but for many of us it's actually around freezing or below first thing on wednesday.
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the weather map for wednesday shows high pressure centred across england and wales. this is where it will stick around for most of the week. around the high pressure, you can see some slightly milder air pivoting around and spreading across scotland. that's where we will have the mildest conditions was but with that also some cloud. that also some cloud, bits and pieces of drizzle, showers in the western isles. there's fog again lingering for a time across southern part of the uk. for the vast majority of us it won't be foggy, in fact, it will be a mostly bright or sunny day with temperatures the fog returns later in the week, this is early on thursday morning and once again it seems like it's the southern part of the uk that will get most of the fog. sunshine a little further north, but once again, here in the western isles, it's more cloudy with that ocean breeze. where the fog does linger on thursday and sticks around to the afternoon, it will be cold, temperatures may not rise any
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higher than 0 degrees. but under the sunnier skies, it will be around 8 degrees for most of us. but under they clear whether it will be around 8 degrees i think, for most of us. again, the highest temperatures in northwest parts of scotland around 11 or so. the same pattern repeats itself into friday morning. fog forming by the early hours and sticking around in some spots during the afternoon. where it does, it is going to be quite cold. quite a raw feel to things. the outlook over the next few days, very little change with high pressure sticking around. these are very much average temperatures for the time of the air. obviously cold where the fog hangs around. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. pressure mounts on borisjohnson over the downing street bring your own booze party during the first covid lockdown. borisjohnson, having survived covid himself, thought it was appropriate to host a party where you could bring your own booze, sit in the garden at downing street, were borisjohnson met me and four other grieving families and told us, to our faces, after listening to my dad's story, i did everything i could to save him. if he has broken the law, that is serious — if he has broken the law, that is serious and _ if he has broken the law, that is serious and if he has misled parliament, i have been clear, anyone — parliament, i have been clear, anyone that misleads parliament cannot_ anyone that misleads parliament cannot continue and therefore he would _ cannot continue and therefore he would have to resign. one in twelve teachers was absent from england's schools last week, as the omicron variant of covid continues to spread a medicalfirst in america,
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where doctors transplant a genetically modified pig's heart, into a human patient.

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