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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  January 11, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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at six — mounting pressure on the prime minister to explain why a party took place at downing street during the height of lockdown. borisjohnson and his wife carrie are understood to have attended the drinks in the garden in may 2020 — around 100 people were invited. i apologise again unreservedly for the upset that these allegations have caused. there's no need for an investigation into this simple central question today — did the prime minister attend the event in the downing street garden? when the party took place the streets were still empty — the rules said you could only meet one person from another household.
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many families affected by covid are furious. i am angry because there was one rule for one person and one - rule for the others. we weren't allowed to be with our loved ones. - and it is very, very sad. the metropolitan police say they are in contact with the government about it. also tonight — the maths lesson in the sports hall. schools tried — the maths lesson in the sports hall. schools tried to cope _ the maths lesson in the sports hall. schools tried to cope with the - schools tried to cope with the number of teachers of work. —— off work. desperate times in afghanistan — the un calls for billions of pounds in aid — with more than half the population now struggling to find enough to eat. and history as a 57—year—old man becomes the first human to be given a pig's heart during a transplant. in sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel — we'll have the latest from melbourne as novak djokovic prepares for the australian open. but with more questions about whether he should be allowed to play.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. there is mounting pressure on the prime minister to explain why a party took place in the downing street garden in may 2020 — the height of lockdown. around 100 people were invited by email by one of the prime minister's senior staff. it's understood around 30 people attended the gathering — and eye witnesses have said the prime minister and his wife were among them. labour has called on borisjohnson to "come clean" about what had happened. at the time of the party in may 2020 across the uk people could only leave home for work, exercise or essential supplies. you could only meet one person from another household outside — and that had to be socially distanced.
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schools were closed for most, hairdressers and non—essential shops were all still closed. weddings were banned and only close family members could attend funerals. (ani here's our deputy political editor, members could attend funerals. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young, with the latest. plenty of questions. the prime minister was _ plenty of questions. the prime minister was at _ plenty of questions. the prime minister was at the _ plenty of questions. the prime minister was at the party, - plenty of questions. the prime l minister was at the party, should plenty of questions. the prime - minister was at the party, should he come clean? but minister was at the party, should he come clean?— minister was at the party, should he come clean? but not many answers. boris johnson — come clean? but not many answers. boris johnson wasn't out _ come clean? but not many answers. boris johnson wasn't out for - come clean? but not many answers. boris johnson wasn't out for the - boris johnson wasn't out for the cameras today. did boris johnson wasn't out for the cameras today.— cameras today. did you attend any arties? cameras today. did you attend any parties? but _ cameras today. did you attend any parties? but the _ cameras today. did you attend any parties? but the prime _ cameras today. did you attend any parties? but the prime minister i cameras today. did you attend any parties? but the prime minister is| parties? but the prime minister is bein: parties? but the prime minister is being drawn _ parties? but the prime minister is being drawn further _ parties? but the prime minister is being drawn further into _ parties? but the prime minister is being drawn further into this - being drawn further into this scandal. during the first lockdown in may 2020 and e—mailfrom senior official martin reynolds seen by itv news invited 100 staff to make the most of the lovely weather and bring their own booze to the downing street garden. witnesses have told the bbc mr johnson and his wife were among 30 people who went along. inside no 10 just an hour before a cabinet minister was telling the country this. ., .., minister was telling the country this. ., .. ., minister was telling the country
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this. ., ., , this. you can meet one person outside your— this. you can meet one person outside your household - this. you can meet one person outside your household in - this. you can meet one person outside your household in an l outside your household in an outdoor public place provided that you stay two metres apart. i public place provided that you stay two metres apart.— two metres apart. i can confirm to the house--- _ two metres apart. i can confirm to the house... so _ two metres apart. i can confirm to the house... so what is _ two metres apart. i can confirm to the house... so what is the - the house... so what is the explanation? _ the house... so what is the explanation? well, - the house... so what is the explanation? well, for - the house... so what is the explanation? well, for nowj the house... so what is the - explanation? well, for now there isn't one. ministers say we must wait for an official investigation launched after allegations of other parties in no 10. if launched after allegations of other parties in no 10.— parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is established. _ parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is established, there _ parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is established, there will— parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is established, there will be - parties in no 10. if wrongdoing is l established, there will be requisite disciplinary action taken. as with all internal investigations, if evidence emerges of what was potentially a criminal offence, the matter_ potentially a criminal offence, the matter would be referred to the metropolitan police. did matter would be referred to the metropolitan police.— metropolitan police. did the prime minister attend _ metropolitan police. did the prime minister attend the _ metropolitan police. did the prime minister attend the event - metropolitan police. did the prime minister attend the event in - metropolitan police. did the prime minister attend the event in the i minister attend the event in the downing — minister attend the event in the downing street _ minister attend the event in the downing street garden - minister attend the event in the downing street garden on - minister attend the event in the downing street garden on the l minister attend the event in the i downing street garden on the 20th minister attend the event in the - downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? _ downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? it — downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? it won't _ downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? it won't wash, _ downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020? it won't wash, mr- downing street garden on the 20th of. may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame _ may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this _ may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on — may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on a _ may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on a few— may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on a fewjunior_ may 2020? it won't wash, mr speaker, to blame this on a fewjunior civil- to blame this on a fewjunior civil servants — to blame this on a fewjunior civil servants the _ to blame this on a fewjunior civil servants. the prime _ to blame this on a fewjunior civil servants. the prime minister- to blame this on a fewjunior civil| servants. the prime minister sets the tone — servants. the prime minister sets the tone. , , the tone. others remembered the lives lost during _ the tone. others remembered the lives lost during the pandemic. . lives lost during the pandemic. 3000 eo - le who lives lost during the pandemic. 3000 people who followed _ lives lost during the pandemic. 22: people who followed the rules
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including my mother—in—law who died alone. and the pain of separation from loved ones. it is what has happened to lisa's family. her brother graham was in intensive care on the date the downing street party took place. he died a few days later but relatives could not be with him all grieve together. could not be with him all grieve touether. , ., ., ., , together. instead of holding my mum i was together. instead of holding my mum l was holding — together. instead of holding my mum l was holding my _ together. instead of holding my mum i was holding my phone _ together. instead of holding my mum i was holding my phone filming - together. instead of holding my mum i was holding my phone filming my i i was holding my phone filming my brother dying. people sacrificed so much _ brother dying. people sacrificed so much. people died, sticking to the rules, _ much. people died, sticking to the rules, and — much. people died, sticking to the rules, and they broke those rules to have a _ rules, and they broke those rules to have a bottle of wine. tiers; rules, and they broke those rules to have a bottle of wine.— have a bottle of wine. very few conservative _ have a bottle of wine. very few conservative mps _ have a bottle of wine. very few conservative mps have - have a bottle of wine. very few i conservative mps have been willing to defend the prime minister over all of this. one former cabinet
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minister said borisjohnson just says what he has to say to get through the day. he tries to lie his way out of everything." another told the bbc, "he has to go, he has run out of road." all eyes now are on the independent report and whether it finds that the prime minister has broken the rules. senior conservatives are angry too. if he has broken the law that is serious and if he has misled parliament i've been very clear before, notjust the prime minister, but anyone who misleads parliament cannot continue and therefore he would have to resign.— cannot continue and therefore he would have to resign. there were no excuses for— would have to resign. there were no excuses for breaking _ would have to resign. there were no excuses for breaking lockdown i excuses for breaking lockdown restrictions and we were constantly reminded what they were. any suggestion that those in power thought that they were above the rules will cause enormous political damage. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. there's been a furious reaction to news of the party from people who lost loved ones during that lockdown and who stuck to the rules. particularly from those who lost
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loved ones. our home editor mark easton has been looking at the public reaction to the latest allegations and borisjohnson's handling of the pandemic. as the prime minister and his staff were apparently partying in the garden at no 10, police squads were in public parks threatening to fine anyone breaching lockdown rules and there were roadblocks set up. more than 4000 people died from covid in britain that week and polls from the time is just around 85% of voters supported the restrictions or wanted them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning — them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning i — them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning i had _ them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings _ them to be even tougher. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with i this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. on the day in question, boris 0n the day in question, boris johnson was in the commons telling mps of his plans for the day. he didn't mention the party he had been invited to at his home that evening. at the time the country was generally supportive of the pm who had only recently been in hospital with covid himself. mrjohnson appeared almost immune to political challenges that i have proved terminal for challenges that i have proved terminalfor some challenges that i have proved terminal for some of his terminalfor some of his predecessors. just before that downing street garden party, polls showed that
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around two thirds of voters thought he was doing well, just a quarter thought he was doing badly. despite being blamed for some of the worst covid death rates in the world his approval ratings bounced back, helping the conservatives make significant gains in the local elections last year. however, since then the gap between those thinking he's done badly and those thinking he's done well has been widening. there isn't anybody out there who believes that the rules should be bentin believes that the rules should be bent in order to enable people working in and around 10 downing street to have a party. so the style that has often worked for him is now working against him. the that has often worked for him is now working against him.— working against him. the day of the downin: working against him. the day of the downing street _ working against him. the day of the downing street party, _ working against him. the day of the downing street party, no _ working against him. the day of the downing street party, no family i downing street party, no family attended the funeral of 75—year—old lelito. lockdown meant her daughter was never able to say goodbye. irate was never able to say goodbye. we went was never able to say goodbye. - went there, there wasjust was never able to say goodbye. - went there, there was just a coffin. what do you think about the prime minister having a party? i'll be honest with you, i really hate him,
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i'm sorry to say it because my mum wouldn't like that. he i'm sorry to say it because my mum wouldn't like that.— wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace. _ wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace, he _ wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace, he has- wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace, he has not i wouldn't like that. he is a disgrace, he has not said | wouldn't like that. he is a i disgrace, he has not said sorry, wouldn't like that. he is a - disgrace, he has not said sorry, he doesn't acknowledge what he has done, he lies and lies and lies and you know it is a disgrace. it done, he lies and lies and lies and you know it is a disgrace.- done, he lies and lies and lies and you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain — you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain can _ you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain can forgive _ you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain can forgive and - you know it is a disgrace. it may be that britain can forgive and forget l that britain can forgive and forget mistakes made by their leader on that sunny day in may, but boris johnson's remarkable resilience and charisma can see him through. but if his party became convinced he is a liability rather than a vote winner they have a reputation of being ruthless. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young is at westminster. how dangerous is this for the prime minister now? it is a dangerous moment for him and that's because he is being dragged into this.— is being dragged into this. several times in the _ is being dragged into this. several times in the house _ is being dragged into this. several times in the house of commons . is being dragged into this. several| times in the house of commons he said the rules in downing street were not broken. his announced this inquiry and usually that is intended to get to the facts but to take the heat out of it and thatjust doesn't
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seem to be happening. i have spoken to dozens of conservative mps here today. of course some of them have always been critics of borisjohnson but i think most worrying for him will be that there are others, some who backed him to be their leader, who now feel let down. several have said that this was a tipping point. they also said they thought he should have been more transparent and they should have been full disclosure about what went on, rather than for stripping out over several months. and of course, tomorrow in the house of commons at noon, prime minister's questions, when he will have to face all this over again. when he will have to face all this over again-— when he will have to face all this over aaain. w' ., ., ,, i. vicki young, thank you. the number of pupils and teachers off school in england because of coronavirus has risen. the latest figures show that 1 in 12 teachers was off work at the end of last week. and more than 300,000 children were at home. numerous schools have told the bbc they are unable to find temporary staff to cover. here's our education editor, branwen jeffreys. how are we doing this morning?
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this is how the school day starts in rochdale. there's 32 staff absent at the moment, 20 staff need covering. checking how many staff are off, 32 this morning, including 11 teachers. how many supply have we got in? five supply. five supply? morning, everybody! chris, the head teacher, is just trying to keep it normal for pupils. but it's a constantjuggling act. ladies, mask on properly, please. it's becoming increasingly more challenging, even though we plan ahead and we try and book as many supply teachers as we think we _ need for the week, the changes in absence on a day by day basis change so quickly that we have to try and _ be one step ahead. so they are merging some lessons today. the head of maths, irfan ashraf, took a double class. 50 year nine pupils learning together. the two points that it crosses, draw a straight line through. l so they get specialist teaching. this kind of contingency planning shows the lengths schools are willing to go to to keep pupils learning in school.
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but also how worried they are about this extra disruption after two years of the pandemic, especially for teenagers facing exams this summer. hoping this latest covid wave passes quickly, year 115 looking forward to gcse exams. it's my year 11 year, i've worked my whole school life towards sitting gcses and i want to do the best i possibly can. i wouldn't say i'm actually hoping to actually do the exams but i think it's actually important because for me if they actually go to another lockdown we are going to get teachers' assessed grades. 100 miles away in birmingham this primary has bought air purifier machines for every class. last term, the autumn term, we were very fortunate. we had less than ten children off with covid. we only had a couple of members of staff, and none of those were teachers. very, very different. we've got more children cases than we had during the whole of the autumn term just in this last week, and the same for staff.
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parents here do voluntary lateral flow tests with their children. i want to keep life normal as possibly it can be, really. i don't want any more disruption, anyways. if he brings it home i've got an elderly i mother—in—law, he is going to pass l it on to her, so again, i test my. kids every other day. the government has appealed to former teachers to return. details of how that's gone are expected tomorrow. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. the latest government figures show almost 121,000 new infections in the latest 24—hour period. on average there were 157,666 new cases per day in the last week. the latest figures show almost 20,000 people in hospital with covid. there've been another 379 deaths — of people who died within 28 days of a positive test — the number is higher than expected because of a technical issue in reporting deaths before christmas. on average in the past week,
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there were 237 deaths per day. 0n vaccinations, almost 36—million people have had a boosterjab, which means more than 62.3% of those aged 12 and over have now had three vaccine doses. fans will be able to return to scotland's stadiums next week after the first minister announced that some covid restrictions are being lifted on large outdoor events from monday. since boxing day no more than 500 people have been allowed to attend. nicola sturgeon says there are some signs that scotland is "starting to turn the corner" with 0micron. alexandra mackenzie reports. not the best start to 2022, as new year celebrations were scaled back. theatres went dark with performances cancelled, and football stadiums fell silent, as matches were postponed. with cautious optimism, the first minister announced a relaxation to some of the restrictions.
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the attendance limit of 500 at large—scale outdoor events will be lifted from monday 17th of january. that means, for example, that spectators will be permitted again at major outdoor sporting events, including football fixtures scheduled for early next week and the forthcoming six nations rugby matches. the scottish tories said this was possible due to the uk vaccination programme and the public. the outlook is much better now, not because of government restrictions but because of people's good sense. the people of scotland got this right, not the government. we will have our first i game here on tuesday. livingston football club say they are delighted that next week's game against dundee can go ahead as normal. it's absolutely fantastic first and foremost for the club. i i think a player—wise, staff—wise, none of us really wanted to be i playing here in front i ofjust 500 spectators. i think from the fans' perspective
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over the last two years _ throughout the full pandemic they've been given a bit of a raw deal. - they had a full season where they weren't i able to come and watch, the fans, | and football means so much to so| many people out there. fans arriving here on tuesday will need to show their vaccine passport and for many that will now include the booster. people can also show evidence of a recent negative lateral flow test. the annual celtic connections festival begins later this month. it is hoped an easing of restrictions on such indoor events will be confirmed next week. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news. from today — if you test positive for covid on a lateral flow test in england but don't have symptoms — you no longer need to have a pcr test as well. the rules are being relaxed to try to ease pressure on supplies. it comes as the government considers whether to shorten the quarantine time for those infected from seven to five days. 0ur health editor hugh
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pym has the latest. pcr testing has become part of everyday life, but now in england, it's not required as confirmation after a positive lateral flow test for those without symptoms. scotland, wales and northern ireland have made the change, which is because cases are spreading so fast. and because of high infection numbers, the welsh government has opted not at this stage to follow scotland and relax restrictions, including strict spectator limits at sporting events. we are in a situation where the pandemic is very much still with us. we are keeping a very close eye on the statistics that are coming in at the moment. we're hoping that we're seeing a stabilisation in those numbers. clearly, i think it will be difficult for us to dismantle things if the numbers are continuing to rise. the booster roll—out is seen as a success, though the daily numbers have tailed off since the pre—christmas period. so, how does the uk's position with the virus compare with other leading economies?
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france and italy are among countries which have seen continued increases in cases relative to their populations. in the us and germany, there have been signs of a flatter trend. in the uk, case rates have come down a bit in the last day or so. the uk was hit before some other countries with the 0micron surge. the key question now — what will be the likely path for infections in the uk over the next few weeks? it looks to me as if the situation is starting to stabilise. there's some signs that we're now seeing a huge rise in the numbers that we expected by this stage, and we're also seeing in some parts of the uk early signs that admissions to hospital are levelling off. we've not seen that everywhere yet, but are hoping that will come, and then we can be more confident about the fact that we're beginning to get through this recent surge. and in a sign of a changing assessment of risks, ministers in england are considering reducing
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the isolation period after a positive test from seven days to five. that's partly to help employers, with the nhs in particular struggling because of widespread staff absences caused by the spread of the virus and the need to isolate. hugh pym, bbc news. the time is 6.19pm. our top story this evening. mounting pressure on the prime minister to explain why a party took place at downing street during the height of lockdown. more during the height of lockdown. than 100 people we coming more than 100 people were invited. coming up, how the hs2 rail line led to the remains of a wealthy roman town being unearthed in a field in nottinghamshire. coming up in sportsday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel — we'll have the latest from the africa cup of nations in cameroon as two of the most successful nations in the tournament's history meet in their opening group game. more than half of the population in afghanistan is now struggling to find enough to eat.
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the humanitarian crisis continues to worsen since the taliban takeover last summer and now the country is in the grip of a bitterly cold winter. the united nations has appealed for more than three and a half billion pounds in aid to try to help avert catastrophe. afghans are facing soaring unemployment, with many unable to feed theirfamilies or heat their homes. the un says nearly 24.5 million people are in need of humanitarian help, and a million children are thought to be at risk from severe malnourishment. from kabul, quentin sommerville sent this report. after 20 years of war, afghanistan faces a long, harsh winter and a cold and hungry peace. victorious, the taliban now guard food queues. more than half the country is going hungry. women, barred from work and education, have lost another fundamental right —
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the ability to feed their families. here in wardak province, we meet pari. as a second wife, she supports a family of six alone. this wheelbarrow of basics is meant to last them 17 days, but maybe less. there was no rice today. winter is very difficult. translation: we don't have money to buy food and firewood. we feel the room with smoke to feel warm, but still it is cold. her granddaughter is always hungry. the baby's mother cannot produce milk. baby formula is beyond the reach of almost everyone here. the taliban are international pariahs, so the economy is being crushed by sanctions. 0nly humanitarian aid is allowed. so in kabul, even the well—to—do are queueing for world food
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programme hand—outs. these wheelbarrows are full of the very basics — salt, rice, peanuts, cooking oil — and for many of the people here, it's the first time they've had food in days. the interesting thing is, though, the bazaars, the markets in central kabul are full of produce but no—one here has any money. and this isn'tjust the case here in kabul, it's the same situation across afghanistan. this should be the time when afghanistan stops and catches its breath. instead, its poorest are sinking deeper into poverty. ajhar moved here from nangarhar province. this house is home to fourfamilies. they cannot afford soap to wash the kids' faces. they burn plastic to keep warm. it still is not safe for them to return, he says.
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"we would have moved to pakistan, but pakistan closed its borders to us." this is a cascading crisis touching every part of society. this three and a half —year—old is doing much better now. you should have seen him weeks ago, his mum says. a million afghan kids will be severely malnourished this year. much of afghanistan's health care system is close to collapse. soraya is a year and a half. her big, bright eyes don't miss a trick. she was severely malnourished. hertummy and her limbs are still swollen. translation: when we came here, her situation was very bad, - and she needed a blood transfusion. thank god she is so much better than she was. the doctor has said we should wait here until the swelling goes down. ten years ago, i lived next
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door to this hospital. it was a time of a great surge of men, material and billions of dollars into afghanistan. western diplomats would say we were not trying to build perfection here, they weren't trying to create switzerland. who knows what they were trying to create? but it wasn't this. it wasn't a country where half the people, more than half the people are going hungry, and babies like soraya are near starvation. should afghanistan now be left to struggle alone? for two decades, afghans of all ages were trapped in a tempest of violence between western forces and the taliban. those battles are now over, but the afghan people's suffering endures. for them there is no respite. quentin sommerville, bbc news, kabul. two men have been arrested in connection with the disappearance of a teenager who went missing 15 years ago. andrew gosden, from doncaster, was 14 when he was last seen
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in september 2007 apparently travelling to london. the case became one of the most high—profile missing person investigations in the north of england. the two men, aged 38 and 45, who were arrested in london on suspicion of kidnap and human trafficking, have both been released under investigation. surgeons in america have made history after a pig's heart has been successfully transplanted into a human for the first time. the 57—year—old man is said to be doing well — four days after the surgery. if it does prove to be successful, it could mean animal organs are used more frequently in human transplants. this report from our medical editor fergus walsh contains pictures of the operation. this is the gene—edited pig heart ready for transplant into a human. the organ looks perfect, a good size and the extraction of the organ went routinely.
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surgeons in maryland spent eight hours performing the world first. scientists have spent decades building to this moment, which some believe could revolutionise transplantation. the recipient was david bennett, seen here with his son and daughter. he was dying of heart failure and too ill to be considered for a human organ. and here is david with his surgeon. he is said to be doing well, although it's unclear how long his new heart will last. we've never done this in a human. and i like to think that we have given him a better option than what continuing his therapy would have been. but whether it's a day, week, month, year, i don't know. the science involved gene editing pig embryos. four pig genes were deactivated, knocked out, this included one to stop the heart from growing too large once transplanted.
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six human genes were added to try to prevent the immune system from immediately rejecting it. the gene—altered embryo was then transferred into a sow with the subsequent litter grown for potential human transplant. i visited research farms in the us breeding gene—edited pigs. the hope is they could solve the organ donor shortage. in the uk, around 500 patients die each year while on the transplant waiting list. some will object to animals being bred as spare parts. but the number needed would be dwarfed by the millions bred for meat. fergus walsh, bbc news. the remains of a wealthy roman trading town have been unearthed in a remote field in northamptonshire by archaeologists working on the construction of the hs2 rail network. they say it's one of the most impressive sites they've found so far.
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0ur correspondentjo black has been looking at what they've uncovered. it is the high—speed line which divides opinion, but as hs2 develops, some of the excavations along the route have provided opportunities for us to see how we used to live. this 12—hectare site in northamptonshire has not only revealed an iron age settlement, but also a roman town. it's not thought to be a story of roman invasion, but more a progression between the two eras. i've been working for ten years now and never come across anything of this scale or even this quality. we will be working incredibly hard to understand what we have on—site and to tell that story. archaeology is telling stories, it's pulling together the physical evidence on the ground, the finds, and the teams in the office are then pulling together their expertise to understand exactly what we have. here in a warehouse miles from the site, thousands of priceless artefacts. the majority are animal bone and pottery, including a sophisticated piece from france.
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also among the finds is this — lead dye presumably from some sort of game, this highly decorative and rare scale weight showing the importance of trade on the site, and then this — part of a leg shackle thought to relate to a prisoner or some sort of enslaved person. while the site and its findings helps to transform our understanding of roman times and beyond, its future involves high—speed rail. jo black, bbc news. you can watch more about that tonight, �*digging for britain' will be on bbc two at 8pm, and available on iplayer afterwards. time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett hello. a dull and damp day across many southern parts of the uk. all of the low cloud and rain and drizzle will be pulling away slowly but surely and clearer skies will follow but as we head further north and there is a strengthening wind that will blow more cloud into
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northern and western scotland and other parts of scotland and northern ireland will be chilly but across england and wales with light winds we will have a frost but also some fog forming overnight and lingering into tomorrow. this is the main area covered by the yellow warning from the met office and a lot of busy roads in this area and the fog is going to be patchy and dense so it could be difficult for travelling for a while. the fog slowly lifting through the morning and for many parts of the uk will be a dry day with more sunshine across england and wales under bit more cloud coming into northern ireland, particularly northern and western scotland but it might drier than today and it's across the north we see the highest temperatures. double figures across northern scotland but habitually despite the sunshine across england and wales and there will be more fog, more widely across england and wales as we head into thursday morning. notjust across the south and midlands, bentine moore of wales, northern england as well and this could last a little bit into the afternoon and after that we will find sunshine away from
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