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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 11, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: an anxious wait for novak djokovic, back on the practice courts ahead of the australian open, but waiting to hear if the country's immigration minister might still revoke his visa. a man in the us becomes the first person to have a heart transplant from a pig, raising hopes of a solution to the shortage of organ donors. borisjohnson refuses to comment on new claims he had a drinks party with dozens of staff during lockdown. research suggests us greenhouse gas emissions went up 6% last year. we'll ask what it means for the biden administration's climate targets.
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welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. novak djokovic is back in training, his visa is still valid and the prospect of a tenth australian open single title lives on. but if it sounds like game, set and match to the serb in his battle with the authorities, his court victory still doesn't guarantee he can stay and compete. the country's immigration minister, alex hawke, could use personal powers at his disposal to revoke the visa despite the judge in his appeal suggesting mr djokovic did everything he could have done to comply with the rules for entry to australia. shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne. within hours of today'sjudgement, novak djokovic posted this picture on twitter, saying he was pleased and grateful that thejudge had overturned the visa cancellation. and despite all that has
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happened, he wants to stay and try to compete at the australian open. cheering and this is the moment his supporters found out about his victory. he won, djokovic won! what we saw today here in the court that the australian legal system is functioning, it is evidence—based, it is aboutjustice. yeah, i'm extremely happy. as is anyone, everyone - in the serbian community here. djokovic�*s family welcomed the news, but remained cautious about what would happen with his visa. i'm very worried, but i don't want to think like that. i just hope that it will stay like this, that he will be free and he will play. it's been a battle for all of us, it's notjust about novak, obviously. we've been defending him in every possible way we could,
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because we know he's a truthful and rightful guy. while many in the tennis community believe djokovic was unfairly treated, some argue that meeting any country's vaccination rules will pose problems for him beyond australia. he would have to face several times those problems, so i think bottom line, he will have to get the vaccine. but for this time, for australia, he got the visa, and they flew in with all the best intentions and having done all the works he should have done beforehand. thejubilant mood turned into chaos and confusion when it became unclear whether djokovic would be allowed to stay despite the court's decision in his favour. at one point, djokovic�*s fans thought they caught a glimpse of him, but they clashed with the police and were dispersed with tear gas. it's only a few days before the tournament djokovic has dominated is due to start, but his win in court doesn't seem to have guaranteed him a chance to defend his title. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. and we'll be crossing
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to melbourne a little later to speak to the refugee council of australia. don't refugee council of australia. go away. a moment of history to report now — doctors in the united states have carried out the first successful transplant of a pig's heart into a human patient. be warned the images you are about to see now of the operation are very graphic. the animal was genetically modified to reduce the chance of the organ being rejected. surgeons at the maryland medical center said the 57—year—old patient was doing well. the experimental operation was considered the last hope of saving his life. we can now speak to dr robert montgomery who performed the first successful transplantation using a genetically engineered pig kidney into a human, who was on life support at the time. dr montgomery is also himself a heart transplant recipient with a genetic heart disorder.
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doctor montgomery, thank you very much forjoining us. i had to say you tick too much and reeboks we could ask for in an expert interview on this topic. let me start first of all with your reaction to this operation. just how big a deal is it? it operation. just how big a deal is it? , ., ., , operation. just how big a deal isit? ,., ., i, operation. just how big a deal is it? ,., ., , , ., is it? it is a really big deal. it is a huge _ is it? it is a really big deal. it is a huge leap _ is it? it is a really big deal. it is a huge leap forward. l is it? it is a really big deal. i it is a huge leap forward. just exlain it is a huge leap forward. just explain why- _ it is a huge leap forward. just explain why. well, _ it is a huge leap forward. just explain why. well, it - it is a huge leap forward. just explain why. well, it is - explain why. well, it is really the first example _ explain why. well, it is really the first example of - explain why. well, it is really the first example of a - the first example of a genetically modified pig organ that has been transplanted into a living human.— a living human. there is a lot of talk and — a living human. there is a lot of talk and effort _ a living human. there is a lot of talk and effort into - of talk and effort into avoiding the rejection of the organ, and i know that is something that in your work you have had to focus on as well. the early signs are good, but how much confidence can be gleaned from the first two or three days that this is really going to hold?—
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three days that this is really going to hold? really what the first two or _ going to hold? really what the first two or three _ going to hold? really what the first two or three days - going to hold? really what the first two or three days does . going to hold? really what the first two or three days does is | first two or three days does is it tells you whether the organ is functioning, and so far this heart appears to be functioning pretty well. although the recipient is still receiving some additional support through a pump called ecmo, which is being gradually weaned off so the pig heart can fully take over. ~ ., ., ., , over. we do have to be realistic _ over. we do have to be realistic than _ over. we do have to be realistic than of - over. we do have to be realistic than of the - over. we do have to be - realistic than of the prospects of this working?— realistic than of the prospects of this working? yes, what this tells us is _ of this working? yes, what this tells us is there _ of this working? yes, what this tells us is there is _ of this working? yes, what this tells us is there is no _ tells us is there is no immediate rejection, which is always been the concern with xenotransplantation. in our xenotra nspla ntation. in our work xenotransplantation. in our work in september of last year, demonstrated that there was good news on that front, but there is a second wave of potential rejection that can occur at about two weeks after the transplant. so we will be waiting to see what happens in the longer term. find waiting to see what happens in the longer term.— the longer term. and i think that was _ the longer term. and i think that was a — the longer term. and i think that was a phase _ the longer term. and i think that was a phase you - the longer term. and i think that was a phase you didn'tl that was a phase you didn't reach with your own particular
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case, because it was a patient i understand who was on life support and deceased after a few days?— support and deceased after a fewda s? ., , . i, few days? that is correct, yes. tell me then, _ few days? that is correct, yes. tell me then, you _ few days? that is correct, yes. tell me then, you are - few days? that is correct, yes. tell me then, you are also - few days? that is correct, yes. tell me then, you are also the| tell me then, you are also the recipient of a heart transplant yourself, you have a genetic heart disorder. in terms of what this might mean and how many people are going to benefit from it, you must be feeling this very personally? i am indeed. i mean, it is new hope for my family and other individuals who suffer from heart disease, that there will be a greater supply of organs because each year about thousand people in the us die waiting a transplant. so this could and that shortage. but are ou could and that shortage. but are you saying _ could and that shortage. but are you saying that we could get to the point where you might say to a patient, yes, we
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have got a transplant for you, and it won't matter if it is a pig heart or a and it won't matter if it is a pig heart ora human and it won't matter if it is a pig heart or a human heart? that is a long way off, but yes, i believe that that will be the case, but we are talking about maybe ten years from now before that sort of scenario would be realistic.- before that sort of scenario would be realistic. and what is it about pigs? _ would be realistic. and what is it about pigs? what _ would be realistic. and what is it about pigs? what is - would be realistic. and what is it about pigs? what is it - would be realistic. and what is it about pigs? what is it that l it about pigs? what is it that makes them so compatible i suppose with humans? there are many things- _ suppose with humans? there are many things. first _ suppose with humans? there are many things. first of _ suppose with humans? there are many things. first of all, - suppose with humans? there are many things. first of all, the - many things. first of all, the organs are about the same size as a human organ, and there is also the fact that they are plentiful, they are used as a food source, used for valves and pharmaceuticals, so there is good acceptance by the public for the use of organs. that is not the case with primate organs, which are actually closer to human. i have to ask you, there are plenty of people who would have a moral ethical perhaps issue
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with this sort of operation. what do you say to them? i mean, i think if you are in the shoes of the person who is going to die waiting for an organ, you would understand that this is a really important thing. that this is a really important thin. ., ., . ., , thing. you are certainly in that situation, _ thing. you are certainly in that situation, and - thing. you are certainly in that situation, and thankl thing. you are certainly in i that situation, and thank you very much indeed for sharing your expertise with us, doctor robert montgomery.- your expertise with us, doctor robert montgomery. thank you so much. let's get some of the day's other news. north korea is reported to have fired a projectile into the sea less than a week after testing what it said was a hypersonic weapon. the japanese coast guard said the latest object appeared to be a short—range ballistic missile. this is the second apparent missile launch in less than a week after the reclusive state's leader, kim jong—un, urged his military to make more military advances. russia's deputy foreign minister, sergei ryabkov, has warned the united states not to underestimate the risks of confrontation with moscow over ukraine. speaking after a round of talks in geneva, mr ryabkov also said
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there was a basis for agreement. for her part, the us deputy secretary of state, wendy sherman, said the russians had told her they did not intend to invade ukraine, and that a build—up of russian troops on the border was just manoeuvring. the nicaraguan president, daniel ortega, has been sworn in for a fourth consecutive term in office amid renewed international pressure over his election victory, widely seen as rigged. the inauguration ceremony, in managua's revolution square, has been boycotted by most leaders in the region. among those attending are the leaders of cuba and venezuela. the president of mexico, andres manuel lopez obrador, says he has covid—i9 for a second time and is experiencing mild symptoms. he will remain in isolation and communicate virtually with his office. the 68—year—old, who rarely wears a face mask, earlier appeared at his daily news conference speaking with a hoarse voice.
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for most people, �*bring your own booze' is a pretty clear message. and that is what was on the invitation sent out to around a hundred people to a gathering at downing street in may 2020 when a covid lockdown was still in place. the invitation was issued by a senior member of borisjohnson's staff, and it's thought around 30 attended, including the prime minister and his wife. the latest revelation follows a barrage of criticism mrjohnson has faced over alleged parties in government offices during covid lockdowns. laura kuenssberg has the latest. the principle private secretary's job is in the shadows, organising the lives of the public and powerful. martin reynolds�* role was not, you may think, to organise a party during a lockdown. an invite leaked to itv news from behind the black door sent to around 100 of number ten's staff. the prime minister today declining to get into
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the details of any such socialising. all of that, as you know, is the subject of a proper investigation by sue grey. so have you already been interviewed by sue grey, and if not, do you object to her questioning you again about this? all that is subject for an investigation by sue grey. remember back then, in the horror of spring 2020, the rules were strict and clear — you could spend time outdoors with people you lived with or with only one other person. and yet, in the building where the rules were being made, a plan was formed for a gathering in downing street's garden on may 20,2020. i'm told around 30 people attended, including, according to two eyewitnesses, the prime minister and his wife, with a long table set out in the garden for drinks and snacks. and there was surprise and concern among some staff at the plan. eyebrows more than raised at the e—mail invite
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sent out by martin reynolds in black and white. messages sent between staff and shown tonight to the bbc that some were well aware of the problem. one wrote at the time: another said: all number ten spokesperson would say tonight was: for weeks, the prime minister has had to defend himself from a deluge of goings—on in downing street. he said again and again nothing went wrong. i have been repeatedly assured, since these allegations emerged, that there was no party and that...and that no covid rules were broken, and that is what i have been repeatedly assured. but for labour's deputy, this latest set of claims is a step too far. i think he should go. i mean, there is no excuses,
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and it will come as no surprise that i don't think boris johnson is up for thejob, but more importantly, i think he's lost the confidence of the british public now with his lies, his deceit and his breaking of his own rules. labour shouldn't hold its breath for that, but borisjohnson just can't shake off claims about his own behaviour during lockdown and the conduct of those right by his side. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: the aftermath of a violent episode in kazakhstan. what to make of the president claims the protests were an attempted coup. day one of operation desert storm to force the iraqis out of kuwait has seen the most intense air attacks since the second world war. tobacco is america's oldest industry, and it's one of its biggest. but the industry is nervous of this report. this may tend to make people want to stop smoking cigarettes.
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there is not a street that is unaffected. l huge parts of kobe - were simply demolished as buildings— crashed into one another. this woman said - she'd been given no help and no advice - by the authorities. she stood outside - the ruins of her business. tens of thousands of black children in south africa have taken advantage of laws, passed by the country's new multiracial government, and enrolled at formerly white schools. tonight sees the 9,610th performance of her long—running play, the mousetrap. when they heard of her death today, the management considered whether to cancel tonight's performance, but agatha christie would have been the last person to want such a thing. this is bbc news. our main story: an anxious wait for novak djokovic as he waits to hear if australia's immigration minister might still revoke his visa.
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let's have more on that story now. asher hirsch is senior policy officer for the refugee council of australia. he's in melbourne. thank you for your time. first of all, there are those who say this is shining the light on the immigration challenges faced by so many today, which is perhaps a good thing but also shining a light on the extraordinary disparity of treatment between a superstar and your average, your average migrant. where do you stand on that? ., ., ~ migrant. where do you stand on that? ., .,~ . migrant. where do you stand on that? ., . , that? novak d'okovic has been detained for — that? novak djokovic has been detained for the _ that? novak djokovic has been detained for the last _ that? novak djokovic has been detained for the last four - that? novak djokovic has been detained for the last four days| detained for the last four days in the park hotel in melbourne alongside 30 other refugees who have been seeking asylum in australia. they have not committed any crime or had their visa cancelled and have been detained by over nine
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years in australia, including many in offshore processing, and they want to see the media focus attention on their plight in this situation, as well as novak djokovic's as well. and novak d'okovic's as well. and in one novak djokovic's as well. and in one sense _ novak djokovic's as well. and in one sense it _ novak djokovic's as well. and in one sense it is _ novak djokovic's as well. and in one sense it is working? yes, and they are saying to us, you know, we don't want anyone detained. we know what it's like to be here for nine years in these inhumane conditions and wejoin with in these inhumane conditions and we join with others in saying no—one should be detained for these kinds of situations.— situations. under any circumstances, - situations. under any circumstances, the l situations. under any i circumstances, the idea situations. under any - circumstances, the idea it is nine years is pretty shocking. you see how this can work as leverage for these people to either speed up their process or indeed to bring it to a close, one way or another? like novak djokovic, _ close, one way or another? like novak djokovic, these _ close, one way or another? i age: novak djokovic, these refugees are really at the hands of the minister, is up to minister to release them aground the movies are and they have been asking for asking for this for years. there have been found be
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refugees by the australian government, they are fearing persecution and cannot go home and hopefully some retention on their plight to help aid in dealing with their release and enable them to find a safe place. i cannotjust ask you, you mentioned the park hotel, where djokovic was staying and a number of others are staying, and we have had some very mixed views as to the stated that accommodation.— views as to the stated that accommodation. �* accommodation. and indeed the treatment people _ accommodation. and indeed the treatment people can _ accommodation. and indeed the treatment people can expect - treatment people can expect there. what is your experience, what have you heard? we there. what is your experience, what have you heard?— what have you heard? we have heard many — what have you heard? we have heard many issues _ what have you heard? we have heard many issues over - what have you heard? we have heard many issues over the - what have you heard? we have| heard many issues over the last year, about the conditions there, including not liking the food, maggots in the food, not being able to go outside for the air, windows are sealed shut, issues of not getting medical treatment. most of these refugees have been taken from offshore processing to these centres in australia to
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get medical treatment and not receiving that for many years. generally, inhumane treatment. the main issue of the attention is not that, it is a prolonged, indefinite detention. these people never know when they will get out, unlike djokovic he spent four days in detention, these people have no idea, it could be tomorrow could be another nine years we wait to hear if things change in that regard.— the president of kazakhstan has described the protests last week, in which dozens are reported to have died, as an attempted coup. troops from russia are currently in the country to restore order, and today president putin said kazakhstan had been targeted by international terrorism. our correspondent steve rosenberg is in kazakhstan's largest city almaty, and sent this report. driving into almaty, you see immediately this is a city on guard. we passed through several
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army checkpoints. they've been set up to prevent more attacks. in the city centre, reminders of the violence the authorities now say was an attempted coup. almaty last week. what had started as peaceful protests over fuel prices... ..in another part of kazakhstan were suddenly looking like war. translation: these bandits were controlled by terrorists. j for the level of organisation here, it must have been a criminal group that planned it in advance. dozens of people were killed. thousands have since been detained. there's still a lot of confusion about who was behind this violence. authorities blame terrorists and bandits. some here talk about a power struggle in the ruling elite. but one thing is clear —
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that to stay in power, the president of kazakhstan had to call on a foreign power for help, and that's russia. enter the russian military. on paper, russian troops here are peacekeepers, deployed to kazakhstan as part of a collective security alliance of former soviet states, the csto. but most of the soldiers are russian, the kremlin keen to demonstrate its regional power. addressing csto colleagues, president putin made events fit his wider narrative. translation: we understand the events in kazakhstan - won't be the last attempt to interfere in the internal affairs of our countries. the measures taken by the csto show we will not allow destabilisation at home and for so—called colour revolutions to take place.
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after the violence in almaty, there are mixed feelings here about the arrival of russian troops. "i welcome the russians coming", this man says. "they'll put a stop to it." "we should be able to cope ourselves," she says. "then again, without outside help, there could be civil war." what happened in kazakhstan has left this country and its people in shock and in fear at what comes next. steve rosenberg, bbc news, almaty. the past seven years have been the hottest on record, according to the eu's copernicus climate change service, which said they were the warmest by a clear margin since 1850. last year was the fifth—warmest year, with record—breaking heat in some regions. and in the us researchers say preliminary figures show greenhouse gas emissions there rose by more than 6% last year. the independent rhodium group says the rise makes it harder for the country to stick to its pledges on emissions
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reductions. we can speak now to a partner at rhodium. john larsen leads us energy and climate policy research, and joins us from amherst in massachusetts. thank you forjoining us. can i get some clarification on that increasing greenhouse gas emissions of 6%, that is based on what was a very low figure for the year before, isn't it? are we looking at a jump ordinarily, it would be a jump ordinarily, it would be a jump or ordinarily it would be a fall? �* , , , or ordinarily it would be a fall? , ~ fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in — fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in any _ fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in any year - fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in any year is - fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in any year is a - fall? let's put it this way, 696 increase in any year is a big l increase in any year is a big jump increase in any year is a big jump for us emissions and yes you are right, coming from the covid related recession, is, you know, i a covid related recession, is, you know, ia big rebound and it's making up two—thirds of the drop. it's making up two-thirds of the drou— the drop. i'm trying to work out how—
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the drop. i'm trying to work out how much _ the drop. i'm trying to work out how much that - the drop. i'm trying to work out how much that does - the drop. i'm trying to work - out how much that does impact the targets that the biden administration has set itself for 2025 and 2030?- administration has set itself for 2025 and 2030? shaw, 2020, the us was _ for 2025 and 2030? shaw, 2020, the us was 2296, _ for 2025 and 2030? shaw, 2020, the us was 2296, below _ for 2025 and 2030? shaw, 2020, the us was 2296, below 2005 - the us was 22%, below 2005 levels are now with the rebound, it is at i7% below 2005 and meanwhile the us needs to get up to 50% below 2005 in the next eight years by 2030 —— sure. the next eight years by 2030 -- sure. ,., , ~ sure. right, so it feels like it's going _ sure. right, so it feels like it's going significantly - sure. right, so it feels like it's going significantly in i sure. right, so it feels like| it's going significantly in the wrong direction?— wrong direction? definitely. and coal-fired _ wrong direction? definitely. and coal-fired power- wrong direction? definitely. i and coal-fired power stations and coal—fired power stations are part of the problem? huge increase. _ are part of the problem? huge increase, 1796 _ are part of the problem? huge increase, 1796 increase - are part of the problem? huge increase, 1796 increase in - are part of the problem? huge increase, 1796 increase in coall increase, i7% increase in coal generation compared to 2020, the first increase we have seen in seven years, carl has been on a set steady decline in the united states and —— coal and is more competitive with natural gas prices in america. we have seen an increase in gas
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prices in 2021 and basically the coal has been limping along over the last three years has been revived due to that competitive advantage. right, to net a competitive advantage. right, to get a sense, _ competitive advantage. right, to get a sense, john, - competitive advantage. right, to get a sense, john, that - competitive advantage. right, to get a sense, john, that the | to get a sense, john, that the american people are more and more cognisant of what is happening in their own environments and their own climate and we have up tina hurricane is an extreme weather examples to draw fine goal from —— we have many examples. i think awareness of climate pressure is at a high but we have not seen that flow up to actual new legislation in action at a federal level and the president has made this issue a priority but it's still working, it still has not seen the marquee bills get over the finish line and start to drive
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change we wait to see how will develop. change we wait to see how will develo -. . ~ change we wait to see how will develo -. ., ~ i. change we wait to see how will develo. ., ~ i. ., change we wait to see how will develo. . ~' ,, ., ., develop. thank you for “oining us. and thank * develop. thank you for “oining us. and thank you h develop. thank you for “oining us. and thank you for h develop. thank you forjoining us. and thank you for being i us. and thank you for being with us here on bbc news. goodbye for now. hello. after a fairly grey, drizzly sort of day on monday, more places will see the sunshine on tuesday. clearer air is working its way south across the uk behind this cold front here, which is only slowly pushing southwards. so we've still got quite a lot of cloud around. the cloud and drizzle will slowly clear southwards through the day, so a reappearance of sunshine from the north, but some of us will hold onto the cloudy drizzly conditions all day in the far south. so we start off with quite a contrast in temperature, mild towards the south, but temperatures a few degrees either side of freezing first thing for scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england as well. this is how tuesday is looking then — you can see the clearer skies for much of the uk as this band of cloud and drizzly patchy rain sink south.
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a bit of mist and murk particularly around coasts and hills for southern england and south wales too, lasting all day. but mild here, io—ii celsius, in the clearer, sunny skies, between about 6—9 celsius, a few showers just rattling in across the north and west of scotland. through tuesday evening and overnight now into wednesday, eventually, we will lose that cold front, that band of cloud and drizzle from the south. so clearer skies for all as we move on into wednesday morning. breezy in the north and milderair here, double figures overnight. but further south, we are likely to see a frost to start your wednesday morning. so moving through wednesday, then, once we have lost that cold front, we've got high pressure building really across the uk, so that's going to bring a lot of dry and settled weather. but a change in temperature because this milder air is coming in from the south—west around the top side of that high—pressure, so moving into northern parts of the uk. further south, we're sitting under the colder air. so, really, from mid—week onwards, we've got a bit of a split. it's mild and breezy in the north, whereas further south, colder with some fog patches that could linger for quite a time.
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that's how wednesday looks, then we've got the cloudier, breezier conditions across parts of scotland in particular. fog patches further south, it will slowly clear away, and then a lot of dry and sunny weather. we've always got that bit more cloud and a few showers in the far north—west. here, 11 degrees for stornoway, and about 7 degrees or so for london. and a few places could struggle where we keep that fog. through the day on thursday, some of that fog could be quite extensive and slow to clear across parts of england and wales too. breezy and cloudy in the far north—west, plenty of sunshine elsewhere, but we could see those lingering fog patches all day for a few areas. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: an anxious wait for novak djokovic. he's back in training ahead of the australian open after winning his appeal against being denied entry. but the country's immigration minister might still revoke his visa. doctors in the us have carried out the first successful transplant of a pig's heart into a human patient. the animal was genetically modified to reduce the risk of the organ being rejected. a breakthrough would raise hopes of a solution to the shortage of organ donors. borisjohnson has refused to say whether he joined dozens of staff for drinks during lockdown. up to a hundred people are said to have been invited to an event in the downing street garden. rules at the time allowed just two people from separate households to meet outdoors. those are the main news headlines.
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