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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 10, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. djokovic has a victory in court, the australian government has been forced to release him from immigration detention, cause for celebration for his family. this immigration detention, cause for celebration for his family.- celebration for his family. this is a hue celebration for his family. this is a huge win- _ celebration for his family. this is a huge win. for— celebration for his family. this is a huge win. for novak _ celebration for his family. this is a huge win. for novak and - celebration for his family. this is a huge win. for novak and his i celebration for his family. this is - a huge win. for novak and his family and the whole free world. the a huge win. for novak and his family and the whole free world.— and the whole free world. the player tweeted this — and the whole free world. the player tweeted this image _ and the whole free world. the player tweeted this image of— and the whole free world. the player tweeted this image of himself - tweeted this image of himself training on court at the australian open venue. the government meanwhile will decide if it will cancel it his bees all over again. after direct talks to the us, russia does not want the west to underestimate confrontation with ukraine. the past
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seven years have been the warmest in recorded history. no backtrack of it made it onto the novak djokovic did make it onto the court. the player says he's focused on playing in the australian open but the legal battle continues with the possibility he could still be deported. let's have a look at these latest developments in detail. novak djokovic left an immigration hotel in melbourne on monday — to the relief of his father. translation: in the and, he won. justice has widened. _ translation: in the and, he won. justice has widened. the _ translation: in the and, he won. justice has widened. the rule - translation: in the and, he won. justice has widened. the rule of. translation: in the and, he won. | justice has widened. the rule of law has one. djokovic�*s brother though was less enthusiastic when was asked what happened when djokovic got covid last year. ok so, uh, this press conference
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is adjourned at the moment. meanwhile the pepper spray has come out in melbourne as police clash with djokovic fans. and the whole saga has led some to draw this conclusion. it appears to me to be a complete embarrassment for the australian government, i have to say. or australia's biggest newspaper, the herald sun, describes a "total balls up". the man himself has tweeted this picture from the rod laver arena. telling us... a lot has happened. and while djokovic focuses on the tennis, let's focus on the latest developments. remember djokovic arrived in australia last wednesday night. he was held for hours, had his visa revoked — and was moved to an immigration hotel. then on monday djokovic had an appeal upheld. the government admitted not allowing him enough time to respond to the visa being revoked. judge anthony kelly cut to it — saying...
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but the problem here is — what are the rules? effectively, the policy changed whilst mr djokovic was in the air. this is backed up by paul sakkal of the age. literallyjust hours before he arrived, the federal government seemed to change its view and said it would apply its own stricter policies at the border. paul sakkal then highlights the crucial point — that this was all about whether having covid recently would allow djokovic to come in. they made a differentjudgment on his medical exemption, the prior infection exemption. the prior infection exemption. certainly by the time djokovic landed, the government position was — that this type of exemption was out. the problem is that's not what tennis australia was saying. in a letter to players on seven december, it wrote... but then listen to this from the ceo of tennis australia on sunday. there was plenty of contradictory
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information, plenty of conflicting information, and we constantly were seeking clarity from day one to ensure that, one, we did the right thing, and two, that we were able to bring the players into the country against our primary objective of everyone being safe. seeking clarity and finding it are of course two different things. and prime minister scott morrison argues the information was there. in relation to the government, our government, the federal government's advice to tell australia that were set out very clearly in november. well in november, the australian health minister wrote to tennis australia: "people who do not meet the definition of fully vaccinated will not be approved for quarantine—free entry". he went on... also bear this in mind. a medical exemption for a prior infection has never been a reason to enter australia as an unvaccinated person. evidently tennis australia thought that it could happen in this case. which means djokovic may have been following the rules —
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but may have been given the wrong ones. or as sydney morning herald reporter chip le grand puts it... the transcript of djokovic�*s conversation at the airport's been released. asked: "are you vaccinated?" djokovic replied: "i am not." that's not the only question for him though. because djokovic broke self—isolation rules in december. we know because these documents were released by djokovic�*s legal team. they show he tested positive for covid on 16 december. the test and the result were on the same day. also on 16 december, djokovic was pictured at a ceremony for a new stamp in his honour. the next day, he was at the novak tennis centre in belgrade. if he had been told, this was against the rules. this would have been as well.
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on the 18th, french newspaper l'equipe reports it did a photoshoot with djokovic in belgrade. and as bbc reality check reports: djokovic was tested in serbia where you are required to isolate for 14 days following a positive test. djokovic didn't do that. nor has he addressed why not. and remember when his family were asked. ok, so, this press conference is adjourned at the moment. in the middle of all of this, we don't know if djokovic is planning on missing the australian open if he didn't get covid in december. while we pour over these unknowns, the judges ruling on monday left the australian government with a choice. let him stay, despite not appearing to meet rules that australians have to meet rules that australians have to follow or deport them world's tennis number one, barring him from the country for years after he appears to have done what was asked of him.
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the united states and russia have concluded tense security talks in geneva — marking the start of a crucial week of diplomacy that could shape the future of ukraine — and the security of europe. on the agenda — russian military build up on the ukrainian border — which you can see here. it's causing a great deal of concern for western allies. the us said it received no answer from russia on de—escalation. speaking after the talks, the russian deputy foreign minister says the us shouldn't underestimate the risk of a confrontation. if now nato proceeds towards deployment are capabilities that are being developed very rapidly in the us and will possibly be introduced somewhere in europe. it would require a military response on the russian part.
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that is a decision to counter this threat through means at our discretion. deputy secretary of state wendy sherman also spoke to reporters after the talks — she said russia had been warned of the consequences should they invade ukraine. we will do what we must to deter russia from taking any action that would be untoward towards ukraine, and that should they do so, there will be enormous costs, potential significant and really compelling costs. it is really a very stark choice, and one that i suspect only mr putin, president clinton can decide.
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——mr putin, president putin can decide. our diplomatic correspondentjames landale is in geneva. the circumstances of this meeting with a _ the circumstances of this meeting with a bilateral one between the united _ with a bilateral one between the united states and russia. in other words. _ united states and russia. in other words. the — united states and russia. in other words, the united states has been falling _ words, the united states has been falling over itself saying it's not going _ falling over itself saying it's not going to — falling over itself saying it's not going to make any agreement on ukraine, — going to make any agreement on ukraine, not going to make any agreement on nato without those countries — agreement on nato without those countries involved. but that said, the parameters where defined by russian — the parameters where defined by russian demands and russian actions. in russian demands and russian actions. in other— russian demands and russian actions. in other words, russia's decision to put 100,000 troops on ukraine's borders, — put 100,000 troops on ukraine's borders, that's why these talks are taking _ borders, that's why these talks are taking place, and secondly, russia's decision— taking place, and secondly, russia's decision to _ taking place, and secondly, russia's decision to demand before christmas a massive _ decision to demand before christmas a massive nato retreat from eastern europe _ a massive nato retreat from eastern europe. so those are the issues that were on— europe. so those are the issues that were on the — europe. so those are the issues that were on the table today. both sides use this _ were on the table today. both sides use this moment, the first chance for diplomats to talk face to face about _ for diplomats to talk face to face about both of these issues, to their set out _ about both of these issues, to their set out their demands, no sign of any real— set out their demands, no sign of any real agreement or progress, but at least _ any real agreement or progress, but at least they didn't break up in any
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acrimony — at least they didn't break up in any acrimon . . , at least they didn't break up in any acrimon . ., , ., ., ., ,~' at least they didn't break up in any acrimon . ., ., ., ., acrimony. i was going to ask about that because _ acrimony. i was going to ask about that because i _ acrimony. i was going to ask about that because i remember - acrimony. i was going to ask about that because i remember when - acrimony. i was going to ask about that because i remember when we j acrimony. i was going to ask about - that because i remember when we used to talk about brexit, we would often talk about the need for a landing zone. i wonder if there is any possible landing zone that's being sketched out between the russians and the americans on this issue. look, let's be honest, the gap between — look, let's be honest, the gap between their two positions is great — between their two positions is great. there is not an immediate landing _ great. there is not an immediate landing zone that can be seen because — landing zone that can be seen because some of these things are very. _ because some of these things are very. you — because some of these things are very, you know, black and white. so for example — very, you know, black and white. so for example, you know, russia demanded today a cast iron guarantee that ukraine would never become a member— that ukraine would never become a member of— that ukraine would never become a member of nato. the united states rejected _ member of nato. the united states rejected that outright. on those kinds _ rejected that outright. on those kinds of— rejected that outright. on those kinds of issues, there is simply no possibility— kinds of issues, there is simply no possibility of concession. where there _ possibility of concession. where there might be at least the possibility of some kind of discussion, the americans put forward — discussion, the americans put forward some ideas for curbing military— forward some ideas for curbing military exercises or looking at the
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deployment of missiles. they raised typically— deployment of missiles. they raised typically the possibility of reviving the treaty, the inter—range nuclear— reviving the treaty, the inter—range nuclear forces treaty. this was abandoned by donald trump two years a-o abandoned by donald trump two years ago after— abandoned by donald trump two years ago after the russians were widely accused _ ago after the russians were widely accused of breaching its provisions. the american said today why don't we have another look at that to see if we can discuss? mutual issues where they can _ we can discuss? mutual issues where they can have reciprocal action. that's_ they can have reciprocal action. that'sjust _ they can have reciprocal action. that'sjust an american they can have reciprocal action. that's just an american idea. there is no _ that's just an american idea. there is no sign _ that's just an american idea. there is no sign yet — that's just an american idea. there is no sign yet of whether the russians— is no sign yet of whether the russians are going to agree with that _ russians are going to agree with that. what is clear where the americans have said they are willing to carry— americans have said they are willing to carry on _ americans have said they are willing to carry on these kinds of discussions in the future. the american _ discussions in the future. the american said the russians that may be, american said the russians that may be lets— american said the russians that may be let's see — american said the russians that may be, let's see how the rest of the talks— be, let's see how the rest of the talks with — be, let's see how the rest of the talks with nato and other countries -et talks with nato and other countries get on _ talks with nato and other countries get on later this week.— talks with nato and other countries get on later this week. james, when ou talk to get on later this week. james, when you talk to those _ get on later this week. james, when you talk to those involved _ get on later this week. james, when you talk to those involved in - get on later this week. james, when you talk to those involved in the - you talk to those involved in the american side of the equation, do they acknowledge that perhaps nato's expansion towards the east has caused russia some discomfort? can they see that?—
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they see that? they say, love, nato is an organisation _ they see that? they say, love, nato is an organisation that _ they see that? they say, love, nato is an organisation that countries - is an organisation that countries joined _ is an organisation that countries joined voluntarily as an open—door policy _ joined voluntarily as an open—door policy. nothing to do at the united states _ policy. nothing to do at the united states if_ policy. nothing to do at the united states. if countries want to discuss joining _ states. if countries want to discuss joining nato, they can do that. that is free _ joining nato, they can do that. that is free choice. she joining nato, they can do that. that is free choice.— is free choice. she served under president _ is free choice. she served under president trump, _ is free choice. she served under president trump, and here - is free choice. she served under president trump, and here is i is free choice. she served under| president trump, and here is her assessment. president trump, and here is her assessment-— assessment. when the russians decided we _ assessment. when the russians decided we weren't _ assessment. when the russians decided we weren't very - assessment. when the russians decided we weren't very serious | decided we weren't very serious about ukraine, ukraine was a domestic political issue, he was trying to tell zelensky to do him a personal favour and advance the 2020 elections, and then when the biden administration tried to be varied to national security business as usual by putting ukraine backend of foreign policy frame, the russians have reacted, you know, something to that. let's remind ourselves of how we got here. formerly part of the soviet union — ukraine declared independence in 1991. as you can see, it shares a border with both russia
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and the european union. in 2014, russia seized part of southern ukraine. it also backed separatists who started a conflict in large areas of the east. it's estimated at least 15,000 people have died since the conflict began. nato secretary generaljens stoltenberg, will meet the russian team on wednesday. he spoke to reporters a little earlier. we need to send a very clear message to russia that we are united, that there will be severe costs, economic, political costs if they once again use military force against ukraine. we provide support to ukraine, helping them to uphold the right for self—defense. but i don't think we can expect that these meetings will solve all the issues. these negotiations are part of a broader discussion the country's debbie preminger had a strong message for moscow earlier on today. we should all realise that russia's
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demands to allies could not be considered as negotiating position. aggressor is not in a position to put conditions until the russian tanks are out of the ukrainian border. we see as russia attempts to shift the discussion by threatening with a new war without moving any step forward for a peaceful settlement. what russia is doing is trying to impose its agenda instead of returning to the negotiating table. let's look at how ukrainians feel about this escalation on their border. these are pictures from a rally on sunday. people here calling on the west not to compromise with putin. several of the protesters there questioned why in the country didn't get a seat at the negotiating table this week, and that's very much a concern, as you will hear in this report from paul adams. you talk to ukrainians _ this report from paul adams. ym. talk to ukrainians about how they feel and they say, look, we have been here before. we have lived with
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us for all of these years. we got used to not crying wolf, so in some senses, they regard this as just a continuation, albeit at a slightly heightened level of a conflict and situation that they have been wrestling with for a very long time. one thing they are concerned about is that they don't want anyone talking about the future of ukraine without involving ukraine, and that of grace is a fear that during these talks in geneva, you have the russians and americans discussed saying this country is very existence if you like, its future and its relationships. and that of course as a source of anxiety, one that when you listen to people like anthony brink and, a very concerted effort to address, there is this refrain now, no talks about ukraine without ukraine. at every stage of the process, their phone calls and contacts going on to make sure that
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the ukrainian perspective is taken account of. the president of kazakhstan has described the protests last week — in which dozens are reported to have died — as an attempted coup d'etat. troops from russia are currently in the country to restore order. today president putin said kazakhstan had been targeted by international terrorism — and said russia would never allow revolutions to take place in the region. our correspondent steve rosenberg is in kazakhstan's largest city almaty, and sent this report. driving into almaty, you see immediately this is a city on guard. we passed through several army checkpoints. they've been setup to more attacks. —— they've been setup to prevent more attacks. in the city centre, reminders of the violence the authorities now say was an attempted coup. almaty last week.
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what had started as peaceful protests over fuel prices, in another part of kazakhstan, were suddenly looking like war. translation: these bandits were controlled by terrorists. j for the level of organisation here, it must have been a criminal group that planned it in advance. dozens were killed. thousands have since been detained. there's still a lot of confusion about who was behind the violence. the authorities blame terrorists and bandits. some here talk about a power struggle in the ruling elite. but one thing is clear, that to stay in power, the president of kazakhstan had to call on foreign power for help — and that's russia. enter the russian military.
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on paper, russian troops here are peacekeepers, deployed to kazakhstan as part of a collective security alliance of former soviet states. but most of the soldiers are russian. the kremlin is keen to demonstrate its regional power. addressing csto colleagues, president putin made events fit his wider narrative. translation: we understand the events in kazakhstan - won't be the last attempt to interfere in the internal affairs of our countries. the measures taken by the csto show we will not allow destabilisation at home and for so—called colour resolutions to take place. after the violence in almaty, there are mixed feelings here about the arrival of russian troops.
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"i welcome the russians are coming. they will put a stop to it." "we should be able to cope ourselves. "then again, without outside help, they could be civil war." what happened in kazakhstan has left this country and its people in shock and in fear at what comes next. steve rosenburg, bbc news. diana kudaibergenova is a sociologist who studies post—soviet countries at the university of cambridge. thanks forjoining us and helping us with a story. first of all, what do you make of this russian claim that the process we saw —— protests to be cyber organised by international terrorism. . ~ cyber organised by international terrorism. ., ,, , ., cyber organised by international terrorism. ., ,, ., ., terrorism. thank you for having me. i should terrorism. thank you for having me. i should also — terrorism. thank you for having me. i should also mention _ terrorism. thank you for having me. i should also mention today - terrorism. thank you for having me. i should also mention today is - terrorism. thank you for having me. i should also mention today is a - i should also mention today is a national morning day in kazakhstan, so we all mourn together. it should be taken with the caveat that we don't yet have an independent or transparent investigation on the ground. the president mentioned there are still investigations ongoing from a state level that will
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provide the full picture, hopefully the full picture and understanding of that. what's important right now is we don't have many independent voices. we don't have an independent investigation, and right now, what we have is from the president himself and from the forces on the ground and president putin himself. i would say that it does seem to be that the violence was organised and well planned, but we still don't have, you know, we only have one view on that, when discourse that's provided by the state. band provided by the state. and interested _ provided by the state. and interested listening to that. when you went to find reliable information about kazakhstan, where are you turning at the moment? where do you get it? taste are you turning at the moment? where do you get it?— do you get it? we have been working and researching, _ do you get it? we have been working and researching, academic— do you get it? we have been working and researching, academic research | and researching, academic research on the ground, i network with different people with whom i'm connecting, but while there is a
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huge blackout and internet was completely gone and the whole country, there were several providers, media providers that seem to have certain access to the telegram channels, what's very important in this country which we have been stressing with my colleagues, it's very, very important that we don't have many institutions of independent media in kazakhstan are independent channels, so a lot of channels were already in the social media space, but they were highly trusted and reliable, so were highly trusted and reliable, so we could get that information from some of these independent news sources. there are several foreign correspondents right now, but there are certain people who are self organising and going back into these communes and try to police the streets in the beginning of the use protests by highly violent groups. we have certain reports like that, but we have to wait for the coming days, what will be the reports from
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eyewitnesses and we have to definitely have an independent investigation going on on the ground or several of them. in investigation going on on the ground or several of them.— or several of them. in the short term, or several of them. in the short term. as you — or several of them. in the short term, as you look _ or several of them. in the short term, as you look at _ or several of them. in the short term, as you look at russian i term, as you look at russian troops in kazakhstan and you look at the aftermath of a very serious crackdown, do you think that for the moment, that is the protests stopped? moment, that is the protests sto ed? ~ . ., moment, that is the protests stoned? ., ., moment, that is the protests stoned? ~ ., ., ., stopped? well, we have to look into the networks. _ stopped? well, we have to look into the networks. a _ stopped? well, we have to look into the networks, a couple _ stopped? well, we have to look into the networks, a couple of— stopped? well, we have to look into the networks, a couple of hours i stopped? well, we have to look into the networks, a couple of hours of. the networks, a couple of hours of internet today, a lot of political activists did come out when they had the chance and the message basically stay united. they condemned the violence, they don't know who these groups where. they understand that the protest was hijacked and what's important is it's a hugely traumatic event for the whole country, so everybody is morning the victims, the people who lost friends and they know people, families who lost their loved ones, so it's a huge tragedy, everybody is obviously trying to send their condolences, but the
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message from the activists is that they condemned... and that basically they condemned... and that basically the last resort because these people were talking for a long time about providing channels to talk about these grievances and formalise the certain groups, institutionalise political parties, so that's what a lot of people are expecting on the ground right now. diana, thank you ve much ground right now. diana, thank you very much for— ground right now. diana, thank you very much for your _ ground right now. diana, thank you very much for your help. _ ground right now. diana, thank you very much for your help. i'm i ground right now. diana, thank you very much for your help. i'm sure l ground right now. diana, thank you | very much for your help. i'm sure we will talk again. diana from the university of cambridge. buckingham palace has released my plans to mark the platinum jubilee this year. the first —— the first event begins on monday, with a competition to invent a new pudding to celebrate 70 years of the queen's reign. the celebrations will culminate in a four—day bank holiday weekend in june. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. every big celebration needs a decent pudding. this was the queen's 90th birthday five years ago. then, bake off winner nadiya hussain did the honours.
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but to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne you don't have to be a star baker. all of us can give it a go. the aim is to find a recipe with staying power. i'm looking for something that's visually beautiful. that's been made with love and has a bit of a story to it, and something that will look great in buckingham palace, as well as on a table in a street party. and there's a history of royally named food. coronation chicken was created for the queen's coronation. and the victoria sponge was named after queen victoria, who loved an afternoon tea. this year's platinum pudding competition is about getting everyone involved. anyone over eight years old can submit a recipe. younger bakers are so much better than they used to be. like the amount of kids, especially on bake off, who were so much better than me at my age, is mind—blowing. the big jubilee celebration comes injune, with the four day bank holiday weekend.
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on thursday, the 2nd, there'll be trooping the colour on horse guards parade for the first time since 2019, due to covid. on friday the 3rd, a service of thanks give poring the queen's reign will be held at st paul's cathedral. the biggest names in entertainment are promised on saturday 4thjune, when the bbc hosts a platinum party at buckingham palace. the ballot for tickets will be launched next month. and then on sunday 5thjune, a pageant on the mall and the big jubilee lunch will be dished out in communities across the country. on the menu will be the winning platinum pudding that it is hoped the royal family will approve of. i spent 11 years cooking for the queen at buckingham palace, and one thing i did realise is that she does have a sweet tooth. afternoon tea, there will be lots of cakes, lots of pastries, but also at dinner lots of puddings too, and i think that one of her weaknesses is probably chocolate. jubilees are about creating memories. it is hope the uk's first ever platinum jubilee will feel that extra bit special.
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i will see you in a couple of minutes' time. hello there. many parts of the uk will see some sunshine tomorrow. today, though, it's been a cloudy start to the week for all of us. cloud's been coming in from the atlantic, and it's been thick enough to bring with it some pockets of rain and drizzle, and the main weather fronts drive in that cloud and rain southwards this evening and overnight. clearer skies following into scotland and northern ireland, where we keep that cloudy, mild air across england and wales, some low cloud and further outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. certainly a mild night for england and wales, much milder than last night for eastern england — no frost this time. but where we have the clearer skies and northern ireland and scotland — particularly in eastern scotland — we could start tuesday with some frost and some sunshine, as well. but we have this cloud, rain and drizzle moving southwards across england and wales, coming to rest across east anglia
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and southern england. we should see some late improvements across south wales and the midlands, with more sunshine further north, a few blustery showers coming into the northwest of scotland. it'll be a bit cooler than today for glasgow and belfast — the highest temperatures will be where we've got that cloudy, damp weather in southern england. that's on that weak weather front there, that moves away overnight. and then, high pressure comes in to build across the southern half of the uk. further north, things look a little different through the rest of the week. there'll be a wind from the atlantic, but that will bring mild air — and it's across northern areas that we'll see the highest temperatures. further south, it'll be colder, the winds will be lighter, and there'll be more mist, fog, and low cloud developing through the week, as well. could well start with some frost across england and wales on wednesday, and a few patches of mist and fog — those will lift and many places dry with some sunshine. a bit more cloud into the northwest on that stronger wind could bring 1—2 showers, and it's across northern scotland that we've got the highest temperatures — through the midlands, perhaps only five celsius. contrast, really, north—south, because of the position
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of the high pressure. now, on top of the high pressure, we've got these milder, stronger atlantic winds. underneath the high, the air�*s just stagnating. so we'll find more mist and fog forming overnight and lingering through thursday across england and wales, perhaps lifting into low cloud. outside of that, some sunshine, more cloud comes in on those stronger winds in the northwest of scotland, but again, it's generally dry. and we've got those contrasts again, north—south, across the uk. heading towards the end of the week, it looks quite grey for many parts of the country, actually, a bit more of this mist and fog developing once again.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. novak djokovic has had a victory in court. the australian government has been forced to release him from immigration detention, and his welcome desk family has welcomed the development. translation: , , ., translation: this is a welcome win for novak's family _ translation: this is a welcome win for novak's family and _ translation: this is a welcome win for novak's family and the _ translation: this is a welcome win for novak's family and the whole i for novak's family and the whole free world. for novak's family and the whole free world-— for novak's family and the whole free world. , ._ ., ,., free world. the player also tweeted this ima . e free world. the player also tweeted this image of _ free world. the player also tweeted this image of himself— free world. the player also tweeted this image of himself training i free world. the player also tweeted this image of himself training on i this image of himself training on court at the australian open venue. meanwhile, the government will have to decide if it will cancel his visa over again. to decide if it will cancel his visa overagain. russia is to decide if it will cancel his visa over again. russia is warning the west do not underestimate the risk of a confrontation with the ukraine.
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and european scientists�*s new data shows the last seven years have been the warmest in recorded history. novak djokovic has returned to training after a judge ruled he could stay in australia. the court ruled officials had failed to give djokovic sufficient time to respond to the decision when he originally arrived last week. his family called it the biggest victory of his career. translation: the game that has been played of the past 5-6 _ days has been really, really incredibly difficult for him and his family. this is a huge win for novak and for his family, and the whole free world. we are all human beings, we have rights.
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we have the right to say what we think. and not to suffer consequences for an opinion — for expressing an opinion. this isn't to do with what he thinks, but what he's done and whether it fits with australia's rule to make rules as to whether they can or can't come in. australia still must discuss whether to... let's talk to isabella higgins europe correspondent at australia's abc news. whatever the rights or wrongs, this is a mess, isn't it? it’s whatever the rights or wrongs, this is a mess, isn't it?— is a mess, isn't it? it's quite situation _ is a mess, isn't it? it's quite situation for _ is a mess, isn't it? it's quite situation for the _ is a mess, isn't it? it's quite situation for the australian l situation for the australian government, but it's no surprise we've gotten here because this issue was the intersection of two issues that australians love and love to hate — that sport and immigration policy. and you've got them colliding at the moment. you had passion on display in the streets,
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dozens of novak djokovic players rallying to have him released. and then, you had a very hard line from then, you had a very hard line from the australian government, saying there are no rules for one person and then rules for the other. that isn't really the case because throughout this pandemic, while australian has maintained a very tight border controls, we've seen celebrities coming in, getting an easier ride, getting different quarantine arrangements. so it's an issue in australia and it's perhaps not surprising it's come to a head the way that has come up when people feel so passionately about sport and about border control, especially during a global pandemic. just so i've understood _ during a global pandemic. just so i've understood this _ during a global pandemic. just so i've understood this correctly i during a global pandemic. just so i've understood this correctly - i during a global pandemic. just so i've understood this correctly - if| i've understood this correctly — if the government were to allow djokovic to stay, given that it's already said that having covid in the last six months isn't a factor, he would need to bend the rules and be treated differently? yes. he would need to bend the rules and be treated differently?— be treated differently? yes, he's already received _
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be treated differently? yes, he's already received a _ be treated differently? yes, he's already received a medical i be treated differently? yes, he's i already received a medical exemption from tennis australia and the victorian state government, who say there is a very vigorous review of there is a very vigorous review of the circumstances. there an intersection of federal rules and state government rules. that's one thing, and it's now a back and forth between who is right and who's wrong, between the victoria government and commonwealth government. you have a great area there, it's going to the court, the court has said this decision to cancel his visa was rushed through— but now he does have that medical exemption. some may say that's enough to bend the rules for him. and lastly, help us with the domestic political context here, because of course, you'll know this inside out but many of us don't follow australian politics as closely as you will do— a lot of australians i'm following on social media say you have to look at the election to understand this story.
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that's exactly right, you've got to remember that, that's exactly right, you've got to rememberthat, like that's exactly right, you've got to remember that, like many places in the world right now, australia is experiencing a huge surge in covid cases, there is shortage on testing, hospitals are becoming incredibly full, you've got real frustration in the community that the government has had years to prepare for this, that they were in a very good position, and now there are so many people getting sick. the morrison government, immigration, border control is probably what they would consider one of their strengths, where they perform well, having that tough border policy. so there are some sceptics and naysayers who say this is a distraction for the government to come out looking like they're tough, and also to push their vaccine programme, to say that they won't bend the rules to anyone. so there's quite a lot of play at the moment, and as i said, some might say this is a very welcome distraction for a government that is really under pressure at the moment and months out from a federal election. . ~
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and months out from a federal election. w , ., election. one quick further question - do we know _ election. one quick further question - do we know when _ election. one quick further question - do we know when the _ election. one quick further question - do we know when the government — do we know when the government will have to take a decision on this? hasn't said it will be done by a certain point? ida this? hasn't said it will be done by a certain point?— a certain point? no set timeline et, we a certain point? no set timeline yet. we heard — a certain point? no set timeline yet, we heard today _ a certain point? no set timeline yet, we heard today that - a certain point? no set timeline yet, we heard today that the i yet, we heard today that the immigration minister would hand down his decisions, but it has remained open and is open to consideration. we here it as being very much discussed amongst the government in the ministers office. so no set timeline but it would not be surprising if there was one today or overnight here in the uk and on tuesday in australia.— overnight here in the uk and on tuesday in australia. thanks for our tuesday in australia. thanks for your help. _ tuesday in australia. thanks for your help. we — tuesday in australia. thanks for your help, we appreciate - tuesday in australia. thanks for your help, we appreciate it. i a court in military—ruled myanmar has sentenced detained former leader, aung san suu kyi, to another four years injail. the nobel laureate, who is 76, is on trial for nearly a dozen cases that carry combined maximum sentences of more than 100 years in prison. aung san suu kyi was ousted in a military coup almost a year
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ago, was found guilty of illegally importing and possessing walkie—talkies — and denies all charges. our correspondentjonathan head has been following the case from thailand — he gave us his assessment of events. if you look at the other charges she faces, which are actually more serious — they could carry prison sentences that could put her in jail for life, she's in her mid—70s — i don't think anybody outside of the military takes this seriously through the judicial process, this is a means by which they are hoping to create an illusion where she cannot be legitimately involved in politics again. that'll be the argument the military makes if myanmar ever reaches the stage of some kind of negotiated end this crisis, you know, which this walkie—talkie charges quite ludicrous — anybody who knows aung san suu kyi probably knows she doesn't know one end of a walkie—talkie from another, and they were discovered in her house when she was arrested, almost certainly used by her security guards — the idea that she's criminally responsible for the licensing of that would be farcical in other circumstances. but ultimately, everything that happens, including
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to aung san suu kyi herself, really depends on the situation on the ground in myanmar — the country's engulfed in very serious armed conflict over the border in myanmar now, we've got very serious attacks on the main capital there. other parts of myanmar being attacked by helicopter gunships. with that level of conflict, if there is a resolution, ultimately things could change very much on the ground if the military remains under pressure — and it's not inconceivable that aung san suu kyi will never spend a day in prison, that she'll remain detained until a point comes where she perhaps must be a part of some kind of negotiated end to this. india's most populous bell weather state, uttar pradesh, with a bigger population than russia, is set to go to polls in the next couple of months. however, a unique problem appears to be turning into a big election issue — stray cows eating up farmers' crops and,
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in some instances, even a deadly threat to humans. the bbc�*s nitin srivastava reports from rural uttar pradesh in northern india. widowed a few months ago, this woman had stopped eating or interacting with family. her 55—year—old husband was killed by a stray cow outside his home. translation: his face | was smashed, intestines ruptured and chest crushed. he died much before we reached the hospital. it was a very painful death. india has a cattle population of more than 200 million, which does not include almost five million stray cows, multiplying fast. the issue of roaming cows is a big political issue here. riding high on the support of majority hindus, in 2017 india's ruling pjp came back to power
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after 15 years in uttar pradesh. evoking religious sentiments of the cow, revered by most hindus, the new regime shut down all illegal slaughterhouses in the state. translation: ours is the first government to ban illegal- slaughtering of cows across the state. anyone found harming a cow in any form will end up in prison. now, with polls round the corner, political parties are trying their best to lure the voters. but not everyone is happy to allow cows to roam free. it is past midnight and winters in north india can be really harsh — but these villagers are out on a night patrol, guarding their farmland from stray cattle. they will be here until sunrise, when a fresh team arrives from the village to replace them. while government claims to have built more than 5,000 cow shelters for stray cows,
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it isn't enough. translation: there are 200 cows in this cow shelter, _ which is our maximum capacity. yes, it is insufficient because about 700—1,000 stray cows are still roaming around. meanwhile, some families have lost all interest in the upcoming polls. mauled by a stray cow a few years ago, this 80—year—old has been in a coma. she doesn't even know that her only son lost his battle to coronavirus early this year. all that these families wish for is an end to the miseries. nitin srivastava, bbc news. stay with us on outside source — still to come... scientists say adopting a plant —based diet cut billions in
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emissions. —— carbon emissions. michael gove has warned the developers they could be hit with further taxes unless they agree to a voluntary plan to cover the cost of fixing dangerous cladding on blocks in england. it's not known how many flats are affected, but the government estimates the total bill for remedial work could run into billions. previously the government's committed money to leaseholders and taller buildings only. here's sarah court. removing dangerous cladding — the grenfell tragedy exposed the scale of building safety failures across britain. the government says it will pressure the construction sector to pay and protect innocent leaseholders. the housing secretary had strong words for property developers today — pay up or we will force you to. to those who mis—sold dangerous products, like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished people's homes, and to those
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who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy — we are coming for you. people living in blocks under 18 metres will no longer have to pay to remove dangerous cladding. until now, only blocks above that height were eligible for funding. developers will be expected to pay for the £4 billion scheme or face legal or tax changes. there's also more money for fire alarms, a review of the scale of work actually needed and leaseholders will have up to 30 years to sue builders for defects — at the moment, its six years. these measures bring some relief for father of four, neil. there will be no new money from the treasury, and developers often argue they met building regulations at the time, so they shouldn't have to pay to cover these costs. the government has given construction firms a deadline of march to come up with a plan of action. but for thousands of people, the financial situation is already critical. sarah corker, bbc news.
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this is outside source, live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... novak djokovic has finally made it onto a tennis court in melbourne after a different type of court rejected the australian government's cancellation of his visa. the world just experienced its fifth—hottest year ever, as average global temperatures continue to rise. that's according to a new report by the eu's climate change monitoring service. the report's authors say the past seven years have been the warmest in recorded history by a clear margin. justin rowlatt has more. deadly floods heralded the new year in brazil, and there've already been
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wildfires the us state of colorado, as 2022 looks to continue the trend of extreme weather we saw last year. these latest temperature figures confirm that europe experienced it's warmest summer on record, as well as devastating floods in germany and belgium injuly. the data collected by european satellites shows 2021 was the fifth hottest year ever recorded. it also shows the concentration of warming gases in the atmosphere continuing to rise, with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane. the with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane.— with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that _ dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the _ dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world _ dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world has - dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world has been i confirms that the world has been warming. we do see, from year—to—year, some years are warmer and some are cooler — but overall, they're getting warmer. and alongside that, they're building up the two most important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, has continued.—
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has continued. what has been really strikin: , has continued. what has been really striking. say — has continued. what has been really striking, say experts, _ has continued. what has been really striking, say experts, are _ has continued. what has been really striking, say experts, are they i striking, say experts, are they weather extremes the world experienced in 2021. the exceptional heatin experienced in 2021. the exceptional heat in canada and in the us, for example. and the direction of travel is impossible to ignore — today's figures show the last seven years have been the hottest years ever recorded. and the bad news is a temporary cooling event in the pacific ocean actually lowered global temperatures vary marginally last year. that will soon pass, so don't expect any of that led up in the warming trend in the years to come. it is, said one senior climate scientist today, yet another warning of the damage we are doing to our planetary home. justin rowlatt, bbc news. one of the authors of the report is samantha burgess. she said the new figures show a noticeable increase. as we heard from the previous report, it was only the fifth—warmest year on record — but that was a warm year with a la nina event present, as well.
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but the frequency and intensity of extreme events that we saw from what we heard in the report in canada, in europe, to rain falling on the summer of the greenland ice sheet for the very first time it's really showing us very alarming trends. what we can see is, as greenhouse gas emissions are continuing to rise, this has a direct impact on our global temperatures. so, although year on year, the temperatures will vary both as a global average, but also regionally distinguished, it does mean we are getting more intense extreme events. so this means that society needs to be prepared to understand its risk and to be much more resilient to these events in the future. borisjohnson has refused to say whether he attended a downing street
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social event during lockdown which may have broken covid rules. several sources have confirmed to the bbc that they received an e—mail inviting them to a drinks gathering inviting them to a drinks gathering in may 2020. let's speak to helen catt, who's in westminster. there have been so many changes since covid began — just remind us what the rules were back in may 2020. well, meeting others was heavily restricted. you could meet one other person outside at around that time when this e—mail is understood to have been sent. several sources have confirmed it to the bbc that they received this e—mail from the prime minister's secretary, a very senior official. he was invited to a drinks gathering in the garden in may 2020, explicitly asking them to a social event with distancing in place. and they confirmed that the content of they confirmed that the content of the e—mail, which was leaked to itv earlier, they say that in the
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e—mail, after what had been an incredibly busy period, "it would be nice to make the most of the lovely weather and have some drinks and the number ten garden." this weather and have some drinks and the number ten garden."— number ten garden." this comes in the context — number ten garden." this comes in the context of _ number ten garden." this comes in the context of a _ number ten garden." this comes in the context of a range _ number ten garden." this comes in the context of a range of _ number ten garden." this comes in the context of a range of other- the context of a range of other claims about social gatherings and downing street at different points during the pandemic was eloped yes, there have been several claims about different gatherings, _ there have been several claims ajrrifit different gatherings, during the pandemic. we knew about this one before, it was raised by the former prime minister's aide, dominic cummings, saying this had happened. the prime minister was asked about this gathering earlier as to whether or not he had attended, and he said that this was — he referred it to the inquiry being carried out by a senior civil servant and all those parties, saying all that is the subject of a proper investigation by sue grey. we should say that two eye witnesses have said they saw the prime minister at this event and the garden too. downing street is not
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commenting further this evening, the senior civil servant is investigating and this —— is due to report back later. just investigating and this -- is due to report back later.— report back later. just quickly, do we know when — report back later. just quickly, do we know when she _ report back later. just quickly, do we know when she will _ report back later. just quickly, do we know when she will tell- report back later. just quickly, do we know when she will tell us i report back later. just quickly, do l we know when she will tell us what she's found? brute we know when she will tell us what she's found?— we know when she will tell us what she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting — she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting to _ she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting to see _ she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting to see when _ she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting to see when that - she's found? we don't know yet, we are waiting to see when that will- are waiting to see when that will happen. are waiting to see when that will ha en. , ., happen. helen live with us from westminster, _ happen. helen live with us from westminster, thank _ happen. helen live with us from westminster, thank you. i the world seems to be getting hotter — but could a change in our diets help society and the environment? an team of researchers belive it could. they say cutting out meat and switching to a plant—based diet might make all the difference. paul behrens researches environmental change at leiden university, in the netherlands. thanks forjoining us here on the bbc. this is not a new message, is it? ., , , ., ., it? no, this is not a new message. we know that _ it? no, this is not a new message. we know that cutting _ it? no, this is not a new message. we know that cutting levels i it? no, this is not a new message. we know that cutting levels of i it? no, this is not a new message. | we know that cutting levels of meat and shifting towards plant —based diets will reduce the amount of admissions in the form of belches and animal manure across the world.
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what we looked at, was because animals take up such a large amount of land, 80% of all agricultural land is used for animal agriculture, we could put that free land from a dietary change into better use, to sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. and what we find is actually, you get a double dividend — you double the benefit of your shift in diets if you are able to allow that land that previously had mostly animal agriculture, allow that land that previously had mostly animalagriculture, but allow that land that previously had mostly animal agriculture, but some other vegetable products, too, back to nature so that it would draw down carbon into those ecosystems and vegetation. l carbon into those ecosystems and vegetation-— vegetation. i noticed that you talked about _ vegetation. i noticed that you talked about a _ vegetation. i noticed that you talked about a shift _ vegetation. i noticed that you talked about a shift in - vegetation. i noticed that you talked about a shift in diet i vegetation. i noticed that you talked about a shift in diet -| vegetation. i noticed that you i talked about a shift in diet - does talked about a shift in diet — does that mean you're not seriously suggesting people give up meat entirely, just less of it?- entirely, 'ust less of it? that's exactl entirely, just less of it? that's exactly right- _ entirely, just less of it? that's exactly right. this _ entirely, just less of it? that's exactly right. this is _ entirely, just less of it? that's exactly right. this is not i entirely, just less of it? that's exactly right. this is not a i entirely, just less of it? that's l exactly right. this is not a purist thing, it means that you have to cut out quite a bit of meat and may be one time a week for red meat at an
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absolute maximum. we looked at planetary diets, which are assessed by a nutritionist and environmentalists to be good for the environmentalists to be good for the environment too. and what we must member as it's notjust climate change, this is a vision for the future, if you like, because it not only reduces the amount of omissions, but if we were able to free at land, we looked at what would happen if people in high income nations eight more plant —based diets — you could see an area around the eu in land. that's huge in terms of biodiversity protection, lower air pollution, better air quality, more access to nature for all of us. so this is a sort of contract between us and food production. contract between us and food production-— contract between us and food production. help us put this in context - _ production. help us put this in context - if — production. help us put this in context - if there _ production. help us put this in context - if there was - production. help us put this in context - if there was a i production. help us put this in context - if there was a major| production. help us put this in i context - if there was a major shift context — if there was a major shift in the food that humans eat, how much difference would that make, versus some of the other major shifts that need to occur to stop
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climate change?— shifts that need to occur to stop climate change? well, we know that even if we wear _ climate change? well, we know that even if we wear the _ climate change? well, we know that even if we wear the entire _ climate change? well, we know that even if we wear the entire energy i even if we wear the entire energy system towards renewables, system towards renewa bles, redesigning system towards renewables, redesigning urban... that would be enough to push us beyond 1.5 celsius. so researchers are talking also about a great food transition, not just the energy transition. also about a great food transition, notjust the energy transition. in that great food transition is one of the things we talked about in the food transition, the change in diets and massive reduction in food waste — when you look at those three, changes in diet and massive reduction in food waste are the two main options, and we can actually do something about that.— something about that. paul, thanks ve much something about that. paul, thanks very much for— something about that. paul, thanks very much forjoining _ something about that. paul, thanks very much forjoining us. _ one of the uk's greatest ever fossil finds has been revealed — the skeleton of a ten—metre—long sea
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predator, rather like a huge prehistoric dolphin, that lived 250 million years ago. it was discovered poking through the mud at rutland water nature reserve in leceistershire. jonah fisher has more. last february, on a bank of mud in a midlands reservoir, joe davis made an extraordinary discovery. we were relandscaping some islands on the rutland water nature reserve there to improve it for bird habitats. and i looked down, ijust saw this series of ridges in the mud and thought, that looks different, there's something there that's different. and it had organic features almost where it connects onto the rib. so, yeah, that's when we thought we need to call somebody and find out. a team of experts was quickly dispatched. joe hadn't found a dinosaur, but it was an ichthyosaur — a monstrous, air—breathing sea reptile, also known as a sea dragon, that swam about 180 million years ago.
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back then, rutland and most of the midlands was under water, covered by a warm, shallow sea. what makes this particular sea dragon so special is its size and condition. this is a backbone, so it's part of the spine, and this is one of more than 150 individual vertebrae in this entire skeleton. so, this individual is not only the most complete ichthyosaur skeleton ever found, the biggest one ever found here in the uk, incredible at ten metres long. but it's actually the biggest prehistoric reptile skeleton ever found here as well, the most complete skeleton. very gently back. 0k. the huge ichthyosaur has now been removed from the reservoir bed. the skull block on its own weighed almost a tonne. having lain in the mud undisturbed for nearly 200 million years, the rutland sea dragon is one of britain's greatest ever fossil finds. jonah fisher, bbc news.
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in the sea dragon finishes this addition of the programme. thanks for watching. hello there. many parts of the uk will see some sunshine tomorrow. today, though, it's been a cloudy start to the week for all of us. cloud's been coming in from the atlantic, and it's been thick enough to bring with it some pockets of rain and drizzle, and the main weather fronts drive in that cloud and rain southwards this evening and overnight. clearer skies following into scotland and northern ireland, where we keep that cloudy, mild air across england and wales, some low cloud and further outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. certainly a mild night for england and wales, much milder than last night for eastern england — no frost this time. but where we have the clearer skies and northern ireland and scotland — particularly in eastern scotland — we could start tuesday with some frost and some sunshine, as well. but we have this cloud, rain and drizzle moving southwards across england and wales, coming to rest across east anglia and southern england. we should see some late improvements
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across south wales and the midlands, with more sunshine further north, a few blustery showers coming into the northwest of scotland. it'll be a bit cooler than today for glasgow and belfast — the highest temperatures will be where we've got that cloudy, damp weather in southern england. that's on that weak weather front there, that moves away overnight. and then, high pressure comes in to build across the southern half of the uk. further north, things look a little different through the rest of the week. there'll be a wind from the atlantic, but that will bring mild air — and it's across northern areas that we'll see the highest temperatures. further south, it'll be colder, the winds will be lighter, and there'll be more mist, fog, and low cloud developing through the week, as well. could well start with some frost across england and wales on wednesday, and a few patches of mist and fog — those will lift and many places dry with some sunshine. a bit more cloud into the northwest on that stronger wind could bring 1—2 showers, and it's across northern scotland that we've got the highest temperatures — through the midlands, perhaps only five celsius. contrast, really, north—south, because of the position of the high pressure. now, on top of the high pressure,
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we've got these milder, stronger atlantic winds. underneath the high, the air�*s just stagnating. so we'll find more mist and fog forming overnight and lingering through thursday across england and wales, perhaps lifting into low cloud. outside of that, some sunshine, more cloud comes in on those stronger winds in the northwest of scotland, but again, it's generally dry. and we've got those contrasts again, north—south, across the uk. heading towards the end of the week, it looks quite grey for many parts of the country, actually, a bit more of this mist and fog developing once again.
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this is bbc news. the government tells house—builders it expect them to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangerous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. to those who miss old dangerous products like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished people's homes, and to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. after novak djokovic wins his fight to stay in australia, his family thank all of those who supported him. l thank all of those who supported him. ., ., ., ~' i., him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up and _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up and supported l world who stood up and supported him, _ world who stood up and supported him. that— world who stood up and supported him, that is the energy that helped him, that is the energy that helped him to— him, that is the energy that helped him to fight. him, that is the energy that helped him to fight-— him to fight. another twist in the downin: him to fight. another twist in the downing street _ him to fight. another twist in the downing street party _ him to fight. another twist in the downing street party is - him to fight. another twist in the
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downing street party is a - downing street party is a controversy, the e—mail from a

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