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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 10, 2022 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. his mother thanks people for their support. translation: he always fought for “ustice. he translation: he always fought for justice- he has— translation: he always fought for justice. he has done _ translation: he always fought for justice. he has done nothing - translation: he always fought for justice. he has done nothing wrong. he hasn't broken any of their laws. but australia's immigration minister could yet decide to revoke his visa and deport him. also this hour... the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the news
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but says it's very late. it is four years or more since the grenfell tower disaster and there have been many broken promises along the way. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen according to new climate data. virgin mobile and 02 phone users will not face roaming charges following announcements by other networks to reintroduce extra fees after brexit. and a four—day uk bank holiday, street parties and a competition to invent a new pudding — celebrations to mark the queen's 70 year reign are announced. novak djokovic has returned to the tennis court after winning a legal battle in australia —
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and he's thanked the judge and fans who supported him. and he's thanked the judge and fans in a tweet, the world number one tennis champion said... at a family news conference in belgrade his brother said... "it was really challenging for our family because it was very emotional and we were very subjective. we have done everything in our power to respect all protocols and don't insult anyone. the whole world has risen." earlier, a judge ruled that the revoking of djokovic's visa was not valid because correct procedures were not followed. despite celebrations by fans, australia's immigration department says ministers are still considering whether to deport the world number one men's tennis player, despite him winning his legalfight to stay in the country. this report from our correspondent
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in melbourne, shaimaa khalil. cheering they've waited days for this decision and when the news came that novak djokovic was to be released from detention, his supporters erupted with joy. he won, djokovic won! judge anthony kelly overturned the government's decision to cancel djokovic's visa. what we saw today here in the court that the australian legal system is functioning, it is evidence—based, it is aboutjustice. yeah, i'm extremely happy as everyone is in the serbian community here. but the jubilant mood changed quickly into uncertainty and confusion when it became unclear whether djokovic would be allowed to stay, despite the court's decision in his favour. this is the world number one saying last week that he was on his way to australia after being granted a medical exemption. novak djokovic had been public about opposing the vaccine and his announcement angered many australians and this is djokovic arriving in melbourne last wednesday,
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before he was held by border force officers for hours. during the video conference hearing, the tennis star's legal team argued that he was treated unfairly by the border officials. they said the player was not given time to consult his legal team or tennis australia when his visa was revoked. they added that djokovic travelled to australia on the understanding that his exemption due to a previous covid—i9 infection was valid and that he had done everything that was required of him by tennis australia. the judge agreed, asking at one point in the hearing, "what more could this man have done?" he was interrogated by border force migration officers in the early morning. they gave him three hours to come up with an answer to this question and that's what they promised to him, so that he could get some legal advice but within an hour, they had made their decision. in other words, they did not give him the time that they promised. but the lawyer for the government
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has said the immigration minister could still use his executive power to cancel the player's visa. it's impossible to ignore the politics at play in all of this. the leadership wanted to appear tough on border and covid rules. throughout this process, did they act because they realised, rightly, i think, that there was kind of public outrage that novak djokovic might be getting different treatment than anybody else? it appears to me to be a complete embarrassment for the australian government. a few hours ago, djokovic's supporters thought they caught a glimpse of him. but they clashed with the police and they were dispersed with pepper spray. in the last hour, his brother djordje told a news conference in belgrade that novak is making up for lost time and is already out training. translation: novak is free, and a few moments _ translation: novak is free, and a few moments ago _ translation: novak is free, and a few moments ago he _ translation: novak is free, and a few moments ago he trained, - translation: novak is free, and a few moments ago he trained, he i translation: novak is free, and a. few moments ago he trained, he was on a tennis court. he went to
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australia to play tennis. that is why, to try to win another australian open and to win a record that he has been chasing for so many years. he had all the documents that were required of him and in the end he got medical exemption with which he got medical exemption with which he travelled to australia. the result of everything else that has happened, we have found out today, we have learned about it today. once again i want to say that novak is an athlete, he is a tennis player. he is the best tennis player of all time. everything he supports in his life is to live up to his principles and ideals. he has been branded in different ways for many years but he
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has always supported the freedom of choice and that is all, nothing else. his mother dijana said the past week has been an emotional rollercoaster for the family. there is flash photography in this. translation: there has been a sectrum translation: there has been a spectrum of _ translation: there has been a spectrum of emotions, - translation: there has been a spectrum of emotions, sadness, i translation: there has been a - spectrum of emotions, sadness, fear, disappointment, and there have been moments when he didn't have his mobile with him and we had no idea what was happening. there was a break—up in communication and we had no idea whether he was well or ill, whether he had eaten and whether everything was all right with him, and those are things that may come as a mother, i can't explain. i can't recover from it easily and i think every mother in the world will understand me. iwant think every mother in the world will understand me. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up
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and supported him, that is the energy that helped him to fight. in melbourne, in front of that so—called hotel. his father srdjan said his son was mentally very strong, and respected the rule of law. translation: this is a huge win for novak and his _ translation: this is a huge win for novak and his family _ translation: this is a huge win for novak and his family and _ translation: this is a huge win for novak and his family and the - translation: this is a huge win for novak and his family and the whole l novak and his family and the whole free world. we are all human beings and we have rights. you have the right to say what we think. i'm not to suffer consequences. for an opinion —— and not to suffer consequences for expressing an opinion. we respect the laws of every country we travel to, we respect their rules and we respect the country where we are travelling. he has respected everything that he was asked what that was asked of
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him. our correspondent guy de launey is in the serb capital belgrade. an emotional press conference from novak djokovic's family, not surprisingly, is serbian public opinion with them? it surprisingly, is serbian public opinion with them? surprisingly, is serbian public oinion with them? , , . opinion with them? it depends which wa ou opinion with them? it depends which way you look — opinion with them? it depends which way you look at _ opinion with them? it depends which way you look at it, _ opinion with them? it depends which way you look at it, and _ opinion with them? it depends which way you look at it, and if _ opinion with them? it depends which way you look at it, and if you - opinion with them? it depends which way you look at it, and if you look i way you look at it, and if you look at the serbian media, the tabloid media, certainly, every day they have been 100% behind novak djokovic channel 100% against australia, and you would not have wanted to be reading the serbian media if you are the australian prime minister, scott morrison, they said some fruity things about him, but novak djokovic is the hero and there has been jubilation in serbia when the judge delivered his verdict and a lot of trepidation when it occurred to people that there was still the possibility of ministerial intervention that could still see novak djokovic deported from australia but finally we are now seeing some degree of relief that he
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is out of detention for the moment and we are going to be able to take and we are going to be able to take a pause for breath and thought. if you talk to people around you, of course they are frustrated with novak djokovic, if they have been vaccinated, they say, why doesn't he just get it done? it would have been easy. just get it done? it would have been eas . , ~ just get it done? it would have been eas . , . ., ., , easy. interesting. we wait to see what happens — easy. interesting. we wait to see what happens next. _ easy. interesting. we wait to see what happens next. we - easy. interesting. we wait to see what happens next. we hear- easy. interesting. we wait to see what happens next. we hear that djokovic is training and he has taken advantage of the court ruling to get out on the court but there are warnings from the government, we suspect there are warnings about this is not the end of the matter. the government reserves, this is the australian government, they reserve the right to take executive action and ministers could intervene and order that novak djokovic is removed from australia but i think everyone is quite aware that that is going to happen, and we are on tender hooks in serbia, which way is it going to
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go in australia? —— tenterhooks. this could be a political matter in australia and that has been the impression that people have been getting in serbia. the president here saying there is political ranting going on in australia and headlines in the newspaper saying that novak djokovic is the victim of a political game. there is a feeling here that it isn'tjust about sport and it isn'tjust about covid regulations or immigration, but it might be what is best for the government in australia in an election year.— government in australia in an election year. thanks for “oining us. the housing secretary says he wants builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangerous cladding on low—rise blocks in england. previously leaseholders were told they would have to take out a loan to pay for the work themselves. our consumer affairs correspondent, sarah corker reports.
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removing dangerous cladding on buildings across britain. since the grenfell tower tragedy nearly five years ago, the row over who should pay to make other tower blocks safe has only intensified. the government will confirm later today that people living in smaller blocks will not have to foot the bill for cladding costs. but non—cladding faults won't be covered. campaigners like sophie from stevenage want ministers to go further. it is a positive step that the government have finally agreed that leaseholders should not be part of the solution for the building safety crisis. but it really doesn't go far enough in terms of the interim costs and all the other fire safety defects that these buildings have. a £4 billion scheme will help people living on buildings between 11 and 18 metres who have previously missed out on grants to remove cladding. mr gove will warn developers they will be expected to pay for the scheme or face legal or tax changes. there will also be more money forfire alarms. a review of the scale
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of the work actually needed, and leaseholders will also be given more time to sue builders over defective flats — up to 30 years after construction. at the moment, it is six years. ultimately, the key question is who put that cladding up, who was responsible for the state of those buildings? they are the individuals, they are the companies who should pay in order to ensure that that cladding is removed and the buildings are safe. there will be no new money from the treasury for this and it is unclearjust how the government plans to pressure the industry to pay. developers often argue they met building regulations at the time and so should not have to bear these costs. the construction industry should pay its part in remediating buildings that are unsafe. but, of course, some of them won't. i hope the reputable companies will play their part. and some of them will have gone out of business so there is no one to pay. here in salford, the problems at lizzie's buildings are not cladding, and she is still facing huge bills to fix
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other fire safety faults. this package does not help me because it is primarily for cladding, and cladding isn't an issue here. it is cavity barriers. so i am still facing or likely to be facing huge bills that i cannot possibly pay. but all of this is already dragging on for years. none of these solutions will be quick or easy. and the financial situation for many is already critical. sara corker, bbc news. the labour leader sir keir starmer has welcomed the government's move, but described the announcement as very late and vague. anything that helps the people who are in this awful position relating to cladding is welcome, but it is very late, four years since the grenfell disaster and there have been many broken promises on the way. anything now that moves this robot is welcome, of course it is,
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but i would prefer that there is a plan rather than just a but i would prefer that there is a plan rather thanjust a promise —— that moves this forward. the terms of what i going to happen is still very fake but after four years and many broken promises this is an important and welcome move —— the terms of what is going to happen is still very vague. let's talk to the labour mp matt pennycook, the shadow minster for housing and planning. a cautious welcome from sir keir starmer but saying they are rather vague, what detail would you like to see? it vague, what detail would you like to see? , ., vague, what detail would you like to see? h, ., , see? it is a cautious welcome because while _ see? it is a cautious welcome because while it _ see? it is a cautious welcome because while it is _ see? it is a cautious welcome because while it is an - see? it is a cautious welcome l because while it is an important step, we agree with the decision to remove the threat of force to loans for leaseholders in smaller buildings, we have been calling for that for a number of time and we may get further details but we are looking for clarity in three main areas. how is the 4 billion going to be raised from developers? i doubt having not paid this money that they are going to get around a table with michael gove and commit to £4
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billion, and that raises important questions about where the money comes from if the developers come forward, many of whom, companies have gone bust, they don't exist any more, and then the question about the pace of remediation and we do need a plan to accelerate the delivery of remediation, for fixing these buildings, and clearing the backlog of building safety fund applications because many leaseholders in buildings have been waiting eight, 12, even more months, with their application, with no decision, and finally we want to see answers on what is going to happen to those who don't want to have —— you don't have cladding defects but i going to face erroneous costs for non—cladding defects like missing fire breaks —— but are going to face. nothing in the announcement for these people but we think that
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is completely unfair. we for these people but we think that is completely unfair.— is completely unfair. we will get more details _ is completely unfair. we will get more details in _ is completely unfair. we will get more details in the _ is completely unfair. we will get more details in the statement i is completely unfair. we will get l more details in the statement that michael gove is making to mps this afternoon. we will get more details in the statement that michael gove is making to mps this afternoon. you are sceptical that they will get more detail. but isn't it more likely the companies will voluntarily cooperate? i likely the companies will voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will. voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will- some — voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will. some won't, _ voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will. some won't, others - voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will. some won't, others will - voluntarily cooperate? i hope they will. some won't, others will be i will. some won't, others will be forced to, and many of these developers have actually gone bust so they are simply not in existence any more and my concern is, if we are talking about future legal action and future taxation proposals, that will take a huge amount of time. we must address the crisis with the urgency required because they are leaseholders around the country who have already paid sizeable costs and i have many in my own constituency who are facing wilderness bills right now so we cannot wait for legislation down the line. there is a building safety bill in the house of parliament
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right now and that is where we want to see the government amend that bill to protect all leaseholders in law from all historic defects because that is the first solution at the end of the day, it does not matter whether it is cladding or non—cladding, leaseholders are blameless and they should not foot the bill in any way, so a cautious welcome, lots of questions that the briefings... welcome, lots of questions that the briefinus. .. ., my welcome, lots of questions that the briefinus... ., , , welcome, lots of questions that the briefings- - -— briefings... you say this is vague and there — briefings... you say this is vague and there are _ briefings... you say this is vague and there are many _ briefings... you say this is vague and there are many holes - briefings... you say this is vague and there are many holes in - briefings... you say this is vague and there are many holes in it, l briefings... you say this is vague | and there are many holes in it, so where should the money come from? the government has put up money and we want to see more coming from developers, the polluters should pay, and that is what should have happened four and a half years ago, they should have got round the table and worked out a fair and proportionate funding mechanism but the principle that leaseholders shouldn't pay isn't —— is what is important here. since the grenfell tower fire, important here. since the grenfell towerfire, there has been a lot of broken promises in those four and a half years, many false dawns, and we
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sincerely hope that today is not another one of those. widespread s math another one of those. widespread sympathy for _ another one of those. widespread sympathy for the _ another one of those. widespread sympathy for the leaseholders - another one of those. widespread i sympathy for the leaseholders but some developers say that they put up buildings and cladding that met the standards at the time and they were allowed by the regulations of the time and that that has happened under various governments of all political persuasions. that under various governments of all political persuasions.— under various governments of all political persuasions. that is why there needs _ political persuasions. that is why there needs to _ political persuasions. that is why there needs to be _ political persuasions. that is why there needs to be a _ political persuasions. that is why there needs to be a joint - political persuasions. that is why l there needs to be a joint approach between government and the industry and that is only fair because the guidance has changed after grenfell and the conception of risk has changed, so it's not the case that anyone is saying that the developer should bear the whole cost, the taxpayers already bearing part of the cost but we need to get more from developers and i hope michael gove is successful although i'm sceptical that he will get the total of £4 billion which raises questions but then i come back to the fact there is a bill going to the house of commons, we could amend it, and there's a cross—party looking at
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this, and so where ever the money comes from, wejust this, and so where ever the money comes from, we just need to make sure blameless leaseholders do not have to contribute in any way for a problem they had no in creating. thanks forjoining us. == problem they had no in creating. thanks forjoining us.— problem they had no in creating. thanks forjoining us. thanks for “oining us. -- they had no art thanks for “oining us. -- they had no part in — thanks forjoining us. -- they had no part in creating. _ and you can watch that statement from michael gove here on the news channel at 330 this afternoon. eight men who sued manchester city football club after they said they'd been sexually abused by paedophile coach barry bennell more than 30 years ago have lost a high court fight for damages. the men who are now in their 40s and 50s say bennell, abused them when they were playing schoolboy football for teams he coached in north—west england between 1979 and 1985. our sports correspondent laura scott has more. they said the club was legally responsible for the harm they have suffered because in their view the relationship between their coach and the club was one akin to employment, but the club denied this. during the
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trial barry bennell gave two days of evidence from his prison where he is quote serving a 3k year sentence, and the decision to call him as a witness was described as colourless although the club ainsua said they were obliged to call relevant witnesses —— described as callous although the club are's insurer said. thejudge said claimants had given vivid and compelling and credible evidence and proved that barry bennell abused him but he said the claims were brought to late to result in a fair trial and that it had not been shown that manchester city were precariously or indirectly liable for barry bennell�*s acts of abuse and the lawyer said for the men they were shocked and dismayed and they will be appealing. manchester city have apologised to abuse survivors and say they have paid around £4 million as part of a compensation scheme but what is clear is that some 30 years after
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these men were abused in their pursuit of a football career, and five years after this legal process began, they are not giving up on what they say is their fight for justice. the prime minister, borisjohnson, says he welcomes a decision by virgin mobile 02, whose users will not face roaming charges this year. two of the uk's four biggest networks — ee and vodafone — are reintroducing roaming charges for customers travelling to europe injanuary, with three set to reintroduce them in may. let's speak to our technology correspondent, marc cieslak. why are these roaming charges being reintroduced? in 2017 roaming charges were basically banned across the eu, mean people could travel across europe using their mobile phones in the way they would at home, using data and making calls and receiving tax. with the uk leaving the eu, mobile networks are no longer obliged to abide by those rules and last year
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all of the big four networks, vodafone, virgin o2, all of the big four networks, vodafone, virgin 02, ee and three, they said they were not going to introduce roaming charges, but two are now going to introduce them. have the first three said why they are doing so? irate have the first three said why they are doing so?— have the first three said why they are doing so? we have put in calls but we have _ are doing so? we have put in calls but we have not _ are doing so? we have put in calls but we have not heard _ are doing so? we have put in calls but we have not heard from - are doing so? we have put in calls but we have not heard from those | but we have not heard from those networks as to why they are doing that. ~ ., networks as to why they are doing that. ~ . ., ., that. we have heard from the prime minister? yes. _ that. we have heard from the prime minister? yes, he _ that. we have heard from the prime minister? yes, he was _ that. we have heard from the prime minister? yes, he was on _ that. we have heard from the prime minister? yes, he was on twitter. minister? yes, he was on twitter sa in: he minister? yes, he was on twitter saying he welcomes _ minister? yes, he was on twitter saying he welcomes the - minister? yes, he was on twitter saying he welcomes the decision| minister? yes, he was on twitter. saying he welcomes the decision by virgin media and 02 to mean saying he welcomes the decision by virgin media and o2 to mean uk citizens can still use their data across europe without extra charges and it will be interesting to see if this tweet has any influence with those other networks. at the very least it is free prime ministerial advertising for that particular network. , ., , network. virgin 02, why have they made the move _ network. virgin 02, why have they made the move not _ network. virgin 02, why have they made the move not to _ network. virgin 02, why have they made the move not to reintroduce| made the move not to reintroduce charges? it
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made the move not to reintroduce charaes? ~ , ., charges? it looks like it will be a oint of charges? it looks like it will be a point of differentiation _ charges? it looks like it will be a point of differentiation for - charges? it looks like it will be a point of differentiation for this . point of differentiation for this network especially when people are thinking about changing their mobile phone, and if they are worried about racking up huge roaming bills as they travel across europe, this might be a point where they go, that is the network i might decide to go with. it is important to point out that the network is probably not going to have to pay out that much and it won't have a financial impact on them because of the reduction in travel as a result of the pandemic. really interesting. thanks for joining us. the last seven years have been the hottest since temperatures began being measured in around 1850. that's according to new global climate data from the eu's satellite system, the copernicus climate change service. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. deadly flooding heralded the new year in brazil and there have already been
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wildfires in the us state of colorado as 2022 looks set to continue the trend of extreme weather that we saw last year. these latest temperature figures confirmed that europe experienced its warmest summer on record as well as devastating floods in germany and belgium injuly. the data collected by european satellites shows 2021 was the fifth hottest year ever recorded. it also shows the concentration of warming gases in the atmosphere continuing to rise with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world is warming and we do see from year to year some years are warmer and some are cooler but overall they are getting warmer and alongside that there is the build—up of greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane and that has continued.
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what has been really striking according to experts are the weather extremes that the world experienced in 2021. the exceptional heat in canada and in the us for example. and the direction of travel is impossible to ignore. the figures show the last seven years have been the hottest years ever recorded. and the bad news is a temporary cooling event in the pacific ocean actually lowered global temperatures marginally last year but that will soon pass so do not expect any letup in the warming trend in the years to come. according to one senior climate scientists it is yet another warning of the damage that we are doing to our planetary home. justin rowlatt, bbc news. one of the co—authors of the report, dr samantha burgess, joins me now.
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grim news that 2021 was one of the seven hottest years on record globally, is that a primary cause? good afternoon, yes, there is, the increasing amount of greenhouse gases that are in the atmosphere of the earth. the gases that are in the atmosphere of the earth. ., , , gases that are in the atmosphere of the earth. . , , ., ., the earth. the measures that are bein: the earth. the measures that are being taken. _ the earth. the measures that are being taken, are _ the earth. the measures that are being taken, are they _ the earth. the measures that are being taken, are they having - the earth. the measures that are being taken, are they having any| being taken, are they having any effect on climate change? the measures _ effect on climate change? the measures to _ effect on climate change? tue: measures to reduce effect on climate change? tte: measures to reduce emissions effect on climate change? t"t9 measures to reduce emissions are having some effect but sadly we are not seeing substantial decrease in the trend of greenhouse gas emissions globally yet. this comes from the european _ emissions globally yet. this comes from the european union's - emissions globally yet. this comes - from the european union's programme, tell us more about how you collect your data? tell us more about how you collect our data? : :, tell us more about how you collect your data?— your data? the climate change service is _ your data? the climate change service is funded _ your data? the climate change service is funded by _ your data? the climate change
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service is funded by the - your data? the climate change service is funded by the eu - your data? the climate change | service is funded by the eu and your data? the climate change - service is funded by the eu and run by the european centre for medium range weather forecasts and we use satellite data and then in situ data from around the world so we take observations from the atmosphere, from the land and the ocean, and we combine these with the latest numerical weather prediction model, sojust numerical weather prediction model, so just like numerical weather prediction model, sojust like the national so just like the national meteorological agency uses to forecast the weather, and we have reconstructed how climate has changed, in our case, for the last 70 years, from 1950 until today. what we saw last year and what we are seeing increasingly is notjust global warming, are seeing increasingly is notjust globalwarming, but are seeing increasingly is notjust global warming, but also extreme weather events why is that? that is ri . ht. weather events why is that? that is right- many — weather events why is that? that is right- many of— weather events why is that? that is right. many of the _ weather events why is that? that is right. many of the viewers - weather events why is that? that is right. many of the viewers will- right. many of the viewers will remember the ipcc report released in august of 2021, and what the ipcc scientists found is that as the
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atmosphere gets warmer and can hold more moisture, because these higher carbon dioxide gases in the atmosphere, it means extreme events are likely to become more intense and more frequent, and we saw many examples of that within the year, there will be devastating floods in central europe that we saw injuly, and also extreme heatwave that we saw across the world injune in canada and injuly in sicily where a new record temperature 48.8 was measured. :, , :, new record temperature 48.8 was measured-— new record temperature 48.8 was measured. :, , :, , , measured. countries have signed up to aspirations _ measured. countries have signed up to aspirations following _ measured. countries have signed up to aspirations following cop26 - measured. countries have signed up to aspirations following cop26 and l to aspirations following cop26 and there are targets that individual countries have got to reduce emissions but these extreme weather events are extremely concerning, is there anything that can be done in there anything that can be done in the short term to help mitigate them? , :, , ::,
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them? yes. countries committed in 2015 to the — them? yes. countries committed in 2015 to the paris _ them? yes. countries committed in 2015 to the paris agreement - them? yes. countries committed in 2015 to the paris agreement to - them? yes. countries committed in| 2015 to the paris agreement to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees and then there are measures we are committed to at cop26 in glasgow including limiting global methane release to 30% of 2020 levels, by 2030, so we see these government commitments to reduce emissions but we also need to understand our risk to an societal risk to extreme events and then make sure that we can be resilient to these extreme events so that is where understanding the probability of heat waves and extreme rainfall events to your local town and region, and then making sure national authorities are doing everything possible to build that resilience into those systems to make sure infrastructure does not fail and that there is no loss of life associated with these extreme events. ~ :, , :, :, ,
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events. methane levels have gone up, haven't they? — events. methane levels have gone up, haven't they? yes, _ events. methane levels have gone up, haven't they? yes, they _ events. methane levels have gone up, haven't they? yes, they have, - events. methane levels have gone up, haven't they? yes, they have, this - haven't they? yes, they have, this was a brand-new— haven't they? yes, they have, this was a brand-new commitment - haven't they? yes, they have, this| was a brand-new commitment that haven't they? yes, they have, this - was a brand-new commitment that was was a brand—new commitment that was made in november and the commitment is only associated with man—made emission releases, so there are also natural sources of methane release like wetlands drying out and sadly there is very little we can do about there is very little we can do about the natural sources of methane, permafrost thawing is another example, but we can tackle things like permafrost thawing by keeping the greenhouse gas emissions down to reduce global temperatures. thahk reduce global temperatures. thank ou so reduce global temperatures. thank you so much- _ reduce global temperatures. thank you so much. thanks _ reduce global temperatures. thank you so much. thanks for— reduce global temperatures. thank you so much. thanks forjoining - reduce global temperatures. thank you so much. thanks forjoining us. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. we are continuing to see a lot of cloud across the uk today, thick enough to see some rain and drizzle in places. mild late evening in the west of england, but
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chillierfurther evening in the west of england, but chillier further east. this weather will push away from scotland overnight, so clearer skies here, but the damp rain and drizzle will push into england and wales. it will be much milder across england and wales overnight. under the clear skies, a frost more likely in eastern scotland. heading into tomorrow, we have the cloud continuing to move southwards, bringing rain and drizzle. that will rest across east anglia and southern england. late improvements across southern wales will stop the rest of the country seeing some sunshine developing. it will not be as warm as today in glasgow and belfast, highest of temperatures in double figures in the cloudy and damp weather in the south. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision
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to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the news but says it's very late. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen, according to new climate data. virgin mobile and 02 phone users will not face roaming charges following announcements by other networks to reintroduce extra fees after brexit. sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. novak djokovic has thanked his fans
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for encouraging him to stay strong — after he won an appeal against the decision to refuse him entry to australia — ahead of next week's australian open. his family say he's returned to the tennis court, after the verdict. there could yet be another twist, the australian government could appeal — but djokovic has tweeted that he wants to stay on and defend his australian open title — he's looking to win a record 21st grand slam. if he does compete, the former wimbledon champion marion bartoli thinks it could be a difficult challenge after recent events. i think you can sort of work his way through that first week and bilbo meant towards a second week. it is how mentally and psychologically he will be affected by all of this and the headlines. he is at his best under pressure and in tough circumstances, but it is how the crowd will react. if you has the whole stadium against him, bowing or whatever, how much will that affect him? it is hard to tell in advance. nick kyrgios has spoken out about how the djokovic situation had been handled — but he now has problems of his own. he's revealed that he's tested positive for covid—19.
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he said he was feeling healthy and had no symptoms, but with the australian open starting a week from today, his participation must be in doubt. kyrgios pulled out of last week's melbourne warm—up event, due to an illness that sparked his asthma, and although he tested negative at the time, today he confirmed he had contracted the virus. british number three harriet dart is through to the second round of qualifying for the australian open. she beat federica di sarra in straight sets and next faces alycia parks of the united states, who's ranked 91 places below her. samantha murray sharan is out though, and there'll be five more britons beginning their attempts to make it into the main draw tomorrow. there's around 10 mins left, in the match between senegal and zimbabwe — the first game of the day at the africa cup of nations which is taking place in cameroon. it is goalless there at the moment, in bafoussam. senegal are africa's top—ranked team and were runners up to algeria in 2019 but they've been hit by numerous covid cases — among those missing are captain kalidou koulibaly and chelsea goalkeeper edouard mendy. zimbabwe are without aston villa midfielder marvelous nakamba the tiny comoros islands will make their debut
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at the tournament later — they take on gabon in yaounde. the archipelago is one of football's youngest nations — they onlyjoined fifa in 2005 — but in qualifying for this competition they won a first competitive international away from home in togo and held egypt to a draw, to make the finals. they're in a tough group, which also includes former winners ghana and morocco but comoros defender said bakari believes they deserve their place. i think we can show the world that we know what we can do. we have to have respect for the other teams because we are new in the competition, but we don't come as a new team, we, like the other teams. we will play like every other team, we will play to win. five supporters have been arrested for incidents during crystal palace's 2—1win at millwall in the fa
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cup on saturday. the fa are investigating after both sets of fans threw flares onto the pitch and a bottle struck the palace midfielder michael olise. cctv images have been sent to the police and one palace fan has been arrested. in addition, one millwall supporter was arrested for alleged discriminatory abuse, two for assaulting stewards, and anotherfor a pitch incursion. millwall have said they will issue life bans for anyone found guilty of discriminatory abuse. that's all the sport for now. pregnant women are being urged again not to delay getting their covid jab or booster in a government campaign. our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, has more. this was claire bromley last summer after she contracted covid, pregnant and on a ventilator because she had been struggling to breathe. she had been about to get vaccinated when she caught the virus. he was getting everything he needed from me because that's what babies do when they are in the tummy but it was me that was getting more and more poorly because
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as he was taking the oxygen he needed, i didn't have enough oxygen to keep giving him and to support myself. claire eventually gave birth to a healthy baby boy, after going through a difficult recovery. today, pregnant women are being urged once again to get protected, with warnings that 96% of them who need hospital treatment for covid are not vaccinated. pregnant women who are admitted with covid, one in three need respiratory support, one in six need to go to intensive care. one in five need to be delivered preterm and one in five, their babies need to go to the neonatal unit. scientists say they now have large—scale data in particularfrom the uk and america to show vaccines are safe. this does not increase the risk of stillbirth or premature birth. there is no increased risk of miscarriage or foetal abnormality, so it's really important to get the safety message to women that we have much more data which is really
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reassuring now that we didn't have previously. boris johnson visited a vaccination centre today. there are some very early signs that the number of infections and hospital admissions may be levelling off. whether that trend continues or not, the message for everyone is to get protected. omicron is still out there, it's incredibly contagious. everybody will know somebody who has had it. it can be pretty unpleasant. sadly, as you know, 90% of the people who are in icu with covid have not been vaccinated. claire was given her second vaccine yesterday. she says she feels very lucky to have had a happy ending after such a traumatic experience. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the government is sending covid lateral flow kits to key industries in england from today, to encourage around 100,000 staff to test
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themselves daily. the aim is to protect critical services, including transport, food processing, and the border force, by catching infections early. staff absences have surged in recent weeks, as workers have tested positive and had to isolate. new research suggests natural defences against a common cold could offer some protection against covid. the small—scale study, published in nature communications, involved just 52 individuals who lived with someone who had just caught the virus. our health correspondent, jim reed, gave us more details. one theory that's been talked about by scientists for ages is, if you've been exposed to another virus in the coronavirus family in the past, so not covid, not sars-cov-2, but one that's related to it, could you build up some protection in that way? and, actually, coronaviruses are notjust about covid. there's lots of different coronaviruses, seven of them. four of those coronaviruses are actually, we think, connected to the common cold.
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so this is not covid, it's a related virus. this theory goes that, if you've been exposed to one of those cold viruses in the past, could it be protecting you against covid? that is what this research is looked into. so they took 52 unvaccinated people, and this was way back in september 2020, before people had had the vaccines. so 52, half of those people, in households of those 52, managed to contract covid, and half didn't. they looked at the group, the half that didn't. those ones that didn't have much higher levels of what are called t cells, which are memory cells, memory immunity cells, that are linked to previous exposure to common colds, coronaviruses that way. so the conclusion they have come to is it looks like if you have been exposed to the common cold, this form of the common cold in the past,
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because it's something that scientists have been thinking about for ages. this is one of the first studies that has actually suggested that's true. new counter—terrorism legislation to protect the public at venues across the country is to be published by the government later. if passed, it would mean that venues have a legal duty to provide specific plans to prevent and deal with an attack. the so—called protect duty has been championed by the martyn's law campaign, started by figen murray, after her son, 29—year—old martyn hett, was killed in the manchester arena bombing. it feels like a giant leap forward in the right direction. i can see sort of the end result now. yeah, it's massive because the government has clearly taken it on board and embraced it, which is good. ijust hope that, you know, it's like you said, it's been a few years i've been campaigning with some other people and we've been pushing and pushing, but i've realised that
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in government, everything is taking a long time. however, it would be amazing if this law could be passed by the fifth anniversary of the attack. that would mean so much. certainly for me, but for the other families as well. a faulty electric heater is being blamed for a fire in an apartment block in new york, which has killed 19 people including nine children. another 32 people were taken to hospital, several of whom are in a critical condition. the building provided affordable housing — many residents were immigrants from gambia. our north america correspondent, nada tawfik, has the latest. neighbours looked on with horror as heavy clouds of smoke engulfed the entire bronx apartment building. he is taking his time. he's got the baby. firefighters were on the scene within minutes. as they battled the initial blaze from a lower level apartment, the rising smoke proved
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to be deadly. it was just pitch black in my house, in the daytime. they were putting out the fire and all you could see was black smoke in front of the windows, black smoke. later, officials said it was a portable space heater that caused one of the worst fire disasters in new york's history. it started in a malfunctioning electric space heater. that was the cause of the fire. the fire consumed that apartment that was on two floors, and part of the hallway. the door to that apartment, unfortunately, when the residents left, was left open. it did not close by itself. the smoke spread throughout the building, thus the tremendous loss of life and other people fighting for their lives. tragically, a number of children have already died and it's feared the death toll could still rise. all 121 units in this building have now been cleared out and residents have been sent to a nearby shelter. and then they will be put in hotels for the time being. now, this high—rise is home
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to a large immigrant community and officials say they will dedicate funds to help them recover what they've lost. we are all feeling this and we are going to be here for this community, to help them navigate through this. crews are already on site cleaning up the debris. but much of what was lost cannot be replaced. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the headlines on bbc news: novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the news but says it's very late. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen,
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according to new climate data. the president of kazakhstan has said last week's unrest in the country was caused by an attempted coup, but didn't name those responsible. he was speaking during a video conference of leaders who are part of a military alliance of former soviet states. nearly 8,000 people were detained when a protest against fuel price rises turned violent. american and russian officials are beginning talks in geneva this morning on the ukraine crisis. russia has gathered 100,000 troops on ukraine's borders, and has called on nato to pull back its own forces from eastern europe. the united states has threatened severe economic retaliation if russia invades. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, is in geneva. he's been telling us how much is at stake. today's talks between us and russian
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diplomats taking place behind me in geneva at the us mission. there are later talks in the week between nato and russia as well. this is really the first chance for both sides to sit down and talk face—to—face not just about the stand—off over ukraine but russia's demands for nato to step back from eastern europe. wendy sherman, the us secretary of state said this was a chance for the us to listen to russian concerns. and the russians said there would be no concessions. the problem is, there is a huge gap between both sides here. the us and the west want to talk about ukraine and deterring any russian invasion. russia wants to talk about its demands for nato to withdraw forces from eastern europe and promise never to allow ukraine to join the alliance. that is a big gap, so there is no great expectation of a breakthrough here today or later in the week. but diplomats say these
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talks are important. at best, they could reveal more about russian intentions and whether vladimir putin is really serious about engaging in diplomacy. at worst, they could breakdown and cause war. so a lot at stake. a court in myanmar has sentenced the country's former leader, aung san suu kyi, to four more years in prison, in the latest of a series of trials. she was convicted for the illegal possession and import of walkie—talkies and breaking covid—19 rules. she's been detained since a military takeover last february, and faces about a dozen charges, all of which she denies. "i think i've found a dinosaur" — those were the words ofjoe davis, who works at rutland water nature reserve, on finding the fossilized remains of a ten—metre—long sea creature that lived 250 million years ago. the marine reptile — or "sea dragon" — is longer than a double decker bus, and is the largest and most complete skeleton of its kind everfound in the uk. jonah fisher reports.
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last february on a bank of mud in a midlands reservoir, joe davis made an extraordinary discovery. i looked down and i saw this series of ridges in the mud. i thought, "hang on, that looks different. there's something there that different." it had organic features on, like where it connects onto the rib. they called back, and a team of dinosaur experts was quickly dispatched. joe hadn't found a dinosaur, but it was an ichthyosaur — a monstrous, air breathing sea reptile, also known as a sea dragon, that swam 250 million years ago. what makes this find so special is just how big it is. not only is this the most complete ichthyosaur skeleton ever found, the biggest one ever found here in the uk, incredible at ten metres long, but it's actually the biggest prehistoric reptile skeleton ever found here as well, the most complete skeleton of any prehistoric reptile. it's incredible. the rutland ichthyosaur has been removed from the mud
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and plans are being made as how best to display one of britain's greatest ever fossil finds. jonah fisher, bbc news. buckingham palace is launching a nationwide competition for britain's bakers to create a special pudding to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. the contest is part of a programme of events injune to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne, including a concert in the grounds of buckingham palace. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. it will be a pudding fit for a queen, or more precisely, for a queen's jubilee. in celebration of her 70 years on the throne, buckingham palace is asking britain to get baking. it is a nationwide competition to create the platinum pudding. recipes need to be submitted by the 4th of february, then five finalists will be invited to bake their creations for an expertjudging panel including dame mary berry, the chef monica galetti, and the queen's head chef, mark flanagan. the pudding will be just one
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of the ingredients to be enjoyed during the platinum jubilee bank holiday weekend, final details of which have been confirmed by the palace. on thursday the 2nd ofjune the queen's birthday parade, trooping the colour, will take place on horse guards parade. that evening, jubilee beacons will be lit in more than 1,500 locations around the united kingdom and the commonwealth. on friday the 3rd ofjune, a service of thanksgiving for the queen's reign will be held at st paul's cathedral. on saturday the 4th ofjune, the bbc platinum party, a live concert, will take place in the grounds of buckingham palace. a public ballot for tickets will be launched next month. finally, on sunday the 5th ofjune, the big jubilee lunch will be staged in communities across the country. that platinum pudding will be part of the menu. and the platinumjubilee pageant will be staged on the mall and will feature among other things, 200 silk flags to be created by children and focusing on climate change and their hopes for the future.
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from pudding to pageant, the organisers hope it will indeed be a fitting tribute to the queen's 70 years of service. nicholas witchell, bbc news. joining us now is 2016 great british bake—off contestant val stones from somerton. good afternoon to you. good afternoon- — good afternoon to you. good afternoon. thank _ good afternoon to you. good afternoon. thank you - good afternoon to you. good afternoon. thank you for - good afternoon to you. good - afternoon. thank you for inviting me. t afternoon. thank you for inviting me. ~ :, :, me. i know you are entering the competition _ me. i know you are entering the competition for _ me. i know you are entering the competition for the _ me. i know you are entering the competition for the platinum - competition for the platinum pudding. what will you be making? well, i won't give too many details away, but it is a taste of summer. it will be elder flowers and lemon, home—made lemon curd, poppy seeds and just a scent of elderflower. it is summer, it isjune. that and just a scent of elderflower. it is summer, it is june. that sounds wonderful- — is summer, it is june. that sounds wonderful- is _ is summer, it is june. that sounds wonderful. is this _ is summer, it is june. that sounds wonderful. is this your _ is summer, it is june. that sounds wonderful. is this your own - wonderful. is this your own creation?— wonderful. is this your own creation? , , :, creation? yes, it is. i love elder flowers. creation? yes, it is. i love elder flowers- i— creation? yes, it is. i love elder
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flowers. i make _ creation? yes, it is. i love elder flowers. i make my _ creation? yes, it is. i love elder flowers. i make my own - creation? yes, it is. i love elder- flowers. i make my own elderflower syrup every year. ijust flowers. i make my own elderflower syrup every year. i just thought, flowers. i make my own elderflower syrup every year. ijust thought, it has to be that. i have done it for years and it is my own recipe, yes. will you be going for the look as well as the taste?— will you be going for the look as well as the taste? very much so. i think it has _ well as the taste? very much so. i think it has to — well as the taste? very much so. i think it has to look _ well as the taste? very much so. i think it has to look delicious, - well as the taste? very much so. i think it has to look delicious, it. think it has to look delicious, it has to look so tender that you just want to put a spoon in and eat it. you are making us all feel hungry here. t you are making us all feel hungry here. :, : :, , you are making us all feel hungry here. :, , ., ~ you are making us all feel hungry here. :, , :,~ :, you are making us all feel hungry here. :, :, here. i will actually make one and take it over— here. i will actually make one and take it over to _ here. i will actually make one and take it over to somerset - here. i will actually make one and take it over to somerset bbc- here. i will actually make one and l take it over to somerset bbc radio. what would it mean to you if you won? tt what would it mean to you if you won? :, :, :, : , won? it would mean that the recipe would be shared _ won? it would mean that the recipe would be shared by _ won? it would mean that the recipe would be shared by millions - won? it would mean that the recipe would be shared by millions of- would be shared by millions of people, because i know that that is its purpose, it will be made by people for their own street parties and things like that. that is what will be important. i think it's
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lovely to share recipes. tt will be important. i think it's lovely to share recipes. it would mean it is _ lovely to share recipes. it would mean it is shared _ lovely to share recipes. it would mean it is shared by _ lovely to share recipes. it would mean it is shared by millions . lovely to share recipes. it would mean it is shared by millions of| mean it is shared by millions of people, but also achieve a sort of immortality, like a tory sponge or coronation chicken, it would be your platinum pudding. —— like a victoria sponge. tt platinum pudding. -- like a victoria sonue. :, , platinum pudding. -- like a victoria sonue. :,, :, platinum pudding. -- like a victoria sonue. :, :, platinum pudding. -- like a victoria sotone. :, :, ,:, sponge. it has to have platinum in it, the sponge. it has to have platinum in it. the name. _ sponge. it has to have platinum in it, the name, because _ sponge. it has to have platinum in it, the name, because it— sponge. it has to have platinum in it, the name, because it is- sponge. it has to have platinum in it, the name, because it is the - sponge. it has to have platinum in l it, the name, because it is the most precious metal, and it would be the most precious pudding. you precious metal, and it would be the most precious pudding.— most precious pudding. you call ourself most precious pudding. you call yourself the _ most precious pudding. you call yourself the cake _ most precious pudding. you call yourself the cake whisperer, - most precious pudding. you call l yourself the cake whisperer, don't you? you whisper to them. what would your cake say to you? eat me, eat me. that was simple. do you have any advice for aspiring bakers who are looking at this competition, thinking, iwant bakers who are looking at this competition, thinking, i want to go? make something you have always made
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and put all of your love into it, all of the flavour into it that you have always done. if you try to do something new, it may be won't work. find some thing that you love doing, lovemaking and that your family and friends love to eat. —— love making. thank you. there was an almost total boycott of the golden globe awards in los angeles overnight. the ceremony was not even televised, after it emerged that the hollywood foreign press, who run the event, had not had a single black member for almost 20 years. among the winners, steven spielberg's remake of west side story won the globe for best motion picture, while succession scooped best television series drama. the power of the dog won best motion picture drama. the us actor and comedian bob saget has been found dead in a hotel room in orlando, florida. he was best known as the jovial dad
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in the us television sitcom full house. the 65—year old had just begun a new stand up tour and had earlier tweeted about his show injacksonville, expressing his delight at being back performing. the orange county sheriff's office said there were no signs of foul play or drug use in his death. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. we've seen much more cloud across the uk today, but for many parts of the country, temperatures have been a bit higher than they were yesterday. now, this is the sort of air we will get into tomorrow for many of us, but these weather fronts are continuing to bring a lot of cloud today, and a bit of rain and drizzle around it as well. but mild air as well — temperatures late afternoon and early evening still double figures for many western areas. it is chillier further east, mind you. we will see that rain and drizzle moving away from scotland and northern ireland, and clearer skies arriving overnight. that cloudy, damp weather continues to push further down into england and wales, but it does mean that it will be much milder than last night
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for eastern parts of england, and no frost here. where we have the clearer skies in scotland and northern ireland, it could be quite a bit colder, mind you. moving into tomorrow, that cloudy, damp weather, continues to run down across england and wales, coming to rest across east anglia, southern england with late improvement in south wales. but the rest of the uk seeing some sunshine. some showers coming on those blustery winds in some western areas of scotland. temperatures in glasgow and belfast won't be as high as today — top numbers likely to be where we have that cloudy, damp weather in southern parts of england. that is on that weak weather front there, which will move away overnight. high pressure will build in across the southern half of the uk. around the top of the area of high pressure, we have some strong winds. that is how we set up the rest of the week. northern parts of the uk will see the highest temperatures, with those atlantic winds. further south, very much lighter winds. it will be colder and we will find increasing amounts of fog and low cloud as well. there could be some patches of mist and fog around in england and wales on wednesday. many parts of the uk, though, will be dry on wednesday,
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with some sunshine. still got those stronger winds in the north and north—west of scotland producing a few spots of rain. otherwise, it will be dry. double figure temperatures in northern parts of scotland. quite a bit chillier than that, though, through the midlands. the reason we have this topsy—turvy weather, if you like, much milder than normal at this time of year for northern areas, is because of these atlantic winds coming around the top of that area of high pressure. the air continuing to stagnate under the high pressure and light winds, so more widespread mist, fog and low cloud only very slowly lifting through the day. outside of that, some sunshine. maybe a bit more cloud coming into northern and western parts of scotland, but again highest temperatures will be in the north. very much colder in the south.
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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. his family hold a press conference. translation: i want to thank eve one translation: i want to thank everyone in — translation: i want to thank everyone in the _ translation: i want to thank everyone in the world - translation: i want to thank everyone in the world who - translation: | want to thank | everyone in the world who stood translation: | want to thank - everyone in the world who stood up and supported him, that is the energy that helped him to fight. but australia's immigration minister could yet decide to revoke his visa and deport him. also this hour... the housing secretary is to update mps on his plans to make builders pay for the removal of unsafe cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the move but says it's very late.
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it is four years or more since the grenfell disaster and there have been many broken promises along the way. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen according to new climate data. virgin mobile and 02 phone users will not face roaming charges following announcements by other networks to reintroduce extra fees after brexit. and a four—day uk bank holiday, street parties and a competition to invent a new pudding — celebrations to mark the queen's 70 year reign are announced. novak djokovic has returned to the tennis court after winning a legal battle in australia, insisting he wants to stay in melbourne and defend his
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grand slam tennis title. he's thanked thejudge and fans who supported him. in a tweet the world number one tennis champion said... at a family news conference in belgrade his brother said, "it was really challenging for our family because it was very emotional and we were very subjective. we have done everything in our power to respect all protocols and don't insult anyone. the whole world has risen." earlier, a judge ruled that the revoking of djokovic's visa was not valid because correct procedures were not followed. despite celebrations by fans, australia's immigration department says ministers are still considering whether to deport the world number one men's tennis player, despite him winning his legalfight to stay in the country. this report from our correspondent in melbourne, shaimaa khalil. cheering
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they've waited days for this decision and when the news came that novak djokovic was to be released from detention, his supporters erupted with joy. he won, djokovic won! judge anthony kelly overturned the government's decision to cancel djokovic's visa. what we saw today here in the court that the australian legal system is functioning, it is evidence—based, it is aboutjustice. yeah, i'm extremely happy as everyone is in the serbian community here. but the jubilant mood changed quickly into uncertainty and confusion when it became unclear whether djokovic would be allowed to stay, despite the court's decision in his favour. this is the world number one saying last week that he was on his way to australia after being granted a medical exemption. novak djokovic had been public about opposing the vaccine and his announcement angered many australians and this is djokovic arriving in melbourne last wednesday,
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before he was held by border force officers for hours. during the video conference hearing, the tennis star's legal team argued that he was treated unfairly by the border officials. they said the player was not given time to consult his legal team or tennis australia when his visa was revoked. they added that djokovic travelled to australia on the understanding that his exemption due to a previous covid—19 infection was valid and that he had done everything that was required of him by tennis australia. the judge agreed, asking at one point in the hearing, "what more could this man have done?" he was interrogated by border force migration officers in the early morning. they gave him three hours to come up with an answer to this question and that's what they promised to him, so that he could get some legal advice but within an hour, they had made their decision. in other words, they did not give him the time that they promised. but the lawyer for the government has said the immigration minister could still use his executive power
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to cancel the player's visa. it's impossible to ignore the politics at play in all of this. the leadership wanted to appear tough on border and covid rules. throughout this process, did they act because they realised, rightly, i think, that there was kind of public outrage that novak djokovic might be getting different treatment than anybody else? it appears to me to be a complete embarrassment for the australian government. a few hours ago, djokovic's supporters thought they caught a glimpse of him. but they clashed with the police and they were dispersed with pepper spray. in the last hour, his brother djordje told a news conference in belgrade that novak is making up for lost time and is already out training. and a warning — there's some flash photography in the next few clips. translation: novak is free, - and a few moments ago he trained, he was on a tennis court.
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he went to australia to play tennis. that is why, to try to win another australian open and to win a record that he has been chasing for so many years. he had all the documents that were required of him and in the end he got medical exemption with which he travelled to australia. the result of everything else that has happened, we have found out today, we have learned about it today. once again, i want to say that novak is an athlete, he is a tennis player. he is the best tennis player of all time. everything he supports in his life is to live up to his principles and ideals. he has been branded in different
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ways for many years but he has always supported the freedom of choice and that is all, nothing else. his mother dijana said the past week has been an emotional rollercoaster for the family. and a warning — there's some flash photography. translation: there has been . a spectrum of emotions, sadness, fear, disappointment. there have been moments when he didn't have his mobile with him and we had no idea what was happening. there was a break—up in communication and we had no idea whether he was well or ill, whether he had eaten and whether everything was all right with him. those are things that, as a mother, i can't explain. i can't recover from it easily and i think every mother in the world will understand me. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up and supported him,
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that is the energy that helped him to fight in melbourne, in front of that so—called hotel. his father srdjan said his son was mentally very strong, and respected the rule of law. translation: this is a huge win for novak and his family - and the whole free world. we are all human beings and we have rights. we have the right to say what we think and not to suffer consequences... ..for an opinion, for expressing an opinion. we respect the laws of every country we travel to, we respect their rules and we respect the country
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where we are travelling. he has respected everything that he was asked — that was asked of him. our correspondent, guy de launey, is in the serbian capital, belgrade, where djokovic is a national hero, but he says public opinion is divided. it depends which way you look at it, and if you look at the serbian media, the tabloid media, certainly, every day they have been 100% behind novak djokovic. and 100% against australia. you would not have wanted to be reading the serbian media if you are the australian prime minister, scott morrison, they said some fruity things about him, but novak djokovic is their hero and there has beenjubilation in serbia when the judge delivered his verdict. a lot of trepidation when it occurred to people that there was still the possibility of ministerial intervention that could still see novak djokovic deported from australia but finally we are now seeing some degree of relief that he is out of detention for the moment. we are going to be able to take
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a pause for breath and thought. if you talk to folk around you, of course they are frustrated with novak djokovic, if they have been vaccinated, they say, "why doesn't he just get it done? "it would have been easy." interesting. we wait to see what happens next. we hear that djokovic is training and he has taken advantage of the court ruling to get out on the court but there are warnings from the government, or we suspect there are warnings that this is not the end of the matter. the government reserves, this is the australian government, they reserve the right to take executive action and ministers could intervene and order that novak djokovic is removed from australia but i think
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everyone is quite aware. we are on tenterhooks in serbia, which way is it going to go in australia? this could be a political matter in australia and that has been the impression that people have been getting in serbia. the serbian president here saying there is political ranting going on in australia and headlines in the newspaper saying that novak djokovic is the victim of a political game. there is a feeling here that it isn't just about sport and it isn't just about covid regulations or immigration, but it might be what is best for the government in australia in an election year. the housing secretary says he wants builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangerous cladding on low—rise blocks in england. previously leaseholders were told they would have to take out a loan to pay for the work themselves. our consumer affairs correspondent, sarah corker reports. removing dangerous cladding on buildings across britain. since the grenfell tower tragedy nearly five years ago, the row over who should pay to make other tower blocks safe has only intensified. the government will confirm
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later today that people living in smaller blocks will not have to foot the bill for cladding costs. but non—cladding faults won't be covered. campaigners like sophie from stevenage want ministers to go further. it is a positive step that the government have finally agreed that leaseholders should not be part of the solution for the building safety crisis. but it really doesn't go far enough in terms of the interim costs and all the other fire safety defects that these buildings have. a £4 billion scheme will help people living on buildings between 11 and 18 metres who have previously missed out on grants to remove cladding. mr gove will warn developers they will be expected to pay for the scheme or face legal or tax changes. there will also be more money forfire alarms. a review of the scale of the work actually needed, and leaseholders will also be given more time to sue builders over defective flats — up to 30 years after construction. at the moment, it is six years.
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ultimately, the key question is who put that cladding up, who was responsible for the state of those buildings? they are the individuals, they are the companies who should pay in order to ensure that that cladding is removed and the buildings are safe. there will be no new money from the treasury for this and it is unclearjust how the government plans to pressure the industry to pay. developers often argue they met building regulations at the time and so should not have to bear these costs. the construction industry should pay its part in remediating buildings that are unsafe. but, of course, some of them won't. i hope the reputable companies will play their part. and some of them will have gone out of business so there is no one to pay. here in salford, the problems at lizzie's buildings are not cladding, and she is still facing huge bills to fix other fire safety faults. this package does not help me
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because it is primarily for cladding, and cladding isn't an issue here. it is cavity barriers. so i am still facing or likely to be facing huge bills that i cannot possibly pay. but all of this is already dragging on for years. none of these solutions will be quick or easy. and the financial situation for many is already critical. sarah corker, bbc news. the labour leader sir keir starmer has welcomed the government's move, but described the announcement as very late and vague. anything that helps the people who are in this awful position relating to cladding is welcome, but it is very late — four years or more since the grenfell disaster and there have been many broken promises on the way. anything now that moves this forward is welcome, of course it is, but i would prefer that there is a plan rather than just a promise. the terms of what is going to happen is still very vague but after four
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years and many broken promises this is an important and welcome step. and you can watch that statement from michael gove here on the news channel at 1530 this afternoon. the headlines on bbc news... novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. the housing secretary is to update mps on his plans to make builders pay for the removal of unsafe cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the move but says it's very late. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen according to new climate data. the prime minister, borisjohnson, says he welcomes a decision by virgin mobile 02, whose users will not face roaming charges this year. two of the uk's four biggest networks — ee and vodafone — are reintroducing roaming charges for customers travelling
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to europe injanuary, with three set to reintroduce them in may. our technology correspondent, marc cieslak, has been telling us more. with the uk leaving the eu, mobile networks are no longer obliged to abide by those rules and last year all of the big four networks, vodafone, virgin 02, ee and three, they said they were not going to introduce roaming charges, but three are now going to introduce them. all apart from virgin 02. have the first three said why they are doing so? we have put in calls but we have not heard from those networks as to why they are doing that. we have heard from the
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prime minister, though? yes, he was on twitter saying he welcomes the decision by virgin media and o2 to mean uk citizens can still use their data across europe without extra charges and it will be interesting to see if this tweet has any influence with those other networks. at the very least it is free prime ministerial advertising for that particular network. virgin 02, why have they made the move not to reintroduce charges? it looks like it will be a point of differentiation for this network, especially when people are thinking about changing their mobile phone. if they are worried about racking up huge roaming bills as they travel across europe, or go on holiday, this might be a point where they go, "that is the network i might decide to go with." it is important to point out that the network is probably not going to have to pay out that much and it won't have a financial impact on them as yet because of the reduction in travel as a result of the pandemic.
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eight men who sued manchester city football club after they said they'd been sexually abused by paedophile coach barry bennell more than 30 years ago have lost a high court fight for damages. the men who are now in their 40s and 50s say bennell, abused them when they were playing schoolboy football for teams he coached in north—west england between 1979 and 1985. our sports correspondent laura scott has more. they said the club was legally responsible for the harm they have suffered because, in their view, the relationship between their coach and the club was one akin to employment, but the club denied this. during the seven week trial, barry bennell gave two days of evidence from his prison where he is serving a 34 year sentence. that is for sexual offences against children. the decision to call him as a witness was described as callous, although the club's insurer said they were obliged to call relevant witnesses.
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today the high courtjudge said barry bennell was a liar and could not be trusted. in contrast, the high courtjudge said claimants had given vivid and compelling and credible evidence and proved that barry bennell abused them but he said the claims were brought too late to result in a fair trial and that it had not been shown that manchester city were indirectly liable for barry bennell�*s acts of abuse. the lawyer for the men said they were shocked and dismayed and they will be appealing. manchester city have apologised to abuse survivors and say they have paid around £4 million as part of a compensation scheme, but what is clear is that some 30 years after these men were abused in their pursuit of a football career, and five years after this legal process began, they are not giving up on what they say is their fight for justice. pregnant women are being urged again not to delay getting their covid jab or booster in a government campaign. our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, has more. this was claire bromley last summer
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after she contracted covid, pregnant and on a ventilator, because she had been struggling to breathe. she had been about to get vaccinated when she caught the virus. he was getting everything he needed from me because that's what babies do when they are in the tummy but it was me that was getting more and more poorly because as he was taking the oxygen he needed, i didn't have enough oxygen to keep giving him and to support myself. claire eventually gave birth to a healthy baby boy, after going through a difficult recovery. today, pregnant women are being urged once again to get protected, with warnings that 96% of them who need hospital treatment for covid are not vaccinated. pregnant women who are admitted with covid, one in three need respiratory support, one in six need to go
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to intensive care. one in five need to be delivered preterm and one in five, their babies need to go to the neonatal unit. scientists say they now have large—scale data in particular from the uk and america to show vaccines are safe. this does not increase the risk of stillbirth or premature birth. there is no increased risk of miscarriage or foetal abnormality, so it's really important to get the safety message to women that we have much more data which is really reassuring now that we didn't have previously. boris johnson visited a vaccination centre today. there are some very early signs that the number of infections and hospital admissions may be levelling off. whether that trend continues or not, the message for everyone is to get protected. omicron is still out there, it's incredibly contagious. everybody will know somebody who has had it. it can be pretty unpleasant.
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sadly, as you know, 90% of the people who are in icu with covid have not been vaccinated. claire was given her second vaccine yesterday. she says she feels very lucky to have had a happy ending after such a traumatic experience. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. new research suggests natural defences against a common cold could offer some protection against coronavirus. the small—scale study, published in nature communications, involved 52 individuals who lived with someone who had just caught covid—19. our health correspondentjim reed gave us more details. one theory talked about by scientists is if you have been exposed to another virus in the coronavirus family, so not covid, but one related to it, could you build up some protection that way? there are seven coronaviruses and four of them are connected
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to the common cold, we think. so, this is not covid, this is a related virus. the theory goes if you have been exposed to one of those cold viruses, could it give you protection against covid? that is what this research has looked into. they took 52 unvaccinated people, in september 2020, before people had vaccines, and half of the people in households of those 52 managed to contract covid and half didn't. they looked at the half that didn't and they had much higher levels of t cells, memory immunity cells linked to previous exposures to common colds and coronaviruses. the conclusion they have come to is that it looks like if you have been exposed to this form of the common cold in the past it might be giving you more protection against covid, which is really interesting.
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it's something scientists have been thinking about for ages but this is one of the first studies suggesting that it's true. the government is sending covid lateral flow kits to key industries in england from today, to encourage around 100,000 staff to test themselves daily. the aim is to protect critical services, including transport, food processing, and the border force, by catching infections early. staff absences have surged in recent weeks, as workers have tested positive and had to isolate. at venues across the country is to be published by the government later. if passed, it would mean that venues have a legal duty to provide specific plans to prevent and deal with an attack. the so—called protect duty has been championed by the martyn's law campaign, started by figen murray, after her son, 29—year—old martyn hett, was killed in the manchester arena bombing. it feels like a giant leap forward
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in the right direction. i can see sort of the end result now. yeah, it's massive because the government has clearly taken it on board and embraced it, which is good. ijust hope that, you know, it's like you said, it's been a few years i've been campaigning with some other people and we've been pushing and pushing, but i've realised that in government, everything is taking a long time. however, it would be amazing if this law could be passed by the fifth anniversary of the attack. that would mean so much. certainly for me, but for the other families as well. a faulty electric heater is being blamed for a fire in an apartment block in new york, which has killed 19 people including nine children. another 32 people were taken to hospital, several of whom are in a critical condition. the building provided affordable housing. many residents were immigrants from gambia.
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our north america correspondent, nada tawfik has the latest. neighbours looked on with horror as heavy clouds of smoke engulfed the entire bronx apartment building. he is taking his time. he's got the baby. firefighters were on the scene within minutes. as they battled the initial blaze from a lower level apartment, the rising smoke proved to be deadly. it was just pitch black in my house, in the daytime. they were putting out the fire and all you could see was black smoke in front of the windows, black smoke. later, officials said it was a portable space heater that caused one of the worst fire disasters in new york's history. it started in a malfunctioning electric space heater. that was the cause of the fire. the fire consumed that apartment that was on two floors, and part of the hallway. the door to that apartment, unfortunately, when the residents left, was left open.
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it did not close by itself. the smoke spread throughout the building, thus the tremendous loss of life and other people fighting for their lives. tragically, a number of children have already died and it's feared the death toll could still rise. all 121 units in this building have now been cleared out and residents have been sent to a nearby shelter. and then they will be put in hotels for the time being. now, this high—rise is home to a large immigrant community and officials say they will dedicate funds to help them recover what they've lost. we're all feeling this and we are going to be here for this community, to help them navigate through this. crews are already on site cleaning up the debris, but much of what was lost cannot be replaced. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the last seven years have been the hottest since temperatures began being measured — in around 1850. that's according to new global climate data
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from the eu's satellite system, the copernicus climate change service. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. deadly floods heralded the new year in brazil and there have already been wildfires in the us state of colorado as 2022 looks set to continue the trend of extreme weather that we saw last year. these latest temperature figures confirmed that europe experienced its warmest summer on record as well as devastating floods in germany and belgium injuly. the data collected by european satellites shows 2021 was the fifth hottest year ever recorded. it also shows the concentration of warming gases in the atmosphere continuing to rise with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world
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is warming and we do see from year to year some years are warmer and some are cooler but overall they are getting warmer and alongside that there is the build—up of greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane and that has continued. what has been really striking according to experts are the weather extremes that the world experienced in 2021. the exceptional heat in canada and in the us for example. and the direction of travel is impossible to ignore. the figures show the last seven years have been the hottest years ever recorded. and the bad news is a temporary cooling event in the pacific ocean actually lowered global temperatures marginally last year but that will soon pass so do not expect any letup in the warming trend in the years to come. according to one senior climate scientists it is yet another warning of the damage that we are doing to our planetary home.
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justin rowlatt, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello, there. we are continuing to see a lot of cloud across the uk today, thick enough to see some rain and drizzle in places. still mild late evening in the west of england, but chillier further east. this damp weather will push away from scotland overnight, so clearer skies here, but the damp rain and drizzle will push into england and wales. it will be much milder than last night across england and wales overnight. under the clear skies, a frost more likely in eastern scotland. heading into tomorrow, we have the cloud continuing to move southwards, bringing rain and drizzle. that will come to rest across east anglia and southern england. late improvements across south wales.
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the rest of the country seeing some sunshine developing. it will not be as warm as today in glasgow and belfast, highest of temperatures in double figures in the cloudy and damp weather in the south. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. the housing secretary is to update mps on his plans to make builders pay for the removal of unsafe cladding from low—rise buildings in england. labour welcomes the move but says it's very late. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen, according to new climate data. virgin mobile and 02 phone users will not face roaming charges following announcements by other networks to reintroduce extra fees after brexit. and a four—day uk bank holiday, street parties
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and a competition to invent a new pudding — celebrations to mark the queen's 70—year reign are announced. in the new few minutes, the government will outline its plan to remove dangerous cladding from low—rise blocks in england. ministers say they expect house builders to pick up the £4 billion bill. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, is at westminster. this has been quite heavily trailed, this statement, and it is had a cautious welcome from campaigners and the opposition. tt cautious welcome from campaigners and the opposition.— and the opposition. it has, but not before time _ and the opposition. it has, but not before time is _ and the opposition. it has, but not before time is the _ and the opposition. it has, but not before time is the message - and the opposition. it has, but not before time is the message that i and the opposition. it has, but not i before time is the message that has also come from those living in buildings deemed unsafe, who have had to shoulder a huge amount of the cost themselves, campaigners working on their behalf and opposition parties as well at westminster, who have accused the government of dragging its feet on this issue for
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too long. since 2017 and the ground —— and the grenfell tower fire, there have been attempts to put the cladding issue right. they have been accusations of not going far enough to protect people and leaving people in certain categories of building having to pay too much for the remediation work, the removal of that cladding and the replacement of it with alternative, safer materials themselves. we have michael gove, themselves. we have michael gove, the new housing secretary, unveiling his new plan to address this ongoing problem in the house of commons this afternoon. we know a good deal of what he is going to say, he is going to want developers who have profited from all of this that, we are coming for you. from all of this that, we are coming foryou. he from all of this that, we are coming for you. he promises that
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leaseholders in buildings between 11 metres and 18 metres high which were previously not covered by the fund of government money, which would pay for remediation work, that they will not have to shoulder what he describes as an unfair burden and will in future be able to have those costs paid for elsewhere. so where is the government going to get the money from to do that? it is not coming from the treasury, no taxpayer money is being made available. i think we can now hear from michael gove himself. t do from michael gove himself. i do confirm that _ from michael gove himself. i do confirm that i _ from michael gove himself. i do confirm that i have _ from michael gove himself. i do confirm that i have asked the permanent secretary of my department to conduct— permanent secretary of my department to conduct an enquiry. it was a matter— to conduct an enquiry. it was a matter of— to conduct an enquiry. it was a matter of considerable regret to me that the _ matter of considerable regret to me that the details of the statement i'm that the details of the statement i'm about — that the details of the statement i'm about to give way shed with the media _ i'm about to give way shed with the media before memos of this house and those most _ media before memos of this house and those most affected. it is worth pausing — those most affected. it is worth pausing at the start of any statement to reflect on my building safety _ statement to reflect on my building safety is _ statement to reflect on my building safety is an issue of concern to all
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of as— safety is an issue of concern to all of as in— safety is an issue of concern to all of as in this — safety is an issue of concern to all of as in this house. it took the tragedy— of as in this house. it took the tragedy at _ of as in this house. it took the tragedy at grenfell in 2017 to put building — tragedy at grenfell in 2017 to put building safety properly on the political — building safety properly on the political agenda. building safety properly on the politicalagenda. families building safety properly on the political agenda. families were living _ political agenda. families were living in— political agenda. families were living in a — political agenda. families were living in a building that was a death— living in a building that was a death trap because of enforcement and compliance in a building safety regime _ and compliance in a building safety regime. this government must take its share _ regime. this government must take its share of— regime. this government must take its share of responsible see for those — its share of responsible see for those failings. over four years on from _ those failings. over four years on from that— those failings. over four years on from that terrible tragedy, it is clear— from that terrible tragedy, it is clear that — from that terrible tragedy, it is clear that the building safety system — clear that the building safety system remains broken. the problem is that— system remains broken. the problem is that we _ system remains broken. the problem is that we have to fix have been identified — is that we have to fix have been identified by many across this house from all— identified by many across this house from all parties. i would like at this point— from all parties. i would like at this point you register my appreciation of the work done by the shadow— appreciation of the work done by the shadow housing minister. he did a great _ shadow housing minister. he did a great deal— shadow housing minister. he did a great deal to bring forth the plight of those _ great deal to bring forth the plight of those affected by this crisis. we
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know— of those affected by this crisis. we know there — of those affected by this crisis. we know there is still a small number of high-rise — know there is still a small number of high—rise buildings with dangerous and unsafe cladding which needs— dangerous and unsafe cladding which needs to _ dangerous and unsafe cladding which needs to be fixed. secondly, we know that those _ needs to be fixed. secondly, we know that those who manufacturer's dangerous products and build dangerous products and build dangerous buildings have faced inadequate responsibility so far. there _ inadequate responsibility so far. there are — inadequate responsibility so far. there are too many buildings today which _ there are too many buildings today which are _ there are too many buildings today which are declared unsafe and there are too— which are declared unsafe and there are too many who have been seeking to profit _ are too many who have been seeking to profit from that current crisis. most _ to profit from that current crisis. most importantly, leaseholders are shouldering a desperately unfair burden — shouldering a desperately unfair burden. they are blameless and it is morally— burden. they are blameless and it is morally wrong that they should be the ones _ morally wrong that they should be the ones asked to pay the price. i am clear— the ones asked to pay the price. i am clear about who should pay the price _ am clear about who should pay the price for— am clear about who should pay the price for remedying these failures, it should _ price for remedying these failures, it should be the industries who profited — it should be the industries who profited as they caused the problem, and those _ profited as they caused the problem, and those who continue to profit as they make — and those who continue to profit as they make it worse. mr speaker, were to take _ they make it worse. mr speaker, were to take action on all of these fronts — to take action on all of these fronts to _ to take action on all of these fronts. to ensure every high—priced dangerous— fronts. to ensure every high—priced dangerous building has the radiation to make _ dangerous building has the radiation to make it— dangerous building has the radiation to make it safe, we will open up the
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next phase — to make it safe, we will open up the next phase of the fund earlier this year and _ next phase of the fund earlier this year and focus on making sure it is risk driven— year and focus on making sure it is risk driven and delivered more quickly — risk driven and delivered more quickly. we will also ensure that those _ quickly. we will also ensure that those who — quickly. we will also ensure that those who profited and continue to profit _ those who profited and continue to profit from — those who profited and continue to profit from the sale of unsafe buildings and construction products must _ buildings and construction products must take — buildings and construction products must take full responsibility for their— must take full responsibility for their actions and pay to put things right _ their actions and pay to put things right. those who knowingly put lives at risk _ right. those who knowingly put lives at risk should be held to account for their— at risk should be held to account for their crimes. those who are seeking — for their crimes. those who are seeking to— for their crimes. those who are seeking to profit from this should be stopped from doing so. i will put them _ be stopped from doing so. i will put them on _ be stopped from doing so. i will put them on notice, to those who miss old dangerous product like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners — or insulation, to those who cut corners to— or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished homes, and to those _ developed or refurbished homes, and to those who sought to profiteer from _ to those who sought to profiteer from the — to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell— from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you we _ grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. we will pursue those responsible. we will review government schemes and programmes to make sure _ government schemes and programmes to make sure that, in accordance with due process, — make sure that, in accordance with due process, there are emotional consequences for any company
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responsible for this crisis and refusing _ responsible for this crisis and refusing to help fix it. in line with— refusing to help fix it. in line with this, _ refusing to help fix it. in line with this, just before christmas, i suspended — with this, just before christmas, i suspended one company from its participation in the help to buy scheme — participation in the help to buy scheme with immediate effect. i also welcome _ scheme with immediate effect. i also welcome a _ scheme with immediate effect. i also welcome a decision by the mercedes formula _ welcome a decision by the mercedes formula 1— welcome a decision by the mercedes formula 1 team to discontinue sponsorship from a cladding firm with immediate effect. the voices of the families were heard, but this is only the _ the families were heard, but this is only the start of the action that must _ only the start of the action that must be — only the start of the action that must be taken. we must also restore common— must be taken. we must also restore common sense to building safety overalt — common sense to building safety overall. we have got to find ways for their— overall. we have got to find ways for their few —— for overall. we have got to find ways fortheirfew —— fortheir overall. we have got to find ways for their few —— for their to be fewer— for their few —— for their to be fewer unsafe buildings. there must be far— fewer unsafe buildings. there must be far greater use of sensible mitigations like spring close and fire alarms in place of unnecessary
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remediation work. an advice note has been wrongly interpreted, so we will been wrongly interpreted, so we will be withdrawing it, and we are supporting new guidance for assessors which will be published this week. second, we will press ahead _ this week. second, we will press ahead with — this week. second, we will press ahead with the building safety fund, adapting _ ahead with the building safety fund, adapting it so it is consistent with adapting it so it is consistent with a proportionate approach. we will set a _ a proportionate approach. we will set a higher expectation now that developers must fix their own buildings and will give leaseholders more information at every stage of the process. thirdly, before easter, we will— the process. thirdly, before easter, we will promote our scheme to indemnify— we will promote our scheme to indemnify assessors, giving them the confidence _ indemnify assessors, giving them the confidence to exercise their balance to professionaljudgment. we will audit— to professionaljudgment. we will audit those assessments to make sure that expensive remediation is only advised _ that expensive remediation is only advised where necessary to remove a threat _ advised where necessary to remove a threat to _ advised where necessary to remove a threat to life. we will work to improve — threat to life. we will work to improve market confidence and i have asked _ improve market confidence and i have asked my—
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improve market confidence and i have asked my colleague to work with insurers — asked my colleague to work with insurers or— asked my colleague to work with insurers or new industry that approaches that bring down the premium — approaches that bring down the premium facing leaseholders. further, — premium facing leaseholders. further, we will take the power to make _ further, we will take the power to make sure — further, we will take the power to make sure that chartered surveyors are able _ make sure that chartered surveyors are able to — make sure that chartered surveyors are able to meet this challenge. they— are able to meet this challenge. they should be clear about our determination to fix the situation for all— determination to fix the situation for all of— determination to fix the situation for all of those caught in this crisis — for all of those caught in this crisis. finally, we must relieve the burden— crisis. finally, we must relieve the burden unfairly placed on leaseholders. i want to pay tribute to all— leaseholders. i want to pay tribute to all of— leaseholders. i want to pay tribute to all of those across the house who campaigned so passionately on this subject _ campaigned so passionately on this subject. they know the injustice of asking _ subject. they know the injustice of asking leaseholders, often young people. _ asking leaseholders, often young people, who have saved hard to pay money _ people, who have saved hard to pay money they— people, who have saved hard to pay money they don't have to fix a problem — money they don't have to fix a problem they didn't cause. all while the firms— problem they didn't cause. all while the firms that made a profit on those — the firms that made a profit on those developments sit on their hands — those developments sit on their hands. we will scrap the proposal for loans— hands. we will scrap the proposal for loans and long—term debt for medium — for loans and long—term debt for medium rice leaseholders. i can
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confirm — medium rice leaseholders. i can confirm that no leaseholders living in a building above 11 metres will ever face — in a building above 11 metres will ever face any costs for fixing dangerous cladding. and working with numbers— dangerous cladding. and working with numbers of— dangerous cladding. and working with numbers of both houses, we will pursue _ numbers of both houses, we will pursue statutory protection for leaseholders and nothing will be off the table _ leaseholders and nothing will be off the table. as part of this, we will introduce — the table. as part of this, we will introduce immediate amendments to the safety— introduce immediate amendments to the safety belt to extend the right of leaseholders, to challenge those who cause — of leaseholders, to challenge those who cause defects, up to 30 years retrospectively. we will provide an additional— retrospectively. we will provide an additional ten to £7 million to fund more _ additional ten to £7 million to fund more fire _ additional ten to £7 million to fund more fire alarms so we can enter the dreadful— more fire alarms so we can enter the dreadful -- _ more fire alarms so we can enter the dreadful —— we can end the dreadful use of— dreadful —— we can end the dreadful use of midnight watches. in the period. — use of midnight watches. in the period. we _ use of midnight watches. in the period, we will work across government to make sure leaseholders are protected from forfeiture and fiction— are protected from forfeiture and fiction because of costs. leaseholders must not shoulder the burden _ leaseholders must not shoulder the burden. we have committed {5.1
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billion— burden. we have committed {5.1 billion of— burden. we have committed {5.1 billion of taxpayer funding from this government but we should not look to— this government but we should not look to the — this government but we should not look to the taxpayer for more funding _ look to the taxpayer for more funding. we should not ask for hard—working taxpayers to pay more taxes _ hard—working taxpayers to pay more taxes to _ hard—working taxpayers to pay more taxes to allow developers off the hook _ taxes to allow developers off the hook we — taxes to allow developers off the hook. we will make the industry pay for all— hook. we will make the industry pay for all of— hook. we will make the industry pay for all of the remaining problems and help— for all of the remaining problems and help cover the range of costs facing _ and help cover the range of costs facing leaseholders. those who manufactured combustible cladding and insulation, who have made vast profits— and insulation, who have made vast profits even — and insulation, who have made vast profits even at the height of the pandemic, must pay now instead of leaseholders. we made a start through— leaseholders. we made a start through the property developer tax and the _ through the property developer tax and the building safety levy, both announced last february, but will now go— announced last february, but will now go further. i will write to developers to convene a meeting in the next _ developers to convene a meeting in the next few weeks and i will report back to _ the next few weeks and i will report back to the — the next few weeks and i will report back to the house before easter. we will give _ back to the house before easter. we will give them a chance to do the right— will give them a chance to do the right thing. i hope they will take it, right thing. i hope they will take it. but— right thing. i hope they will take it. but i— right thing. i hope they will take it, but i can confirm to the house that if— it, but i can confirm to the house that if they— it, but i can confirm to the house that if they do not then, if necessary, we will impose a solution upon _ necessary, we will impose a solution upon them _ necessary, we will impose a solution upon them in law. finally, we must never— upon them in law. finally, we must never be _ upon them in law. finally, we must never be in — upon them in law. finally, we must never be in this position again, so
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we are _ never be in this position again, so we are putting the recommendations in law— we are putting the recommendations in law and _ we are putting the recommendations in law and we will commence the fire safety— in law and we will commence the fire safety act~ _ in law and we will commence the fire safety act. we are launching new guidance — safety act. we are launching new guidance on removing the incentives for industry — guidance on removing the incentives for industry to cut corners and help stop the _ for industry to cut corners and help stop the prioritisation of cost over value _ stop the prioritisation of cost over value we — stop the prioritisation of cost over value. we will legislate on—board reforms — value. we will legislate on—board reforms to— value. we will legislate on—board reforms to the system as well. it will bring — reforms to the system as well. it will bring forward measures in a white _ will bring forward measures in a white paper so that when time allows we will— white paper so that when time allows we will have legislation on social housing — we will have legislation on social housing regulation so social housing tenants _ housing regulation so social housing tenants can and not be ignored as those _ tenants can and not be ignored as those in _ tenants can and not be ignored as those in the grenfell community several— those in the grenfell community several years. those in the grenfell community severalyears. it those in the grenfell community several years. it is long past time that we _ several years. it is long past time that we fix— several years. it is long past time that we fix this crisis and through the measures i have set out today, we will _ the measures i have set out today, we will seek redress for past wrongs and secure _ we will seek redress for past wrongs and secure funds from developers and we will— and secure funds from developers and we will protect leaseholders today and fix _ we will protect leaseholders today and fix the system for the future. i commend — and fix the system for the future. i commend this statement to the house. i now commend this statement to the house.
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i now call— commend this statement to the house. i now call this shadow secretary of state. t i now call this shadow secretary of state. :, ~' , :, i now call this shadow secretary of state. :, ,, y:, :, i now call this shadow secretary of state. :, ~' i:, :, ,:, i now call this shadow secretary of state. :, ~' i:, :, y:, 4' state. i thank you for your kind words about — state. i thank you for your kind words about jack _ state. i thank you for your kind words about jack romy, - state. i thank you for your kind words about jack romy, who i state. i thank you for your kind - words about jack romy, who should have been with us here today. there is a spacer where there that i know he would have occupied. jack was one of those who occupied centrepoint tower in protest. he was never afraid to speak truth to power and i hope to date marks the start of all of us across the house invoking his spirit. 4.5 years after the appalling tragedy at grenfell, and a road paved with broken promises and full storms, hundreds of thousands are still trapped in unsafe homes, millions are caught in the wider crisis and the families of 72 people who lost their lives are waiting for justice. it is a relief we finally have consensus that the developers at manufacturers who profited from this scandal, not the victims, should bear greater costs, and that plainness leaseholders must not pay.
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after a year of hell, we welcome the decision to remove the threat of forced loans. what makes him think that he can force developers who, forfour that he can force developers who, for four years, that he can force developers who, forfouryears, have that he can force developers who, for four years, have failed to do the right thing, to pay up? there is no plan. if he has one, can we hear it? he will find an open door on this side of the house if he has a credible proposal to bring. he wants developers that if negotiation fails, our backstop, what we can do is increase taxation of those responsible. that isn't quite right, is it? i have the letterfrom responsible. that isn't quite right, is it? i have the letter from the chief secretary to the treasury. i remind him what it says, you may use a high level threat of tax or legal solutions in discussions with developers, but whether or not to impose or raise taxes remains a
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decision for me, the chief secretary, and is not a given at this point. if i have seen this letter, i'm fairly sure that the developers have as well. it appears furthermore that what he has told the public, that tax rises are the backstop, is not what he has told the treasury. this letter says, you have confirmed separately that budgets are a backstop for funding these proposals in full, should sufficient funds not be raised from industry. that is not what the secretary of state told the house a moment ago. can he clear this up? has the chancellor agreed to back a new tax measure if negotiations fail, or is he prepared to see his allocated budgets or monies for social funding allocated budgets or monies for socialfunding raided? or will he go back to the treasury and renegotiate and legislate if he fails in march? if that is the case, it will take months. there is nothing to stop freeholders from passing on the cost to leaseholders in the meantime. has
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he got an assessment of how many leaseholders will be hit with huge bills if he delays? it is serious, i hope that he is, why is he not putting these powers into the building safety belt now? the only tricky has up his sleeve, as he just confirmed, is to ban them from help to buy, at we know that the impact of that will be marginal. can he see the problem? you will also know there is a gaping hole in what he has proposed. a significant number of buildings have cladding and non—cladding defects and leaseholders in them face erroneous costs to fix things like missing fire breaks and defective compartment asian. you cannot make a building half say. —— compartmentalisation. —— you cannot make a building half safe. why will he not amend his bill so that all of
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these leaseholders are protected from historic defects in law? the pace of remediation has been painfully slow. he is now on track to miss the deadline to fix all grenville —— all grenfell style cladding. will he get a grip on what is happening in his own department and ensure that the progress of remediation is accelerated markedly? for affected leaseholders, as he knows, this has been a living nightmare, and we await to them to bring it to a swift conclusion. what he has given us today is a welcome shift in tone and some new measures that we hope will succeed on this side of the house. the harder i look at this, the less it stands up. we were promised justice and change to finally do right by the victims of this scandal. that takes more than more promises, takes a plan.
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i am great foot with a shadow secretary of state for her questions. can i entirely agree with the generous and fitting words that she had _ the generous and fitting words that she had forjack dromy, he was a relentless — she had forjack dromy, he was a relentless campaigner for social justice — relentless campaigner for social justice. he had many achievements that we _ justice. he had many achievements that we will all record as we think of his— that we will all record as we think of his contribution. can i also welcome _ of his contribution. can i also welcome the consensual approach that she is— welcome the consensual approach that she is taking and her front bench are taking — she is taking and her front bench are taking to seeking to ensure that we place _ are taking to seeking to ensure that we place responsibility where it truly— we place responsibility where it truly lies? she had a number of appropriate questions to follow—up to ensure — appropriate questions to follow—up to ensure that we deliver effectively. she made the point with respect _ effectively. she made the point with respect to— effectively. she made the point with respect to the building safety fund at the _ respect to the building safety fund at the allocations have been slow. that is _ at the allocations have been slow. that is true — at the allocations have been slow. that is true. it is better to be honest— that is true. it is better to be honest about those areas where
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government has not performed as it should _ government has not performed as it should. one of the first things i did was— should. one of the first things i did was to _ should. one of the first things i did was to ask for all of the steps necessary— did was to ask for all of the steps necessary to be taken to ensure that that money— necessary to be taken to ensure that that money was spent effectively. one of— that money was spent effectively. one of the province we have had is that it _ one of the province we have had is that it is _ one of the province we have had is that it is a — one of the province we have had is that it is a demand led system, so we relied — that it is a demand led system, so we relied on — that it is a demand led system, so we relied on those who have been responsible to come forward. one of the things— responsible to come forward. one of the things we are looking to do is to work— the things we are looking to do is to work with the national fire chiefs— to work with the national fire chiefs council that we have the most extensive _ chiefs council that we have the most extensive analysis of all of the buildings that need our support and we can— buildings that need our support and we can accelerate the work. her concerns — we can accelerate the work. her concerns are not misplaced and it is certainly— concerns are not misplaced and it is certainly my— concerns are not misplaced and it is certainly my intention to ensure that we — certainly my intention to ensure that we accelerate and make brands if at work _ that we accelerate and make brands if at work. she also made the point that non—cladding costs do need to be met— that non—cladding costs do need to be met and — that non—cladding costs do need to be met and i agree. she specifically requested _ be met and i agree. she specifically requested that we provide mms to the building _ requested that we provide mms to the building safety belt to ensure that there _ building safety belt to ensure that there was statutory protection for leaseholders. that is our intention, we will— leaseholders. that is our intention, we will bring forth those amendments and i'd _ we will bring forth those amendments and i'd forward to working with her and i'd forward to working with her and colleagues across the house to
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provide _ and colleagues across the house to provide the most robust legal protection. she also doubted, and again— protection. she also doubted, and again i_ protection. she also doubted, and again i can — protection. she also doubted, and again i can understand the basis of that, _ again i can understand the basis of that, whether or not developers, given— that, whether or not developers, given that — that, whether or not developers, given that past behaviour, would necessary — given that past behaviour, would necessary come sweetly to the table. that is _ necessary come sweetly to the table. that is why _ necessary come sweetly to the table. that is why it important we have a range _ that is why it important we have a range of— that is why it important we have a range of tools available. it is inborn— range of tools available. it is inborn to _ range of tools available. it is inborn to recognise there are some developers — inborn to recognise there are some developers and some in the industry who have _ developers and some in the industry who have the right thing. it is also important — who have the right thing. it is also important to recognise that one representative struck an important and helpful tone. representative struck an important and helpfultone. it representative struck an important and helpful tone. it is clear that taxes _ and helpful tone. it is clear that taxes if— and helpful tone. it is clear that taxes if necessary play a part. i don't _ taxes if necessary play a part. i don't want _ taxes if necessary play a part. i don't want to move there, but we have _ don't want to move there, but we have the — don't want to move there, but we have the absolute assurance that we can use _ have the absolute assurance that we can use the — have the absolute assurance that we can use the prospect of taxation in order— can use the prospect of taxation in order to _ can use the prospect of taxation in order to bring people to the table. all taxation decisions are made by the chancellor. no chief chancellor would _ the chancellor. no chief chancellor would say — the chancellor. no chief chancellor would say other than that. but the fact they— would say other than that. but the fact they have authorised me to use the prospects of taxation, the fact
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that we _ the prospects of taxation, the fact that we have taxation through the residential tax shows we will take every— residential tax shows we will take every step necessary. the final point _ every step necessary. the final point which was implicit, perhaps explicit, — point which was implicit, perhaps explicit, was that we will be judged on our— explicit, was that we will be judged on our actions. that is entirely fair~ _ on our actions. that is entirely fair~ i— on our actions. that is entirely fair. i recognise, given the scale of frustration so many have felt in the past, — of frustration so many have felt in the past, they can only be satisfaction when we bring this to a conclusion — satisfaction when we bring this to a conclusion. today marks a significant step forward but there is more _ significant step forward but there is more work to do, and i hope we can do— is more work to do, and i hope we can do that — is more work to do, and i hope we can do that on a cross—party basis to bring _ can do that on a cross—party basis to bring justice to those who do it. iwill_ to bring justice to those who do it. i will cooperate. can i say to you to the mother of the house that the tributes to her husband, his work will be long remembered, along with those of david amis. i believe this
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is another step forward which is greatly welcomed and greatly needed. i think the extension of the liability of 30 years is wrong for those who knew what they were doing was wrong. 30 years is fine for those who do not know they were making as mistake. one problem on the insurance premiums paid by leaseholders for the property they don't own, which may have gone up from £300 a year to £3000 a year. i believe the association of british insurers will look to see whether there is price gouging, in simple terms, and if
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there is some kind of catastrophic reinsurance needed that the government will help them with that. they will need to come down to the £300 they were before. the last point i would like to make is that the treasury will expect to get the benefit of levy and tax towards the 5 billion already announced and contributions which are coming from developers will relieve burdens on leaseholders. the government also gets the vat on money spent, which is 20% of the total cost. if that has come down to 12 billion, how much extra will the treasury be getting gresham at the treasury should not be making money from this catastrophe. t should not be making money from this catastrohe. :, ~ :, :, catastrophe. i thank the father of the house for _ catastrophe. i thank the father of the house for his _ catastrophe. i thank the father of the house for his questions. - catastrophe. i thank the father of the house for his questions. i - catastrophe. i thank the father of| the house for his questions. i will also say— the house for his questions. i will also say he — the house for his questions. i will also say he is quite right that sir david _ also say he is quite right that sir david amis, before his sad death, with one _ david amis, before his sad death, with one of— david amis, before his sad death, with one of the most prescient and
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most _ with one of the most prescient and most effective campaigners for improved building safety. his memory is very— improved building safety. his memory is very much— improved building safety. his memory is very much in my mind. the point that he _ is very much in my mind. the point that he makes about the need to look at unlimited liability for those who consciously and deliberately operated in a reckless fashion is one i_ operated in a reckless fashion is one i will— operated in a reckless fashion is one i will consider and will be considered in the passage of the bill. considered in the passage of the hilt his— considered in the passage of the bill. his point that we should work with others, particularly the broad leasehold — with others, particularly the broad leasehold community who have done so much to— leasehold community who have done so much to identify the way forward, is one that _ much to identify the way forward, is one that we — much to identify the way forward, is one that we intend to do. the one about— one that we intend to do. the one about insurance premiums is right and that— about insurance premiums is right and that is— about insurance premiums is right and that is why my noble friend will be talking _ and that is why my noble friend will be talking to baroness morgan and others _ be talking to baroness morgan and others in _ be talking to baroness morgan and others in order to ensure that more insurers _ others in order to ensure that more insurers like — others in order to ensure that more insurers like aviva do the right thing — insurers like aviva do the right thing i— insurers like aviva do the right thing. i note his point about vat and treasury contributions. in the ongoing _ and treasury contributions. in the ongoing conversations we have the
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chancellor — ongoing conversations we have the chancellor of the exchequer, i will reflect _ chancellor of the exchequer, i will reflect the — chancellor of the exchequer, i will reflect the important point he makes will. reflect the important point he makes with |_ reflect the important point he makes will. , :, : :, , , will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the — will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the house _ will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the house to _ will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the house to the _ will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the house to the work- will. i wish to echo the sentiments around the house to the work that i around the house to the work that jack dromy has done on this issue. it has been almost five years since the grenfell fire. in that time, they have been four housing secretaries and several approaches to this issue. first, the government would pay, then leaseholders, and now developers. all because the treasury has for so long refused to act further on this issue. this confusion is not only harming homeowners facing a cost of living crisis but affecting the ability of devolved governments to plan their responses appropriately. can the secretary of state guarantee that this latest policy will be acted upon, and will he commit to acting with the devolved governments to provide clarity? can he make clear
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when the already promised funding will be fully and finally deliver to the devolved governments for this matter? t the devolved governments for this matter? :, :, ., matter? i am grateful to the honourable _ matter? i am grateful to the honourable lady _ matter? i am grateful to the honourable lady for - matter? i am grateful to the honourable lady for her- matter? i am grateful to the i honourable lady for her points matter? i am grateful to the - honourable lady for her points was to be _ honourable lady for her points was to be will— honourable lady for her points was to be will work with the devolved governments. the developer property tax is _ governments. the developer property tax is distributed appropriately in line with — tax is distributed appropriately in line with the formula and other requirements. i should say that i'm requirements. ishould say that i'm grateful— requirements. ishould say that i'm grateful to— requirements. i should say that i'm grateful to both the scottish government, welsh, and at the northern— government, welsh, and at the northern ireland executive for the work— northern ireland executive for the work they— northern ireland executive for the work they have done on this issue and we _ work they have done on this issue and we all— work they have done on this issue and we all have much to learn from one another~ — and we all have much to learn from one another. i and we all have much to learn from one another-— and we all have much to learn from one another. i welcome the direction of travel in this _ one another. i welcome the direction of travel in this statement, _ of travel in this statement, specifically that leaseholders will not have to pay for cladding remediation. i am also glad to see that building products makers are now coming within the scope of government and not only property developers. i personally have been shocked by some of the revelations
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coming from the grenfell enquiry. i think potentially we need to address the building products sector. can i stress that speed and delivery here is critical. it is now 4.5 years since the tragedy in my constituency and what is important is not only having a good plan but it is executing it quickly and efficiently. t executing it quickly and efficiently.— executing it quickly and efficientl. :, ,: :, , executing it quickly and efficientl. :, ,: :, efficiently. i am conscious of the need for speed. _ efficiently. i am conscious of the need for speed. i _ efficiently. i am conscious of the need for speed. i quite - efficiently. i am conscious of the need for speed. i quite agree. if| need for speed. i quite agree. if you look— need for speed. i quite agree. if you look at— need for speed. i quite agree. if you look at the behaviour of some of the~~ _ you look at the behaviour of some of the... taste— you look at the behaviour of some of the... ~ :, :, , :, you look at the behaviour of some of the... ~ :, :, :, the... we will leave that debate now in the commons _ the... we will leave that debate now in the commons and _ the... we will leave that debate now in the commons and the _ the... we will leave that debate now in the commons and the housing - in the commons and the housing secretaries there, michael gove, outlining details of plans to get developers to pay to remove unsafe cladding. let's take a look at the weather now.
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hello there. we've seen much more cloud across the uk today, but for many parts of the country, temperatures have been a bit higher than they were yesterday. now, this is the sort of air we will get into tomorrow for many of us, but these weather fronts are continuing to bring a lot of cloud today, and a bit of rain and drizzle around it as well. but mild air as well — temperatures late afternoon and early evening still double figures for many western areas. it is chillier further east, mind you. we will see that rain and drizzle moving away from scotland and northern ireland, and clearer skies arriving overnight. that cloudy, damp weather continues to push further down into england and wales, but it does mean that it will be much milder than last night for eastern parts of england, and no frost here. where we have the clearer skies in scotland and northern ireland, it could be quite a bit colder, mind you. moving into tomorrow, that cloudy, damp weather, continues to run down across england and wales, coming to rest across east anglia, southern england with late improvement in south wales. but the rest of the uk
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seeing some sunshine. some showers coming on those blustery winds in some western areas of scotland. temperatures in glasgow and belfast won't be as high as today — the housing compound you housing secretary says he expects developers to pay the £4 billion bill to resolve cladding issues. to billion bill to resolve cladding issues. :, :, :, issues. to those who sought to ro -e issues. to those who sought to property from _ issues. to those who sought to property from the _ issues. to those who sought to | property from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy, we are
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coming for you. the of the grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. of the grenfell tragedy, we are cominu for ou. :,, , :, coming for you. the developers and manufacturers _ coming for you. the developers and manufacturers who _ coming for you. the developers and manufacturers who profited - coming for you. the developers and manufacturers who profited from i coming for you. the developers and l manufacturers who profited from this appalling _ manufacturers who profited from this appalling scandal, not the victims, should _ appalling scandal, not the victims, should bear greater costs, and leaseholders must not pay. novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. his family held a press conference. translation: | want to thank - everyone in the world who stood up and supported him, that is the energy that helped him to fight. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen according to new climate data. ikea has cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff who need to self—isolate because of covid exposure. "i think i've found a dinosaur" — the fossilized remains of a ten metre long sea creature that lived 250 million years ago is discovered in rutland. in the past half hour, the housing secretary, michael gove,
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has told mps he's prepared to use legal means to make builders pay to remove unsafe cladding from lower—height buildings in england. mr gove said it had taken the "tragedy" of the grenfell tower fire injune 2017, in which 72 people died, to put building safety properly on the agenda. speaking in the commons, he added that developers should pick up a £4 billion bill forfixing problems, not residents. mr gove warned that those who profited off unsafe buildings will be pursued. i'm putting them on notice, to those who mis—sold dangerous products like cladding and insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished homes, and to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. i have established a dedicated team in my department to expose and pursue those responsible. we will begin by reviewing government schemes and programmes to make sure
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in accordance with due process there are commercial consequences for any company which is responsible for this crisis and refuses to help to fix it. in line with theirs, just before christmas i instructed holmes england to suspend ride on homes which has been connected to the company that reconstructed grenfell tower in the help to buy scheme, with immediate effect, and i want to welcome the decision by the mercedes formula 1 team to discontinue sponsorship from kings, the cladding firm, with immediate effect. the voices of the families of the bereaved and the survivors of the grenfell tower fire were heard but this is only the start of the action that must be taken. but labour's shadow housing secretary, lisa nandy, questioned if mr gove had the power to impose taxes on developers who won't pay. today he warned developers that if negotiation fails, our backstop, what _ negotiation fails, our backstop, what we — negotiation fails, our backstop, what we can do is increased taxation on those _ what we can do is increased taxation on those responsible, but that is not quite —
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on those responsible, but that is not quite right, is it? i have the letter— not quite right, is it? i have the letter from _ not quite right, is it? i have the letter from the chief secretary to the treasury and can i remind him what _ the treasury and can i remind him what it— the treasury and can i remind him what it says? he was told, you may use a _ what it says? he was told, you may use a high—level threat of tax or legal— use a high—level threat of tax or legal solutions in discussions with developers, but whether or not to impose _ developers, but whether or not to impose or— developers, but whether or not to impose or raise taxes remains a decision— impose or raise taxes remains a decision for— impose or raise taxes remains a decision for me, the chief secretary and is _ decision for me, the chief secretary and is not _ decision for me, the chief secretary and is not a — decision for me, the chief secretary and is not a given at this point, it says _ and is not a given at this point, it says if— and is not a given at this point, it says if i— and is not a given at this point, it says. if i have seen this letter, i'm says. if i have seen this letter, in fairly— says. if i have seen this letter, i'm fairly sure that the developers have, _ i'm fairly sure that the developers have as _ i'm fairly sure that the developers have, as well. it appears that what he has _ have, as well. it appears that what he has told — have, as well. it appears that what he has told the public that tax rises — he has told the public that tax rises are — he has told the public that tax rises are the backstop is not what he has _ rises are the backstop is not what he has told — rises are the backstop is not what he has told the treasury, and this letter— he has told the treasury, and this letter says. — he has told the treasury, and this letter says, you have confirmed separately that budgets are a backstop for finding these proposals in full— backstop for finding these proposals in full should sufficient funds not be raised — in full should sufficient funds not be raised from industry, and now that is— be raised from industry, and now that is not— be raised from industry, and now that is not what the secretary of state _ that is not what the secretary of state told the house a moment ago, so can— state told the house a moment ago, so can he _ state told the house a moment ago, so can he clear this up? has the chancellor— so can he clear this up? has the chancellor agreed to back a new tax measure _ chancellor agreed to back a new tax measure if— chancellor agreed to back a new tax measure if negotiations fail or is he prepared to see his already
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allocated budget, monies for social and affordable housing raided? we can and affordable housing raided? we. can no and affordable housing raided? can go over and affordable housing raided? 9 can go over to our correspondent, jonathan blake. what did michael gove say in more detail? this jonathan blake. what did michael gove say in more detail?- jonathan blake. what did michael gove say in more detail? this is the long-awaited _ gove say in more detail? this is the long-awaited you _ gove say in more detail? this is the long-awaited you plan _ gove say in more detail? this is the long-awaited you plan to _ gove say in more detail? this is the long-awaited you plan to address i gove say in more detail? this is the l long-awaited you plan to address the long—awaited you plan to address the building safety crisis which has been ongoing in the uk now overfour years, since the grenfell tower fire in 2017, and it has come to light that materials, cladding, mostly used on the outside of new build flats, has been dangerous and it needs to be removed and replaced, and other defects and features which are not safe in buildings. they also need to be remedied. the cost for that runs into many millions and millions of pounds and there has been a question about who should foot the bill and under the previous planet was to a large part taxpayers, and the government, stumping up money but only for
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buildings above 18 metres high —— under the previous plan. buildings are lower than that, the cost largely had to be shouldered by people living in the flats, leaseholders who had to take out loans. to pay for that work. now there is a new plan as we heard from michael gove, that buildings above 11 metres, the money will come not from it leaseholders themselves but from it leaseholders themselves but from elsewhere, from developers and private companies, the government hopes, and the people they argue are responsible for the defects and the things that need to be put right in the first place. that is the major change, and there is a new category of buildings for which the repair and remediation costs will be covered, not by the people living in them, and michael gove said he wanted to bring forward a statutory protections for leaseholders, to protections for leaseholders, to protect them in law from having to shoulder any costs. there will also
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be changes to regulations which have seenin be changes to regulations which have seen in some cases the government says, over interpreted outcomes where things like waking watches and other measures have been put in place unnecessarily. there will be other changes, as well. but that is in large part a big shift in the government's policy towards addressing the building safety crisis and some far—reaching measures, no doubt, outlined by michael gove this afternoon which had been broadly welcomed by campaigners, leaseholders and opposition parties.— campaigners, leaseholders and opposition parties. time is of the essence and _ opposition parties. time is of the essence and this _ opposition parties. time is of the essence and this is _ opposition parties. time is of the essence and this is now - opposition parties. time is of the essence and this is now nearly i opposition parties. time is of the l essence and this is now nearly five years since the grenfell tower tragedy. what happens next, what is the timetable?— the timetable? michael gove has set a timetable for _ the timetable? michael gove has set a timetable for between _ the timetable? michael gove has set a timetable for between now- the timetable? michael gove has set a timetable for between now and i a timetable for between now and easter to get developers around the table, to come up with a solution to
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do the right thing, as he put it, and offer a way to find the money, £4 billion, that the government estimates is needed here, to put right what needs to be done. whilst there is a timetable for those talks to happen, for a solution the government hopes to be found, there is no fixed timetable for the money to be paid orfor the work to be done, and as lisa nandy for labour highlighted in her questioning after the statement from michael gove, several targets are set to be missed and it has been running for too long already, and that is something michael gove accepted. there is an urgency but it hangs on whether the developers and companies involved in the property sector are willing and able to come forward with a solution that the government is happy with and if not, the question is, where is the money going to come from and how will it work? michael gove has
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put forward a couple of possible options there, some threats of possible new tax which developers and property companies could be hit with or compelling them to pay, somehow, through a change in the law. . :, :, :, somehow, through a change in the law. jonathan blake, thanks for “oininu law. jonathan blake, thanks for joining us- _ novak djokovic says he is focused on playing in the australian open next week after winning a court battle that overturned his visa cancellation. the 34—year—old serb said he practised on court in melbourne within hours of leaving an immigration detention hotel. but australia's immigration minister still has powers to cancel the visa again, and deport the unvaccinated player. this report from our correspondent in melbourne, shaimaa khalil. cheering they've waited days for this decision and when the news came that novak djokovic was to be released from detention, his supporters erupted with joy. he won, djokovic won!
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judge anthony kelly overturned the government's decision to cancel djokovic's visa. what we saw today here in the court that the australian legal system is functioning, it is evidence—based, it is aboutjustice. yeah, i'm extremely happy as everyone is in the serbian community here. but the jubilant mood changed quickly into uncertainty and confusion when it became unclear whether djokovic would be allowed to stay, despite the court's decision in his favour. this is the world number one saying last week that he was on his way to australia after being granted a medical exemption. novak djokovic had been public about opposing the vaccine and his announcement angered many australians and this is djokovic arriving in melbourne last wednesday, before he was held by border force officers for hours. during the video conference hearing, the tennis star's legal team argued that he was treated unfairly
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by the border officials. they said the player was not given time to consult his legal team or tennis australia when his visa was revoked. they added that djokovic travelled to australia on the understanding that his exemption due to a previous covid—19 infection was valid and that he had done everything that was required of him by tennis australia. the judge agreed, asking at one point in the hearing, "what more could this man have done?" he was interrogated by border force migration officers in the early morning. they gave him three hours to come up with an answer to this question and that's what they promised to him, so that he could get some legal advice but within an hour, they had made their decision. in other words, they did not give him the time that they promised. but the lawyer for the government has said the immigration minister could still use his executive power to cancel the player's visa. it's impossible to ignore the politics at play in all of this. the leadership wanted to appear tough on border and covid rules. throughout this process,
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did they act because they realised, rightly, i think, that there was kind of public outrage that novak djokovic might be getting different treatment than anybody else? it appears to me to be a complete embarrassment for the australian government. a few hours ago, djokovic's supporters thought they caught a glimpse of him. but they clashed with the police and they were dispersed with pepper spray. earlier, the player's brother djordje told a news conference in belgrade that novak was now focused on training. a warning — there's flash photography in the next clip. translation: novak is free, - and a few moments ago he trained, he was on a tennis court. he went to australia to play tennis. that is why, to try to win another australian open and to win a record
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that he has been chasing for so many years. he had all the documents that were required of him and in the end he got medical exemption with which he travelled to australia. the result of everything else that has happened, we have found out today, we have learned about it today. once again, i want to say that novak is an athlete, he is a tennis player. he is the best tennis player of all time. everything he supports in his life is to live up to his principles and ideals. he has been branded in different ways for many years but he has always supported the freedom of choice and that is all, nothing else. our correspondent, guy de launey, is in the serbian capital, belgrade, where djokovic is a national hero, but says
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public opinion is divided. it depends which way you look at it, and if you look at the serbian media, the tabloid media, certainly, every day they have been 100% behind novak djokovic. and 100% against australia. you would not have wanted to be reading the serbian media if you are the australian prime minister, scott morrison, they said some very fruity things about him, but novak djokovic is their hero and there has beenjubilation in serbia when the judge delivered his verdict. a lot of trepidation when it occurred to people that there was still the possibility of ministerial intervention that could still see djokovic deported from australia but finally we are now seeing some degree of relief that he is out of detention for the moment. we're going to be able to take a pause for breath and thought. but if you talk to folk around you,
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of course they're frustrated with novak djokovic, if they have been vaccinated, they say, "why doesn't he just get it done? "it would have been easy." interesting. we wait to see what happens next. we hear that djokovic is training and he has taken advantage of the court ruling to get out on the court but there are warnings from the government, or we suspect there are warnings that this is not the end of the matter. absolutely. the government reserves, this is the australian government, they reserve the right to take executive action and ministers could intervene and order that novak djokovic is removed from australia and i think everyone is quite aware of that. we are on tenterhooks in serbia, which way is it going to go in australia? this could be a political matter in australia and that has been the impression that people have been getting in serbia.
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the serbian president saying there is political ranting going on in australia and headlines in the newspaper saying that novak djokovic is the victim of a political game. there's a feeling here that it isn't just about sport and it isn't just about covid regulations or immigration, but it might be what is best for the government in australia in an election year. the headlines on bbc news... the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. his family hold a press conference. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen according to new climate data.
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the last seven years have been the hottest since records began in around 1850. that's according to new global climate data from the eu's satellite system, the copernicus climate change service. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, reports. deadly floods heralded the new year in brazil and there have already been wildfires in the us state of colorado as 2022 looks set to continue the trend of extreme weather that we saw last year. these latest temperature figures confirmed that europe experienced its warmest summer on record as well as devastating floods in germany and belgium injuly. the data collected by european satellites shows 2021 was the fifth hottest year ever recorded. it also shows the concentration of warming gases in the atmosphere continuing to rise with record levels of both carbon
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dioxide and methane. the new data confirms that the world is warming and we do see from year to year some years are warmer and some are cooler but overall they are getting warmer and alongside that there is the build—up of greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane and that has continued. what has been really striking according to experts are the weather extremes that the world experienced in 2021. the exceptional heat in canada and in the us, for example. and the direction of travel is impossible to ignore. the figures show the last seven years have been the hottest years ever recorded. and the bad news is a temporary cooling event in the pacific ocean actually lowered global temperatures marginally last year but that will soon pass so do not expect any letup in the warming trend in the years to come.
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according to one senior climate scientists it is yet another warning of the damage that we are doing to our planetary home. justin rowlatt, bbc news. joining us now is professor liz bentley, the chief executive of the royal meteorolgoical society. good of the royal meteorolgoical society. afternoon. thr have good afternoon. the last seven years have been the hottest since the mid 19th century, since we were measuring these things and last year was the fifth warmest globally and i suspect rather miserably this will be of no surprise? that suspect rather miserably this will be of no surprise?— suspect rather miserably this will be of no surprise? that is right. we have seen in _ be of no surprise? that is right. we have seen in recent _ be of no surprise? that is right. we have seen in recent years _ be of no surprise? that is right. we have seen in recent years record i have seen in recent years record breaking heat events and heatwave events, wild fires, flooding, and those temperature records keep creeping up and up, and last year was the fifth warmest on record and that was during the year when we had a cooling event that takes place in the pacific ocean which tends to suppress global average temperatures
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so even in a year with that particular cooling event happening, we still saw the fifth warmest year on record. :, :, :, , on record. the other thing that has characterised _ on record. the other thing that has characterised last _ on record. the other thing that has characterised last year _ on record. the other thing that has characterised last year very - on record. the other thing that has characterised last year very vividly | characterised last year very vividly in the memory of people is the extreme weather events that we saw, we saw them in europe, extreme flooding, and also fires. that we saw them in europe, extreme flooding, and also fires.- flooding, and also fires. that is riuht. flooding, and also fires. that is right. record-breaking - flooding, and also fires. that is| right. record-breaking summer flooding, and also fires. that is i right. record-breaking summer for right. record—breaking summer for europe, right. record—breaking summerfor europe, the flooding events affecting germany and belgium, in the early part of the summer, and the early part of the summer, and the heat event, record—breaking heat in europe, leading to wildfires in many countries across europe, and we are seeing these events happening on are seeing these events happening on a much more frequent basis around the world. , :, :, :, , , the world. this data has been released by — the world. this data has been released by the _ the world. this data has been released by the eu's - the world. this data has been released by the eu's climate l the world. this data has been i released by the eu's climate change service called copernicus, how important is this kind of data to countries in terms of their efforts to mitigate climate change? tt is to mitigate climate change? it is really important _ to mitigate climate change? tit 3 really important we captured this climate data to get a good picture
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of how these trends are changing, to understand not only the changes in temperature and rainfall amounts but also the greenhouse gas emissions that we are putting into the atmosphere, things like carbon dioxide and methane, and this report highlights that both of those greenhouse gases are continuing to increase and the need to buck that trend and start reducing the greenhouse gases that we emit into the atmosphere, so that is about mitigation of climate change, thinking about how we can make changes to our lifestyle and to businesses, to governments implementing changes so we can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but we also need to think, extreme weather events are happening so we need to learn to adapt to our changing climate as well. there are lonu-term changing climate as well. there are long-term measures _ changing climate as well. there are long-term measures and _ changing climate as well. there are l long-term measures and short-term long—term measures and short—term measures? long-term measures and short-term measures? :, , :, , , measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs — measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs to _ measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs to take _ measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs to take place _ measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs to take place now i measures? that is right, absolutely. action needs to take place now in i action needs to take place now in order to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and that can be driven by governments and we saw the cop26
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conference in glasgow last year and there are signs that governments want to move in that direction, maybe not quick enough that we would like to see from the climate data we have seen, but there is action we can take as individuals and that is really important. it sometimes when we have compact problems, it feels there is little we can do as individuals, but we do have a choice, we can make changes to our lifestyle to reduce our own greenhouse gas emissions —— when we have complex problems. whether that is reducing the amount of meat and dairy we eat, travelling less, by not flying, walking and cycling instead, just simple changes which can reduce our own greenhouse gas emissions. :, :, :, , the prime minister, borisjohnson, says he welcomes a decision by virgin mobile 02, whose users will not face roaming charges this year. two of the uk's four biggest
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networks — ee and vodafone — are reintroducing roaming charges for customers travelling to europe injanuary, with three set to reintroduce them in may. our technology correspondent, marc cieslak, has been telling us more. with the uk leaving the eu, mobile networks are no longer obliged to abide by those rules and last year all of the big four networks, vodafone, virgin 02, ee and three, they all said they were not going to introduce roaming charges, but three are now going to introduce them. all apart from virgin 02. have those three said why they are doing so? not yet. we have put in calls but we have not heard from those networks as to why they are doing that. we have heard from the prime minister, though? yes, he was on twitter saying he welcomes the decision
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by virgin media and o2 to keep roaming free, which means uk citizens can still use their data across europe without extra charges and it will be interesting to see if this tweet has any influence with those other networks. at the very least, it is free prime ministerial advertising for that particular network. 50, virgin 02, why have they made the move not to reintroduce charges? it looks like it will be a point of differentiation for this network, especially when people are thinking about changing their mobile phone. if they are worried about racking up huge roaming bills as they travel across europe, or go on holiday, this might be a point where they go, "that is the network i might decide to go with." it's important to point out that the network is probably not going to have to pay out that much and it won't have a financial impact on them as yet because of the reduction in travel as a result of the pandemic.
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the uk has reported 140 2000, 224 covid cases on monday. —— 140,200. covid cases on monday. ——140,200. so that is nearly a thousand up. about 800 up. on yesterday. the figures are often a bit depressed on sunday and the figures for people who have died within 28 days of a positive covid test showed there were 77 covid—19 deaths reported yesterday, compared with 97 the day before. pregnant women are being urged again not to delay getting their covid jab or booster in a government campaign. our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, has more. this was claire bromley last summer after she contracted covid, pregnant and on a ventilator, because she had been struggling to breathe. she had been about to get vaccinated when she caught the virus. he was getting everything he needed
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from me because that's what babies do when they are in the tummy but it was me that was getting more and more poorly because as he was taking the oxygen he needed, i didn't have enough oxygen to keep giving him and to support myself. claire eventually gave birth to a healthy baby boy, after going through a difficult recovery. today, pregnant women are being urged once again to get protected, with warnings that 96% of them who need hospital treatment for covid are not vaccinated. pregnant women who are admitted with covid, one in three need respiratory support, one in six need to go to intensive care. one in five need to be delivered preterm and one in five, their babies need to go to the neonatal unit.
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scientists say they now have large—scale data, in particular from the uk and america, to show vaccines are safe. this does not increase the risk of stillbirth or premature birth. there is no increased risk of miscarriage or foetal abnormality, so it's really important to get the safety message to women that we have much more data which is really reassuring now that we didn't have previously. boris johnson visited a vaccination centre today. there are some very early signs that the number of infections and hospital admissions may be levelling off. whether that trend continues or not, the message for everyone is to get protected. omicron is still out there, it's incredibly contagious. everybody will know somebody who has had it. it can be pretty unpleasant. sadly, as you know, 90% of the people who are in icu with covid have not been vaccinated. claire was given her second vaccine yesterday. she says she feels very lucky
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to have had a happy ending after such a traumatic experience. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. new research suggests natural defences against a common cold could offer some protection against coronavirus. the small—scale study, published in nature communications, involved 52 individuals who lived with someone who had just caught covid—19. our health correspondentjim reed gave us more details. one theory that's been talked about by scientists for ages is, if you've been exposed to another virus in the coronavirus family in the past, so not covid, not sars-cov-2, but one that's related to it, could you build up some protection in that way? and, actually, coronaviruses are notjust about covid. there's lots of different coronaviruses, seven of them. four of those coronaviruses are actually, we think, connected to the common cold. so this is not covid, it's a related virus.
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this theory goes that, if you've been exposed to one of those cold viruses in the past, could it be protecting you against covid? that is what this research has looked into. so they took 52 unvaccinated people, and this was way back in september 2020, before people had had the vaccines. so 52, half of those people, in households of those 52, managed to contract covid, and half didn't. they looked at the group, the half that didn't. those ones that didn't had much higher levels of what are called t cells, which are memory cells, memory immunity cells, that are linked to previous exposure to common colds, coronaviruses that way. so the conclusion they have come to is it looks like if you have been exposed to the common cold, this form of the common cold in the past, it might be giving you more protection against covid, which is really interesting, because it's something that scientists have been thinking about for ages. this is one of the first studies that has actually
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suggested that's true. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello, there. we are continuing to see a lot of cloud across the uk today, thick enough to see some rain and drizzle in places. still mild late evening in the west of the uk, but chillier further east. this damp cloudy weather will push away from scotland overnight, so clearer skies here, but the damp rain and drizzle will push into england and wales. it will be much milder than last night across the eastern side of england. under the clear skies, a frost more likely in eastern scotland. heading into tomorrow, we have the cloud continuing to move southwards, bringing rain and drizzle. that will come to rest across east anglia and southern england. late improvements across south wales. the rest of the country seeing some sunshine developing. away from those showers.
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it will not be as warm as today in glasgow and belfast, highest of temperatures in double figures in the cloudy and damp weather in the south of england. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england.
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novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open. his family will hold a press conference. the last seven years have been the hottest the world has ever seen, according to new climate data. ikea has cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff who need to self—isolate because of covid exposure. "i think i've found a dinosaur" — the fossilized remains of a ten—metre—long sea creature that lived 250 million years ago is discovered in rutland. sport, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. novak djokovic thanked his fans for keeping him strong, after he won his appeal against a decision to refuse him entry to australia. he tweeted he's looking to defending his australian open tennis title — but a former wimbledon champion feels if he does compete, the going might be tough him.
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marion bartoli said djokovic could be mentally drained by events over the last few days. there's still possibility for another twist — the australian immigration minister is expected to decide whether to use his personal power to cancel the visa for a second time. djokovic is on for a record 10th title in melbourne, and landmark 21st grand slam overall. i think you can sort of work his way through that first week and build his momentum to a second week. it is how he will be affected by all of this and the headlines. he is the best under pressure and in tough circumstances, but it is how the crowd will react. if he has the whole stadium against him, boeing or whatever, how will that affect him? it is hard to tell in advance. nick kyrgios has spoken out about how the djokovic situation has been handled — he might have situation
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of his own to deal with. krygios revealed he's tested positive for covid—19. he said he was feeling healthy and had no symptoms, but with the australian open starting a week from today, his participation must be in doubt. kyrgios pulled out of last week's melbourne warm—up event, due to an illness that sparked his asthma, and although he tested negative at the time, today he confirmed he had contracted the virus. heartbreakfor zimbabwe, in their opening africa cup of nations match — they were beaten by one of the tournament favourites senegal deep into stoppage time. senegal were awarded a late penalty after kelvin madzongwe handled the ball in the box — causing pandemonium. sadio mane, so accustomed to scoring in the premier league for liverpool — converted from the spot. zimbabwe, over 100 places below their opponents in the rankings, are hoping to avoid a third straight exit at the group stage. there are four more teams in action right now. guinea up against malawi. goalless at the moment.
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and two of the favouriotes, morocco and ghana — 0—0 with just over half an hour played. later on, a big day for the comoros — up against gabon, that kicks off injust over two hours. the tiny comoros islands will make their debut at the tournament later — they take on gabon in yaounde. the archipelago is one of football's youngest nations — they onlyjoined fifa in 2005 — but in qualifying for this competition they won a first competitive international away from home in togo and held egypt to a draw, to make the finals. they're in a tough group, which also includes former winners ghana and morocco, but comoros defender said bakari believes they deserve their place. i think we can show the world that we know what we can do. we have to respect the other teams, because we are new in the competition, but we don't come as a new team, we come as
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a team like other teams. we believe in our team, we have confidence in our football and in our team, we have confidence in ourfootball and we will in our team, we have confidence in our football and we will play like every team, we will play to win. meanwhile, there's a big fa cup tie at old trafford tonight. manchester united are at home to aston villa — it'll be steven gerrard's first trip there as a manager. he says villa are treating it as a �*super important�* game, and his team will have to take a positive approach because there are no replays this season. we need to go there and be as ambitious _ we need to go there and be as ambitious and brave as we can. it is not like _ ambitious and brave as we can. it is not like it— ambitious and brave as we can. it is not like it used to be where you can set up _ not like it used to be where you can set up in _ not like it used to be where you can set up in a — not like it used to be where you can set up in a certain way and you have may be _ set up in a certain way and you have may be a— set up in a certain way and you have may be a safety net in a certain period — may be a safety net in a certain period of— may be a safety net in a certain period of a _ may be a safety net in a certain period of a game where you can full-back— period of a game where you can full—back on a period of a game where you can full— back on a replay. it period of a game where you can full—back on a replay. it has changed _ full—back on a replay. it has changed the dynamics. if we can go there _ changed the dynamics. if we can go there and _ changed the dynamics. if we can go there and give a real strong account of ourselves, i am confident we can do that, _ of ourselves, i am confident we can do that, i_ of ourselves, i am confident we can do that, i hope it will be an interesting night. last year's runner up, john higgins, is through to the quarter finals of snooker�*s masters. the four—time world champion beat
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zhao xintong of china by six frames to two at alexandra palace. next up, he'll play mark williams — who knocked out the defending champion yan bingtao yesterday. and you'll be able to watch that fa cup game on bbc one tonight, coverage from 7.30pm. that's all the sport for now. eight men who sued manchester city football club, after they said they'd been sexually abused by paedophile coach barry bennell more than 30 years ago, have lost a high court fight for damages. the men, who are now in their 40s and 50s, say bennell abused them when they were playing schoolboy football for teams he coached in north—west england between 1979 and 1985. our sports correspondent, laura scott, has more. they said the club was legally responsible for the harm they have suffered because, in their view, the relationship between their coach and the club was one akin to employment, but the club denied this. during the seven week trial, barry bennell gave two days of evidence from his prison where he is serving a 34 year sentence. that is for sexual offences against children. the decision to call him
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as a witness was described as callous, although the club's insurer said they were obliged to call relevant witnesses. today the high courtjudge said barry bennell was a liar and could not be trusted. in contrast, the judge said claimants had given vivid and compelling and credible evidence and proved that barry bennell abused them but he said the claims were brought too late to result in a fair trial and that it had not been shown that manchester city were directly or indirectly liable for barry bennell�*s acts of abuse. the lawyer for the men said they were shocked and dismayed and they will be appealing. manchester city have apologised to abuse survivors and say they have paid around £4 million as part of a compensation scheme, but what is clear is that some 30 years after these men were abused in their pursuit of a football career, and five years after this legal process began, they are not giving up on what they say is their fight for justice.
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ikea has cut its sick pay for unvaccinated staff. the company says anyone with a medical reason for not being vaccinated will still get full pay. wessex water has also introduced cuts to sick pay for unvaccinated staff. joining me now is efrat gordon, associate in employment at lee and thompson. she also runs a legal advice instagram account, without prejudice. good afternoon. what is the legal basis for a policy like this at ikea and wessex water?— basis for a policy like this at ikea and wessex water? good afternoon. thank ou and wessex water? good afternoon. thank you for— and wessex water? good afternoon. thank you for having _ and wessex water? good afternoon. thank you for having me. _ and wessex water? good afternoon. thank you for having me. the i thank you for having me. the equality act 2010 protects people from being disconnected against for protected characteristics, including gender, sex and others including maternity and disability, etc. introducing a policy such as this
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could potentially be discriminatory, depending on the reasons as to why somebody does not want to be vaccinated. if someone believes that they cannot be vaccinated, if they are a jehovah's witness, that could be discriminatory. however, ikea have actually made mitigating circumstances and said, if somebody cannot be vaccinated for particular reasons, they will take that into consideration and they may still pay them full six pay. it seems like they are protecting themselves against any discrimination claims that may arise.— that may arise. fascinating. so miaht that may arise. fascinating. so mi . ht we that may arise. fascinating. so might we see _ that may arise. fascinating. so might we see other _ that may arise. fascinating. so might we see other big - that may arise. fascinating. so i might we see other big employers going down this route as well, do you think?— going down this route as well, do ou think? : ,,:, , _, 4, you think? absolutely. if you think back to this _ you think? absolutely. if you think back to this time _ you think? absolutely. if you think back to this time last _ you think? absolutely. if you think back to this time last year, i you think? absolutely. if you think back to this time last year, we i you think? absolutely. if you think. back to this time last year, we were talking about mandating vaccines,
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the famous no jab, nojob policy by pimlico plumbers. we were saying at the time that that would probably be illegal. since then, things have developed, and we have said, you should be encouraging your staff to be vaccinated, rather than mandating. an easier way of getting your staff vaccinated. one way to encourage staff is to cut sick pay. if you think about it, if you are paying staff for pay to sit at home while they are isolating, they will not have any reason to get vaccinated. but if you say, if you are unvaccinated, we will only pay you statutory sick pay, they may say, i cannot live off that, so they are more likely to get vaccinated and come into work. that will help with the staff shortages which we are seeing at the moment. i think
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that will be a trend we will see going forward. is that will be a trend we will see going forward-— that will be a trend we will see auoin forward. , :, , . going forward. is there a difference between the _ going forward. is there a difference between the public _ going forward. is there a difference between the public and _ going forward. is there a difference between the public and private i between the public and private sector in terms of where it might be more difficult to apply a policy like this? : , ,:, , more difficult to apply a policy like this? �* , 99, , , like this? absolutely. in my opinion. — like this? absolutely. in my opinion. i— like this? absolutely. in my opinion, i think _ like this? absolutely. in my opinion, i think it _ like this? absolutely. in my opinion, i think it will- like this? absolutely. in my opinion, i think it will be i like this? absolutely. in my. opinion, i think it will be more difficult to apply it in the public sector, which is heavily unionised, such as in the nhs. those sick pay policies are likely to be more contractual, so it will be more difficult to cut them. i think it will be easier to implement them in the private sector, which are not heavily unionised and where policies are not contractual. ok. heavily unionised and where policies are not contractual.— ikea, which employs about 10,000 people in the uk, said in a statement...
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"fully vaccinated co—workers or those with mitigating circumstances will receive full pay for self—isolations. unvaccinated co—workers will be paid in line with our company absence policy for self—isolation, with close—contact isolation being paid at statutory sick pay. we appreciate that this is an emotive topic and all circumstances will be considered on a case by case basis, therefore anyone in doubt or concerned about their situation is encouraged to speak to their manager." the crown prosecution service has authorised hertfordshire police to charge a metropolitan police officer with further offences. the charges against david carrick relate to allegations involving four women between 2009 and 2018. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, can tell us more.
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what more do we know? there was a count which was increased by the end of november. buy today, he was facing wendy separate charges against —— 20 separate charges against —— 20 separate cases against four women. there are now eight women in total, 29 charges in total. the charges include 13 rapes, five sexual assaults, three counts of coercive behaviour, counts of full —— of full imprisonment. he will appear at westminster magistrates' court on wednesday in relation to the nine new charges that he faces. thank you.
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a faulty electric heater is being blamed for a fire in an apartment block in new york, which has killed 19 people including nine children. another 32 people were taken to hospital, several of whom are in a critical condition. the building provided affordable housing — many residents were immigrants from gambia. our north america correspondent, nada tawfik, has the latest. neighbours looked on with horror as heavy clouds of smoke engulfed the entire bronx apartment building. he is taking his time. he's got the baby. firefighters were on the scene within minutes. as they battled the initial blaze from a lower level apartment, the rising smoke proved to be deadly. it was just pitch black in my house, in the daytime. they were putting out the fire and all you could see was black smoke in front of the windows, black smoke. later, officials said it was a portable space heater that caused one of the worst fire disasters in new york's history. it started in a malfunctioning
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electric space heater. that was the cause of the fire. the fire consumed that apartment that was on two floors, and part of the hallway. the door to that apartment, unfortunately, when the residents left, was left open. it did not close by itself. the smoke spread throughout the building, thus the tremendous loss of life and other people fighting for their lives. tragically, a number of children have already died and it's feared the death toll could still rise. all 121 units in this building have now been cleared out and residents have been sent to a nearby shelter. and then they will be put in hotels for the time being. now, this high—rise is home to a large immigrant community and officials say they will dedicate funds to help them recover what they've lost. we're all feeling this and we are going to be here for this community, to help them navigate through this. crews are already on site
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cleaning up the debris, but much of what was lost cannot be replaced. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. a swimmer who represented great britain at the last paralympic games says he is "sick to death" of being laughed at because of his dwarfism. will perry has a common form of dwarfism and says people like him are often filmed or laughed at in the street. the 21—year—old has called on people to challenge those doing it. we can speak to will now. thank you forjoining us. very distressing to hear about what you have had to go through. teilii distressing to hear about what you have had to go through.— have had to go through. tell us about it. have had to go through. tell us about it- it _ have had to go through. tell us about it. it is _ have had to go through. tell us about it. it is outrageous. i have had to go through. tell us| about it. it is outrageous. every time we go out in public, whether it is shopping, meeting with france or family, we are stared at and laughed at and pointed at. people can even film us. it is ridiculous. we feel
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like we have to stay inside, hide from people abusing us, i think is the correct word. this from people abusing us, i think is the correct word.— from people abusing us, i think is the correct word. this is happening to ou, a the correct word. this is happening to you, a paralympian _ the correct word. this is happening to you, a paralympian who - to you, a paralympian who represented the country. it is to you, a paralympian who represented the country. it is so u ”settin represented the country. it is so upsetting because _ represented the country. it is so upsetting because i _ represented the country. it is so upsetting because i got - represented the country. it is so upsetting because i got back- represented the country. it is so i upsetting because i got back from tokyo, which is obviously a paralympic games, the biggest celebration of all different sorts of disabilities. we were treated like stars, everybody congratulates us for our tremendous efforts for competing for our country and we all get back and people like myself and others are subjected to being laughed at, filmed, photographed, abused publicly. it is literally night and day. we had a party in wembley. as soon as that was over, it was back to the same old staring and someone constantly. tt it was back to the same old staring and someone constantly. it is and someone constantly. it is extraordinary, _ and someone constantly. it is extraordinary, people filling you in the street? :, , :,
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the street? yeah, they have called me derogatory _ the street? yeah, they have called me derogatory terms _ the street? yeah, they have called me derogatory terms like - the street? yeah, they have called me derogatory terms like midget. | the street? yeah, they have called. me derogatory terms like midget. it is incredibly offensive. people tell me i need to grow, it is disgusting. i don't know where that video goes, if it goes on social media or is sent to theirfriends. if it goes on social media or is sent to their friends. but it is happened many times. you sent to their friends. but it is happened many times. you say that art of it happened many times. you say that part of it may _ happened many times. you say that part of it may come _ happened many times. you say that part of it may come from _ happened many times. you say that part of it may come from the i part of it may come from the portrayal in the media or in shows or comedies of people with dwarfism. yes, i think a good example of that is wolf of wall street, where we are used as darts on a human dartboard. much more people are exposed to
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media like that, or people on tick—tock making fun of themselves, thatis tick—tock making fun of themselves, that is what the public sees and then they see us as comical characters. they think we are funny, they think we are mythical creatures but we actually exist. we are humans who need to go shopping, we want to meet up with family and friends and we can't do so in comfort. mit? meet up with family and friends and we can't do so in comfort. why have ou felt we can't do so in comfort. why have you felt compelled _ we can't do so in comfort. why have you felt compelled to _ we can't do so in comfort. why have you felt compelled to speak - we can't do so in comfort. why have you felt compelled to speak out i we can't do so in comfort. why have you felt compelled to speak out like i you felt compelled to speak out like this? �* ::, , �* you felt compelled to speak out like this? �* :: , �* ., :, �* this? because i've had enough. i've taken this all— this? because i've had enough. i've taken this all my _ this? because i've had enough. i've taken this all my life, _ this? because i've had enough. i've taken this all my life, along - this? because i've had enough. i've taken this all my life, along with i taken this all my life, along with everyone else i know. so many pictures. i have so many people telling their stories of how it was happening to them as well. i believe it is my duty to make a difference. i haven't seen anything yet to make a big change for people with
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dwarfism. ifeel i a big change for people with dwarfism. i feel i should lead that change. as a paralympian, it is my duty to do so. not only demonstrate what people with disabilities can do but also demonstrate that we are normal people as well, we deserve the same respect that everyone else deserves. ~:, , the same respect that everyone else deserves. , , :, , , deserves. many people will be watchin: deserves. many people will be watching this _ deserves. many people will be watching this interview - deserves. many people will be watching this interview and i deserves. many people will be i watching this interview and feeling disturbed and distressed at what you are having to go through, what can people do to help? if are having to go through, what can people do to help?— people do to help? if you are feelin: people do to help? if you are feeling brave _ people do to help? if you are feeling brave enough, i people do to help? if you are feeling brave enough, thesel people do to help? if you are i feeling brave enough, these stand people do to help? if you are - feeling brave enough, these stand up for us to stop if you see us being laughed at, tell the others. it is a simple as that. it is a hard problem to fix —— tell the others off. it is ok if somebody is curious, but come up ok if somebody is curious, but come up and ask me why i look like this.
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some people are good at explaining it and some are not. call others out orjust get on with your life. i'm not interested in what anyone else is doing around town. they don't need to be interested in me. it’s is doing around town. they don't need to be interested in me. it's so simle. need to be interested in me. it's so simple- now _ need to be interested in me. it's so simple- now you — need to be interested in me. it's so simple. now you have _ need to be interested in me. it's so simple. now you have decided i need to be interested in me. it's so simple. now you have decided you| simple. now you have decided you speak about that, has it been helpful? t speak about that, has it been helful? :, , speak about that, has it been helful? :,, speak about that, has it been helpful?_ do - speak about that, has it been helpful?_ do you i helpful? i hope so. do you personally. _ helpful? i hope so. do you personally. i— helpful? i hope so. do you personally, i meant. i helpful? i hope so. do you personally, i meant. yes,| helpful? i hope so. do you i personally, i meant. yes, i'd helpful? i hope so. do you - personally, i meant. yes, i'd never knew that — personally, i meant. yes, i'd never knew that so _ personally, i meant. yes, i'd never knew that so many _ personally, i meant. yes, i'd never knew that so many people - personally, i meant. yes, i'd never knew that so many people would i personally, i meant. yes, i'd never. knew that so many people would back me up. i didn't realise i would get a reaction like this. i have never felt so good in my life, knowing i have had so many people in my corner. if they are shocked by it, it means that more people don't know and then hopefully we can start to get things changed. it makes me feel really good. get things changed. it makes me feel reall aood. , :, :, i.
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get things changed. it makes me feel reall aood. , :, :, really good. very good if you total -- very good _ really good. very good if you total -- very good of— really good. very good if you total -- very good of you _ really good. very good if you total -- very good of you to _ really good. very good if you total -- very good of you to talk- really good. very good if you total -- very good of you to talk to i really good. very good if you total -- very good of you to talk to us. | —— very good of you to talk to us. will perry, a member of team gb, paralympian. thank you. "i think i've found a dinosaur" — those were the words ofjoe davis, who works at rutland water nature reserve, on finding the fossilized remains of a ten—metre—long sea creature that lived 250 million years ago. the marine reptile — or "sea dragon" — is longer than a double decker bus, and is the largest and most complete skeleton of its kind everfound in the uk. jonah fisher reports. last february on a bank of mud in a midlands reservoir, joe davis made an extraordinary discovery. i looked down and i saw this series of ridges in the mud. i thought, "hang on, that looks different. there's something there that's different." it had organic features on, like where it connects onto the rib. they called back, and a team of dinosaur experts was quickly dispatched. joe hadn't found a dinosaur, but it was an ichthyosaur — a monstrous, air breathing sea reptile, also known as a sea dragon,
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that swam 250 million years ago. what makes this find so special is just how big it is. not only is this the most complete ichthyosaur skeleton ever found, the biggest one ever found here in the uk, incredible at ten metres long, but it's actually the biggest prehistoric reptile skeleton ever found here as well, the most complete skeleton of any prehistoric reptile. it's incredible. the rutland ichthyosaur has been removed from the mud and plans are being made as how best to display one of britain's greatest ever fossil finds. jonah fisher, bbc news. buckingham palace is launching a nationwide competition for britain's bakers to create a special pudding to mark the queen's platinumjubilee. the contest is part of a programme of events injune to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne, including a concert in the grounds of buckingham palace. here's our royal correspondent,
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nicholas witchell. it will be a pudding fit for a queen, or more precisely, for a queen's jubilee. in celebration of her 70 years on the throne, buckingham palace is asking britain to get baking. it is a nationwide competition to create the platinum pudding. recipes need to be submitted by the 4th of february, then five finalists will be invited to bake their creations for an expertjudging panel including dame mary berry, the chef monica galetti, and the queen's head chef mark flanagan. the pudding will be just one of the ingredients to be enjoyed during the platinumjubilee bank holiday weekend, final details of which have been confirmed by the palace. on thursday the 2nd ofjune the queen's birthday parade, trooping the colour, will take place on horse guards parade. that evening, jubilee beacons will be lit in more than 1500 locations around the united kingdom and the commonwealth. on friday the 3rd ofjune a service of thanksgiving for the queen's reign will be held at st paul's cathedral.
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on saturday the 4th ofjune the bbc platinum party, a live concert, will take place in the grounds of buckingham palace. a public ballot for tickets will be launched next month. finally, on sunday the 5th ofjune, the big jubilee lunch will be staged in communities across the country. that platinum pudding will be part of the menu. and the platinumjubilee pageant will be staged on the mall and will feature among other things, 200 silk flags to be created by children and focusing on climate change and their hopes for the future. from pudding to pageant, the organisers hope it will indeed be a fitting tribute to the queen's 70 years of service. nicholas witchell, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. good evening. there will be sunshine across more of the country tomorrow.
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today, there has been a cloudy start to the new working week. that has been coming from the atlantic. it has been thick enough to bring some rain and drizzle, no huge amounts at all. at 6pm this evening, we have temperatures in double figures. it has been more chilly further east. this damp weather we have got across scotland and northern ireland should move away, with clearer skies following overnight. that thick cloud will bring rain and drizzle into england and wales. a milder night for england and wales, no frost this time. temperatures for close to freezing in scotland and northern ireland, especially in eastern parts of scotland. a sunny start here tomorrow. cloud and rain and drizzle for england and wales, continuing to move southwards, getting stuck across east anglia and southern parts. some late improvements for south wales and the
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midlands. some showers coming into the western coast of scotland. mould for the time of year under the cloud, in southern england. that is on that weak weather front which moves away tomorrow evening. high pressure builds in across southern areas of england and wales for the next you days. further north, a stronger wind coming from the atlantic, so northern areas will seek the highest temperatures. in the south, colder and increasing amounts of fog and low cloud. we may start with some frost for england and wales on wednesday. most of the uk will be dry with some sunshine. again, stronger winds in the north loving cloud into the north—west of scotland but lifting temperatures into double figures in northern scotland, compared with 5 degrees in the midlands. we have a contrast north and south because of where the high pressure is. we have milder,
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stronger atlantic winds across the top of the high. in the centre, the air is stagnating, so more mist, fog and low cloud on thursday. that will be slow to lift and may lift into low cloud. outside of that, some sunshine but more cloud in the north—west of scotland with higher temperatures. those contrasts continue between north and south of the uk. that will continue into friday as well. some slow to lift mist and fog as well.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the housing secretary says he expects builders to pay the 4 billion pound bill to remove dangeous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. to those who missold dangerous products like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished people's homes, and to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy. we are coming for you. the developers and manufacturers who profited from this appalling scandal, not the victims, should bear greater costs and that blameless leaseholders must not pay. novak djokovic says he's pleased and grateful that he's won his appeal against a decision to refuse him a visa to enter australia. he's now back on the tennis court ahead of the australian open.
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his family hold a press conference.

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