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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 10, 2022 4:00am-4:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm david eades. our top stories: novak djokovic�*s court case against his deportation from australia is underway, after the world's top mens tennis player had his visa cancelled by the authorities there. at least 19 people, including nine children, die in a fire at an apartment block in new york city. the smoke spread throughout the building, thus the tremendous loss of life and other people fighting for their lives right now in hospitals all over the bronx. a little boy lost, and found again. the baby who went missing in the chaos of the afghan evacuation is reunited
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with his family. west side story is one of hollywood's winners at this year's rather ignored golden globe awards. well, it's not the court novak djokovic had in mind when he headed to melbourne for the australian open. but a judge in the city is now sitting to determine if the 9—time winner of the event gets any chance at all to defend his title. or if he decides the world's number one tennis player should be deported in keeping with the decision of australia's border force. djokovic arrived last week with a medical exemption from entry rules over covid vaccination, but his visa was cancelled at the airport. from melbourne, shaimaa khalil reports. for days, they've been showing their solidarity on the streets of melbourne.
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no court appearance for novak djokovic, who's still in an immigration detention hotel six days after flying in. 0h, mate, i haven't slept since he's come off the plane. we're all sick to the stomach. it's a very unfortunate situation for australia. it's becoming very embarrassing. the prospect of djokovic�*s deportation has sparked a sporting and diplomatic storm and, today, former wimbledon champion andy murray weighed in, saying the row is really not good for tennis at all. the anger continues in his home country of serbia, with another day of protests in the capital belgrade and fury from his family. his mother dijana criticised the living conditions where he's being kept. translation: they locked him up, because it is a prison, - the place he is in right now. it is not a detention facility, it is a prison. they are not giving him breakfast. he only gets lunch and dinner. for breakfast, nothing.
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this was djokovic arriving on wednesday. his legal team say he was granted a vaccine exemption from tennis australia because he tested positive for covid—19 on 16 december. that was also the day when these pictures were taken, showing the tennis player maskless at a ceremony in serbia, where he was honoured with his own postage stamps. it's unclear at which point he took the pcr test and when he knew he had covid. djokovic�*s lawyers have said that onjanuary 1, he received a document from the government's home affairs department, telling him his travel declaration responses indicated he met the requirements for a quarantine—free arrival into australia. but in its court submission, released hours before the hearing, the government said it had not given the tennis star an assurance about his vaccine waiver, adding that an e—mail from the home affairs department was not a guarantee that his so—called medical exemption would be accepted.
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the legal document also challenged djokovic�*s claim for a medical exemption on the basis he contracted covid—19 in mid—december, saying there was no suggestion he had acute major medical illness. just a week before the australian open begins, a judge will now decide whether the nine—time champion will be able to defend his title. a short time ago, the chief executive of tennis australia spoke out about the confusion. well, we're not going to lay the blame on anyone. all i can say — primarily because there's much conflict, conflicting information, much contradictory information, the whole time — there's, every single week we were talking to home affairs, we were talking to all parts of government to ensure that, one, we were on the right process with, one, these exemptions, but knowing also that everyone coming in had to be vaccinated, and we're at that point. so, the conflicting information
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and the contradictory information that he received is because of the changing environment. we are in a very challenging environment for everyone that's been involved in this process. the court has been adjourned for lunch, it is due to start and probably about ten minute. our correspondent in melbourne, shaimaa khalil, is ouside the court. another point was made about novak djokovic's conditions, the fact he was held in the airport for hours, with limited access to his legal team and an exchange between novak djokovic and the border officers, him saying, you know, when he realised that his visa was being revoked, he said, "if there is an error, i don't understand it. i've done everything that's been asked of me, i need time to speak with my lawyers and tennis australia." so again, his lawyers making a point about procedural errors and that he did not have enough time to respond to his visa being revoked. yeah, as we know, shaimaa, this is a case ofjustice in action here, but the
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government, the prime minister, for goodness sake, lots of ministers have spoken out, public opinion�*s been pretty clear. it's going to be a challenge if he is allowed to stay. i think it's going to be a challenge either way. there are so many strands to this story, david. there is the anger on both sides. there is the politics, federal politics, state government politics, there is of course tennis australia saying they've been caught in the middle between the state of victoria and the federal government. there are the visa requirements that seem to have confused everyone in the past two days, and of course, there is the small detail of the tennis tournament that's only a few days away! remember, novak djokovic is here because he wants to take part in the australian open to defend his title. this is an event and a title that he's dominated, winning nine times, and he wanted to go for a 10th. this is now still looking very much in doubt. but we know that later this afternoon
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we're going to hear the government's argument. why did they revoked his visa? why did they say that a prior covid—19 infection is not a condition for exemption? that's really at the heart of this story. was novak djokovic right to be granted an exemption, and who does that? who has the right to give him that? and of course, with all of that happening, the tennis star waits that decision, a judge now has to decide whether or not he can defend his title. a lot of questions to answer, i will be speaking to a legal expert in migration is a little bit later in the bulletin so do stay with us for that. 19 people, including nine children, have been killed in a fire that's being called the worst for 30 years in new york. it began in an apartment on the 19th floor of a residential building in the bronx. it's thought to have been caused by a portable electric heater. our correspondent nada tawfik has more. it's the worst fire the city
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has seen in decades. as this high—rise building in the bronx went up in flames, no part was spared. firefighters arrived within three minutes after a blaze broke out in a duplex apartment. crews found victims on each floor, some in cardiac and respiratory arrest. in those terrifying moments, residents were rescued from their windows and in smoke—filled hallways. i had to grab my dogs and one got stuck on the steps and then i had to let the firemen come past because he had a kid with no shoes on. dozens are in hospital with life—threatening injuries. tragically, among the dead are children. this is a horrific, horrific, painful moment for the city of new york. and the impact of this fire is going to really bring a level ofjust pain and despair. the true extent of the devastation is still unknown. nada tawfik,
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bbc news, new york. the commissioner of the city's fire department gave more details about what led to the fire. this fire began in an apartment that spans two floors on the second and third floor of the building. it started in a malfunctioning electric space heater. that was the cause of the fire. the fire consumed that apartment that is on two floors and part of the hallway. the door to that apartment, unfortunately, when the residents left, was left open and did not close by itself and the smoke spread throughout the building, thus, the tremendous loss of life on other people fighting for their lives right now in hospitals all over the bronx. let's get some of the day's other news. aid organisations have suspended their operations in an area of northwest tigray in ethiopia where 56 civilians were killed by an air strike over the weekend. the un office for humanitarian
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affairs said relief work had been paused because of what it called �*the ongoing threats of drone strikes'. more than 160 people are reported to have died in several days of unrest in kazakhstan and almost 6,000 have been arrested after riots there. the new figures, which have not been independently verified, would mark a drastic increase in the death toll. fuel price rises sparked the unrest that broke out a week ago in the country's west, spreading quickly to large cities. american and russian officials will hold talks in geneva later at the start of a week of diplomacy that could shape the future of ukraine and the security of europe. western allies want to deter russia from invading ukraine, but moscow is looking for concessions from nato, which will be holding separate talks with the russian government later this week. iraq's new parliament has held its first session since october's elections.
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it was disrupted by altercations among mps and the ill health of the temporary speaker. mps did eventually vote to re—elect mohammed al—halbousi as speaker. a popular hill resortjust outside the pakistani capital islamabad has become a disaster zone after a blizzard and heavy snowfall trapped thousands of people in their cars. day trippers were visiting murree to see the snow on friday when at least 22 people died as trees fell on the road, some froze to death in their vehicles. our correspondent farhat javed reports. they thought it would be a family outing in the snow but, for many, it turned into a tragedy. most of the dead are members of the same families. officials say, despite the warnings of dangerous weather, thousands of tourists descended on the small hill station of murree. many ended up with their cars
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trapped in a metre of snow. samina's terrified family was stuck in their car all night. translation: it was very difficult. - i could sense death everywhere. there was a mountain of snow all around us and we were just praying for god to help us. pakistan army's units are now clearing the roads, clogged with snow and stranded cars. at least 500 families are in shelters, but there is anger at the authorities. many roads like this are still blocked and, while the road clearance operation is being carried out, there is massive criticism against local and provincial authorities. even the federal government is also being criticised and held responsible, especially for the loss of life, and many say that these lives could have been saved had the government taken action well in time. electricity was lost and the communication was not proper. traffic was so jammed and people were not able to get
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here, along with the staff and the stuff they need. the prime minister, imran khan, has ordered an inquiry into what went wrong. more snow is expected next week. and many want more than just a weather warning to prevent a similar tragedy again. farhatjaved, bbc news, murree. coming up injust a moment: steven spielberg's west side story takes the top award at this year's scaled back golden globe awards. day one of operation desert storm to force the iraqis out of kuwait has seen the most intense air attacks since the second world war. tobacco is america's oldest industry, and it's one of its biggest, but the industry is nervous of this report. this may tend to make people want to stop smoking
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cigarettes. there is not a street that is unaffected. l huge parts of kobe were simplyl demolished as buildings crashed into one another. this woman said she'd been given no help and no advice| by the authorities. she stood outside the ruins of her business. j tens of thousands of black children in south africa have taken advantage of laws, passed by the country's schools. tonight sees the 9,610th performance of her long—running play the mousetrap. when they heard of her death today, the management considered whether to cancel tonight's performance, but agatha christie would have been the last person to want such a thing. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: novak djokovic's court case against his deportation from australia is underway after the world's best tennis player had his visa cancelled
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by the authorities there. let's get more on that case, which is resuming in melbourne after a break for lunch. maria jockel is a lawyer with bdo in melbourne. she's an expert in migration cases. thank you very much indeed for joining us, maria. i mean, it feels like this should be straightforward enough and yet, it looks a bit of a mess. what do you make of it? i it looks a bit of a mess. what do you make of it?— it looks a bit of a mess. what do you make of it? i think that civen do you make of it? i think that given what's — do you make of it? i think that given what's happened - do you make of it? i think that| given what's happened globally with the pandemic, some 300 million cases worldwide and 500,000 in australia, we are dealing with unprecedented circumstances and we've always known that australia's these are laws and entry requirements are laws and entry requirements are arguably the most complex in the world. i can take you through what the process is, because there appears to have
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been some confusion about what the process, in fact, ought to be as opposed to what some people are commentating on. yeah, if you could clarify it for us, that would be great! 0k, for us, that would be great! ok, this is a very potted summary but in any event, there are various aspects to entry to australia. first of all, you have to get the visa, it has to be the right visa. in this instance, mr djokovic got a 408 sports fees. prior to entry to entering australia, he was required to evidence that he was fully vaccinated and if he wasn't, in accordance with australia's entry requirements, which are in fact policed and determined by the australian border force, not the department of home affairs, then in effect, our law permits that his visa will be cancelled on arrival. he has the option to depart australia, as some other people did who had been given some exemptions which have been found subsequently not to have been appropriate
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ones, but he chose not to depart. ones, but he chose not to de art. a . ones, but he chose not to deart. ., , depart. maria, if! can stop ou depart. maria, if! can stop you there. _ depart. maria, if! can stop you there, for _ depart. maria, if! can stop you there, for a _ depart. maria, if! can stop you there, for a second, i depart. maria, if! can stop| you there, for a second, his lawyers say that one exemption is if you have had covid, which he has had. he is registered as having had it. is it not the case then?— having had it. is it not the case then? david, it is the case then? david, it is the case insofar _ case then? david, it is the case insofar as _ case then? david, it is the case insofar as it - case then? david, it is the case insofar as it only - case then? david, it is the | case insofar as it only goes case then? david, it is the - case insofar as it only goes so far, the case insofar as, remember, australia is a federation. the commonwealth determines what noncitizens can enter australia and on what basis. so even though you have a visa, it can be cancelled on arrival if you are a noncitizen for appropriate reasons, and that's the subject of litigation at the moment. but separately, the victorian government and ministerfor government and minister for health government and ministerfor health in conjunction with tennis australia, assisted mr djokovic by obtaining a medical exemption on the basis that he had disclosed that he had had covid, apparently on the 16th of december 2021. but it does not accord with the
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commonwealth requirements, the commonwealth requirements, the commonwealth requirements, which are based on atagi advice, which is quite clear, it provides extensive advice that you've got to have an acute medical or major medical condition that warrants a temporary medical examination relevant for covid—19 vaccines. so australia has always had a tough border control measures and especially since the closure of the border in march 2020 and the progressive opening of the borderfrom the 15th of december 2021 but only in prescribed circumstances. right, so i have to ask, maria, because we don't have that much time left, but in the court of public opinion, it's pretty clear australians feel that djokovic should go home. d'okovic should go home. look, i djokovic should go home. look, i cannot comment _ djokovic should go home. look, i cannot comment on _ djokovic should go home. look, i cannot comment on public - i cannot comment on public opinion. i think i'm in victoria and we've had the longest knockdown in the world, 265 days, we are a small nation
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on a vast consonant with 500,000 of us currently being stymied from being able to work, and ifor example only my homestudy because of omicron and our government's commitments to preserving public health. to the detriment of the economy, if need be. i can understand that many australians would be aggrieved but likewise, many will think that they want to watch their favourite tennis star performing the australian open. let's see whatjudge kelly decides in what is a complex jurisdiction and david, i would be pleased to comment further on the various limbs that must be met before, in effect, you can enter australia, but the current message, subject to judicial determination, is going to assume that you're going to assume that you're going to assume that you're going to be able to enter australia just because you recently had covid.- australia just because you recently had covid. yes. there are requirements _ recently had covid. yes. there are requirements to _ recently had covid. yes. there are requirements to be - recently had covid. yes. there are requirements to be meant and a exemption should have been lodged and they should have been approval for entry on the basis of the documentation
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that was provided by the victorian government. whatever the outcome. — victorian government. whatever the outcome, maria, _ victorian government. whatever the outcome, maria, i— victorian government. whatever the outcome, maria, ithink- the outcome, maria, i think people will have got that message, at least. don't assume, check, will be a good message to take away. we went to the outcome but in the meantime, maria jockel, thank you very much indeed. meantime, maria jockel, thank you very much indeed. pleasure, and thank _ you very much indeed. pleasure, and thank you — you very much indeed. pleasure, and thank you for _ you very much indeed. pleasure, and thank you for allowing - you very much indeed. pleasure, and thank you for allowing me i and thank you for allowing me to speak. changing topic now. in the chaos at kabul airport last august as thousands of families tried to escape the taliban, a 6—week—old baby boy became separated from his parents. they ended up in the us, knowing nothing of his fate. now he has been found, in the care of a taxi driver in kabul. our correspondent there, quentin somerville, has the story. salaam! amid afghanistan's thousand tragedies, a small beam of sunshine. sohail was only 40 days old when he was lost as his family escaped kabul. he is now back in his auntie's arms. "sohail is in good health," his aunt says. "we are a bit
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unfamiliarfor him. "but he has been very good and he hasn't cried. "he's been sleeping well — he's onlyjust woken up." in the chaos that followed the taliban's takeover here in august, an exodus as families fled the country. sohail�*s dad was a security guard at the us embassy. they joined the flood of people rushing to leave. like others shown here, he was handed to us marines guarding the airport fence. once inside, the family couldn't find him. they left for the united states. taxi driver hamid safi says he found the boy all alone by the roadside inside the airport. unable to find the family, he says he took him home. "as a father, i know how it feels to have children," mr safi tells me. "i couldn't leave him alone, so i saved him and took care of him and my wife fed him." with no son of his own, mr safi was reluctant to let the boy go.
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it took weeks of negotiation and some time in taliban detention before he handed sohail back. he, his wife and his daughters are distraught without the boy. the last five months have been enormously difficult for many afghan families, but none more so than this family. having sohail back is an enormous relief and the hope is now that he willjoin his brothers and sisters and his mum and dad in the united states. now in michigan, sohail�*s parents have asked the us government to fly him to them. after so long apart, the baby only responds to mohammed — the name mr safi gave him. but now he's back with them, his family say sohail will soon rediscover who he is. quentin sommerville, bbc news, kabul. steven spielberg's remake of west side story has won the golden globe for best motion picture at the ceremony taking place in los angeles.
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a scaled—back private ceremony has replaced the usual red carpet event in response to heavy criticism last year after it emerged that the voting panel — of around 100 people — had no black members. the coronavirus pandemic also affected the evening. sam asi is producer and presenter of bbc cinematic at bbc arabic, as well as being a member of the hollywood foreign press association. he's in los angeles. good to see you there, sam. we know some of the winners but first of all, give us a flavour as to how the evening went. you know, it as to how the evening went. you know. it was. — as to how the evening went. you know. it was. i _ as to how the evening went. you know, it was, i think, _ as to how the evening went. 7m, know, it was, ithink, better for cinema because people were focused on the winners, they were focused on the clips and on the movies and there were no movement around. on the movies and there were no movementaround. normally on the movies and there were no movement around. normally when we have the big stars, people are just looking at the stars, they are not really looking at they are not really looking at
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the movies or does my kaynan even recall sitting down and watching the award show because everyone was moving around. it was more aboutjust partying. here, it is about the movies. it was, truly, unique. maybe it'lla it was, truly, unique. maybe it'll a trend because those other people who watch the movies. and they are honouring the filmmakers.— the filmmakers. crosstalk. it is a big positive _ the filmmakers. crosstalk. it is a big positive to _ the filmmakers. crosstalk. it is a big positive to come - the filmmakers. crosstalk. it is a big positive to come out. is a big positive to come out of what has been a big negative for the foreign press association so give us a rundown, we heard west side story has lower —— stole the show alleys for best musical or comedy so is there a sort of standout winner from the night? of standout winner from the night? of course. the power of the dog, jane campion, it won the best director, actor, that's impressive. that's bad news for belfast, to be honest with you, because it was the main
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competitor for the power of the dog and it one the people's award here which is a very strong indicatorfor the strong indicator for the oscars... strong indicator for the oscars- - -_ strong indicator for the oscars. . . ,, ,, �* oscars... crosstalk. the kenneth — oscars... crosstalk. the kenneth branagh- - oscars... crosstalk. the | kenneth branagh- directed kenneth branagh— directed movie. kenneth branagh- directed movie. ., , ., kenneth branagh- directed movie. ., , , movie. the only one the best screenwriter. _ movie. the only one the best screenwriter. ok. _ movie. the only one the best screenwriter. ok. did - movie. the only one the best screenwriter. ok. did you - movie. the only one the best i screenwriter. ok. did you have a favourite _ screenwriter. ok. did you have a favourite out _ screenwriter. ok. did you have a favourite out of _ screenwriter. ok. did you have a favourite out of those? - screenwriter. ok. did you have a favourite out of those? i - a favourite out of those? i personally connected with belfast because it resonates with my experience as a palestinian, because as a child, i really lived that experience. not knowing why people are killing each other and this kid, i saw myself in him when i was a kid. so obviously, it moved me deeply and profoundly. you obviously, it moved me deeply and profoundly.— and profoundly. you have a personal— and profoundly. you have a personal preference - and profoundly. you have a personal preference for - and profoundly. you have a personal preference for the and profoundly. you have a - personal preference for the top you had a connection to it. at}! you had a connection to it. of course! we watch you had a connection to it. i>f course! we watch movies for this! ,,., course! we watch movies for this! ., ., , this! sam, thanks for giving us an insight _ this! sam, thanks for giving us an insight as — this! sam, thanks for giving us an insight as to _ this! sam, thanks for giving us an insight as to how _ this! sam, thanks for giving us an insight as to how those - an insight as to how those awards did go, joining us from la. a full list and rundown of all
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of the winners on the website. you are watching bbc news. hello again. sunday brought us a mixed picture of weather. there was a bit of rain across northern areas. we had some lovely winter sunshine across parts of the midlands, east anglia, southern england, parts of wales for a time as well but towards the end of the day, we did rather lose the bright skies in wales, replaced it with some thicker cloud and started to lose the visibility as well. now, right now, we're seeing cloud increase from the west as a warm front begins to push its way in. that is starting to push a bit of patchy light rain and drizzle in across these western areas, but temperatures are rising hour by hour, so it is increasingly turning mild. heading into the first part of monday morning, ten degrees there in plymouth, but cold in rural aberdeenshire — some of the deeper valleys, about —5 degrees or so. through monday, this area
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of milder air is going to slowly creep its way a little bit further eastwards. with that, could be an odd spit of drizzle just about anywhere through the day, but it will be mainly focused across the west. some heavier rain, though, for western scotland, with strengthening winds here during the course of the afternoon. it is for these western areas that the temperatures will be at their highest — 13 degrees in belfast. further east, not quite so high temperatures, but they're still above average — highs of 7—9 degrees. through monday night and into tuesday, our warm front gets chased down by this cold front. behind the cold front, we get the colder air moving back in. so for tuesday, the murky weather will be across the south — mist and hill fog patches, a bit of light rain or drizzle from that system. further north, a fair bit of sunshine, northern ireland, northern england, wales, the midlands, too. a few showers, though, for the northwest of scotland. the temperatures just dropping away again across most parts of the uk, but mild in the south this time. from wednesday onwards, high pressure builds
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to the south of the uk and with this high pressure, winds are going to be coming around that from quite a long way south. the mildest air will be heading in across these northern areas. but there will be quite a lot of cloud around — thick enough to give some spots of drizzle. no great amounts, but it could be quite damp at times for the highlands and the western isles, perhaps the northern isles as well. but it's here where we'll see temperatures in double figures. after a frosty start elsewhere, should be some sunny spells. but as the week goes by, a lot of quiet weather. there will probably be some dense patches of fog around as well across parts of england and wales later in the week. that's your latest weather.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: a court in melbourne is hearing an appeal by tennis world number one novak djokovic against the cancellation of his australian visa. he's spent five days in an immigration detention there. arguments centre on whether his recent recovery from covid—19 exempts him from australia's vaccine policy. at least 19 people have died, nine of them children, after a fire in an apartment building in new york city. a malfunctioning electric heater is thought to have sparked the incident. 32 people are in hospital with life—threatening injuries. the power of the dog has become the second film directed by a woman to win best drama at the golden globes. steven spielberg's west side story was the other big winner. there was no celebrity ceremony after a fallout over the lack of diversity among the judges.

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