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tv   Ros Atkins On... The storming...  BBC News  January 9, 2022 10:45pm-11:01pm GMT

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paragraph on the left of the ft, about a small hotel owner whose energy company went under because of the traumatic rise in wholesale energy prices, gas prices — and they've energy prices, gas prices — and they've been energy prices, gas prices — and they've been told their bill can go from 2000 a month to as much as £10,000 a month in one go. it's a story that really lies behind what the daily mail front page says, "save us from cost—of—living crisis, boris." louw yes, and this will now be the defining issue for the government to get to grips with and tackle quite urgently, because the energy crisis is just getting worse. i've heard anecdotally from so many people _ i've heard anecdotally from so many people about their bills going up by astronomical amounts, this case in the astronomical amounts, this casein the ft_ astronomical amounts, this case in the ft today, and its businesses having _ the ft today, and its businesses having a — the ft today, and its businesses having a huge impact, as well,
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inflation — having a huge impact, as well, inflation rising, other things like welfare — inflation rising, other things like welfare increasing, the national insurance — welfare increasing, the national insurance tax is coming in in april, lots of— insurance tax is coming in in april, lots of conservative mps, and i'm sure _ lots of conservative mps, and i'm sure all— lots of conservative mps, and i'm sure all mps, but conservative mps, because _ sure all mps, but conservative mps, because they have an impact on the government and how they vote in their— government and how they vote in their support for the prime minister, orworried their support for the prime minister, or worried about what this will feel— minister, or worried about what this will feel like for their constituents who are already being hit in _ constituents who are already being hit in the _ constituents who are already being hit in the pockets. and all these things— hit in the pockets. and all these things coming together does not bode well. things coming together does not bode well and _ things coming together does not bode well. and of course, you have local elections _ well. and of course, you have local elections coming up in may, as well, where _ elections coming up in may, as well, where conservatives are starting from _ where conservatives are starting from a _ where conservatives are starting from a very high bar. so on the doorstep, _ from a very high bar. so on the doorstep, the bread—and—butter issues _ doorstep, the bread—and—butter issues that really matter to people are these — issues that really matter to people are these very issues, and i think the concern — are these very issues, and i think the concern is very genuine around what _ the concern is very genuine around what is _ the concern is very genuine around what is government do? doesn't intervene? — what is government do? doesn't intervene? from the treasury's perspective, there's reticence because, _ perspective, there's reticence because, having intervened a lot in the pandemic for understandable reasons, — the pandemic for understandable reasons, they're trying to move away
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from being _ reasons, they're trying to move away from being perhaps as activist and interventional list. but i'm not sure _ interventional list. but i'm not sure they'll be able to do that so suddenly — sure they'll be able to do that so suddenly. it�*s sure they'll be able to do that so suddenl . �* , ., sure they'll be able to do that so suddenl . �*, ., , ., , sure they'll be able to do that so suddenl. , ,,,. suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen _ suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen quite _ suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen quite a _ suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen quite a lot - suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen quite a lot on - suddenly. it's a story i suspect will be seen quite a lot on the| will be seen quite a lot on the front page of the mirror over the next few months?— front page of the mirror over the next few months? yes, 'ust because the are next few months? yes, 'ust because they so — next few months? yes, 'ust because they so many _ next few months? yes, just because they are so many people _ next few months? yes, just because they are so many people struggling l they are so many people struggling at the moment. if we are looking at just average bills going up by around £600, then that's notjust for the poorest in the country, but including people who are squeezed in the middle. we've heard even in the sunday telegraph earlier today, they're thinking we could be facing food shortages because of this cost—of—living crisis that we are to expect from around april. people are being faced not only with energy bills going up, we've got inflation soaring, rampant tax hikes — a lot squeezed on, and we've been hearing from a lot of senior tories over the last weeks voicing their concerns, saying boris needs to get a grip on
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it notjust because it'll be something that will affect them politically, but he really have a think about whether he would like anyone he meets to be going through anyone he meets to be going through any of these choices or having to decide whether to clothe or feed their children, going without food for themselves. that's a real choice people in britain are having to make, and it's 2022. it's so disheartening that people are having to make decisions like that. mi; to make decisions like that. my apologies for getting your bright democrat name wrong, i'll get right in the future, i hope he'll be back despite that unintended insolent about a0 minutes for around two, as it were, where we will talk to you both about the jubilee — it were, where we will talk to you both about thejubilee — some good news talking coming up. thank you both very much for now. join us again for the papers after a bit of sport and whether —— a bit of weather, and we'll be joining sport and whether —— a bit of weather, and we'll bejoining our colleagues in singapore for newsday.
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you all know what happened in washington onjanuary the 6th last year. we all watched. the storming of the capitol shocked america — it shocked the world. this is the story of what happened that day, and what has happened since. at the heart of the violence, in the home of america's democracy, was a belief that that democracy wasn't working. i believe this election was stolen byjoe biden and his, er, democratic friends. the belief the election was stolen was widespread among republican supporters. it still is. and the idea has been relentlessly pushed by donald trump. before the election he predicted it would be rigged, and, once he'd lost, he carried on. this is a case where they're trying to steal an election. _ they're trying to rig an election. and we can't let that happen.
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lest there is any doubt, this isn't true. there's no evidence of widespread electoral fraud, no evidence that fraud affected who won. but a lack of evidence wasn't stopping the president or his supporters. and so, when donald trump called on people to head to washington onjanuary the 6th, they did, in their thousands. this was the day congress would certify the result. we now know this was also the day some trump supporters would try and stop that from happening. at around noon, donald trump addressed a rally near the white house. and we fight, we fight like hell. and if you don't fight like hell, you're not. going to have a country any more. thousands of trump supporters responded by walking to the capitol building. some were clear on their intentions. freedom! charge the capitol! at around 2pm, the crowd turned violent. the storming of the capitol had begun. and as the attack developed, police officers defended the locked—down debating chambers, while the politicians took cover. protesters assaulted officers
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with pipes and bars. the office of house speaker nancy pelosi was ransacked, and vice president mike pence, who was overseeing the certification ofjoe biden�*s victory, was rushed out of the building. while all of this was happening, there was silence from the president. eventually, hours after the attack began, donald trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent election. but we can't play into - the hands of these people. we have to have peace. so go home. we love you, you're very special. in time, they did go home — but the attack would claim five lives, scores of police officers were injured, there was millions of dollars�* worth of damage, and many people were clear who was responsible. this is one republican strategist. this is perhaps the worst day in america since 9/11. and i don't use that kind of rhetoric lightly. all of this was preventable
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from the beginning. and so, the president does bear significant — significant — blame for this. in time, the house of representatives charged mr trump with incitement of insurrection. this made him the only president in us history to be impeached twice. the jurors in this impeachment trial were america's senators — and already, many from the president's own party had condemned him. there's no question, none. that president trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day. but in the end, enough republican senators chose not to vote for a conviction. that, though, would not be the only trial connected to january the 6th. thejustice department had begun its own investigations. in the past year, over 700 people have been arrested and charged. more than 70 have already been sentenced. and the us attorney general says the work isn't done. the actions we have taken thus far
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will not be our last. thejustice department remains committed to holding alljanuary 6th perpetrators, at any level, accountable under law. there is a criticism of the department ofjustice though. that it's focused on the rioters themselves, and less on those who may have organised, funded, or incited them. the department refutes that criticism. and also, it's not the only source of scrutiny of these events. in the aftermath of january the 6th, republicans and democrats in congress called for an independent investigation. for example, senator lindsey graham, a staunch trump supporter, told fox news... but a proposal for exactly that was blocked by the republicans. instead, the democratic majority in the house of representatives, the lower house, set up a committee comprised of seven democrats and two republicans. it began hearing testimony injuly, and its vice
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chair is the republican — and fierce trump critic — liz cheney. if those responsible are not held accountable, and if congress does not act responsibly, this will remain a cancer on our constitutional republic. well, sincejuly, hundreds of people have been interviewed, in private. most agreed to talk, some had to be subpoenaed. and two key people refused to take part. the first was steve bannon, donald trump's former presidential adviser. he was out of the white house long before january the 6th, but not out of politics. and in his podcast, the day before the attack, he said... for this, and for other reasons too, the january 6th committee wanted to talk to him. but steve bannon didn't want to talk — and has now been charged with criminal contempt of congress. the committee's democratic chair explained why. no—one in this country, no matter how wealthy or how powerful, is above the law.
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left unaddressed, this defiance may encourage others to follow mr bannon down the same path. to which steve bannon has said this. if the administrative state wants to take me on, bring it, - i because we're here to fight thisl and we're going to go on offence. you stand by, you see how we're going to go on offence, 0k? - the second person to defy the committee subpoena was president trump's former chief of staff, mark meadows. he, too, has been found in contempt of congress and may also face criminal charges. mr meadows had handed over thousands of pages of records, but then refused to cooperate further. but even that material was revelatory. we saw text messages he'd received during the attack. fox news host laura ingraham wrote... and there was also a message from the president's son — read out by liz cheney. donald trumertexted, again and again, urging action by the president.
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"we need an oval office address. he has to lead now. it has gone too far and gotten out of hand." other messages were received the day before the attack. fox news host sean hannity said... you could argue he was right to be concerned — and the committee is requesting an interview with mr hannity. but there's one key figure whose testimony and evidence remains elusive. former president trump has perhaps, unsurprisingly, refused to cooperate. he's taken legal action to block the release of official white house communication records. and these delays mean it's not certain the committee will finish its work before the mid—term elections in november.
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and the politics of this remain farfrom predictable — while many condemned what happened onjanuary the 6th, the idea that underpinned it remains. a year on from the storming of the capitol, polls show two thirds of republicans believe voter fraud helped joe biden to win. given that that didn't happen, that raises profound questions about one of the two main parties in the world's most high—profile democracy. and the democrats argue harm is already being done. the root cause of january 6th, is still with us today. it is the big lie, pushed by donald trump, that is undermining faith in our political system. but for all this criticism, for all the convictions of those involved in the riot, donald trump remains the dominant political figure in the republican party. and it remains the case that he believes america's democracy is rigged — as do his supporters. if you believed that, you'd be furious, you'd be outraged. and so the emotion that drove january the 6th remains. and there's no reason to think it
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won't manifest itself again. hello again. towards the end of sunday across wales in southwest england, we started to see cloud thicken and roll in. and as it moved in, we started to lose some of the visibility, it started to get quite murky — and that marking up process continues at pace at the moment. we've got a warm front pushing in at the moment right now, bringing some thinker cloud, a bit of light rain and drizzle associated with that. we are seeing mist and fog patches forming around some of our coast and hills. it's quite mild, though, for western areas, still cold in rural aberdeen sure, lowest temperatures about —5 or so. as we head through the rest of monday, this area of milder air is very gradually creeping its way further eastwards. so a bit of drizzle to start off across western areas, could be an odd spitjust about anywhere as at thinker cloud continues to push across the midlands and into eastern areas. some heavier rain for
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a time in west scotland, where it'll turn quite breezy. for these western areas, that's where it'll be mildest, with highs of 13 in belfast. not quite so mild in the east, but these temperatures are still above average.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... a court hearing is about to open in melbourne as tennis world number one novak djokovic will fight to overturn the cancellation of his visa by the australian government. at least 19 people are dead — including nine children in a fire in the bronx area of new york city. shortening coronavirus isolation in england — a minister says if approved — it would ease staff shortages and cut the isolation period from seven days to five. live from our studio in singapore...
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this is bbc news. it's newsday.

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