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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 9, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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coming up in sport — england are doing their best to defy australia, but can they bat out the final day and draw the fourth test in sydney? a look at what the weather has in the week— a look at what the weather has in the week ahead. _ it's sunday ninth january. our main story: a senior government minister has given his support to reducing the coronavirus isolation period in england. speaking to the sunday times, the former vaccines minister — now education secretary — nadhim zahawi backed the idea of isolating for five days instead of seven. our political correspondent ben wright reports. at the moment, people who test positive for covid are required to quarantine for at least seven days
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of the process is a straining staffing levels in the public and private sectors. the united states recently shortened the self isolation window to five days stop earlier this month, the uk health security agency said doing the same here would be counter—productive, but, it would keep the policy under review. in this interview, nadeem zaha we said if the agency wants to cut isolation for five days would be even more helpful. he said the country is witnessing the disease is a constant presence like the common cold or flu a constant presence like the common cold orflu but no a constant presence like the common cold or flu but no longer a constant presence like the common cold orflu but no longer causing a constant presence like the common cold or flu but no longer causing a crisis at the three tests may come to an end but responding to the times that this would happen within weeks the government said no decision had been taken and free tests would remain in place as long as they were needed. ben wright, bbc news. parents of 12— to 15—year—olds are being urged to get
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their children vaccinated, as around half a million appointments are made available in england. the announcement comes after the news that 150,000 people in the uk have now died within 28 days of a positive covid test. let's take a look at the latest data. there were 146,390 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. 313 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. the total number of people who've died with covid now stands at 150,057. 0n vaccinations, more than 35.2 million people have now had a boosterjab, which means just over 60% of people aged 12 and over have now had three vaccine doses. danjohnson has this report. is the number of covid deaths
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reaches 150,000, more vaccinations are being offered to the young. half are being offered to the young. half a million slots have been made available at 300 centres across england, for children aged 12—15. senior doctors are urging parents to get kids in. senior doctors are urging parents to net kids in. ~ �* , ., senior doctors are urging parents to netkidsin.~ �* ., , get kids in. we've spoken to parents around the country _ get kids in. we've spoken to parents around the country from _ get kids in. we've spoken to parents around the country from different. around the country from different backgrounds and in their communities and parents who want their children vaccinated. —— do want their children vaccinated. it is really important, notjust to keep their child safe and to keep children in education but to keep families and communities save as well. according to the latest — communities save as well. according to the latest nhs — communities save as well. according to the latest nhs figures, _ communities save as well. according to the latest nhs figures, more - communities save as well. according to the latest nhs figures, more thani to the latest nhs figures, more than 1.4 million young people aged 12—15 in england had body had theirfirst dose since september. that is more than half of them. little spread is one of many places seeing covid cases rising. so as well as backfilling children, older people are being encouraged to come forward for a boosterjab. are being encouraged to come forward fora boosterjab. —— for a booster jab. —— middlesborough. for a boosterjab. --
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middlesboranh. ., ~' ., middlesborough. our work for middlesborough _ middlesborough. our work for middlesborough council - middlesborough. our work for middlesborough council and l middlesborough. our work for - middlesborough council and taking children to school, it's covid is very rife in the city —— in the teesside area. we have been double vaccinated and this is a rooster. thus coming out of covid, we are out by 28 days. —— this is our booster. this was our earliest opportunity to come and get our booster. i just come and get our booster. i 'ust thou~ht come and get our booster. i 'ust thought rd fl come and get our booster. i 'ust thought i'd come i come and get our booster. i 'ust thought i'd come and i come and get our booster. i 'ust thought i'd come and get i come and get our booster. ijust thought i'd come and get my - come and get our booster. ijust thought i'd come and get my booster. this is_ thought i'd come and get my booster. this is my— thought i'd come and get my booster. this is my booster vaccine. covid is going _ this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high— this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays— this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays so— this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays so i've - this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays so i've been l going high nowadays so i've been outside. — going high nowadays so i've been outside. i— going high nowadays so i've been outside. i90— going high nowadays so i've been outside, i go outside _ going high nowadays so i've been outside, i go outside a _ going high nowadays so i've been outside, i go outside a lot- going high nowadays so i've been outside, i go outside a lot and . going high nowadays so i've been outside, i go outside a lot and i. going high nowadays so i've beeni outside, i go outside a lot and i do work_ outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in _ outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in a _ outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in a restaurant _ outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in a restaurant now— outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in a restaurant now so - outside, i go outside a lot and i do| work in a restaurant now so people who come — work in a restaurant now so people who come in. — work in a restaurant now so people who come in. i_ work in a restaurant now so people who come in, i thought _ work in a restaurant now so people who come in, i thought it- work in a restaurant now so people who come in, i thought it is- work in a restaurant now so people who come in, i thought it is better| who come in, i thought it is better to get— who come in, i thought it is better to get a _ who come in, i thought it is better to get a booster— who come in, i thought it is better to get a booster vaccine _ who come in, i thought it is better to get a booster vaccine as - who come in, i thought it is better to get a booster vaccine as well. l who come in, i thought it is better. to get a booster vaccine as well. we know for to get a booster vaccine as well. know for covid, for many many people, 2019 and also 2020, people died. so important for people to look after themselves. you don't want to take _ look after themselves. you don't want to take a _ look after themselves. you don't want to take a chance. _ look after themselves. you don't want to take a chance. you - look after themselves. you don't want to take a chance. you don'ti want to take a chance. you don't know _ want to take a chance. you don't know ohce — want to take a chance. you don't know once we get covid, the virus, how you _ know once we get covid, the virus,
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how you are — know once we get covid, the virus, how you are going to react. what we know _ how you are going to react. what we know is _ how you are going to react. what we know is how — how you are going to react. what we know is how the covid vaccine works, there _ know is how the covid vaccine works, there is— know is how the covid vaccine works, there is plenty of data now for the last there is plenty of data now for the test one _ there is plenty of data now for the last one year to come along and we know— last one year to come along and we know people getting the vaccine especially when they have had the second _ especially when they have had the second and the booster, they are getting _ second and the booster, they are getting a — second and the booster, they are getting a milder form of illness so come _ getting a milder form of illness so come along and get the vaccine. there _ come along and get the vaccine. there is— come along and get the vaccine. there is a — come along and get the vaccine. there is a push in scotland for everyone to come and get vaccinated in an effort to get covid numbers under control and make sure hospitals are not overwhelmed. dan johnson, bbc news. fully vaccinated travellers and children can now take a lateral flow test rather than a more expensive pcr when arriving back in the uk. they only have to isolate if the test is positive — and since friday they no longer need to take a test before departing. there are no changes for those who haven't had two doses of the covid vaccine. later today, novak djokovic�*s legal team will appeal a decision by australian authorities to revoke his visa, over a row about his covid vaccination status.
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it's after documents were released suggesting the tennis star had been granted a vaccine exemption to enter the country because he had tested positive for the virus last month. simonjones reports. supporters of novak djokovic gather outside the immigration detention centre in melbourne where he's staying. they want to see him on the tennis court. the countdown is now on to his court case. 0h, mate, i haven't slept until he came off the plane, we're all sick to the stomach. it's a very unfortunate situation for australia. it's becoming very embarrassing. this was djokovic arriving on wednesday. his legal team say he'd received a vaccine exemption to enter the country from tennis australia, because he'd tested positive for covid on december 16. that was the day on which these pictures were taken, showing djokovic maskless at a ceremony in his home country of serbia, at which he was honoured with his own postage stamps in recognition of his achievements.
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it's unclear whether he had taken a test at this stage. the following day, serbian media says he was pictured handing out awards to young players. it is unclear whether he knew he had covid. another player, renata voracova, from the czech it is prison. this is not immigration hotel, this is present. —— prison. another player, renata voracova, from the czech republic, has now left the hotel and the country after her visa was cancelled. djokovic had been asked to move to somewhere he could train ahead of the open. thatlooks unlikely, but he has been given exercise equipment and gluten—free food. one former australian foreign minister is not sympathetic. there's no way you could give him an exemption when exemptions haven't been given to people
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who want to go to australia to see dying parents, and, you know, injured relatives. there are all sorts of heart—rending stories about people not being able to see their relatives in australia, but those people are not famous, so they don't get an exemption. but it will now be up to a judge to decide, just a week before the australian open begins. simon jones, bbc news. elsewhere, labour is calling for a windfall tax on oil and gas producers, to help low and middle income families cope with rising energy bills. the party said the conservatives had presided over a decade of failed energy policies. the government said the energy price cap was protecting millions from higher bills and it was supporting vulnerable households with schemes worth more than four billion pounds.
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all the papers have these photose. they're of the duchess of cambridge have been released to mark her 40th birthday. the portraits, taken by fashion photographer paolo roversi, will go on display this year in three places which have a special meaning to her royal highness: berkshire, st andrews and anglesey. they will then be housed in the permanent collection of the national portrait gallery. i think that is my favourite one. the one in the red dress. very glam. around half a million vaccination appointments are being made available online injanuary as part of a big push for parents in england to book their 12— to 15—year—olds in for a jab. walk—in slots will also be available at some sites and hundreds of schools will be visited over the next fortnight as part of the scheme. we'rejoined now by gp dr ellie cannon. thanks for coming on. thanks for coming on especially this early on a sunday morning. first of all, we have heard two stories this morning.
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one bad nadeem zahawi is a saying that the isolation period should be cut down from seven to can we get your response to that initially. irate your response to that initially. we seem to your response to that initially. - seem to be moving in to a different stage of this pandemic. if you remember going back to 2020, there were times where people were isolating for 14 days. it had come down to five days, very different. that is a reflection of army crime. it is milder and also a reflection of the fact there is a lot of immunity in the uk now thanks to vaccination. —— omicron. and previous infection. it is also a reflection of the other halves from non— covid. we have seen how much of the workforce is being effect by these long isolation period and so cutting that fire proportion is really worth it.—
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cutting that fire proportion is really worth it. that leads nicely to the second _ really worth it. that leads nicely to the second story _ really worth it. that leads nicely to the second story on - really worth it. that leads nicely to the second story on the - really worth it. that leads nicely l to the second story on the sunday times today and that is also about covid and ijust want times today and that is also about covid and i just want to ask, times today and that is also about covid and ijust want to ask, the lateral flow tests. i don't know whether you have had them, your patience. stories are saying they don't know if they will be free, something the government has denied. at a time when inflation is high and things are very expensive. what is your take on that?— things are very expensive. what is your take on that? well, i work in a ve larae your take on that? well, i work in a very large inner-city _ your take on that? well, i work in a very large inner-city gp _ your take on that? well, i work in a very large inner-city gp surgery - your take on that? well, i work in a very large inner-city gp surgery in l very large inner—city gp surgery in london with 12,000 patients and over the last year or two, obviously i've been encouraging people to get tested as and when they have symptoms and without even having to pay for tests, there was already some reluctance to get symptoms, people don't want a positive covid test, they don't want to have to be off work, possibly they can't afford it. other reasons would be people don't want to be trapped by the app or track and trace. a little bit
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reluctant. if we add in having to pay as well, but really affect it for a lot of people, it affects the access for a lot of people and it puts another barrier up towards people doing the right thing sol don't think it would be a good idea. another story, don't think it would be a good idea. anotherstory, people don't think it would be a good idea. another story, people being urged to have their children vaccinated. what are your thoughts around this? this is 12-15 are your thoughts around this? this is 12—15 —year—olds. this are your thoughts around this? this is 12-15 -year-olds._ is 12-15 -year-olds. this story is ersonal is 12-15 -year-olds. this story is personal towards _ is 12-15 -year-olds. this story is personal towards me _ is 12-15 -year-olds. this story is personal towards me because i l personal towards me because i actually have a child in this age category. i would absolutely recommend that other parents follow suit and get their children vaccinated, notjust to protect them against covid of course but to protect them against restrictions, protect them against restrictions, protect them against isolation and that awful education disruption and disruption to their social life that they've had really for the last two years now. there is a schools programme for the vaccination so many people like myself will have
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opted for their child to be vaccinated in school but i think it is great to now also offer those vaccination appointments within the community because many kids miss those appointments in school last term because they actually had covid. ~ ., term because they actually had covid. ~ . ., term because they actually had covid. . ., ., covid. what would you say to those arents, covid. what would you say to those parents. though. — covid. what would you say to those parents, though, who _ covid. what would you say to those parents, though, who are - covid. what would you say to those | parents, though, who are hesitant? i've been speaking to parents and i've been speaking to parents and i've heard from certain people that theyjust i've heard from certain people that they just feel that their children are too young. they just feel that their children are too young-— they just feel that their children are too young. well, thankfully in this country _ are too young. well, thankfully in this country we _ are too young. well, thankfully in this country we vaccinate - are too young. well, thankfully in this country we vaccinate our- this country we vaccinate our children when they are eight weeks old against a range of fatal illnesses so we give them lots of vaccinations when they're very young. a huge number before they are even one—year—old that is one of the reasons i sleep well at night because i know that my kids are vaccinated against potentially fatal illnesses. we have seen millions of children now around the world have the covid vaccination and be fine and have very minimal side effect.
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what we know from history of medicine and science that actually, viruses can have long—term effects but they haven't actually been vaccinations that have long—term side effects and that is what reassures me and that is why i've had my kids vaccinated. can reassures me and that is why i've had my kids vaccinated.— reassures me and that is why i've had my kids vaccinated. can you see a time when — had my kids vaccinated. can you see a time when the _ had my kids vaccinated. can you see a time when the age _ had my kids vaccinated. can you see a time when the age limit _ had my kids vaccinated. can you see a time when the age limit might - had my kids vaccinated. can you see| a time when the age limit might drop even further? it a time when the age limit might drop even further?— even further? it certainly could. obviously _ even further? it certainly could. obviously in _ even further? it certainly could. obviously in the _ even further? it certainly could. obviously in the united - even further? it certainly could. obviously in the united states l even further? it certainly could. i obviously in the united states they are vaccinating children much younger. i think as young as five and six stop so there may be an opinion coming from the body that actually governs our vaccinations in this country to recommend that. it is hard to say because we are obviously in this changing phase of the pandemic and it may not actually be necessary. but it might become something that you could opt into doing as time goes on.— doing as time goes on. doctor cannon, doing as time goes on. doctor cannon. as — doing as time goes on. doctor cannon, as always, _ doing as time goes on. doctor cannon, as always, crystal- doing as time goes on. doctor i cannon, as always, crystal clear. thank you for your time and enjoy
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the rest of your weekend. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. i noticed you were scraping the car windscreen this morning. it is a bit frosty out there. ., , . ., ., ,, . there. one of my favourite 'obs at 3am, i there. one of my favourite 'obs at 3m. i do — there. one of my favourite 'obs at 3am, i do apologise * there. one of my favourite 'obs at 3am, i do apologise to _ 3am, i do apologise to my neighbours. a bit chilly out there at the moment. very good morning to you, but for many of you it is going to be a brighter day than yesterday. it won't be completely dry. if few showers already in the west and a few more developing as we go through the day, chiefly across parts of scotland, northern ireland and later into northern parts of england stop let me show you the big picture from space at the moment. this cloud brought all the rain yesterday. this cloud is having a way tomorrow, so there is a bit of a window between them, hence the clear skies. there are clumps of light cloud out to the west which should bring in the showers across parts of scotland, northern ireland, one or two elsewhere. many will start the day dry. showers a little bit wintry in
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places as well. as we go through the morning, if anything the showers will come together into some longer spells of rain the parts of western and south—western scotland, into northern ireland, and they will drift their way down into northern parts of england through the afternoon. isolated showers elsewhere. many will be dry with some semi— spells, especially east anglia and the south—east where yesterday it rained all day long. towards the various are southwest, conneu towards the various are southwest, connell and the isles of scilly, thicker cloud and result. temperatures up to 10 degrees here, a cool and chilly day elsewhere after frosty the showers feeding for after frosty the showers feeding for a time. some freezing fog patches in scotland, could get down to —6 and passed of eastern scotland for a while but temperatures will lift later in the night as the clouds start increase from the west. these are the temperature is as we start tomorrow morning, still may be a touch of frost in the very far east of scotland and england but around eight to 10 degrees in western areas. that is because you will be in this little zone between a warm front and a cold front. the air is a little bit milder than the air either side of it, the warm front
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itself is the thicker cloud across western areas to begin with, bringing patchy rain and drizzle. turning quite misty and murky around the hills on the coast. the odd heavy a burst of rain across northern and western scotland, where the winds will be strength through the winds will be strength through the day to gale force and we will start to see a few splashes of rain pushing across into eastern england during the afternoon. many will stay dry with some hazy sunshine at times, and note the temperatures higher today, times, and note the temperatures highertoday, eight times, and note the temperatures higher today, eight to 10 degrees. the rain pushes into tuesday, weakening as it does, so showery rain across southern parts of england for tuesday but brighter conditions developing elsewhere. some sunny spells, staying windy in northern scotland. one or two showers, temperatures again around six to 11 degrees. beyond that, we will see high pressure gradually building from the south. so for the rest of the week, wednesday into the end of the week, high pressure across southern areas keeping things dry. a bit more breeze across the north of scotland, coming in of the atlantic, and that will have an impact on the temperatures as we go through the end of the week. notice aberdeen up to around ten or 11 degrees, whereas the likes of
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abergavenny and across parts of england, around four or five celsius. as the high pressure builds, quite nice by day for some of you, there will be some overnight frost and fog. where the fog lingers, it would be quite chilly. overall the week ahead, after this weekend, looking largely dry for many. irate weekend, looking largely dry for man . ~ ., weekend, looking largely dry for man . ~ . . , ., weekend, looking largely dry for man. . ., . many. we will have a bit of that. thank you- _ many. we will have a bit of that. thank you. nice _ many. we will have a bit of that. thank you. nice thai, _ many. we will have a bit of that. thank you. nice thai, matt. - many. we will have a bit of that. i thank you. nice thai, matt. thank ou ve thank you. nice thai, matt. thank you very much- — let's have a look at some of today's front pages. the sunday times with the claim that the distribution of free lateral flow tests could end as part of a government strategy to start living with covid. the paper says the prime minister, borisjohnson, will announce new plans within weeks, with free tests potentially only being provided in high—risk settings such as care homes, hospitals and schools and for those with symptoms. the observer has spoken to the former chairman of the uk's vaccine task force, who says covid should be treated as an endemic
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virus similar to the flu. it comes after it was announced that 150,000 people have now died across the uk within 28 days of a positive covid test. and writing in today's sunday telegraph, the foreign secretary, liz truss, has said the government will overhaul the post—brexit agreement over northern ireland unilaterally if she is unable to reach a solution with the european union. there is also an image of the duchess of cambridge, one of three photos released by kensington palace to mark her 40th birthday. hgppy happy birthday. i feel like we have teased those _ happy birthday. i feel like we have teased those other— happy birthday. i feel like we have teased those other pictures. - happy birthday. i feel like we have teased those other pictures. do i happy birthday. i feel like we have. teased those other pictures. do you want to see the other two? irate teased those other pictures. do you want to see the other two? we have to do it. i want to see the other two? we have to do it- twill— want to see the other two? we have to do it. i will grab— want to see the other two? we have to do it. i will grab that _ want to see the other two? we have to do it. i will grab that side. - to do it. i will grab that side. there is the _ to do it. i will grab that side. there is the red _ to do it. i will grab that side. there is the red one - to do it. i will grab that side. there is the red one that - to do it. i will grab that side. there is the red one that we | to do it. i will grab that side. - there is the red one that we have been showing you as well. two more here. quite the victorian inspired one, it has to be said here, in
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black and white. there is a sepia toned one here. three pictures to mark the duchess's birthday and those three will go on show in towns in which she has lived across the country before going to the national portrait gallery. maybe a new side that we have not seen of her. but there are the three that we have been promising. that there are the three that we have been promising.— been promising. that off the shoulder look. _ been promising. that off the shoulder look. what - been promising. that off the shoulder look. what else - been promising. that off the i shoulder look. what else have been promising. that off the - shoulder look. what else have you not? you shoulder look. what else have you got? you know _ shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, _ shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i _ shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i am - shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i am a - shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i am a bit - shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i am a bit of. shoulder look. what else have you got? you know me, i am a bit of aj got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut. _ got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut. so — got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut, so i— got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut, so i love _ got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut, so i love this - got? you know me, i am a bit of a military nut, so i love this one. . military nut, so i love this one. this is about soldiers using bikes. british troops trained to drop behind enemy lines, trialing these electric motorbikes for battlefield missions. you can see them there, hopefully. you don't expect soldiers on one of those, do you? it all on one of those, do you? it all feels a bit _ on one of those, do you? it all feels a bit great _ on one of those, do you? it all feels a bit great escape. - on one of those, do you? it all feels a bit great escape. being dropped behind enemy lines with the parachute and the motorbike. the
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story is that they are quiet, they are silent, because they are electric bikes. you would be behind enemy lines, silently making your way. some pretty muddy terrain, as well. not bad. hat way. some pretty muddy terrain, as well. not bad.— way. some pretty muddy terrain, as well. not bad._ from - well. not bad. not at all. from bikin: , well. not bad. not at all. from biking. let's — well. not bad. not at all. from biking, let's talk _ well. not bad. not at all. from biking, let's talk sports. - well. not bad. not at all. from biking, let's talk sports. you i well. not bad. not at all. from i biking, let's talk sports. you know i will ask biking, let's talk sports. you know i will ask you _ biking, let's talk sports. you know i will ask you about _ biking, let's talk sports. you know i will ask you about the _ biking, let's talk sports. you know i will ask you about the cricket. i i will ask you about the cricket. dare i say it, england are doing fine. they are hanging in there. i am hearing in my ear that a wicket has gone, they are now six down. england never make it easy, do they? famous last words, they should be all right. they have about 100 balls to see out. �* . right. they have about 100 balls to seeout. �* . | right. they have about 100 balls to see out._ i know. it| see out. don't say that! i know. it is mission — see out. don't say that! i know. it is mission impossible _ see out. don't say that! i know. it is mission impossible to - see out. don't say that! i know. it is mission impossible to win. i see out. don't say that! i know. itj is mission impossible to win. that will not happen in sydney. the rain helped them out a little bit. they had to bat out the entire day, at the moment with four wickets in hand. there is a new ball that australia are playing with and we know that england have a propensity to collapse at times, so it could well happen again. i will stay positive, though. for now england on
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course, with four wickets and 100 balls to see out. to see if they can draw the test match and avoid a whitewash. zak crawley batted well to reach 77 runs, in the end bowled lbw by cameron green. are really breezy, handy innings by him. captainjoe root gotjust 24, bowled by scott boland again. he has had a nightmare ashes so far. ben stokes battled hard. he was out for 60, a really brave effort amid his struggle with a side strain. he has not played a lot of cricket. australia havejust taken the new ball. they are at the moment at 218/6. newcastle united may now be one of the richest clubs in the world, but that didn't shield them from a classic fa cup upset
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as they were beaten by league one side cambridge. new signing kieran trippier made his first appearance for the premier league side. but it wasn't enough to save the match, as his new team were humbled in a 1—0 defeat. joe ironside providing the goal to send cambridge into the fourth round, and their travelling fans wild in the stands. we always knew going into the game we had nothing to lose. we only can win, and just we had nothing to lose. we only can win, andjust we we had nothing to lose. we only can win, and just we needed to come here and be the best version of ourselves, and that's what we did today. you know, we scored, we kept a clean sheet, which is really important. you come here and not many teams can do that. we always had that belief, and i am really happy. look how many supporters have come here to support us. we sold out. it is incredible, what a way to start the year. so a great day for cambridge but a disastrous one for newcastle. here is what their all—time leading goal—scorer, alan shearer, had to say on the defeat last night. i hope the players that are on the pitch for newcastle went and
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apologised and thanked those fans for their support, because there was 52,000 there today. fa cup third round, cambridge at home. cambridge deserved it, they were superb, and congratulations to them. but i hope they went and thanked them, because they went and thanked them, because they deserved more than the rubbish that they were served up today. and the shocks continued as kidderminster, the lowest ranked team left in the cup, pulled off a stunning comeback to beat championship side reading 2—1. the national league side had to fight through an incredible 12 minutes of injury time, and you can see how much the victory means to them. there was more non—league success as boreham wood beat league one's afc wimbledon 2—0. tyrone marsh was on the scoresheet as the national league side qualify for the fourth round for the first time in their history. so who would they like to face next? i don't really care. i have to be honest with you, will stone comes to town on tuesday. i know it sounds really, really cliched, but as a manager you can't switch off. as much as i want to enjoy the planning
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and the organisational side of things, we have a mid week against joe ironside. it is our bread—and—butter. we need to make sure we put performance on. obviously i will have one eye on the draw —— woolstone. another premier league side to get knocked out was burnley. they were leading 1—0 against huddersfield but conceded twice in the second half to lose the game, matty pearson heading in the winner with just three minutes left. but the holders, leicester, are safely through. james maddison got one of the goals as they beat claudio ranieri's watford 4—1 at the king power stadium. there are nine more third—round games today, including liverpool versus shrewsbury, which kicks off at 2:00pm at anfield. jurgen klopp hopes to be back in the dugout for the match after having covid. liverpool's squad has been badly hit by coronavirus and were forced to shut down first—team training earlier this week. the family of the world number one tennis star, novak djokovic, havejoined supporters in the serbian capital, belgrade, as the row over his australian immigration status continues. he was denied entry into the country
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over his covid vaccine status. a crucial court case will be held in melbourne later today to determine whether he can stay and compete at the australian open or whether he needs to leave the country. our balkans correspondent guy de launey reports. this isn't the kind of rally that is normally associated with the world's best male tennis player, but the supporters of novak djokovic, these are anything but normal times. this event outside serbia's national assembly reflects the widely felt outrage about their champion's flight. instead of setting up a warm welcome for the nine times australian open winner, the host nation found fault with his papers —— plight. that has left novak djokovic cooling his heels and quarantine instead of warming up for the tournament. these people are showing their support for serbia's number one sporting star. they have come to express their disapproval for what is happening to him in australia, and to listen to the
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family of novak djokovic explain how they feel about their son spending orthodox christmas weekend in a quarantine hotel in melbourne. just imarine. quarantine hotel in melbourne. just imagine. just imagine if you have a son and he spent christmas, our christmas, in prison. this is for me a present, this is not like an immigration hotel. this is present, because they don't allow him to go out. —— prison. because they don't allow him to go out- -- prison-— out. -- prison. belgrade's novak tennis centre _ out. -- prison. belgrade's novak tennis centre is _ out. -- prison. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where _ out. -- prison. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where you i out. -- prison. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where you will. out. -- prison. belgrade's novak. tennis centre is where you will find the next generation of champions. this girl is targeting victory at wimbledon 2024, when she will be 18. she credits novak djokovic for supporting her development at his tennis centre, and she says she was happy to return the favour at the family rally. j happy to return the favour at the family rally-— family rally. i think he deserves all of that, _ family rally. i think he deserves all of that, and _ family rally. i think he deserves all of that, and he _ family rally. i think he deserves all of that, and he deserves i family rally. i think he deserves all of that, and he deserves our support. he is our man, he is playing for our country, so even if we can't help that much, we are there to support him at least.
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belgrade's main coronavirus vaccination centre could do with a similar level of support. serbia's overall vaccination rate is languishing below 50%, and novak djokovic�*s ambivalent stand towards inoculation hasn't helped, so not also be in sympathise with his current situation. translation: i would say that _ current situation. translation: i would say that there _ current situation. translation: i would say that there are _ current situation. translation: i would say that there are some i current situation. translation: i i would say that there are some double standards. as on the one hand we are constantly being told that we should get vaccinated, and then when it comes to a person like novak djokovic, we see that there are exceptions. fist djokovic, we see that there are exceptions-— djokovic, we see that there are excetions. . . , . . . , exceptions. at least the church has liven its exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. _ exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. the _ exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. the patriarch i given its blessing. the patriarch said that millions of orthodox serves would remember novak djokovic in their christmas prayers, and they will be hoping that monday's judgement in melbourne will bring deliverance for their sporting icon. took us through what we will hear today. we will get the verdict tonight. localtime, and today. we will get the verdict tonight. local time, and that could determine whether he is allowed to
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stay. determine whether he is allowed to sta . , , ., . ,, determine whether he is allowed to sta. , , ., . stay. this is it. novak d'okovic could have i stay. this is it. novak d'okovic could have flown i stay. this is it. novak d'okovic could have flown back i stay. this is it. novak djokovic could have flown back if i stay. this is it. novak djokovic could have flown back if he i stay. this is it. novak djokovic- could have flown back if he decided that was enough, accepted that decision. he could have flown back home to serbia, but he wants to fight, he wants to play this australian open. on the tennis side of things, let's not forget he is tired on 20 grand slams with roger federer and rafael nadal. he knows if he can get his 21st grand slam that propelled him to the status of the greatest ever, that is something that means a lot to him. at this hearing tonight we will have to see a dramatic u—turn if he is to play. his lawyers feel confident. they say he has a legitimate vaccine exemption. he wouldn't have stayed at that detention hotel for these days and nights if he didn't believe he could still play.— days and nights if he didn't believe he could still play. given how much is ridind he could still play. given how much is riding on — he could still play. given how much is riding on it. _ he could still play. given how much is riding on it, it _ he could still play. given how much is riding on it, it is _ he could still play. given how much is riding on it, it is really _ is riding on it, it is really interesting what the psychology of this could be now as well. quite a distraction ahead of any sort of sporting tournament, never mind one with so much riding on it, as you say, against nadal and fetter, and to take those titles.— to take those titles. absolutely, and one of— to take those titles. absolutely, and one of the _ to take those titles. absolutely, and one of the considerations i to take those titles. absolutely, | and one of the considerations as to take those titles. absolutely, i and one of the considerations as he has been in that hotel, he hasn't
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been training —— federer. he hasn't been training —— federer. he hasn't been able to play while some his rivals have been wanting up, but psychologically he is strong. he wouldn't have chosen to fight this out if he didn't believe he has a chance. but the whole of australia, the whole of the world, will be looking to see what this decision is in melbourne tonight.— in melbourne tonight. absolutely, thanks. i in melbourne tonight. absolutely, thanks- i can't _ in melbourne tonight. absolutely, thanks. i can't take _ in melbourne tonight. absolutely, thanks. i can't take the _ in melbourne tonight. absolutely, thanks. i can't take the pressure, | thanks. i can't take the pressure, england, liverpool, tennis... the biggest, most powerful telescope nasa has ever launched has successfully been assembled in space, two weeks after its christmas day take—off. it's hoped the james webb telescope will teach astronomers about the history of the cosmos as well as search for signs of life on other planets. alice key reports. we have reached the end of deployment and we are loading into the launchpad. deployment and we are loading into the launchpad-— the launchpad. applause. celebrations _ the launchpad. applause. celebrations from - the launchpad. applause. celebrations from mission | the launchpad. applause. - celebrations from mission control in baltimore as the final piece of the telescope puzzle slot into place. there are no cameras on board for this live animation was the only way
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to see the final mirrored wing of the royal's largest space telescope unfold. —— world's largest. irate the royal's largest space telescope unfold. -- world's largest. we have a fully unfolded _ unfold. -- world's largest. we have a fully unfolded observatory. i unfold. -- world's largest. we have a fully unfolded observatory. all. a fully unfolded observatory. all right. a fully unfolded observatory. all right- talking — a fully unfolded observatory. all right. talking afterwards, i a fully unfolded observatory. all| right. talking afterwards, nasa's director of science _ right. talking afterwards, nasa's director of science praised i right. talking afterwards, nasa's director of science praised them | right. talking afterwards, nasa's i director of science praised them for making history. j director of science praised them for making history-— making history. i want to tell you 'ust how making history. i want to tell you just how excited _ making history. i want to tell you just how excited and _ making history. i want to tell you just how excited and emotional. making history. i want to tell you just how excited and emotional i | making history. i want to tell you i just how excited and emotional i am right now. we have a deployed telescope in orbit. a magnificent telescope in orbit. a magnificent telescope in orbit. a magnificent telescope in which the world has never seen. what a way to make history, everybody! the never seen. what a way to make history, everybody!— history, everybody! the new observatory _ history, everybody! the new observatory will _ history, everybody! the new observatory will look - history, everybody! the new observatory will look deeper history, everybody! the new- observatory will look deeper into space than ever before. infrared technology will allow it to see the first stars and galaxies formed a 13.5 alien years ago. —— billion years ago. it 13.5 alien years ago. -- billion years ago-— 13.5 alien years ago. -- billion earsado. . , ., years ago. it will also be able to look into the _ years ago. it will also be able to look into the dusty _ years ago. it will also be able to| look into the dusty environments where _ look into the dusty environments where stars grew up and new planets forming _ where stars grew up and new planets forming. that is one of the places that will— forming. that is one of the places that will help slightly closer to
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home — that will help slightly closer to home as — that will help slightly closer to home as well is the beginning of the universe _ home as well is the beginning of the universe. and home as well is the beginning of the universe. �* ., ' home as well is the beginning of the universe-_ 20 _ home as well is the beginning of the universe._ 20 years i home as well is the beginning of the universe._ 20 years in i universe. and lift off! 20 years in the making. _ universe. and lift off! 20 years in the making. it — universe. and lift off! 20 years in the making, it was _ universe. and lift off! 20 years in the making, it was successfully l the making, it was successfully launched on christmas day but it was so big it had to be flat packed inside a rocket to make it into orbit. over the past two weeks it has been slowly unfurling as it travels nearly1 million miles away from earth to circle the sun. but for it to send back images, each segment now has to line up perfectly to act as a single huge mirror. each one of those _ to act as a single huge mirror. each one of those mirrors _ to act as a single huge mirror. earl one of those mirrors which is very light weight have motors on the back which can move them up and down, tipped them sideways, rotate them and even slightly bent them to make sure they have exactly the right focus. ., , _, , . , focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in — focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space _ focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space before _ focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space before but - focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space before but if- focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space before but if it i been tried in space before but if it works, by the summer, it should be sending back its first images and scientists say they could revolutionise the way we see our universe. alice key, bbc news.
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and absolutely fascinating but clearly lots of work still ahead. during the pandemic thousands of dog thefts were reported across the uk and ireland. molly was one of those stolen dogs, and her owner says she'll never give up the fight to bring her home. here's her story. are you good? i would actually rather know that she was dead than to imagine the sort of people that she's with right now. a miniature, bitch, two—year—old, lads. it's the smell that gets i you first and then hundreds of these eyes - looking back at you.
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i have seen people taking photographs of dogs. i guarantee that i can look on dog for sale pages and see those pictures. only a very, very small percentage of people are actually prosecuted for this. good girl! she still has love to give and still has faith - in the human race. good girl, good girl! we haven't stopped fighting for even a single day, and we never will. are you good? one of my favourite things that i remember about molly is that she just had so much
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love inside herfor all of us. she's just so lovable and kind. the last photo that i took of molly, mollyjust stood there behind the flowers. in those photos, she really looks like she's smiling. those were the last photos that i took of her. the evening that molly was stolen, we had our back door open. the two dogs were outside, molly and millie. millie came back and there was no sign of molly. ten minutes passed, then 20 minutes, and i was still calling her, like, i was shouting at the top of my lungs at this point. there was just no sign, so we started to walk the roads and we also took the cars out, drove around locally, up to the village. it was midnight then that mum rang the guards
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and she reported molly as missing, we suspected her as stolen. she possibly wasjust picked up... ..thrown in the boot, closed it down. she's in darkness from that point. then when it opens up again, she has no idea where she is or who she's with. she's being handed over on a rope. her collar is... we don't know where. it's been removed at that point. you feel sick and you panic. i said to my mum, i would actually rather know that she was dead than to
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imagine the sort of people that she's with right now. you'd rather go out onto your road and see that someone had knocked your dog down, you'd rather know that they had lived their life and that they'd the most amazing time with their family who love them and adore them and that...then they are gone. you know, you'd rather know that. something we've talked about quite a bit on this during the pandemic. something we've talked about quite a bit on this programme in recent weeks is the rise in dog thefts during the pandemic. gangs are involved now, the prices of these animals have risen £5,000, £10,000 a time for a dog. gangs are violent, i had constituents being knocked to the ground, beaten, stamped on their hands, threats to them, threats
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to their home, threats to their families. within less than 12 hours, we had pretty much an entire campaign going. by the following morning, we had created the first poster and we were going door—to—door as well in different places. that next day after molly was stolen, we created the actual bring molly home facebook page to post every day and just try and make her too hot to handle — that's what everyone says to do — make her too hot to handle. someone will dump her because they won't be able to sell her if everyone knows that she's a stolen dog. we miss you, molly. we miss you so very much. you are nothing short of the best, best girl, and we love you. we hope you're ok for now. please don't forget us
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and never think we've given up on you. we hope to god... a week after molly was stolen, i received a message on the facebook page from a person who remains anonymous, who said, "can you ring me? i know who stole your dog." we called the guards straight away with that. our garda siochana, which is the irish police. when we were given information about a certain location that she had passed through, the next morning, the guards were at that property.
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the cctv, which has been watched by the guards, she is seen being passed on from one person to the next. within 12 hours of being stolen, she had been sold twice already.
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i've been working for about 25 years for law enforcement. we're taking this facial data, this tracking, this metaviewl in 3d, and transmitting that over to our entirely- new virtual avatar. both myself and other people connected to the investigation have received death threats, so it's important that we retain our anonymity for the protection of both our families and ourselves. demand for puppies went through the roof.
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the type of guys we're investigating began to look at any method they could for obtaining puppies. one of the easiest ways to obtain puppies quickly is to obtain a breading age bitch, and the quickest way of doing that illicitly is to steal it. naturally, a dog will have one, possibly two litters a year. however, because of the demand, they need more litters a year. so they pump the animals full of her hormones, it is just literally litter after litter after litter. it does terrible things to the animals in that process. all i saw in front of me i was this pitiful, broken dog. she smelt disgusting, i
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she was covered in faeces, urine, she has a skin tumouron herside,| which was severely infected. i would say that she has definitely been used i for breeding, which is what- happens with so many of these poor bitches that are used i for moneymaking machines. as she's obviously got i stronger, her personality is coming out now. she still has love to give and still has faith - in the human race, which is even more heartbreaking —| that we can use, abuse and then dump and they still forgive us i and they still want to love us. nobody is enforcing the laws that we have, and the laws that we have are so weak anyway. the police need too much notice, the authorities need too much notice. nobody wants to know.
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theyjust keep passing the buck, and somebody's got to stand up, take responsibility and do you look at a map and work out the best way to get into that site safely, climbing through hedges, swimming across water, whatever you have to do to locate those animals. usually your heart is in your mouth because you've got to be so alert about what's going on, because at any minute, you could be in a lot of danger. it's the smell that gets you first, and then hundreds of these eyes looking back at you. some of the animals, they're in a terrible state, matted coats. you can hardly see what breeds they are sometimes. when cages are on top of each other, then the faeces
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and the urine will drip down from one cage into another cage. some of them are sort of scrabbling at the cage and standing up with their paws on the cage. some are whining, barking, and then there's others that are just so traumatised, that they're at the back of the cage. they're terrified and they won't come near you. so usually, it'll happen in the middle of the night and it's always terrifying because are they going to bring the dog or are they going to hit you over the head and take the money? the owners are so petrified that you'll get the police involved, because the first thing they say is, "if you bring the police down here, then we're going to kill your dog." you just wait and pray that it all goes to plan and nobody
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gets hurt and that you get the dog back. i always say, take a slip lead with you, throw the slip lead over the dog as quick as you can, give them the money and just get out of there. i know people that have remortgaged their houses and they've taken out loans. i can't tell you how it feels when it works. you see the owner in floods of tears. i'm usually in floods of tears. it's amazing. but we shouldn't have to be doing that. we received a further anonymous call. that information suggested that molly had been moved to the uk. i was just furious. all the work that we had put in wasn't enough, because it happens so fast.
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he runs r&r transport services, and richie is responsible for transporting a number of animals across the irish sea illicitly.
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i have lived here for many years. i dread having to go that way. i have seen that lorry there on numerous occasions. for quite some time he has been visiting that place. this one particular time i happened to be driving past. there was a man and a lady, and they had a cage and in this cage there was a pug and another dog, a terrier type, i think it was. and they took the cage to the jockey door and they were feeding the dogs into the lorry. a dog, who i believe was molly,
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was on the back of a cart. the more i look at the picture of molly and the more i remember this dog, and i would say yes, it was molly on the back of that cart. i have seen dogs come out of there with awful wounds. i have seen a dog and she had cigarette burn scars all down her neck and down her back. she was in a really bad way. i have seen a dog come out of there where it has lost the top of its tail and there was blood coming out of it. i have seen many, many dogs coming out of there. bitches, with their teats are dragging on the floor, where they have been bred and bred and bred. it really breaks your heart. nobody wants to see that, nobody wants to witness it.
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however it is thrust in yourface because nobody is doing anything about it. i have seen people taking photographs of dogs. i guarantee that i can look on dog—for—sale pages and see those pictures. the guards contacted the uk police in the area with what info they had, it wasn't enough to search any property at that time. nothing came from that, and we were lost from that point.
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the reality is, you can watch these crimes happening from your own bedroom. man: springer miniature. bitch, two—year—old, lads. i have seen videos of multiple men auctioning a dog and she is sitting in the middle of them. she's a miniature springer. what do you reckon of her, boys? just got her here now. and they are shining torches on her, flashing them over her eyes and making their pitch for her sale. and it's really just horrendous. there is numerous facebook groups which are solely used for buying and selling dogs. any registered or licensed breeder would not be selling on facebook.
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these groups are ongoing continuously, and there is nobody monitoring them. the magnitude isjust massive. every time i log in online there's more posts. we often see as well, comments from people who say "i check molly's page every single day, just to see if she's home". "i have never cried so much over a dog that i've never met, i hope you get her home soon." molly's story has just grown so big that i don't know what's going to happen when we finally
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get to tell people that she's back. i think is going to be insane. people want to come and meet her, we will have to do a kind of drive—by meet and greet molly at the gate, i think. it was actually one of the girls who was on our molly team, was looking on websites to see if she could find different stolen dogs. that is how it often happens, they are spotted in ads for sale. since december 2019, i would estimate i have looked at between 10— to 20,000 adverts. the adverts have been designed, have been engineered to target your heartstrings and from the very first sentence, it evokes the image of a wholesome pet, animals that are well looked after, but when you scratch the surface there is an illegal and illicit trade. the amounts of money involved
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in this are eye—watering. the rewards you can get from a litter of puppies run on average between £20-30,000 a litter. if you are prosecuted for breeding illicitly, and you are likely to get a very low level fine. so we are looking at between £5—750. and of course only a very, very small percentage of people are actually prosecuted for this.
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very few people are caught for stealing dogs, and then very few people are charged. and when they are charged, they get very minimal sentences. my chocolate labrador, if he were stolen it would be treated in much the same way as a laptop. an object that has been taken. the fact that they are sentient, the fact that they are companions, the fact that they are family members has not been taken into consideration whatsoever. they need to be taken more seriously by the police, they need to be taken more seriously by by the courts, they need to be taken more seriously by by the politicians that have the opportunity to change the laws. it is literally pandora's box and we have only
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scratched the surface. i think the pandemic maybe exacerbated it, but prior to that they had already secured their marketplace. the people we are dealing with are highly organised, and hyper—mobile. there needs to be far more investigators looking at this, there needs to be more interaction between the agencies. and until we do that, this problem is not going to go away. i don't know how i feel about it. we still are without molly, so to be honest, all we really care about is getting her home. i wouldn't say that that'sjustice, you know. this is the victim impact statement that i had written to be read in court.
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"molly's theft has affected each of us in different ways, from anxiety and paranoia to sleep deprivation, recurring nightmares, and most of all, grief." "we have had our hopes raised up and then shattered on more than one occasion by people who have falsely claimed to have molly. we have had countless sleepless nights due to regular intrusive thoughts about their conditions molly might be kept in now. when we finally do get to sleep, the nightmares ensue. these are mainly dreams in which we eventually find molly... cries. ..only to be jolted awake with the dreadful reminder that this is really not the case. she is still missing."
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millie! molly! say hi! are you having a great time? good girl. hey millie, you having a nice time? i actually had a dream last night. i remember in the dream being with molly, and i think i brought her to meet my mother, mam hadn't seen her yet, that she was back. she was saying, "it's not real", and i said, "no, it's definitely real, it's way more real than the dreams where i feel like she's home".
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and then i woke up, and i was like... here we go again. hey, molly! you getting all the pets? all the pretty pets? 0h, molly. good morning. welcome to breakfast with sima kotecha and ben thompson. our headlines today: the education secretary becomes the first cabinet minister to back reducing covid isolation in england
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down from seven days to five. parents of 12— to 15—year—olds are urged to book vaccines for their children, as the uk records 150,000 covid deaths. novak djokovic prepares for a court hearing after insisting he has a vaccine exemption to enter australia — because he had covid last month. no red carpet, no tv ceremony and no stars — the golden globes kicks off awards season later — shrouded in controversy. coming up in sport — england's cricketers are fighting to survive in sydney where they need to bat out the final day to draw the fourth ashes test — with three wickets in hand late on _ . they will be a few showers around toda . . they will be a few showers around today- for — . they will be a few showers around today- for many — . they will be a few showers around today. for many of— . they will be a few showers around today. for many of you _ . they will be a few showers around today. for many of you a _ . they will be a few showers around today. for many of you a brighter. today. for many of you a brighter day but _ today. for many of you a brighter day but details _ today. for many of you a brighter day but details on _ today. for many of you a brighter day but details on that _ today. for many of you a brighter day but details on that and - today. for many of you a brighter day but details on that and a i today. for many of you a brighter day but details on that and a look at what _ day but details on that and a look at what weather _ day but details on that and a look at what weather has _ day but details on that and a look at what weather has in _ day but details on that and a look at what weather has in store i day but details on that and a look at what weather has in store for. day but details on that and a look. at what weather has in store for us for the _ at what weather has in store for us for the week— at what weather has in store for us for the week ahead _ at what weather has in store for us for the week ahead here _ at what weather has in store for us for the week ahead here on- for the week ahead here on breakfast _
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good morning. welcome, thanks for joining. a senior government minister has given his support to reducing the coronavirus isolation period in england. speaking to the sunday times, the former vaccines minister — now education secretary — nadhim zahawi backed the idea of isolating for five days instead of seven. our political correspondent jonathan blake has more details. jonathan, nadhim zahawi has suggested he would back a move to reduce the covid isolation period down to five days? it would be. not least for the government to do this after the united states reduce the isolation period there down to five days, the uk health security agency said it would be a move that would be counter—productive. some believed that it would be too risky to allow people out of isolation after such a
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short period of time and they would continue to be infectious. but as we know, the sheer numbers of people isolating at the moment, having tested positive for coronavirus, is putting a huge strain on the nhs but other sectors of the economy as well so there are these calls for the government to take a step to reduce it and nadhim zahawi has given his backing to that. in an interview with the sunday times this morning. you said that if it were to be recommended that weather case it be even more helpful that it is not necessarily something ministers are going to do unilaterally, it would need advice from scientists, advisers and as i say at the moment it doesn't look like they will follow us's lead and cut the period anytime soon. and there are reports this morning that the government might be changing its policy on lateral flow tests too? yes, i think this is perhaps a sign of something to come. of course at the moment, lateralflow tests availability issues aside are there
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for us are there to keep testing for coronavirus as they are a vital part of the government's approach to managing the pandemic at the moment was a it is hard to see a situation where that continues indefinitely. according to the sunday times it could be a matter of weeks. the use of lateral flow tests are limited to certain people working in certain settings, schools and the nhs, for example. it strong pushback from government that that is yet to happen. no decisions have been taken, we are told, and they are remaining an important part of the government's approach.— remaining an important part of the government's approach. thank you, jonathan blake. _ government's approach. thank you, jonathan blake. our— government's approach. thank you, jonathan blake. our political- jonathan blake. our political correspondence. parents of 12— to 15—year—olds are being urged to get their children vaccinated, as around half a million appointments are made available in england. the announcement comes after the news that 150,000 people in the uk have now died within 28 days of a positive covid test. let's take a look
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at the latest data. there were 146,390 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. 313 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. the total number of people who've died with covid now stands at 150,057. on vaccinations, more than 35.2 million people have now had a boosterjab, which means just over 60% of people aged 12 and over have now had three vaccine doses. danjohnson has this report. as the number of covid deaths reaches 150,000, more vaccinations are being offered to the young. half a million slots have been made available at 300 centres across england for children aged 12—15. senior doctors are urging parents to get kids booked in. we've spoken to parents around the country from different backgrounds and different
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communities and parents do want their children vaccinated. it's a really important thing, notjust to keep the child safe and to keep children in education, but to keep families and communities safe as well. according to the latest nhs figures, more than 1.4 million young people aged 12—15 in england have already had their first dose since september. that's more than half of them. middlesborough's one of many places seeing covid cases rising, so as well as vaccinating children, older people are being encouraged to come forward for a boosterjab. i work for middlesborough council and taking vulnerable children to school and covid's very rife in the teesside area. we've been double vaccinated and this was our booster. with us coming out of covid, we're out by 28 days so this was the earliest opportunity to come and receive our booster.
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this new strain is hurting everyone so, ijust thought i'd come and get my booster. this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays so, i've been outside, _ i go outside a lot and i do work in a restaurant now— so people come in and go, so i thought it's better- to get a booster vaccine as well. we know for covid, for many, many people, 2019 and also 2020, people died. so important for people to look after themselves and family. you don't want to take a chance. we don't know once we get covid virus how you're going to react. what we know is that the covid vaccine works, there's plenty of data now for the last one year, so come along, and we know that people who are getting the vaccine especially when they've had the second and the booster, they're getting a milder
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form of illness so come along and get the vaccine. there's a similar push in scotland for everyone aged 12 and over to get vaccinated in an effort to bring case numbers under control and make sure hospitals aren't overwhelmed. dan johnson, bbc news. later today, novak djokovic�*s legal team will appeal a decision will talk about the implications of rather —— reaching that rather grim milestone. let's bring you up to date with the other stories. later today, novak djokovic�*s legal team will appeal a decision by australian authorities to revoke his visa, over a row about his covid vaccination status. it's after documents were released suggesting the tennis star had been granted a vaccine exemption to enter the country because he had tested positive for the virus last month. simonjones reports. serbian music plays.
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supporters of novak djokovic gather outside the immigration detention centre in melbourne where he's staying. they want to see him on the tennis court. but the countdown is now on to his court case. oh, mate, i haven't slept since he's come off the plane, we're all sick to the stomach. it's a very unfortunate situation for australia. it's becoming very embarrassing. this was djokovic arriving on wednesday. his legal team say he'd received a vaccine exemption to enter the country from tennis australia, because he'd tested positive for covid on december 16. that was the day on which these pictures were taken, showing djokovic maskless at a ceremony in his home country of serbia, at which he was honoured with his own postage stamps in recognition of his achievements. it's unclear whether he had taken a test at this stage. the following day, serbian media says he was pictured handing out awards to young players. it's unclear whether he knew he had covid. his motherjoined a protest against his treatment in belgrade where it's the orthodox christmas weekend. just imagine it, if you have son and he's spending christmas, our christmas, orthodox, in prison.
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this is for me prison, this is not like immigration hotel, this is prison. another player, renata voracova, from the czech republic, has now left the hotel and the country after her visa was cancelled. djokovic had been asked to move to somewhere he could train ahead of the open. that looks unlikely, but he has been given exercise equipment and gluten—free food. one former australian foreign minister is not sympathetic. there's no way you could give him an exemption when exemptions haven't been given to people who want to go to australia to see dying parents, and, you know, injured relatives. there are all sorts of heart—rending stories about people not being able to see their relatives in australia, but those people are not famous, so they don't get an exemption.
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but it will now be up to a judge to decide, just a week before the australian open begins. simon jones, bbc news. we're joined now by our correspondent guy de launey, who is in novak djokovic�*s home city of belgrade. guy, what's the reaction there? they are following very closely and i would say this. saga about the photographs on social media with the postage stamp on the awards for the children, that hasn't made much of an impression here. people are not particularly orbit about that. they say well, maybe novak didn't know he was positive at the time when his photographs were taken and in any case, that would be a problem in serbia, not australia. in serbia, it would be dealt with when it is —— when he is back here. what we will now see is more rallies for support for novak djokovic. it is pretty snowy here. there was still a good turnout in front of the national assembly yesterday when the djokovic family were once again leading the
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calls for support for serbia rush serbia's champion as serbia see him and they will be hoping that the next day in a kind ofjudgement they really want to see. what they now want is deliverance for novak djokovic that he can get back to the kind of court where he really belongs. kind of court where he really belonds. ., ~ kind of court where he really belonds. . ,, i. kind of court where he really belonds. a, ~' ,, kind of court where he really belonds. ., ~' ,, . kind of court where he really belonds. ., ~' . , kind of court where he really belonds. . ~' . , ., belongs. thank you so much, die, for the update- — belongs. thank you so much, die, for the update- -- _ belongs. thank you so much, die, for the update- -- guy- _ elsewhere, labour is calling for a windfall tax on oil and gas producers, to help low and middle income families cope with rising energy bills. the party said the conservatives had presided over a decade of failed energy policies. the government said the energy price cap was protecting millions from higher bills and it was supporting vulnerable households with schemes worth more than four billion pounds. if you pick up a newspaper today, you are bound to see one of these pictures. three new photographs of the duchess of cambridge have been released to mark her 40th birthday. the portraits, taken by fashion photographer paolo roversi, will go on display this year in three places which have a special meaning to her royal highness: berkshire, st andrews and anglesey. they will then be housed
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in the permanent collection of the national portrait gallery. it is just about to turn 7:13am. good morning. let's returned one of our top stories this morning. the prime minister has said every death is a "profound loss", as more than 150,000 people in the uk are now recorded to have died within 28 days of a positive covid test. paige taylor's mum, christine, died with covid at the height of the pandemic last february. paige is here with us now. thank you so much for coming in, paige. we're going to start off with talking about your monthly. can you tell us what she was like? she talking about your monthly. can you tell us what she was like?— tell us what she was like? she was the most fantastic _ tell us what she was like? she was the most fantastic mother. - tell us what she was like? she was the most fantastic mother. from l tell us what she was like? she was l the most fantastic mother. from the age of 12 i was her carer, which was quite tough for me, but i was more than happy to look after her. she would be there for me when i was at
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school and i needed help with any essays and obviously as time went on, she got quite ill sol essays and obviously as time went on, she got quite ill so i had to look after her more and more. but she inspired me every day and still continues to inspire me until now. tell us a little bit more about your mum's condition. she tell us a little bit more about your mum's condition.— tell us a little bit more about your mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but — mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but she _ mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but she had _ mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but she had to _ mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but she had to go _ mum's condition. she had a number of conditions but she had to go to - conditions but she had to go to hospitalfor a kidney conditions but she had to go to hospital for a kidney infection and i said to my family, "i hope she doesn't go into hospital because it is covid and i hope she doesn't get it. lucky the first time she went in she didn't but the second time she did and i said to my family if she goesin did and i said to my family if she goes in she will never come home and she didn't. ~ , ., . , she didn't. when you hear the number 150,000 deaths — she didn't. when you hear the number 150,000 deaths uk _ she didn't. when you hear the number 150,000 deaths uk wide, _ she didn't. when you hear the number 150,000 deaths uk wide, what - she didn't. when you hear the number 150,000 deaths uk wide, what goes l 150,000 deaths uk wide, what goes through your mind? it 150,000 deaths uk wide, what goes through your mind?— 150,000 deaths uk wide, what goes through your mind? it makes me upset and it also makes _
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through your mind? it makes me upset and it also makes me _ through your mind? it makes me upset and it also makes me angry _ through your mind? it makes me upset and it also makes me angry to - through your mind? it makes me upset and it also makes me angry to think- and it also makes me angry to think there are people like me have lost a mother, father, sister, rather, but those are the figures of people that make father. those are the people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for covid. there are more than that, 173,000 people, who have died from covid is one of the factors of death. so there is a lot more than what is being said and it makes me upset. idroihozlt lot more than what is being said and it makes me upset.— it makes me upset. what you are makind it makes me upset. what you are making so _ it makes me upset. what you are making so clear, _ it makes me upset. what you are making so clear, of _ it makes me upset. what you are making so clear, of course, i it makes me upset. what you are making so clear, of course, is i it makes me upset. what you are making so clear, of course, is we can talk about numbers and everyone of those numbers is a person, a family, it is a life. and it was made all the more difficult because it was very difficult for you to visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely- _ visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely- l— visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely. i was _ visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely. i was only _ visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely. i was only able i visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, definitely. i was only able to i visit your mum, wasn't it? yes, | definitely. i was only able to see herfour definitely. i was only able to see her four days before she died and i didn't know she was going to die because every time she went into hospital, she came out and when i come i didn't know that would be the
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last time i would say goodbye and then the day that she died, i called every day to see how she was and they said, "can i give you a call back in ten minutes and they called back in ten minutes and they called back and said i'm sorry, your mum has passed away. i wasn't able to be there when she passed and to say that everything was going to be ok. but she was by herself. she didn't have anyone. there are others, of course, who share similar stories and were unable to see their loved ones before they pass. are you speaking to others? is that comforting? yes. to others? is that comforting? yes, so i am to others? is that comforting? yes, so i am part — to others? is that comforting? yes, so i am part of— to others? is that comforting? yes, so i am partofa— to others? is that comforting? yes, so i am part of a group _ to others? is that comforting? ya: so i am part of a group called covid—19 families forjustice, all those families have lost loved ones to covid, and it is tragic to think they have been in the same situation as me, and the number of people who were unable to say goodbye to their loved ones is awful, and i wish that upon nobody. pond
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loved ones is awful, and i wish that upon nobody-— loved ones is awful, and i wish that u-on nobod . . . , ., upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new— upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new year— upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new year has _ upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new year has been _ upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new year has been a _ upon nobody. and i imagine christmas and the new year has been a really i and the new year has been a really difficult time. if you look back, would you have liked things to have been handled differently?— would you have liked things to have been handled differently? 10096. this ear was been handled differently? 10096. this year was the — been handled differently? 10096. this year was the second _ been handled differently? 10096. this year was the second year _ been handled differently? 10096. this year was the second year that - been handled differently? 10096. this year was the second year that i i year was the second year that i couldn't spend christmas at home. the first year there were tier 3 restrictions in london. i wish that the covid vaccine would have been rolled out quicker. my mum was due to have a vaccine two weeks after she died, and i know that she would have had it if she could have. the fact that restrictions are easing now is ridiculous. i think that the government should be doing more, and the way that they have handled this pandemic is for, and there is so much more that could have been done, and that is why we need this enquiry as soon as possible. and and that is why we need this enquiry as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. and what comfort would _ as soon as possible. and what comfort would it _ as soon as possible. and what comfort would it give - as soon as possible. and what comfort would it give you i as soon as possible. and what comfort would it give you if. as soon as possible. and what i comfort would it give you if there was an enquiry and it finds there are certain failings in the way that it has been handled? i wonderfor
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you, facing the loss that you faced, like 150,000 other people, what difference would it make to you? obviously it wouldn't bring my mum back and bring the families back that have been lost, but it would bring some solace.— bring some solace. thank you so much. bring some solace. thank you so much- we _ bring some solace. thank you so much. we really _ bring some solace. thank you so much. we really appreciate i bring some solace. thank you so much. we really appreciate you | much. we really appreciate you coming in. we really do wish your family well. take care of yourself. in a statement, the department of health and social care said: "every death from this virus is a tragedy and our sympathies are with everyone who has lost loved ones. we are thankful for the collective national effort and the hard work of frontline health and social care staff. their tireless efforts have saved thousands of lives". there's growing concern over the rising number of covid hospital admissions, particularly in older people, as recent data shows infections are rising in the over—70s. it's as pressure continues to mount on the nhs due to covid—related staff absences.
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we're joined now by professor rupert pearse, an intensive care consultant. it is good to have you with us this morning. i don't know how much of our previous conversation you are able to hear there but i want to talk first of all about that milestone, 150,000 deaths. as we were discussing, every one of those is a personal tragedy. it is a loss to a family, it is an individual story. just first of all, your reaction to hitting that room milestone. reaction to hitting that room milestone-— reaction to hitting that room milestone. ~ ., , , milestone. well, i mean, it is very sad listening _ milestone. well, i mean, it is very sad listening to _ milestone. well, i mean, it is very sad listening to paige's _ milestone. well, i mean, it is very sad listening to paige's story, - milestone. well, i mean, it is very sad listening to paige's story, and | sad listening to paige's story, and it is exactly as you described in the piece. covid — there may have been 150,000 deaths, but each one of thoseis been 150,000 deaths, but each one of those is an individual tragedy, somebody�*s son, daughter, mum or dad. and i think as doctors and
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co—workers, that is how we see it. we don't so much think about these milestones as much as each individual step towards those milestones, because each one of thoseis milestones, because each one of those is a personal experience both for family and healthcare staff. find for family and healthcare staff. and ou have for family and healthcare staff. and you have lived _ for family and healthcare staff. and you have lived through all of this, of course, in yourjob in the intensive care unit. give me a little snapshot of how this past two years has been. i suppose here we are now with cases rising again. what does that mean for you and your workload? ~ ., , ., , ., , workload? well, the last two years has been a — workload? well, the last two years has been a real— workload? well, the last two years has been a real rollercoaster - workload? well, the last two years has been a real rollercoaster ride l has been a real rollercoaster ride for everyone, because it has been the same for staff in the nhs. rushed and hasty planning in the first wave and an experience like nothing we have ever had, followed by relief as things were getting better. and at that stage, it seems looking back like we were terribly naive. i don't think we had any idea what was coming after and how
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difficult last winter has been. fortunately for intensive care staff, while we do have a lot of patients with covid in icu, we haven't had that huge surge of extra cases that we saw last winter. the real pressure is for our colleagues on the general wards, the physicians, respiratory physicians and elderly care workers and so on, they are the ones who are feeling they are the ones who are feeling the real pressure at the moment. what told us this take on you personally? there is a temptation, i guess, to look at nhs frontline staff and saying they are doing a greatjob and getting on with this. but it must take a personal toll with this sort of workload and the sort of grim milestone.— sort of grim milestone. well, i think it affects _ sort of grim milestone. well, i think it affects different - sort of grim milestone. well, i | think it affects different people sort of grim milestone. well, i i think it affects different people in different ways. certainly we know that there is very high incidence of post—traumatic stress disorder amongst nhs staff in the last couple
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of years, and various other mental health problems as well. i think a lot of people will reportjust being tired and really wishing it would end and we could back to business as usual and trying to deliver the great care we are always setting out to give. i think the hardest thing for me at the moment is that we can't deliver the quality of care that we are used to giving. that to a lot of us feels like it is our fault. , . �* , ., ~ a lot of us feels like it is our fault. , . �*, ., ~ ., fault. yes, and let's talk about vaccinations. _ fault. yes, and let's talk about vaccinations. we _ fault. yes, and let's talk about vaccinations. we have - fault. yes, and let's talk about vaccinations. we have been i fault. yes, and let's talk about - vaccinations. we have been looking at the figures once again this morning and there is a certain proportion of the population that is still reluctant to have the vaccination. given everything that you have told mejust vaccination. given everything that you have told me just now about the impact that is having on services and icus, and on doctors and nurses who are manning those hospitals, what is your message to those who are still reluctant to get the vaccinations?— are still reluctant to get the vaccinations? ~ , , . vaccinations? well, in my experience
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it is not so much _ vaccinations? well, in my experience it is not so much that _ vaccinations? well, in my experience it is not so much that people - vaccinations? well, in my experience it is not so much that people are - it is not so much that people are reluctant. vaccine hesitancy is a bit more complex than that. there are people who have been too busy or have not got around to it and with a bit of encouragement and support would get vaccinated. there are people who are anxious, who listened to fake reports about vaccines and were very disturbed by that. there are people who have just taken bad advice. in icu, it remains the case that the majority of our patients have not been vaccinated in icu with covid, and those who can talk to me all say they wish they could get the vaccine now, which of course they can't because they have to get better before they can have it. so i think in the majority, if you are not vaccinated and you are not sure what to do, go and speak to your gp. go and speak to a pharmacist and find someone who will listen to your concerns, listen to the reasons why you are not vaccinated. because on
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the whole, the overwhelming majority of people who have those conversations will find that they are reassured by the answers. one thing i can tell you for certain is that if you want to avoid dying from covid or being in icu with covid, get vaccinated, because that is the single best thing you can do by fire to keep yourself safe. fix, single best thing you can do by fire to keep yourself safe.— to keep yourself safe. a good messa . e to keep yourself safe. a good message on _ to keep yourself safe. a good message on which _ to keep yourself safe. a good message on which to - to keep yourself safe. a good message on which to end. . to keep yourself safe. a good | message on which to end. we to keep yourself safe. a good - message on which to end. we are gratefulfor message on which to end. we are grateful for your time this morning. thank you for being with us. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. asi as i said earlier, i am really loving that tie and the background behind you. please tell me it is going to be a bit warmer. fix, behind you. please tell me it is going to be a bit warmer. a little bit on the chilly _ going to be a bit warmer. a little bit on the chilly side, _ going to be a bit warmer. a little bit on the chilly side, but - going to be a bit warmer. a little bit on the chilly side, but there l going to be a bit warmer. a little | bit on the chilly side, but there is something milder coming away for something milder coming away for some of you week. today, the big thing for most is it is a bit brighter. some eastern areas cloudy and wet through the day. a few showers around, this is where the showers around, this is where the showers have been falling. the blue is rain, the light is sleet and hill
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snow, mainly across western areas. a bit more abundant in western scotland and northern ireland and it will continue to do so in the coming hours. quite wet at times before brightening up again into the afternoon. the showers eventually putting into northern parts of england through the second part of the day. to the north of that, a lot of dry and sunny weather in northern scotland, showers in wales fading, the midlands, east anglia and the south—east, compared with yesterday dry and much sunnier. for the channel islands, devon, cornwalland south—west wales it turns cloudy at later. as rain and drizzle coming. elsewhere another very cool day. through this evening and overnight, showers fade there is going to be a sharp and widespread frost initially, but temperatures rise later in the night, as cloud spills in from the west, bringing patchy rain and drizzle into the morning. the mild pushing its way eastwards as we go through monday. more details on that and some wonderful pictures to show you later as well. keep us hanging. i pictures to show you later as well. keep us hanging-— sophie raworth will present the new sunday live programme on bbc one at 9:00am this morning. sophie, what do you
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have on today's show? iam here, good morning. new year, new programme and i am here. we have plenty for you this morning. i have been to a hospital in london, one of the first to experience a omicron wave. we will find out what impact that has had on them, how it has affected them and talking about the fact that nhs staff have to have a vaccination in england by april. they have to be double vaccinated. i will be talking as well, because schools are back, to the education secretary, finding out what the situation is for schools around the country. in the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves, will be joining us to talk about the cost of living. and if you're a downton fan, we have elizabeth mcgovern coming into talk to us about her new play. she has not only written or adapted the script but she is also starring in it. we have plenty for you. dojoin me at nine a.m.. i it. we have plenty for you. do 'oin me at nine a.m..i me at nine a.m.. i will be 'oining ou, me at nine a.m.. i will be 'oining you. don-t — me at nine a.m.. i will be 'oining you. don-t worry. * me at nine a.m.. i will be 'oining
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you, don't worry. we h me at nine a.m.. i will be 'oining you, don't worry. we will_ me at nine a.m.. i will be joining you, don't worry. we will see - me at nine a.m.. i will be joining - you, don't worry. we will see sophie a little later. it's usually one of the biggest nights in hollywood, but this evening's golden globes ceremony will be without a—list stars or a red carpet as it takes place behind closed doors. it is after the organisation behind the awards, the hollywood foreign press association, came under heavy criticism for lacking diversity among its members. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. #it # it all began tonight... tonight, west side story _ # it all began tonight... tonight, west side story is _ # it all began tonight... tonight, west side story is one _ # it all began tonight. .. tonight, west side story is one of- # it all began tonight... tonight, west side story is one of the - # it all began tonight... tonight, west side story is one of the big l west side story is one of the big favourites to win at the golden globes. but one of its stars and its director, steven spielberg, will not be there. the same goes for belfast, which is tied for the most nominations — seven. we which is tied for the most nominations - seven. we we are lookin: nominations - seven. we we are looking to _ nominations - seven. we we are looking to cleanse _ nominations - seven. we we are looking to cleanse the _ nominations - seven. we we are l looking to cleanse the community. you wouldn't want to be the odd one out in this street.— out in this street. touch my family and i will kill— out in this street. touch my family and i will kill you. _ out in this street. touch my family and i will kill you. it— out in this street. touch my family and i will kill you. it is—
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out in this street. touch my family and i will kill you. it is based - out in this street. touch my family and i will kill you. it is based on i and i will kill you. it is based on the childhood _ and i will kill you. it is based on the childhood of— and i will kill you. it is based on the childhood of its _ and i will kill you. it is based on the childhood of its director, . and i will kill you. it is based on the childhood of its director, sir kenneth branagh, who has never won a golden globe. if he does tonight, the way he will find out is on his computer. it is doubtful that he will even care. the golden globes are normally a star—studded event, but they have been beset with problems for the past year. an los angeles times expose revealed that they have not had a single black voter for almost two decades, and there are accusations of unethical practices. this prompted tom cruise to send back the three golden globes he had one. the rights holders, nbc, said they would not broadcast the ceremony, and despite radical changes being introduced, hollywood en masse decided to boycott the event. this week, the golden globes announced that the ceremony at the beverly hilton hotel in los angeles will be a private event and will not be live streamed, with winners simply being announced on social media. this prompted us talk show host conan o'brien to ask:
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and ricky gervais 's, who has hosted the golden globes five times, has even suggested there is a chance this could be the last time they are held. ., . , ' this could be the last time they are held. ., ., , ' .,, . held. you are the number-1 topic ahead of tater _ held. you are the number-1 topic ahead of tater tots, _ held. you are the number-1 topic ahead of tater tots, and - held. you are the number-1 topic ahead of tater tots, and the - held. you are the number-1topicj ahead of tater tots, and the pope followed you. figs ahead of tater tots, and the pope followed yon-— ahead of tater tots, and the pope followed you. as to who could win, when it comes _ followed you. as to who could win, when it comes to _ followed you. as to who could win, when it comes to the _ followed you. as to who could win, when it comes to the tv _ followed you. as to who could win, l when it comes to the tv categories, there could be a procession for succession. the media family drama series has the most nominations, with five. i5 series has the most nominations, with five. , ., ., ., . with five. is he going to watch? could we make _ with five. is he going to watch? could we make a _ with five. is he going to watch? could we make a note - with five. is he going to watch? could we make a note in - with five. is he going to watch? could we make a note in the i with five. is he going to watch? - could we make a note in the minutes that he _ could we make a note in the minutes that he is— could we make a note in the minutes that he is watching us? but could we make a note in the minutes that he is watching us?— that he is watching us? but with no-one able _ that he is watching us? but with no-one able to _ that he is watching us? but with no-one able to watch _ that he is watching us? but with no-one able to watch the - that he is watching us? but with| no-one able to watch the globes that he is watching us? but with i no-one able to watch the globes as no—one able to watch the globes as they are, it is fully expected that tonight? winners will not even acknowledge that they have one. i am acknowledge that they have one. i am a aood acknowledge that they have one. i am a good guy- — acknowledge that they have one. i am a good guy- i — acknowledge that they have one. i am a good guy- lam _ acknowledge that they have one. i —n a good guy. i am better than you. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00am this morning, that's to come on the bbc news channel, but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one.
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hello, this is breakfast with sima kotecha and ben thompson. the family of the world number one tennis star, novak djokovic, havejoined supporters in the serbian capital belgrade, as the row over his australian immigration status continues. he was denied entry into the country over his covid vaccine status. a court case will be
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held later today — to determine whether he can stay in the country and compete at the australian open. our balkans correspondent guy de launey reports. this is not the kind of rally that is normally associated with the world's best male tennis player for supporters of novak djokovic, is anything but normal times. this event outside serbia's national assembly —— assembly, instead of serving up a warm welcome for the nine times australian open winner they found fault with his papers was not that has left novak djokovic cooling his heels in quarantine instead of warming up for the tournament. applause. these people are showing the support serbia's number one sporting star. they have come to express their disapproval what's happening to him in australia and to listen to the family of novak
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djokovic explain how they feel about their son spending orthodox christmas weekend in a quarantine hotel in melbourne. just christmas weekend in a quarantine hotel in melbourne.— hotel in melbourne. just imagine, 'ust hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine _ hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if _ hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if you _ hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if you have _ hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if you have a - hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if you have a son i hotel in melbourne. just imagine, just imagine if you have a son and he is spending christmas, our christmas, orthodox, in prison. this is for me prison, this is not like immigration hotel, this is present. because they don't allow him to go out. �* ., �* , because they don't allow him to go out. �* . �*, ., . ~' because they don't allow him to go out. �* . �*, ., , out. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where you — out. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where you will find _ out. belgrade's novak tennis centre is where you will find the _ is where you will find the next generation of serbian champions. clara is targeting victory and credits novak djokovic for support at the tennis centre and it says she was happy to return the favour at the family rally. i was happy to return the favour at the family rally.— the family rally. i think he deserves _ the family rally. i think he deserves all— the family rally. i think he deserves all of— the family rally. i think he deserves all of that i the family rally. i think he deserves all of that and i the family rally. i think he | deserves all of that and he the family rally. i think he - deserves all of that and he deserves our support. deserves all of that and he deserves oursupport. he deserves all of that and he deserves our support. he is our man, playing for our country so even if we can't help that much, we are there to support him at least.—
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support him at least. grey's vaccination _ support him at least. grey's vaccination centre _ support him at least. grey's vaccination centre could i support him at least. grey's vaccination centre could do | support him at least. grey's i vaccination centre could do with a similar level of support. serbia's overall rate is languishing below seven —— 70%. novak�*s stands against vaccination that stance against vaccination.— vaccination that stance against vaccination. �* ,, �* ., vaccination. translation: iwould sa there vaccination. translation: iwould say there are _ vaccination. translation: iwould say there are double _ vaccination. translation: iwould say there are double standard i vaccination. translation: iwould say there are double standard is i vaccination. translation: iwould say there are double standard is onj say there are double standard is on the one hand we are constantly being told we should get vaccinated and then when it comes to a person like novak djokovic, we see that they are exceptions. that novak djokovic, we see that they are exce tions. �* ., , novak djokovic, we see that they are exce tions. �* . , . . novak djokovic, we see that they are excetions. �* . , . . ., , exceptions. at least the church has riven its exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. _ exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. millions - exceptions. at least the church has given its blessing. millions of- given its blessing. millions of orthodox serbs would remember novak djokovic in their christmas prayers and they would be hoping that monday'sjudgement in and they would be hoping that monday's judgement in melbourne would bring deliverance for their sporting icon. guy de launey, bbc news, belgrade. so, what might the outcome of that court hearing be? we can speak now to carina ford, who is an australian immigration lawyer based in melbourne.
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thanks forjoining us this morning. all eyes will be on this court hearing today. what can we expect? good morning. we expect a large amount of people to listen in tomorrow but also submissions for mr djokovic have already been filed. look, the preliminary viewpoint is that there is an argument there for him in terms of whether he was appropriately given procedural fairness in the way that this was cancelled as well as a number of issues with the notice itself that was put to him. and there is also a lot of confusion both coming from tennis australia, the federal government and the victorian government and the victorian government as to who was responsible for determining whether or not he met the medical exemptions so we watch this space and see how tomorrow goes. haste
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watch this space and see how tomorrow goes.— watch this space and see how tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watchinu. tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watching- what _ tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watching. what is _ tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watching. what is the _ tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watching. what is the mood - tomorrow goes. we will definitely be watching. what is the mood like in l watching. what is the mood like in australia, if you could gauge how most people were feeling towards djokovic, what would you say? there is --eole djokovic, what would you say? there is people on — djokovic, what would you say? there is people on both _ djokovic, what would you say? there is people on both sides. _ djokovic, what would you say? there is people on both sides. as - djokovic, what would you say? there is people on both sides. as you i is people on both sides. as you might be aware, we are going through a really, the largest amount of cases we have had of covid stop and it is really holidays. there is a lot of no stock in supermarkets and the lead up to this cancellation had been an unusual period in terms of that there was also a lot of criticism towards the prime minister as to the handling of opening up so there is a lot of people in australia's viewpoint that he should be vaccinated because we are sitting at around in victoria about 92% so relatively high level vaccination and you are also, from melbourne in particular, have spent months in
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lockdowns so you have that side and then you have the other side where clearly there is a lot of support for djokovic stock we had a strong serbian community in melbourne. also he is the number one tennis player. there is an argument there to be said that the process could have been done maybe a bit more fairly and transparent so this is where it is interesting. then you have the other issue of the hotel that he is paying in which is an immigration detention hotel and we have refugees who have been locked up and been in there for around nine years. so who can clearly articulate that it is not a five star venue.- can clearly articulate that it is not a five star venue. was 'ust about to ask fl not a five star venue. was 'ust about to ask you i not a five star venue. was 'ust about to ask you about i not a five star venue. wasjust about to ask you about the i not a five star venue. wasjust i about to ask you about the hotel. is there anything you can tell us about what it is like? there are some claims there are maggots in the food. some people saying that is not the case. have you got any insight? the maggots story actually arose
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about two weeks before is all escalated. it is a pretty grim hotel and one of its biggest issues is that the detainees in their can't leave it and it does not have good airflow. you probably wouldn't necessarily stay there and that is why it is being used for what it is so it is definitely not a fancy place. and alternatively, though, he could have also ended up at the immigration detention centre which is even worse. this is, they could have granted him an alternative detention as well but it would have been relatively controversial given the cancellations at the airport are not necessarily uncommon in australia. i not necessarily uncommon in australia-— australia. i know you are not -s chic australia. i know you are not psychic but _ australia. i know you are not psychic but if _ australia. i know you are not psychic but if you _ australia. i know you are not psychic but if you had - australia. i know you are not psychic but if you had to i australia. i know you are not psychic but if you had to put| australia. i know you are not| psychic but if you had to put a australia. i know you are not i psychic but if you had to put a bet on in regards to what the result might be today, what would you get on? , ., ., “
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might be today, what would you get on? , ., ., ~ ., , on? -- bet on i do think there was an issue with _ on? -- bet on i do think there was an issue with the _ on? -- bet on i do think there was an issue with the way _ on? -- bet on i do think there was an issue with the way it _ on? -- bet on i do think there was an issue with the way it was i on? -- bet on i do think there was i an issue with the way it was handled on at the airport. often these cases are very rushed. i still don't quite understand why his documents were not checked before boarding the plane and there is a real issue as to coming out through the documents as to whether or not they actually said they would wait until 830 so he could potentially contact a lawyer because he couldn't get in contact with his lawyer during the evening and then they change their mind. as and then they change their mind. as a lawyer, who deals with procedural fairness all the time, my initial thought is why couldn't theyjust give him that opportunity before cancelling the visa, knowing that in cases where you are cancelled at the airport, particularly when you travel to australia, it is a long haul flight, travel to australia, it is a long haulflight, you often miss asleep, you are stressed, et cetera and it would have been a better way to maybe approach it. i think he is in with a chance of it being set aside
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though i guess what is important to understand is even if it is set aside, they can still cancel again should they choose to do so. thank ou so should they choose to do so. thank you so much _ should they choose to do so. thank you so much for— should they choose to do so. thank you so much for that _ should they choose to do so. thank you so much for that insight. i you know what we're going to talk about next. you know me, i love let's talk about cricket! in the cricket, england are hanging in there. just against australia 263 for 8. zak crawley batted well to reach 77 runs, in the end trapped in front by cameron green's yorker captainjoe root gotjust 2a, bowled by scott boland again. ben stokes battled hard — he was out for 60, a really brave it is australia and anything. let's fingers crossed, it doesn't happen again. they are hanging in there at
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the moment. when isn't going to happen, it is all about drawing the test match. zak crawley batted well to reach 77 runs, in the end trapped in front by cameron green's yorker lbw by cameron green. captainjoe root gotjust 2a, bowled by scott boland again. ben stokes battled hard — he was out for 60, a really brave effort amid his struggle with a side strain. pat cummins then got rid of buttler and wood in the space of three balls and then jonny bairstow felt like the big wicket for australia, bowled by bowland and caught by marnus labushangne leaving jack leach and stuart broad with it all to do. newcastle united may now be one of the richest clubs in the world but that didn't shield them from a classic fa cup upset, as they were beaten by league one side cambridge.
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new signing kieran trippier made his first appearance for the premier league side but it wasn't enough to save the match as his new team were humbled in a i—0 defeat, joe ironside providing the goal to send cambridge into the fourth round, and their travelling fans wild in the stands. we always knew going into the game we had nothing to lose. we only can win, and just we needed to come here and be the best version of ourselves, and that's what we did today. you know, we scored, we kept a clean sheet, which is really important. you come here, and not many teams can do that. we always had that belief, and i am really happy. look how many supporters have come here to support us. we sold out. it's incredible — what a way to start the year. what a way to start the year. so a great day for cambridge but a disastrous one for newcastle. here's what their all—time leading goalscorer alan shearer had to say on the defeat last night. i hope the players that are on the pitch for newcastle went and apologised and thanked those fans for their support, because there was 52,000 there today. fa cup third round,
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cambridge at home. cambridge deserved it. they were superb, and congratulations to them. but i hope they went and thanked them, because they deserved more than the rubbish they were served up today. and the shocks continued as kidderminster, the lowest ranked team left in the cup, pulled off a stunning comeback to beat championship side reading 2—1. the national league side had to fight through an incredible 12 minutes of injury time and you can see how much the victory means to them. there was more non—league success as boreham wood beat league one's afc wimbledon 2—0. tyrone marsh was on the scoresheet as the national league side qualify for the fourth round for the first time in their history. so who would they like to face next? i don't really care, i have to be honest with you. wealdstone comes to town on tuesday. i know it sounds really, really cliched, but as a manager you can't switch off. as much as i want to enjoy the planning and the organisational side of things, we have a mid—week against wealdstone.
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it's our bread—and—butter. we need to make sure we put a performance on. obviously i will have one eye on the draw. another premier league side to get knocked out was burnley. they were leading i—0 against huddersfield but conceded twice in the second half to lose the game. matty pearson heading in the winner with just three minutes left. but the holders leicester are safely through. james maddison got one of the goals as they beat claudio ranieri's watford 4—1 at the king power stadium. there are nine more third round games today including liverpool v shrewsbury which kicks off at 2 o clock at anfield. jurgen klopp hopes to be back in the dugout for the match after having covid. liverpool's squad has been badly hit by coronavirus and were forced to shutdown first—team training earlier this week. in rugby union, there was a thrilling end in the match between harlequins and exeter in the premiership. ill—man exeter were winning right up until the final 2 minutes. andre esterhuizen's try levelling things up just leaving the ice—cool marcus smith to kick the conversion and hand his side the win by iii points to 12. elsewhere there were wins
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for gloucester and northampton. edinburgh put five tries past cardiff to go top of the united rugby championship. it finished 34—10 in the scottish capital — ramiro moyano with the pick of the scores after a flowing move. elsewhere there were wins for glasgow warriors and munster. gloucester—hartpury increased the pressure on the top four in the women's premier 15s with a bonus point win over leaders bristol. ellie underwood crashed over with her second try of the match to seal a iii—36 victory. gloucester are now up to fifth in the table. elsewhere second place exeter beat sale sharks. ican i can see jack leach is gone and england have one more wicket... some imressive england have one more wicket... some impressive multitasking _ england have one more wicket... fine impressive multitasking going on. doing the rest of the sport while keeping an eye... i doing the rest of the sport while keeping an eye. . .— doing the rest of the sport while keeping an eye... i can see some of ou auoin keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh.! _
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keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh.! it — keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh.! it is _ keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh,! it is less _ keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh,! it is less one - keeping an eye... i can see some of you going oh,! it is less one wicket| you going oh,! it is less one wicket in hand. let's see! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. with some pictures as well, which you told us about earlier. something to live the spirits _ you told us about earlier. something to live the spirits this _ you told us about earlier. something to live the spirits this morning. i to live the spirits this morning. take a look at these stunning weather watch images that came out last night. the aurora borealis was on show as far south as norfolk. it is caused by charged particles interacting with oxygen in the upper atmosphere, the purple and the blue other nitrogen, and it is almost how a neon light works as you stick electricity in it and it interacts with the gases in there. it produces a spectacular show. it has led to a frost this morning, but it also means there is a bit more on the way of sunshine around. some of you are probably pleased with that after yesterday's wind and rain. there is still some rain to come for some of you, a few showers dotted around for some of you. showing you the picture
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from space, a window of clear weather helped us to see the aurora but that was yesterday's cloud. this is coming in for tomorrow. a little bit of fine weather, but the shower cloud is a bit more abundant across parts of northern scotland and northern ireland, a bit of hills no. one or two wintry flurries out towards the west of england and wales, many in the uk starting the day dry and bright with frost on the ground and on the cars. for many central and eastern areas it was —— it will stay sunny. northern england will see more cloud during the second half of the day with outbreaks of rain, and turning cloudier. the channel islands, devon, cornwall and eventually pembrokeshire with some rain here. 10 degrees, the sign of some mild weather. a cool day for most once again and with that cool air in place, a widespread frost across eastern areas. may be as low as —6 in scotland for a time. not by the end of the night, though. temperatures rising as patchy rain
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pushes in and by tomorrow morning belfast at eight degrees in plymouth at ten. much milder with the potential for frost still there in the east. that is because there is a wedge of milder air pushing in between these two weather fronts, most active to the north across parts of western scotland but the weather fronts will bring some patchy rain and drizzle here and there. the first one starting in western parts of england and wales, trundling eastwards slowly through the day. easy sunshine in the far east. low cloud through western coasts and hills. mainly to the north and west of scotland where winds strengthening through the day and we could see gales as we head into the evening. temperatures will be up on what we have seen over the past few days, may be as high as 13 degrees in belfast. that milder air will push its way a bit further south was once again as we go through monday night into tuesday and with it the outbreaks of rain. cloudier, damperstart and with it the outbreaks of rain. cloudier, damper start towards the south of the country tuesday, rounding up to sunshine. a few showers to the north—west. a blustery day on tuesday, and temperatures a little bit above normal for the time of year at
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around six to ii normal for the time of year at around six to 11 degrees. that sunshine will transfer its way southwards as we go through into wednesday and we will see a little ridge of high pressure building from the south. quite a substantial one, how far north diskettes will depend on whether we see any rain on the north of scotland and how strong the winds will be. always a bit windier in northern scotland but that wind coming in off the atlantic. the mildest conditions for the end of the week in the northern half of the country, and the south always a bit cooler, especially where any mist and fog lingers. there could be some frost by night. that is how it is looking. frost by night. that is how it is lookinr. ., .. frost by night. that is how it is lookinr. ., ~ i. , frost by night. that is how it is lookinr. ., ,, , . ., looking. thank you very much and thank ou looking. thank you very much and thank you for— looking. thank you very much and thank you for those _ looking. thank you very much and thank you for those lovely - looking. thank you very much and l thank you for those lovely pictures. they were amazing. more of those later, hopefully. now on breakfast, it's time for click.
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that's it from us from ces. we'll be back in vegas next year. echoes: next year... next year... not a casino or convention centre in sight! thundering, powerful music plays. welcome to ces 2022 from vegas! it's been touch and go but we made it, and there's plenty of tech here. yeah, not as much as we were expecting, though, to be honest. in fact, quite a few big names pulled out quite late in the day due to you—know—what, which does mean that the world's biggest tech show
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feels somewhat smaller, doesn't it? there are still plenty of gadgets, though. yep, true. i'll be looking at a few for the home in a minute but in the meantime, do you fancy a brew? i think it's time for a tea break, don't you? you've been working hard already, clearly. very hard, yes! this is the bru tea maker. now, you can put in any loose tea or tea bags and then you set it for exactly how long you want that tea to be brewing for, so it'll hopefully make you your perfect cuppa. my perfect cuppa is i'd say about 3.5 minutes. can you do that? ok, i shall try and oblige. it's got quite a handy self—cleaning function in there as well. with these machines, that's often the hassle, isn't it? 0k. set up a 3.5—minute interlude, please. yeah, actually. not a bad cup of...tea. where... ? 0h! she's gone. that should keep him busy for a bit.
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now, these days, we're having more food deliveries than ever, so could this be a solution? fresh portal allows you to set it to hot or cold so your delivery should be kept atjust the right temperature. the finished product will have uv—c lights to sanitise it and a camera to monitor yourfood, but the problem is you do need to cut a big hole in your house to put it in. and here's today's delivery, which is rather unusually some yogurt. one issue with deliveries is that they often come with way more packaging than you need — that i'll be after later — but clear drop hopes to overcome the problem of not enough soft plastics being recycled with this, a device that compresses them. you can either put in there plastic bags like this or any soft packaging. this isjust a prototype — the finished product will be about two—thirds of this size — but this is what happens.
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and this is what the plastic comes out looking like once it's condensed. i've been told that this is probably the quantity that your average family would come up with over the course of two months and being like this instead of big, puffy bags does make it a lot easier to be ground down at a recycling facility. anyhow, i'm going to pop that there because i need to get to the kitchen. as it happens, i'm not much of a fan of plain yoghurt but there is a reason that i've got this here. first of all, let me pour some into the bowl. this is spoontek and the company claims that through a mild electric current that runs through it, your food should taste better. now, when i'm using it, the food will be covering this silver dot here. and when i'm eating with it, my finger will naturally cover that silver bit at the back. so this light will come on to show that it's definitely working. to test it, i'm actually going to be blindfolded so that i can't tell the difference between this, the functioning spoon, and these two that don't.
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i'm going to put this on and omar, can you come over and just mix things up a bit so i don't know what spoon i'm using? 0k. it's here somewhere, i think. bleep. ok, this tastes like yoghurt. that tasted exactly the same as it did on the first spoon. um, strangely, that mouthful maybe sort of tasted a bit better? but i don't know. if i wasn't really thinking about it, i wouldn't notice a difference. it's not like you feel an electric current or anything. but i'm going to guess that this is the right spoon. musical flourish. it is. 0k. i was genuinely not expecting that! ok, well, let's give it a go again. bleep. i think this is the spoon. buzzer blares. no. no! and i really thought it wasn't the first one. maybe it was just luck, i guess, the first time. let's do it again. bleep. not feeling so sure this time. i'm going to go for this being the spoon. and it is!
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ok, that was two out of three. and it could be luck but i don't know! it was two out of the three. the difference was so small, i wonder if it would be more substantial with something that tasted a bit stronger but i don't know! there's my really scientific test. and when it's time to leave the house, especially if you're going to be away for a while, then you may be concerned about security. and here's something that's taken things on a level from the old timer switch that makes it look like someone's in when the lights go on and off. let me just set it up. there we go. simple. it's got a sensor in it so it knows if it's day or night. done. home shadows aims to create the illusion that there are people moving around in the room and to me, it did just look like a bit of a glitchy light, which i suppose would indicate someone was in. but it doesn't exactly look like this.
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upbeat electronic music plays. welcome to eureka park, where there's always something weird to see, including this. this is levita — a cabinet where you can make anything float. they've put perfumes and watches in here for retail shops but today, they've put my microphone inside. and because the founders are magicians, they won't tell me how this is done. i am going to need that back, please. really? yes. sure, ok. here it is. there you go for your microphone, sir. it's magic! laughter. as always, more and more things are getting connected to the internet. this is a smart tap. i can ask my voice assistant "alexa, ask moen for 500ml of water". alexa: wave over sensor to dispense 500ml now. | there we go! exactly 500ml — very clever. emily, does this mean if the wi—fi goes off,
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i can't make a cup of tea? absolutely not! you will always have tea. the motion control sensor will continue to operate. this is battle racing, a start—up from colombia which i think we can say is inspired by an italian—japanese plumber. i can even leave little traps here for the people racing behind me, and then off i go! this is flying magic cleaner. the idea is that once you've vacuumed your carpet, you can suck some more dust out of the air — not using magic, but using static electricity.
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there's a few companies here this year doing facial recognition for dogs, so let's give it a try. here's a dog. we hold that to the camera and it has identified it asjohn. now, what about this dog with the pretty hair clip? is that a different dog or the same dog? that is alsojohn. laughs. upbeat electronic music plays. what do alcohol and bitcoin both have in common? every high is followed by a crash. i've just met cecilia. this is a robot bartender. i put my cup here. show me your id. and she's asking me for id, because obviously i look under 21. cecilia, i'll have a metaverse please. oh, cecilia. you're breaking my heart. you're shaking my cocktails daily. ok, well, taste test. oh, very nice!
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is that pomegranate? thank you. and this is the perfect gadget for if you've been doing sports or exercise orjust walking around ces all day. it's cryosocks and it's going to give me instant deep cooling in my muscles from this canister here, so ijust give it a press... ah! oh, it is very cold! mmm. that was chris, and we haven't quite finished with weird and wonderful yet. oh good! you know that nice feeling you get when a baby nibbles your finger? no! no, me neither, but someone does, so meet amagami ham ham. stick yourfinger in its mouth. right. is this like i'm torturing a toy? this is quite strange. tell us what that's like. ooh!
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it's squeezing the end of my finger. it's kind of... yes, it is. ..dry — i don't know! it's weird. well, you enjoy that while i read the press release, which says it's designed to recreate the somewhat pleasing sensation that people get when human babies and pet animals softly bite on the fingers. it uses a special algorithm to randomly select from two dozen nibbling patterns to keep users interested — are you still interested? fascinated. most people like the nibbling sensation but know they need to teach their children or pets to stop it because kids and animals will otherwise bite them with full force eventually. amagami ham ham is a robot that frees humankind from the conundrum of whether to pursue or not pursue the forbidden pleasure. how's that for you? it's got quite excitable. can i take my finger out? yes, you may! and on that note, i think we'll leave it for ces for this week. it's good to be back, though, isn't it? it's very good to be back. it's been wonderful. super. ooh! as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. spencer, are you ok? thanks for watching. we'll see you soon.
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bye! good morning, welcome to breakfast with sima kotecha and ben thompson. our headlines today: the education secretary becomes the first cabinet minister to back reducing covid isolation in england down from seven days to five. parents of 12 to is—year—olds are urged to book vaccines for their children, as the uk records 150,00 covid deaths. novak djokovic prepares for a court hearing after insisting he has a vaccine exemption to enter australia — because he had covid last month.
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no red carpet, no tv ceremony and no stars — the golden globes kicks off awards season later — shrouded in controversy. and after its christmas day launch, we find out how the james webb telescope is doing on its million—milejourney to the sun's orbit. coming up in sport — england have survived a nail—biting finish in sydney. with just one wicket in hand — jimmy anderson gets them over the line to draw the fourth ashes test and avoid a whitewash. while there will be a brighter day for many.
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a look at what the weather has in store for the week ahead. a senior government minister has given his support to reducing the coronavirus isolation period in england. speaking to the sunday times, the former vaccines minister — now education secretary — nadhim zahawi backed the idea of isolating for five days instead of seven. our political correspondentjonathan blake has more details. jonathan, nadhim zahawi has suggested he would back a move to reduce the covid isolation period down. this is certainly been up for discussion for some time especially after the government would use the period from ten days to seven provided there were negative lateral flow tester was end of that period and the united states took the decision to reduce it to five days soon after that. those advising the government have suggested the move would be counter—productive because as many point out people can still be infectious towards the end of that few days but nevertheless there are many who would like to see the period reduced because as we all
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know that issues pressure on the nhs and other sectors of the economy caused by the sheer number of people having to isolate after testing positive with covid at the moment. nadeem zahawi giving his backing to any potential move in that direction telling the sunday times the uk health advisory agency were going to look at reviewing it and if they say they will bring it back down to five days that would be even more helpful but no suggestion this is a precursor to that actually happening any time soon. and there are reports this morning that the government might be changing its policy on lateral flow tests too? speculation about how this will be part perhaps, perhaps a shift from the government and the country as a whole being in pandemic mode into dealing with coronavirus is something that happens in life
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normally and cycles every year such as flu or other winter viruses. but there is pretty firm response from there is pretty firm response from the government saying that lateral flow tests remain an important part of the response of the moment and they are of course freely available, supply issues aside, to all of us as a way to help manage the pandemic. but is it going to be the case indefinitely they will be freely available? perhaps not but no confirmation that will happen again any time soon and indeed some strong opposition to this exceptionally from the labour party who say this would be the wrong move at the wrong time in the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon calling any move in that direction at this point utterly wrong headed. parents of 12 to 15 year olds are being urged to get their children vaccinated, as around half a million appointments are made
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available in england. the announcement comes after the news that 150,000 people in the uk have now died within 28 days of a positive covid test. let's take a look at the latest data. there were 146,390 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. 313 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. the total number of people who've died with covid now stands now stands at 150, 057. on vaccinations, more than 35.2 million people have now had a boosterjab, which means just over 60% of people aged 12 and over have now had three vaccine doses. danjohnson has this report. as the number of covid deaths reaches 150,000,
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more vaccinations are being offered to the young. half a million slots have been made available at 300 centres across england for children aged 12—15. senior doctors are urging parents to get kids booked in. we've spoken to parents around the country from different backgrounds and different communities and parents do want their children vaccinated. it's a really important thing, notjust to keep the child safe and to keep children in education, but to keep families and communities safe as well. according to the latest nhs figures, more than 1.4 million young people aged 12—15 in england have already had their first dose since september. middlesbrough's one of many places seeing covid cases rising, so as well as vaccinating children, older people are being encouraged to come forward for a boosterjab. i work for middlesbrough council and taking vulnerable children
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to school and covid's very rife in the teesside area. we've been double vaccinated and this was our booster. with us coming out of covid, we're out by 28 days so this was the earliest opportunity to come and receive our booster. this new strain is hurting everyone so, i follow the rules anyway, ijust thought i'd come and get my booster. this is my booster vaccine. covid is going high nowadays so, i've been outside, i go outside a lot and i do work in a restaurant now so people come in and go, so i thought it's better to get a booster vaccine as well. we know for covid, for many, many people, 2019 and also 2020, people died. so important for people to look after themselves and family. you don't want to take a chance. we don't know once we get covid virus how you're going to react. what we know is that the covid vaccine works,
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there's plenty of data now for the last one year, so come along, and we know that people who are getting the vaccine especially when they've had the second and the booster, they're getting a milder form of illness so come along and get the vaccine. there's a similar push in scotland for everyone aged 12 and over to get vaccinated in an effort to bring case numbers under control and make sure hospitals aren't overwhelmed. dan johnson, bbc news. later today novak djokovic's legal team will appeal a decision by australian authorities to revoke his visa, over a row about his covid vaccination status. it's after documents were released suggesting the tennis star had been granted a vaccine exemption to enter the country because he had tested positive for the virus last month. simonjones reports. serbian music plays. supporters of novak djokovic gather outside the immigration detention centre in melbourne where he's staying. they want to see him on the tennis court. the countdown is now
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on to his court case. oh, mate, i haven't slept since he came off the plane, we're all sick to the stomach. it's a very unfortunate situation for australia. it's becoming very embarrassing. this was djokovic arriving on wednesday. his legal team said he had received a vaccine exemption to enter the country from tennis australia, because he had tested positive for covid on december 16th. that was the day on which these pictures were taken, showing djokovic maskless at a ceremony in his home country of serbia, at which he was honoured with his own postage stamps in recognition of his achievements. it's unclear whether he had taken a test at this stage. the following day, serbian media says he was pictured handing out awards to young players. it is unclear whether he knew he had covid. his motherjoined a protest against this treatment in belgrade. this
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his motherjoined a protest against this treatment in belgrade.- this treatment in belgrade. this is -rison, this treatment in belgrade. this is prison. this _ this treatment in belgrade. this is prison. this is _ this treatment in belgrade. this is prison, this is not _ this treatment in belgrade. this is prison, this is not like _ this treatment in belgrade. this is prison, this is not like an - prison, this is not like an immigration hotel, this is present. another player, renata voracova, from the czech republic, has now left the hotel and the country after her visa was cancelled. djokovic had been asked to move to somewhere he could train ahead of the open. it looks unlikely, but he has been given exercise equipment and gluten—free food. there's no way you could give him an exemption when exemptions have not been given to people who wanted to go to australia to see dying parents, and, you know, injured relatives. there are all sorts of heart—rending stories about people not being able to see their relatives in australia, but those people are not famous, so they don't get an exemption. but it will now be up to a judge to decide, just a week before the australian open begins. simon jones, bbc news. we're joined now by our correspondent guy de launey, who is in novak djokovic's home
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city of belgrade. guy, what's the reaction there? everyone is very supportive of novak djokovic and the media here have been full of article saying they think he has a good case when we go into this court hearing on monday in australia that he has all the documentation and raging against what they see as a chilean efforts at delaying the hearing to prevent novak djokovic entering the main draw of the australian open. —— australian efforts. we may have snow this afternoon but it didn't prevent lots of people from coming out yesterday. people not too bothered about the photographs you are hearing about showing novak djokovic
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out in public without a mask. they just want to see their hero back where he, they think, belongs stop. labour is calling for a windfall tax on oil and gas producers, to help low and middle income families cope with rising energy bills. the party said the conservatives had presided over a decade of failed energy policies. the government said the energy price cap was protecting millions from higher bills and it was supporting vulnerable households with schemes worth more than £4 billion. three new photographs of the duchess of cambridge have been released to mark her 40th birthday. the portraits, taken by fashion photographer paolo roversi, will go on display this year in three places which have a special meaning to her royal highness: berkshire, st andrews and anglesey. they will then be housed in the permanent collection of the national portrait gallery.
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here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. i have a bit of good news if you're fed up with rain. things look a bit more dry for next week. compared with the rain we saw yesterday for many of you are much brighter start. a sunny sunrise in eastbourne. coldest at the moment in parts of eastern scotland, —5 in aberdeenshire at the moment. some frost and ice around but compared to yesterday the cloud that brought the rain, we are in a clear window ahead of gathering cloud towards the west. that will bring a different day tomorrow. in that window between the two weather systems it still contains some showers particularly
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in the west. quite frequent across argyll and bute in parts of northern ireland and isolated showers in parts of england and wales. northern ireland and southern scotland will see the bulk of the showers in the morning and northern england in the afternoon. the north of scotland clear skies and sunshine, a fine day to come. for much of wales and the midlands and east anglia and south wales will stay dry today. in the south it will turn mild later on and everywhere seeing some rain by the end of the afternoon. rain across many western areas tonight. eastern parts clear to begin the night and temperatures could drop to —6 in parts of eastern scotland but by the end of the night temperatures up as cloud pushes in an eight to 10 degrees in the west. this sector of milder air between the warm front and the cloud and drizzle eastwards and the cloud and drizzle eastwards and bringing heavy rain through the
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day to north—west scotland and strengthening winds touching deal for slater. in the warmer segment we have lots of low cloud so quite a mystery around hills and course in the west. in the east sunshine and predominantly dry. not a lot of rain around computer yesterday. as we going into the afternoon temperatures up to 12 or 13 in the west and eight or nine in the east. higher than we would expect this time of year. a milder night for many particularly england and wales and a little colder for scotland and northern ireland but some sunshine at times and always more cloud and southern parts of england and wales with outbreaks of rain or drizzle chiefly towards the south—east. temperatures dropping little bit but still above where we should be in this stage of january. into next week high pressure gradually built
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in and where are winds are south we will see mist and fog and in cambridge for degrees or 5 degrees and in abergavenny. temperatures in aberdeen will be ten or 11 degrees. there will be some big variations to the next as we go through next week. some of us will have to deal with fog and frost on the most mornings. a renewed appeal is underway in scotland for people to come forward for their boosterjabs. it comes just days after the country reached a milestone of more than a million cases since the start of the pandemic. we're joined now by the scottish health secretary, humza yousaf. renewed appeal for younger people
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explain what you're asking for. yellow might it is very simple stop we are asking you to come forward for your booster dose if you are eligible. haste for your booster dose if you are eliaible. ~ ~' ., for your booster dose if you are eliaible. ~ ~ ., ., .. ., for your booster dose if you are eliaible. ~ ~' ., ., eligible. we know unvaccinated you are 12 and a — eligible. we know unvaccinated you are 12 and a half— eligible. we know unvaccinated you are 12 and a half times _ eligible. we know unvaccinated you are 12 and a half times more - eligible. we know unvaccinated you are 12 and a half times more likely| are 12 and a half times more likely and it is not too late to get your booster dose or first or second dose. don't feel embarrassed, nobody willjudge you, come forward whatever dose you are eligible for because we know in this fight against the virus vaccines really help to reduce severe illness, hospitalisation and death. what help to reduce severe illness, hospitalisation and death. what is strikina is hospitalisation and death. what is striking is there _ hospitalisation and death. what is striking is there are _ hospitalisation and death. what is striking is there are still— hospitalisation and death. what is striking is there are still very i striking is there are still very different restrictions on peoples ability to do different things
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across the four nations. the scottish government announcing it has logged 1 million covid cases since the start of the pandemic. how is it case numbers are still so high? is it case numbers are still so hiuh? ~ ~ ., is it case numbers are still so hiuh? ~ ., . ., is it case numbers are still so hiuh? ~ ., .., ., high? we know omicron has a higher attack rate than _ high? we know omicron has a higher attack rate than any _ high? we know omicron has a higher attack rate than any variant - high? we know omicron has a higher attack rate than any variant we i high? we know omicron has a higher attack rate than any variant we have l attack rate than any variant we have seen before but hopefully it is less severe. the problem is because of it having the vast atack rate a small percentage of the numbers going into hospital will put significant strain on the nhs and this is right across health services right across the four uk nations. what you can do to help protect us, yourself, the nhs and public services is get yourself vaccinated and we have the capacity and all we need is for people to
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come through the door and roll up their sleeves.— their sleeves. scotland is under much tighter — their sleeves. scotland is under much tighter restrictions i their sleeves. scotland is under much tighter restrictions on i their sleeves. scotland is under l much tighter restrictions on other parts of the uk, particularly things like hospitality, and we know the impact that can have on jobs and the wider economic picture, so i wonder weather those tighter restrictions are just not working given we have seen the case numbers saw in scotland to? in seen the case numbers saw in scotland to?— seen the case numbers saw in scotland to? . . ., .., scotland to? in the data that came out recently _ scotland to? in the data that came out recently our _ scotland to? in the data that came out recently our infection - scotland to? in the data that came out recently our infection rate i scotland to? in the data that came out recently our infection rate is i out recently our infection rate is one in 20 and in wales 20 and 20 and in england one in 15. i would say that you have seen protective measures in wales and in scotland and in england although there are some protective measures that have the least restrictions and that may be in part why the infection rate is greater but what i would say is that we have to balance. if we wanted to
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stop omicron completely in its tracks you could do something extreme but nobody would contemplate that at the moment because we know the severe impact that would have on the severe impact that would have on the economy and mental health and it's about balancing and making sure we get thejudgment it's about balancing and making sure we get the judgment right. that it's about balancing and making sure we get the judgment right.— we get the 'udgment right. that is a lot of we get the judgment right. that is a lot of controversy _ we get the judgment right. that is a lot of controversy about _ we get the judgment right. that is a lot of controversy about the - lot of controversy about the individual figures and the specific nature of them. i want to talk about the death toll across the uk as a whole, 150,000 covid deaths within 20 days of a positive test. it is an awful milestone for us to have reached and every one of those is a personal story, a family that has faced loss. it personal story, a family that has faced loss-— faced loss. it is a really grim milestone — faced loss. it is a really grim milestone for _ faced loss. it is a really grim milestone for us _ faced loss. it is a really grim milestone for us to - faced loss. it is a really grim milestone for us to have i faced loss. it is a really grim i milestone for us to have reached faced loss. it is a really grim - milestone for us to have reached and this is why i don't like using the phrase we need to learn to live with covid because that means we have to
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accept some people are going to die with covid and that is a difficult reality to try to contemplate. these are notjust statistics, we all know somebody who has passed away from covid and the human story behind that, there is a person behind that and families are devastated so these milestones, grim as they are, are a reminder we have to do everything in our power to control this virus. something we hear a lot right now is learning to live with this virus. let's talk a little bit about the isolation period. we are told that nadeem zahawi would back a reduction from seven to five days if the science was right. why has it taken so long in scotland to come down
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from ten days to seven days? the uk nations all move _ from ten days to seven days? the uk nations all move at _ from ten days to seven days? the uk nations all move at a _ from ten days to seven days? the uk nations all move at a different - from ten days to seven days? the uk nations all move at a different pace l nations all move at a different pace on this. it is not that there is not a risk attached and going from ten to seven days. we wanted time to consider weather or not we would inadvertently accelerate the transmission of the virus by cutting that isolation period. by doing so we then have to accept that risk and we then have to accept that risk and we wanted to look at as much data as we wanted to look at as much data as we possibly could and understand the impact it would have on public services. so to reduce the isolation period from ten days to seven if you have two negative tests and fever free, we will continue to keep that matter under review. that free, we will continue to keep that matter under review.— free, we will continue to keep that matter under review. that are huge applications — matter under review. that are huge applications for _ matter under review. that are huge applications for staffing _ matter under review. that are huge applications for staffing in - matter under review. that are huge applications for staffing in all i applications for staffing in all sorts of businesses but particularly the nhs. on that note would you support a reduction to five days if
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the science proved it was possible? we have just made the change from ten to seven days but clearly we are always guided by the science and we have a good relationship with other uk nations. i havejust met with have a good relationship with other uk nations. i have just met with the other health ministers on thursday evening and we are always looking at the science, science in scotland and in england and wales and northern ireland, we are looking at ensuring the science between us and we will keep that under review but were not contemplating at this stage going from seven days until five days. thank you for being with us. the biggest, most powerful telescope nasa has ever launched has successfully been assembled in space — two weeks after its christmas day take off. it's hoped the james webb telescope will teach astronomers about the history of the cosmos, as well as search for signs of life on other planets. alice key reports.
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mission control: we have reached the end of deployment and we are preloading into the launch pad. cheering and applause. celebrations from mission control in baltimore as the final piece of the telescope puzzle slots into place. there are no cameras on board so this live animation was the only way to see the final mirrored wing of the world's largest space telescope unfold. mission control: and we have a fully jws webb unfolded observatory. all right. talking to staff afterwards, nasa's director of science praised them for making history. i want to tell you just how excited and emotional i am right now. we have a deployed telescope in orbit. a magnificent telescope
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the likes of which the world has never seen. so how does it feel to make history, everybody? you just did it! the new observatory will look deeper into space than ever before. infrared technology will allow it to see the first stars and galaxies formed a 13.5 billion years ago. it's also going to be able to look into the really dusty environments around where stars grow up and where new planets are forming. that's one of the places that will help slightly closer to home as well as at the beginning of the universe. and lift off! 20 years in the making, it was successfully launched on christmas day, but it was so big it had to be flat—packed inside a rocket to make it into orbit. over the past two weeks it's been slowly unfurling as it travels nearly one million miles away from earth to circle the sun. but for it to send back images, each segment now has to line up perfectly to act as a single huge mirror.
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so each one of those mirrors, which is very lightweight, have motors on the back which can move them up and down, tip them sideways, rotate them and even slightly bend them to make sure they have exactly the right focus. nothing this complex has ever been tried in space before, but if it works, by the summer, it should be sending back its first images and scientists say they could revolutionise the way we see our universe. alice key, bbc news. we're joined now byjenifer millard, astronomer and presenter of the awesome astronomy podcast. the piece there that we watched explained it but for those at home who are not into astronomy, why is this so significant and such a big deal? it this so significant and such a big deal? , ., ., ., , ., this so significant and such a big deal? ., ., , ., , , deal? it is an enormous deal because this telesc0pe — deal? it is an enormous deal because this telescope allows _ deal? it is an enormous deal because this telescope allows us _ deal? it is an enormous deal because this telescope allows us to _ deal? it is an enormous deal because this telescope allows us to see - deal? it is an enormous deal because this telescope allows us to see the i this telescope allows us to see the universe and away we have not been to do before full stop the most exciting things this telescope will do is peeling back further into
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cosmic history. —— mike peeling back. ——peering. the light has travelled all the way and has shifted from what hubble would be able to see to the infrared that the james webb can see. it can see gases present in the atmosphere which may indicate life so it is incredibly exciting. indicate life so it is incredibly excitina. , , indicate life so it is incredibly excitin.. , , c, exciting. many people may have followed since _ exciting. many people may have followed since the _ exciting. many people may have followed since the launch - exciting. many people may have followed since the launch on - followed since the launch on christmas day and not taken quite how complicated this procedure was to unfold the better panels and a lot could have gone wrong. fix, lat lot could have gone wrong. a lot could have _ lot could have gone wrong. a lot could have gone _ lot could have gone wrong. a lot could have gone wrong. - lot could have gone wrong. int could have gone wrong. you can build in so that if signals are not to see
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properly you can try a software update would with an xbox or playstation but with some of their mechanical devices it was not practical of weight and size limitations to build on any redundancies so something is absolutely had to work and over 170 release devices and dozens of mortars and everything worked exactly as it should have. its function. _ exactly as it should have. its function. i — exactly as it should have. its function, i don't want to simplify it, but the mirrors reflect what they see, as mirrors do. it does work like _ they see, as mirrors do. it does work like a _ they see, as mirrors do. it does work like a more _ they see, as mirrors do. it does work like a more conventional l work like a more conventional telescopes in the sense it collects light and this directs onto the primary hexagon shaped mirrors which is then reflected onto the secondary mirror at the end of the three tripod legs you see in the picture which then sends the light to the instruments hidden behind the mirror, why there is a hole in the middle of that mirror. it operates
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on a different part of the electromagnetic spectrum we can see. some rattlesnakes have infrared sensors on the noses and that is what this telescope will do, look at the infrared universe._ the infrared universe. when do we aet the infrared universe. when do we net to see the infrared universe. when do we get to see what — the infrared universe. when do we get to see what it _ the infrared universe. when do we get to see what it is _ the infrared universe. when do we get to see what it is recording - the infrared universe. when do we get to see what it is recording and| get to see what it is recording and sending back?— get to see what it is recording and sendina back? , ., ., , ., , sending back? everyone wants to see this and i am — sending back? everyone wants to see this and i am desperate _ sending back? everyone wants to see this and i am desperate to _ sending back? everyone wants to see this and i am desperate to see - sending back? everyone wants to see this and i am desperate to see the i this and i am desperate to see the first images. it has a five—month commissioning period and bringing all the instruments online making sure everything is working properly. it should be ready to take science images about three months to four months after launch and we will get to see them after about six months because they have to be analysed and cleaned up and made to look nice and pretty and the big question is what is that first image is going to be? nobody knows and i can't wait to see
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it. it nobody knows and i can't wait to see it. , , . ., y it. it is very exciting. so lovely to see you. — it. it is very exciting. so lovely to see you, thanks _ it. it is very exciting. so lovely to see you, thanks for - it. it is very exciting. so lovely i to see you, thanks for explaining all of that for us. and so much work has gone into getting to where we are and still quite a way to go. impressive technology. now on bbc breakfast, punk and clean rivers campaigner feargal sharkey talks to the bbc�*s climate editorjustin rowlatt about how he ended up the champion of britain's water ways. i'm going fly fishing with britain's most high—profile river campaigner, the pop star feargal sharkey. he is probably best known for this song. # i'm going to hold you, going to hold you tight. # get teenage kicks right through the night.# the dj john peel described teenage kicks as the best pop song ever written. feargal had other top ten hits and a long career behind the scenes in the music industry, but now he is pretty much a full—time campaigner.
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# scooby—dooby—doo.# so i want to know how a working class punk who grew up in derry during the troubles ended up as the champion of britain's rivers. and along the way, he's going to try to teach me how to fly fish. so, one word of warning foryou, feargal. i have never... i've done the sort of angling with a float, whatever you call it. but i've never done fly fishing. as izaak walton said, "is it not an art to catch a trout with a fly?" can you count to three? can i count to three? i think i can manage that, yes. you're going to do fine. you're going to be ok. let's get going. i'm not sure feargal sharkey realises the scale of the challenge he is taking on. so, as we can tell, we have a very handy cameraman as a target here. go for it. see if you can take him out. so, what we can do is one, two, three. it's simple. one, two, three. and you are sort of feeding it with that hand a little bit? i'm just letting it run through itself. if you get enough energy into it,
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the line itself will extend and shoot out all by itself. i guess it's my turn now. just go for it. one, two... oh, it's up in the tree! well, the good news is you're not dropping your back cast. how did...? i mean, because you grew up in derry in northern ireland, didn't you? yep. and you were a working class lad. yeah. how did a working class punk from derry end up...? this is considered the gentleman's sport! it's a long time since anybody called me that, i have to tell you. well, ironically enough, if you want to get into fly fishing, there is no finer place than northern ireland. a, it's not considered elitist because lots of people do it. it's cheap, it's easily accessible and it's open to all. so, by way of example, when i was growing up in derry i could go to the middle of town, get on a bus and,
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20 minutes later, be standing on the banks of a river on the edge of derry called the faughan. and, to this day, it's still got salmon running up the river faughan. and i think, at the time, membership of the faughan anglers association was, like, 15, 20 quid or something. and was that cross—community? yeah, there was never... i don't remember on the bank of any lough, lake, river... so, you might be fishing next to a protestant, there are bombs going off and you're like, "how's the fish rising? oh, there's a good spot down there for trout." you have to bear in mind that this thing about catholics and protestants, i had neighbours that were protestants. did it ever come up? no. it didn't. because, ironically enough, they were living the same kind of lives. the brown trout in the river are out of season, the brown trout in the river are out of season, so we're going after a related species called grayling. one of the beauties about grayling
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is not only are they a phenomenally so we're going after a related species called grayling. sensitive fish, incredibly sensitive to water quality. so if you've got grayling... you're doing well. ..you know your river is in good shape. he says his character was forged early on in life. growing up in derry in particular, northern ireland in general, during the late '605 and '70s, and particularly coming from a republican background, there was all the disruption and the devilment and the punkish attitude you ever needed. was out there, and you wanted it. it was there on the streets. well, bearing in mind my parents, like a lot of parents, were out there on civil rights marches. shall we just say there was only enough room for punky kind of attitude. and, ironically enough, it was one of the things that was a driver of the undertones. in that that is why we wrote songs about chocolate and girls. can you think of a better way of spending...? it's not bad, is it? just hanging out here.
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when feargal sharkey hit the big time and move to london, he kept up his fly fishing hobby. and, being an enterprising sort, he ended up as chairman of the oldest fly fishing club in england, the amwell magna in hertfordshire. i think i've got the flick... ok, point the rod down at the river. all right, start from there. 1000... 0h! i think i let it lie on the water for too long. that's ok. this is not as easy as feargal makes it look. rivers have become a passion for you. ironically enough, it goes back to me becoming chairman of the amwell magna, in that, as part of the handover, i began to realise there had been a big issue involving the drop in the volume of water in the river. it's a conversation that's been going on with the environment agency and the local water
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company for 15, 16 years. i could not comprehend why anybody was still talking about something 16 years later. so what that taught me, itjust made me curious as to why, ultimately, a bunch of old men who just want to go fishing had to go to all that trouble with the charity and spend a year and a half digging out information, freedom of information requests, putting our case together, to take the environment agency to the high courtjust to get them to do the right thing. it does seem extraordinary, doesn't it? i stupidly, kind of philosophically, went, "if we had to do all of that, what else is going on?" at that point, as i now describe it, i got an itch and stupidly i scratched that itch. started scratching. let's get the fly on, here... every time i scratch that itch, ijust end up with a bigger itch. he means the more he researched the issues facing britain's rivers, the more serious he realised
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the problems were. every single river in the country is polluted. i didn't make that up, that is the environment agency data. truth is, one of the biggest sources of pollution is the water industry. now filling pretty much every river in the country is contaminated to some degree. they are saying that these are sewage overflows that are required because the system is flooding and they need to clear the water out. yeah. that's basically their argument, isn't it? and it's also an argument that very handily overlooks the fact that this country was taken to the european court ofjustice in 2012, because curiously enough there is quite an extensive bit of legislation about water companies and how and when they may be allowed to dump sewage into rivers. and the european court ofjustice ruled that what is going on in this country is illegal and sewage overflows should only ever be used in exceptional situations.
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so we now know that last year they spent 3.1 million hours on 400,000 separate occasions. is anything remotely exceptional about any of that? 3.1 million hours, 400,000 separate occasions? correct. we are now beginning to think that is a gross underestimation of what is going on. to such an extent thatjust three weeks ago defra, the environment agency, and ofwat have now announced a major investigation into the operation of 2000 sewage works in england. now, that is a triumph for campaigners like yourself. it's notjust you, is it? there's an army of anglers, environmentalists and other campaigners who have been saying we need to get on top of it. feargal says his experience of the troubles explains a lot about his direct approach to campaigning. i've watched plumbers and electricians and schoolteachers bring down the government in northern ireland in the 19705. so, of course you can.
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why not? they are doing the wrong thing — well, let's go and fix it. simple. that led me onto the journey i've been on over the past, i think, four years now. and directing his considerable energies into river campaigning has transformed people's perception of him, say feargal. for decades of my life, i could walk into little pubs in rural villages in this country, and people invariably would want to talk about music. yeah. in the modern world, i now walk into, it happened quite recently, a rural pub in a little isolated little village and the barman wanted to talk about rivers. and that, for me, is the really intriguing shift that's now "i'd no idea about this riverthing, feargal. "it's bloody outrageous, i'm absolutely furious this is allowed to happen." "i didn't realise you were a singer, feargal, i thought you were a river campaigner! teenage kicks? really, did you sing that? i" there you go. such is the crazy life i lead. he doesn't plan to stop campaigning any time soon. in fact, he has got
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a new target in his sights. the big thing that you've been campaigning on has been the issue of sewage. the bigger problem of pollution in the rivers doesn't come from sewage. well, it doesn't, because... i will happily admit that i picked on sewage because it was a very simple, direct message that was easily communicated. the barman in the little rural pub, in a a little village, everybody gets the idea. the truth is, the biggest polluter in this country is actually agriculture and the industrialisation of food production and meat production and chickens. what is the problem with agriculture? twofold — it is basically commonly slurry and fertiliser running off fields into rivers. this is fertiliser, so you might think maybe that is the good thing? maybe the river weeds would enjoy a little extra... a horrendously bad thing. someone sent me pictures yesterday of lake windermere. again, one of our national treasures. there is green algae in lake windermere because all
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of that fertiliser creates a massive explosion in the population of little microorganisms. the simple truth of the matter is, extraordinary idea that it is, the fish actually suffocate because of the lack of oxygen in the river or the lake, and that is the modern world we are creating. go for it. as you have probably guessed, we didn't catch anything. but as i'm learning, that is not really the point. it's about being out at beside a beautiful river, putting the world to rights. there you go, my boy. oh, look at that! that's what i need. one cup of coffee. cheers. i'll stick with a good old british cup of tea. well, thanks for teaching me... slainte mhaith. ..a good lesson. maybe i'll catch something next time. welcome to the world of fly fishing.
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just in role good feargal sharkey. it's been a bit of a nail—biting morning as far as cricket is concerned, hasn't it? good morning. it has been. i'm just glad it paid off to have some optimism at 6:20am thinking england could do this, and we're hearing is a wicket is gone, a wicket is gone... but they on. i had a feeling last night, i did, i'm not saying psychic, but ijust had a feeling... i'm glad you did, because i thought they were crazy, it's they were talking about, but my goodness did they make it a hard—fought battle. england clung on for a tense draw on the final day of the fourth test in sydney to end australia's hopes of an ashes whitewash. england knew it was a huge ask to win this test match going into the final day — but a draw was possible opener zak crawley batted really well to reach 77 runs, a smart innings from him but in the end trapped in front
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by cameron green's yorker. hard — he was out for 60, a really brave effort amid his struggle with a side strain. pat cummins got rid of buttler and wood in the space of three balls and then jonny bairstow felt like the big wicket for australia, bowled by bowland and caught by marnus labushangne, but the tail survived jack leach leading the resistance before he went for 26. it left stuart broad and james anderson here with 12 nervy balls left to survive, anderson at 39 saw them over the line, which they did to ensure england go into the fifth and final test in hobart — that starts on friday — with something to build on. staying in australia — later tonight our time the world number one novak djokovic will set out his case at a court in melbourne, following the decision by officials to revoke his visa,
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just a week before the start of the australian open. russell fuller is the bbc�*s tennis correspondent and joins us now live from melbourne. good morning. what should we expect novak djokovic to argue at his hearing, and how would you rate his chances of getting what he wants? the court papers gave us an indication of the approach that novak djokovic�*s legal team are taking. they are a legal firm novak djokovic�*s legal team are taking. they are a legalfirm based in melbourne, they are certainly citing procedural unfairness. i suppose the biggest issue on which they may have a chance of success is that djokovic was told by tennis australia, and he was told by the state government, the victorian government, the anybody who has been infected by covid in the past six months will be able to defer their vaccination therefore have a medical exemption. djokovic sighed and
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provided evidence of the fact that he had tested positive on december 16. the federal government have been saying all along and increasingly vocal loop that is not good enough reason to defer your vaccination and get into australia at this time, and we can see they have written to the director of tennis australia telling the start. it's a special hearing of the start. it's a special hearing of the federal circuit court in melbourne, tomorrow morning, 10am melbourne, tomorrow morning, 10am melbourne time. i! he melbourne, tomorrow morning, 10am melbourne time.— melbourne time. if he loses he could et still melbourne time. if he loses he could yet still appeal. _ melbourne time. if he loses he could yet still appeal, but _ melbourne time. if he loses he could yet still appeal, but that _ melbourne time. if he loses he could yet still appeal, but that would - melbourne time. if he loses he could yet still appeal, but that would be i yet still appeal, but that would be difficult. you know know that djokovic, you have sat down with him many times. what will have been going through his head these past few days and nights in the melbourne hotel room, and how well equipped is he to phone from this whatever happens? i he to phone from this whatever ha ens? , ,, . he to phone from this whatever hauens? , ,, . �* he to phone from this whatever hauens? , ,,. �* , happens? i suspect he didn't see this coming _ happens? i suspect he didn't see this coming at — happens? i suspect he didn't see this coming at all. _ happens? i suspect he didn't see this coming at all. he _ happens? i suspect he didn't see this coming at all. he was i this coming at all. he was travelling to melbourne under the impression that everything was ok. now the australian border forces saying there was documentation
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presented at the airport, but he had this information from the state government if not the federal government, so after spending eight or nine hours, at melbourne airport, he had time to come to terms of the, he had time to come to terms of the, he has heard from the serbian prime minister that he's managed to get gluten free food into the hotel, some exercise equipment and a laptop, not the conditions he's used to playing in, hardly idealfrom the australian open, he's treated and posted on instagram his thanks to people around the world, but it must be an unsettling period. i suspect he feels less than confident that this is going to be successful, but he has a chance. if the order had been carried out immediately, djokovic would already be back home. a phenomenal record in melbourne, nine times the champion, here is tied on 20 grand slams with federer and nadal, whatever happens to him,
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it's not going to be the end of the issue with the other slams on the horizon this year, it will be something he runs into a game. yes. something he runs into a game. yes, this is a loophole, _ something he runs into a game. yes, this is a loophole, if— something he runs into a game. yes, this is a loophole, if like. _ something he runs into a game. uses this is a loophole, if like. the you fact that he tested positive on the 16th of december, and certainly, as i was explaining, that was good enough at anything australia and the state government alarm into the country this time, but he is not going to continue to test positive for covid dick before grand events, and you would think the united states may require proof of vaccination before they let players play in that country, so there is a lot to think about. i don't think it would have the vaccine, is made that clear, and from what i know of him, he's a man who sticks to his principles, however misguided you may think they are, he's not someone who is going to change his mind about this, just because it enhances his tennis career, but potentially, at least this year, and we don't know how long vaccination will be
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required by countries to enter the border, it could be seriously detrimental to his tennis career, and he is 3a years old, let's not forget. and he is 34 years old, let's not foruet. ~ , , and he is 34 years old, let's not foruet. ~ , , forget. absolutely. 11pm uk time is when we exoeet — forget. absolutely. 11pm uk time is when we expect to _ forget. absolutely. 11pm uk time is when we expect to get _ forget. absolutely. 11pm uk time is when we expect to get this - forget. absolutely. 11pm uk time is when we expect to get this hearing | when we expect to get this hearing on the way. we will leave it there for the time, thank you. in rugby union, there was a thrilling end in the match between harlequins and exeter in the premiership. 14—man exeter were winning right up until the final 2 minutes. andre esterhuizen's try levelling things up just leaving the ice—cool marcus smith to kick the conversion and hand his side the win by 14 points to 12. elsewhere there were wins for gloucester and northampton. edinburgh put five tries past cardiff to go top of the united rugby championship. it finished 34—10 in the scottish capital — ramiro moyano with the pick of the scores after a flowing move. elsewhere there were wins for glasgow warriors and munster.
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and breeze. so much happening in australia, the tennis on one side and then the cricket. so, one drama descended temporarily. one might be continuing. but russell said was a good point, whatever they decide at the hearing, french open on the horizon, wimbledon this summer, the us open, strict rules on new yorker and the covid scene, the story is not coming to an end. it feels like a test case. absolutely, all the stands will be watching, as will be. this is where we say goodbye to ben, who is off to read the news for new sunday morning programme with sophie raworth. so, thanks, ben, good to see you. here's matt with the weather. very good morning to you, notjust a
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stunning sunrise in devon a short while ago, but take a look at these photos from last night, after that wet weather so, some of our weather watchers were treated to this stunning display of the aurora borealis. it's george nimmock caused by charged particles coming from the sun interacting with their atoms and molecules in our atmosphere to shoot out these beautiful colours. the greens are oxygen molecules causing that, the reds and purples and blues all caused by nitrogen molecules in our atmosphere, and they were just stunning images to finish what was a pretty grey and wet day. at least today across the country we have got something much drier and brighter across the uk. we are going to see some sunshine, there is clear skies through the night have led to the sunny conditions this morning, this shot captured earlier, but you can see from satellite where we had the clearer skies, we have another weather system coming in tomorrow,
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be notices clumps of cloud, they are producing cut showers at the moment, is a very lively one is a moment for the west and south—west of scotland and northern ireland, sleet and snow over the hills, some wintry showers to the west of england and wales, some of those surveyed for the time, northern england where we see the showers gradually extend through the afternoon, we expect a slightly wetter afternoon for some of you. your brighten up a bit through southern scotland and northern ireland and it will see in the next few hours, this afternoon wales, east anglia some of dry, patchy rain is more than eire tries to patch its way in, that will work its way to western areas, cloud and outbreaks of rain, head of it while it's rise you could see frost during the night, eastern areas getting as minus six in one or two spots, only a slim chance as we start the monday morning rush—hour. 8—10 , much
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milder compared to this morning, this model air here sandwiched between a warm front bringing patchy rain and drizzle on this one bring heavy bursts of rain to the north west of scotland are strengthening winds. girls across the finals later in the day. hazy sun to the parts of england, patchy drizzle from yorkshire down towards the isle of wight, west of that lots of low cloud around, furs are drizzled around, heaviest rain in parts of western scotland. temperatures tomorrow higher than today up to 12-13 in tomorrow higher than today up to 12—13 in the west, 7—8 in the east, the murderer will last a little bit are going into next week. that is how it is looking. it's usually one of the biggest nights in hollywood, but this evening's golden globes ceremony will be without a—list stars, or a red carpet, as it takes place behind closed doors. it's after the organisation behind the awards, the hollywood foreign press association, came under heavy criticism for lacking
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diversity among its members. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. # it all began tonight...# tonight, west side story is one of the big favourites to win at the golden globes. but none of its stars or its director, steven spielberg, will not be there. the same goes for belfast, which is tied for the most nominations — seven. we're looking to cleanse the community. you wouldn't want to be the odd one out in this street. touch my family and i'll kill you. it is based on the childhood of its director, sir kenneth branagh, who has never won a golden globe. if he does tonight, the way he will find out is on his computer. it is doubtful that he will even care. the golden globes are normally a star—studded event,
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but they have been beset with problems for the past year. an los angeles times expose revealed that they have not had a single black voter for almost two decades, and there are accusations of unethical practices. this prompted tom cruise to send back the three golden globes he had won. the rights holders, nbc, said they would not broadcast the ceremony, and despite radical changes being introduced, hollywood en masse decided to boycott the event. this week, the golden globes announced that the ceremony at the beverly hilton hotel in los angeles will be a private event and will not be live—streamed, with winners simply being announced on social media. this prompted us talk show host conan o'brien to ask: and ricky gervais, who has hosted the golden globes five times, has even suggested there is a chance this could be the last time they are held. you're the number one topic
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ahead of tater tots, and the pope followed you... as to who could win, when it comes to the tv categories, there could be a procession for succession. the media family drama series has the most nominations, with five. is he going to watch? could we make a note in the minutes that he is watching us? but with no—one able to watch the globes and with things as they are, it is fully expected that tonight's winners will not even acknowledge that they have won. i'm a good guy. i'm better than you. we are joined now by the film critic karen krizanovich. thanks so much forjoining us this morning. the golden globes usually are such a big event, and they feel very much like an anti—climax. how significant is the fact that they are being boycotted like this by so many? it’s are being boycotted like this by so man ? �* , , .. .
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many? it's quite significant that the are many? it's quite significant that they are being _ many? it's quite significant that they are being boycotted. i many? it's quite significant that they are being boycotted. they| many? it's quite significant that i they are being boycotted. they used to be the forerunner to the oscars, in which case it is very important, more important than some of the regional events awarded throughout america, and now they seem to have lost their entire credibility and almost, well, they were saying, they are in the metaphorical doghouse with this 90th minute ceremony that no one is going to see. also, bookies are not even, this is significant, it's difficult to make a bet on the golden globes, not that i suggest you do, but this is showing how far they have slipped. what about the oscars? of these are not as prominent as they once were, is there a chance the oscars could follow suit?— follow suit? pretty much, it's like the olympics _ follow suit? pretty much, it's like the olympics of— follow suit? pretty much, it's like the olympics of film-making. i the olympics of film—making. there is a suggestion that the oscars are not significant and it's only for the market, it's an important showcase for getting people and interested in event cinema, cinema
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and struggling right now again streaming, common awards are very important to raise the profile, but the thing is the oscars have, like the thing is the oscars have, like the baftas the thing is the oscars have, like the baftas and also my organisation, the baftas and also my organisation, the critics circle of the uk, have fought to get more diverse voting members, and that's important, not only for equality and also a variety of stories, but also opening up new markets to cinema in general. you would think. _ markets to cinema in general. you would think, if— markets to cinema in general. you would think, if they did diversify theirjudging panel, it would all be back on. is theirjudging panel, it would all be back on. , ., ., ,j theirjudging panel, it would all be back on. , . ., ,” ., back on. is it that easy? no, it really isn't- — back on. is it that easy? no, it really isn't. two _ back on. is it that easy? no, it really isn't. two decades i back on. is it that easy? no, it really isn't. two decades of i really isn't. two decades of neglect, and also the fact that there is 87 members, nobody really knows who they are, there are also some other anomalies, like people being sent to paris and then suddenly a television series set in paris wins against another one that was more critically acclaimed, and the so there have been sniffy moments in the past with the golden globes, anyway, they're fighting
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very hard to keep the oscars significant, and it's quite difficult to do that when people are criticising awards in general, and also the fact the viewing figures are down. �* , , ., . are down. and briefly, what which other big movies _ are down. and briefly, what which other big movies that _ are down. and briefly, what which other big movies that we - are down. and briefly, what which other big movies that we should l are down. and briefly, what which | other big movies that we should all be watching very closely, and perhaps should rent out or go to the cinema to watch? qm. perhaps should rent out or go to the cinema to watch?— cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did net cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did aet a cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot — cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot of _ cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot of votes, _ cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot of votes, but - cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot of votes, but i - cinema to watch? ok, well, belfast did get a lot of votes, but i do i did get a lot of votes, but i do feel, as feel, as much as he is a local boy, it's not getting the love that it should get. would say jane campion is power of the dog is very strong, also a succession is very strong, also a succession is very strong as well.— strong, also a succession is very stron: as well. . ~ , . strong as well. thank you very much for all of that. _ strong as well. thank you very much for all of that. that _ strong as well. thank you very much for all of that. that is _ strong as well. thank you very much for all of that. that is all _ strong as well. thank you very much for all of that. that is all for - for all of that. that is all for today, thank you so much forjoining ben and i, wishing you a lovely weekend, but don't forget, breakfast will be back tomorrow from 6am, so
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make sure, like i said, enjoy the rest of your weekend and we will see you soon, goodbye.
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hello, welcome to bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are your top stories... novak djokovic prepares for a court hearing — after saying he has a vaccine exemption to enter australia — because he had covid last month. the education secretary becomes the first uk cabinet minister to back reducing covid isolation down from seven days to five. the afghan baby separated from his parents in kabul during the chaos of the us withdrawal is reunited with relatives. russian troops arrive in kazakhstan as order is restored following six days of violence. the duchess of cambridge at 40 — three new portraits will go on display in english towns where kate has lived
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to celebrate her birthday.

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