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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 8, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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and that may increase in the week ahead the weather will become fine and dry with some sunny spells. hello, this is bbc
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news with shaun ley. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment with aubrey allegretti and sian griffiths — first the headlines. more than 150,000 people in the uk have now died within 28 days of a positive covid test — since the pandemic began. lawyers for novak djokavic claim he was given a vaccine exemption to enter australia, because he'd had a recent covid infection. thousands more flat—owners will be spared the expense of replacing unsafe cladding under new government plans to make developers offer £4 billion towards the costs. at least 21 people have died in north—eastern pakistan after heavy snowfall trapped them in their vehicles. nasa's james webb space telescope has unfolded its final mirror panel after launching on christmas day. the golden primary mirror will allow the telescope to be properly focused — helping scientists to better study the universe.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are aubrey allegretti political correspondent at the guardian, and sian griffiths, education and families editor at the sunday times. welcome to both of you. lovely to see you again. we've got quite a few of them this time on saturday night. the observer leads with comments from the former chairman of the uk's vaccine task force, who says we must end mass vaccinations for covid and treat the virus like we do flu. the sunday times also looks at a post—pandemic britain, reporting that free lateral flow tests will come to an end as the country is told to live with covid. according to the sunday telegraph, liz truss, the new brexit negotiator, is insisting that the uk will overhaul the post—brexit agreement over northern ireland whether or not the eu will do it as well. another cabinet minister writes
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in the sunday express — this time the home secretary priti patel, warning the house of lords not to water down new police powers in tackling knife crime. the online independent says that oil and gas firms were invited by the government to help write the rules on whether new drilling complies with the uk's climate targets. and finally, the sunday mirror claims its crisis time on albert square as danny dyer quits eastenders. now, how many stories like that have we had with different stars over the years, and eastenders keeps rolling along like all of the best soaps. let's begin with the sunday times. 0bviously sian�*s paper, but it is a very striking front—page story. the very striking front-page story. the sto here very striking front-page story. the story here is _ very striking front—page story. tue: story here is that very striking front—page story. tte: story here is that the very striking front—page story. t"te: story here is that the government very striking front—page story. tte: story here is that the government is looking quite soon it seems to axe the mass free lateral flow testing that we have all been relying on, particularly over the last few weeks. this story says that the tests will
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continue to be carried on in high—risk settings or settings where they want to keep them open. and they want to keep them open. and they will also still be provided to people who are symptomatic with covid. but obviously this will be quite a big change in how we all live our daily lives. i don't know about you, but i've been doing lateral flow tests twice a week like the government tells us. it is going to be quite different if boris johnson signals that he wants to withdraw there is. that will obviously have a big impact on the never of cases we are reporting every day and the whole dynamic, the daily news agenda of the news we get of daily cases is probably going to change quite significantly. we here in this building, _ change quite significantly. we here in this building, as _ change quite significantly. we here in this building, as well— change quite significantly. we here in this building, as well as - change quite significantly. we here in this building, as well as all - change quite significantly. we here in this building, as well as all the l in this building, as well as all the buildings where people are still going on, as you are doing, these regular lateral flow tests. this going on, as you are doing, these regular lateralflow tests. this is a good exclusive at the times has got. sourced to a senior whitehall
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source, which always covers a multitude of sins. but it kind of fits with all of the other signals and cues that we are getting, doesn't it?— and cues that we are getting, doesn't it? , , ., , ., ., doesn't it? yes, stories on other front pages _ doesn't it? yes, stories on other front pages as — doesn't it? yes, stories on other front pages as well. _ doesn't it? yes, stories on other front pages as well. the - doesn't it? yes, stories on other- front pages as well. the government seems _ front pages as well. the government seems to— front pages as well. the government seems to want to move back to more normality— seems to want to move back to more normality really and ditch some of the measures that it has been using to try— the measures that it has been using to try and _ the measures that it has been using to try and control the spread of infection — to try and control the spread of infection i_ to try and control the spread of infection. i think it's quite jarring _ infection. i think it's quite jarring that the stories are coming on a day— jarring that the stories are coming on a day where the figures are showing — on a day where the figures are showing that 150,000 people have died of— showing that 150,000 people have died of covid in the uk, which is one of— died of covid in the uk, which is one of the — died of covid in the uk, which is one of the highest, of course, in the world — one of the highest, of course, in the world. and each of those deaths, of course, _ the world. and each of those deaths, of course, an— the world. and each of those deaths, of course, an individual tragedy, and family— of course, an individual tragedy, and family and friends left grieving. so these stories that the government is now thinking about
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moving _ government is now thinking about moving to — government is now thinking about moving to stop free lateral flow tests _ moving to stop free lateral flow tests. there is a story in the observer— tests. there is a story in the observer about the possibility of ending _ observer about the possibility of ending mass vaccination programmes. ithink— ending mass vaccination programmes. i think it's _ ending mass vaccination programmes. i think it's interesting that it is coming — i think it's interesting that it is coming on _ i think it's interesting that it is coming on this day when another headline — coming on this day when another headline could have beenjust those statistics, _ headline could have beenjust those statistics, really. headline could have been 'ust those statistics, reallyh statistics, really. those terrible statistics- _ statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if— statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if we _ statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if we take _ statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if we take a - statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if we take a look - statistics, really. those terrible statistics. if we take a look at l statistics, really. those terrible l statistics. if we take a look at the front of the observer. treat covid as we do flu. this is clive, who was in charge of the vaccine task force. what do you make of this? because he says that mass population vaccine, we now need to manage disease not virus spread. that is the objection, not to have everybody protected. yeah, ministers and scientists alike have been faced with the question of now we are very much moving through
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the booster programme, 61% was the latest figure we had for the number of people who have had a third dose so far. what comes next? how sustainable is it for us to inoculate the entire population every time there is a new variant or every time there is a new variant or every four months if immunity starts waving. 0nce every four months if immunity starts waving. once we get to the end of this rooster programme, he is saying we should turn to specifically trying to look at different things. so we have all obviously come slight epidemiologists through this pandemic. reading on the front page of the observer, moving away from just vaccines. now looking into research on t cells and b cells as well. so that vulnerable people can be targeted specifically, rather than the whole population. as we have seen, the nhs is very focused
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on covid entering out the vaccine, and it leaves it very little room to deal with other issues. thtnd and it leaves it very little room to deal with other issues.— deal with other issues. and yet, sian, at the _ deal with other issues. and yet, sian, at the bottom _ deal with other issues. and yet, sian, at the bottom of - deal with other issues. and yet, sian, at the bottom of the - deal with other issues. and yet, | sian, at the bottom of the page, deal with other issues. and yet, i sian, at the bottom of the page, a further 330 deaths were reported in the 48 hours to saturday. and it says that is the highest daily never from february last year. so we are not at the point really where we can say the worst is definitely over. we think it is. but are we ready to move to that stage of covid that we just treat as an annual disease we have to live with? the just treat as an annual disease we have to live with?— just treat as an annual disease we have to live with? the front pages are suggesting — have to live with? the front pages are suggesting that _ have to live with? the front pages are suggesting that covid - have to live with? the front pages are suggesting that covid should i have to live with? the front pages i are suggesting that covid should be treated _ are suggesting that covid should be treated now as endemic rather than pandemic — treated now as endemic rather than pandemic. there are people not suggesting that. as a disease more similar— suggesting that. as a disease more similar to _ suggesting that. as a disease more similarto flu, suggesting that. as a disease more similar to flu, that we are going to have _ similar to flu, that we are going to have to _ similar to flu, that we are going to have to live — similar to flu, that we are going to have to live with. i think it is nadhim _ have to live with. i think it is nadhim zahawi, the education secretary, who says in the sunday times _ secretary, who says in the sunday times we — secretary, who says in the sunday times we are going to have this for the next _ times we are going to have this for the next five or six years. we have
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to learn_ the next five or six years. we have to team to — the next five or six years. we have to learn to live with it. but you are right, _ to learn to live with it. but you are right, the numbers in the last couple _ are right, the numbers in the last couple of— are right, the numbers in the last couple of days have been very, very high _ couple of days have been very, very high so— couple of days have been very, very high so it _ couple of days have been very, very high. so it doesn't look as though we are _ high. so it doesn't look as though we are at— high. so it doesn't look as though we are at the peak of the current wave _ we are at the peak of the current wave of— we are at the peak of the current wave of infection. and that there is some _ wave of infection. and that there is some way— wave of infection. and that there is some way to go. nadhim zahawi in the sunday— some way to go. nadhim zahawi in the sunday times also says that we have tot sunday times also says that we have got a _ sunday times also says that we have got a very. _ sunday times also says that we have got a very, very bumpy couple of weeks _ got a very, very bumpy couple of weeks ahead of us as we open schools. — weeks ahead of us as we open schools, as a million students across — schools, as a million students across the _ schools, as a million students across the country to go back to university — across the country to go back to university. we could see infection rates _ university. we could see infection rates going up again. take university. we could see infection rates going up again.— university. we could see infection rates going up again. take us to the other story. — rates going up again. take us to the other story. one _ rates going up again. take us to the other story, one of— rates going up again. take us to the other story, one of the _ rates going up again. take us to the other story, one of the other - other story, one of the other stories on the front of the observer. djokovic is suggesting he had been recently infected. but he wasn't exactly behaving like somebody was infected? yes, so i think basically. — somebody was infected? yes, so i think basically, documents - somebody was infected? yes, so i think basically, documents have i somebody was infected? yes, so i. think basically, documents have been released that show the date on which novak djokovic claims to have got his positive covid—i9 test result, and that was through a medical exemption that meant he didn't need
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to prove his vaccination status to gain access to australia. now we knew the date, and people have found pictures of him out and about, we are told in the newspaper at indoor sporting venues without a mask on, and i suppose that is perhaps casting doubt on the suggestion that he may be to get his test result that day. we will have to wait and find out. obviously novak djokovic has been in this hotel in melbourne for two or three days now, but it is obviously an issue that has taken a lot of people's attention and it's really getting to the heart of the whole vaccine question. exactly how much should people have to prove that they have had it in order to gain access to certain things. and australia, because of the intensity of all of the restrictions there, thatis of all of the restrictions there, that is the very saw four people there, for people who are outside and watching it is a little bit less strange. because we think, we are not quite used to those very intense border restrictions. aha, not quite used to those very intense border restrictions.— border restrictions. a very striking photograph _ border restrictions. a very striking photograph on _
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border restrictions. a very striking photograph on the _ border restrictions. a very striking photograph on the front _ border restrictions. a very striking photograph on the front of - border restrictions. a very striking photograph on the front of the - photograph on the front of the independent on this story, a reminder that there are a lot who live in australia. many will have left. they were out in force. the story in the observer rather suggests that they may be backing the wrong horse, as it were. maybe he hasn't been as good a boy as they think? ~ , ., , he hasn't been as good a boy as they think? . , ., , , ~ think? well, it is a very striking imate on think? well, it is a very striking image on the — think? well, it is a very striking image on the front _ think? well, it is a very striking image on the front of _ think? well, it is a very striking image on the front of the - think? well, it is a very striking - image on the front of the observer. it is image on the front of the observer. it is a _ image on the front of the observer. it is a sort _ image on the front of the observer. it is a sort of— image on the front of the observer. it is a sort of flag with a picture of djokovic's face on it and his supporters are rallying around it. i think— supporters are rallying around it. i think his _ supporters are rallying around it. i think his supporters are also holding _ think his supporters are also holding demonstrations in belgrade as well _ holding demonstrations in belgrade as well i_ holding demonstrations in belgrade as well. i think it will all turn, it seems, _ as well. i think it will all turn, it seems, on this court case that is being _ it seems, on this court case that is being heard — it seems, on this court case that is being heard on monday in australia, where _ being heard on monday in australia, where djokovic has appealed against not being _ where djokovic has appealed against not being allowed to play. and i think— not being allowed to play. and i think if— not being allowed to play. and i think if he — not being allowed to play. and i think if he loses that, and there have _ think if he loses that, and there have been— think if he loses that, and there
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have been quite a few lawyers on the television _ have been quite a few lawyers on the television today suggesting that he probably will lose that, then he will he — probably will lose that, then he will be deported. and then i don't know— will be deported. and then i don't know what— will be deported. and then i don't know what lengths his supporters will then — know what lengths his supporters will then go to to continue the debate — will then go to to continue the debate. , , . ., will then go to to continue the debate. , . ., .,, debate. they might boycott the open, or whether they _ debate. they might boycott the open, or whether they might _ debate. they might boycott the open, or whether they might be _ or whether they might be demonstrating at the event. 0n the front of the telegraph, liz truss, i will use article 16. i guess this is going to come as a huge surprise in brussels, is it? the article says that the eu negotiator, vice president of the commission, is due to be hosted by liz truss on thursday. so this kind of free meeting tactics is probably not usually unexpected. understandably, top story for the telegraph. yeah. top story for the telegraph. yeah, it is a sabre _ top story for the telegraph. yeah, it is a sabre rattling _ top story for the telegraph. yeah, it is a sabre rattling by _ top story for the telegraph. yeah, it is a sabre rattling by liz - top story for the telegraph. yeah, it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. l it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. in it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. in her_ it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. in her first — it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. in herfirst big it is a sabre rattling by liz truss. in her first big role, taking over from _ in her first big role, taking over
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from lord — in her first big role, taking over from lord frost, heading up the post—brexit negotiations. she is talking — post—brexit negotiations. she is talking very tough. she says she would _ talking very tough. she says she would invoke article 16. you know, "if would invoke article 16. you know, "if we _ would invoke article 16. you know, "if we have — would invoke article 16. you know, "if we have to use article 16, i am willing _ "if we have to use article 16, i am willing to — "if we have to use article 16, i am willing to do _ "if we have to use article 16, i am willing to do that." but we have heard _ willing to do that." but we have heard this — willing to do that." but we have heard this tough talk before on both sides and _ heard this tough talk before on both sides and nobody has actually triggered it yet.— triggered it yet. even the commission _ triggered it yet. even the commission did - triggered it yet. even the commission did it - triggered it yet. even the commission did it and - triggered it yet. even the i commission did it and then triggered it yet. even the - commission did it and then back triggered it yet. even the _ commission did it and then back down in a matter of hours. there is no frost, but no sign of a thought yet? not yet, and i seem to remember in the autumn when people were talking about whether they would be a breakthrough in the northern ireland protocol, an issue that will go on and on and on. and i think is quite interestingly one of the reasons why the leadership challenges that boris johnson based are quietly going on in the background. because covid is still very much ongoing, the issue of brexit is still very much ongoing, and i'm not sure that very
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many conservative mps feel like they want to switch leader while these issues still remain unresolved. liz truss supported remain in the referendum and a sort of trying to convert herself as a new brexiteer. so she has obviously employed a very tough language commission is the members would like to hear, the telegraph to get that positive pr. ads, telegraph to get that positive pr. a couple of things to do before we go. green farm payments, according to the house of commons public accounts committee. risk big food price increases. the government's solution to getting rid of the old farm subsidies. to getting rid of the old farm subsidies-— to getting rid of the old farm subsidies. . , , ., , . subsidies. yeah, so this is a piece based on an _ subsidies. yeah, so this is a piece based on an article _ subsidies. yeah, so this is a piece based on an article by _ subsidies. yeah, so this is a piece based on an article by sir- subsidies. yeah, so this is a piece| based on an article by sir geoffrey clifton _ based on an article by sir geoffrey clifton brown, who is the committee's deputy chairman. he is writing _ committee's deputy chairman. he is writing in_ committee's deputy chairman. he is writing in the telegraph. he says we need to— writing in the telegraph. he says we need to be _ writing in the telegraph. he says we need to be really, really careful that we — need to be really, really careful that we don't become dependent on imported _ that we don't become dependent on imported food from abroad, because
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it will— imported food from abroad, because it will lead _ imported food from abroad, because it will lead to big increases in food — it will lead to big increases in food prices. and this comes, of course, — food prices. and this comes, of course, as— food prices. and this comes, of course, as britain is facing a looming _ course, as britain is facing a looming cost of living crisis anyway with rising — looming cost of living crisis anyway with rising energy prices. and it comes— with rising energy prices. and it comes as — with rising energy prices. and it comes as borisjohnson is preparing to hold _ comes as borisjohnson is preparing to hold talks with rishi sunak and the business secretary this week to discuss _ the business secretary this week to discuss options for helping families cope with _ discuss options for helping families cope with the sharp rise in the cost of energv_ cope with the sharp rise in the cost of energy from april.— of energy from april. sian, you are a lad in of energy from april. sian, you are a lady in red _ of energy from april. sian, you are a lady in red tonight. _ of energy from april. sian, you are a lady in red tonight. we _ of energy from april. sian, you are a lady in red tonight. we have - a lady in red tonight. we have another lady in red on the front of the telegraph and the express. they all love kate, don't they? the papers. kate middleton is 1t0. some of us remember 1t0. but she is really the darling of the papers now. just in the last 30 seconds, what do you put that down to?— put that down to? well, she is obviously _ put that down to? well, she is obviously seen _ put that down to? well, she is obviously seen as _
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put that down to? well, she is obviously seen as a _ put that down to? well, she is obviously seen as a very - put that down to? well, she is i obviously seen as a very helpful, successful wife to william. he is

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