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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 8, 2022 3:00pm-3:31pm GMT

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i'm jane hill. here are the latest headlines... tennis grand slam champion novak djokovic was given a vaccine exemption to enter australia because he had covid in december, according to court documents. flat owners in the uk won't have to pay to remove dangerous cladding from lower—height buildings under new government plans. the bbc understands the plans will be announced next week. at least 21 people have died in north—eastern pakistan after heavy snowfall trapped them in their vehicles. days after violent and deadly protests erupted in kazakhstan, the former domestic intelligence agency chief is detained on suspicion of high treason. and it's almost complete.
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these are the pictures live at nasa and in space. nasa will fully deploy it's primary mirror on the james webb telescope, marking the end to the most complex space telescope deployment yet. hello, good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. welcome to bbc news. novak djokovic has applied for leave to remain in australia on the grounds that he had covid last month. his lawyers said he was given a medical exemption from the country's vaccine rules by the organisers of the australian open. but he was refused entry by immigration officials when he landed in melbourne on wednesday. a court hearing will decide on monday whether he
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should be deported. but on the day that novak djokovic�*s legal team says he tested positive for covid, serbia's post office presented him with postage stamps in his honour — the men's world no one tweeted about it the day afterwards, on the 17th. it comes as renata veracova, a czech doubles player, left australia this morning after her visa was cancelled because of her covid—19 vaccination status. djokovic, who has said he's opposed to vaccination, had been granted a medical exemption to play in the tournament in a decision that infuriated many australians. our correspondent shaimaa khalil has the latest from melbourne. the world's top tennis player is spending the weekend in an immigration detention hotel. and his supporters have turned up for a third day. this is novak djokovic arriving
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in melbourne on wednesday. the documents his legal team presented to the court state he'd received the exemption from tennis australia, with a follow—up letter from the home affairs department saying he was allowed into the country. his legal team added that onjanuary 1st djokovic received a document from home affairs telling him his responses indicated he met the requirements for a quarantine—free arrival into australia. what is becoming clear is a breakdown in communication among those making the decisions and what the judge has to look at and examine is exactly which rules apply. is it state government rules or federal government rules? and until a decision is made about whether novak djokovic can remain in australia, the world number one is still stuck in this immigration detention hotel,
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and in the middle of a huge controversy. this particular set of incidents, the victorian government was not briefed on the matter. in terms of how people got into the country, that's a matter for the federal government. last night his mother offered some reassurance. novak, is i think... he said he is ok, but...|'m not so sure. but he is mentally very stable, and he is waiting. that's what he can do, waiting until monday morning to see what they are going to decide. the tennis tournament is only a few days away, and what's normally one of the biggest highlights here is turning into a political and a diplomatic embarrassment for australia. that was our correspondent. let's speak to catherine whitaker, co—host of the tennis podcast.
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hello, good afternoon. good afternoon- — hello, good afternoon. good afternoon. so _ hello, good afternoon. good afternoon. so we _ hello, good afternoon. good afternoon. so we are - hello, good afternoon. good afternoon. so we are now. hello, good afternoon. good. afternoon. so we are now told hello, good afternoon. good - afternoon. so we are now told that novak djokovic _ afternoon. so we are now told that novak djokovic had _ afternoon. so we are now told that novak djokovic had covid-19 - afternoon. so we are now told that novak djokovic had covid-19 in - novak djokovic had covid—19 in december that is why he got the exemption to play in the australian open. do you just take that at face value? open. do you “ust take that at face value? . , . , open. do you “ust take that at face value? . , ., , , ., value? that is a very good question, it is the question _ value? that is a very good question, it is the question and _ value? that is a very good question, it is the question and the _ value? that is a very good question, it is the question and the question . it is the question and the question at issue when his case goes to court on monday. in leaked documents from his legal team, it claims that he contracted covid—i9 on the 16th of december. his movements have been traced over the 16th and the 17th. he was doing public engagements on both of those days in serbia. it is also true, again from leaked documents, that it seems that the deadline for applying for the medical exemption would tennis australia in the victorian government was the 10th of december. wasn't a stroke of luck that he contracted covid—19 on the 16th of
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december and had a pathway to entered the tournament or did have another plan prior to contracting covid—19 on the 16th of december and did they delay that deadline from the 10th of december, put it back for him? there are a lot of questions for him begging to be answered. , . , , ., answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the — answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the first — answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the first that _ answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the first that we _ answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the first that we have - answered. yes, as i understand it, this is the first that we have had i this is the first that we have had that he actually has had the virus. yes, absolutely. 0nce that he actually has had the virus. yes, absolutely. once it became evident by his own very tone deaf social media posts that he was travelling to australia with that exemption which he —— as he put it, there was speculation what that medical exemption was founded on. every reason beyond having contracted covid in the past six months does not seem compatible with a top level athlete. we are talking
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about very serious medical condition. it seemed very probable that that was the reason this was the first sort of —— but this is the first sort of confirmation. this is... he first sort of confirmation. this is- -- he is _ first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such _ first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such a _ first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such a huge - first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such a huge star. first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such a huge star and first sort of confirmation. this is... he is such a huge starand he is... he is such a huge star and he will have big teams of people around him. is your sense that there will have been anyone in his circle saying, do you know what, let's think about the pr side of this as well as the rules and the restrictions. because this is australia, this is a country that has such tight restrictions. they have had so little freedom for the past two years. do you think there was no one in his camp saying we need to be really careful? whatever your views are about vaccines, we have to be careful how we handle this. �* ., , , ., this. another very good question. it is hard to believe _ this. another very good question. it is hard to believe that _ this. another very good question. it is hard to believe that there - this. another very good question. it is hard to believe that there is - this. another very good question. it is hard to believe that there is no i is hard to believe that there is no one saying that to him. but people at this kind of status, it is hard to overestimate how big and grand
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his status is in serbia. i think it is beyond any kind of celebrity that we have in the uk. it is hard to find a comparison to how big he is and how respected and admired he is in serbia. he exists in a bit of an code chamber, quite honestly. we have learned on the court over the past 15 years the qualities that make him great our defiance and refusal to see things any other way but his own. those attitudes have won him 21 grand slam titles, so i guess you can kind of understand the self affirming mental situation where he says why should i see it any other ways because i am one of the greatest tennis players of all time. those of the mental circumstances that got me into this position. it is a pr disaster and it is not his first one. yes, it is strange to think that somebody with his money and means and resources
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would not have better advised him. maybe he is not listening. i do would not have better advised him. maybe he is not listening.— maybe he is not listening. i do not know. maybe he is not listening. i do not know really _ maybe he is not listening. i do not know. really interesting. - maybe he is not listening. i do not know. really interesting. if- maybe he is not listening. i do not know. really interesting. if he - maybe he is not listening. i do not know. really interesting. if he is. know. really interesting. if he is granted what he wants on monday and if it transpires he does play in the australian open, i mean, we are second—guessing, but what on earth is the crowd reaction going to be, against that context of what the australian people have gone through. from what i can gather, i am not in australia yet. there is a certain level of sympathy for him. people can see that this has developed into a situation from which nobody is emerging well at all. not the australian government, not the federal authorities, and certainly not know that djokovic. there is more sympathy for him now than when he was announcing his medical
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exemption. that might have been the catalyst to this whole situation. if he had not made a public he had gotten this exemption to come to australia it might not have gotten this reaction and things may not have sparked into gear as they have. there is a certain amount of sympathy for the fact that he is being detained. i should say that detained is a strong word. he is choosing to stay in australia in order to appeal the deportation. it is his choice to remain there. it is not his choice to be in the accommodations, he is definitely unhappy about that. but it is his choice to remain there and appeal. i think there is a certain level of sympathy with that. but whether that counteracts the outrage from the fact that he tried to travel to australia at all and find a loophole in the stringent rules, i don't know. , ., ., , ., know. so interesting to hear your pempeetive- _ know. so interesting to hear your pempeetive- i—
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know. so interesting to hear your perspective. i was _ know. so interesting to hear your perspective. i was going - know. so interesting to hear your perspective. i was going to - know. so interesting to hear your perspective. i was going to say i perspective. i was going to say happy travels down under, but i am tempted to say, all of your paperwork is watertight. but actually, for the australians it is not a laughing matter. their immigration rules are strict at the best of times.— immigration rules are strict at the best of times. yes, i have checked all of my paperwork _ best of times. yes, i have checked all of my paperwork several - best of times. yes, i have checked all of my paperwork several times| all of my paperwork several times and i will still be very anxious when i get to the border. perhaps he will talk when _ when i get to the border. perhaps he will talk when you _ when i get to the border. perhaps he will talk when you make _ when i get to the border. perhaps he will talk when you make it _ when i get to the border. perhaps he will talk when you make it there. - will talk when you make it there. good to talk to you. that is catherine whitaker who is co—host of the tennis podcast. she is heading there for the tennis open which begins a week on monday. 0ur our other main story back here in the uk... up to half a million flat owners across the uk may no longer face the cost of replacing dangerous cladding on their properties, under new government proposals. the plans, due to be announced by the housing secretary michael gove next week, would instead see developers forced to pay. our business correspondent
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simon browning has the details. it's a building safety crisis. an estimated half a million people live in homes wrapped in flammable materials. added to that a missing fire breaks, defective insulation and flammable balconies. but who is to blame, and who should fix them? up to now the government's approach was for dangerous cladding removal to be paid for by the building safety fund. it was only for buildings more than 18.5 metres in height. everything else was to be covered by either developers paying, or via a loan scheme for leaseholders. it's meant blocks like this, austin apartments in the south—east london, were previous cut off from government support because it is below 18.5 metres. but on monday, michael gove, the levelling up secretary, is expected to say that will change and lower height buildings will get support. government will try to secure up to £4 billion from developers towards the cost. and if they don't pay for it voluntarily, it is understood the government will use the law to enforce it. flat owners this morning have
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cautiously welcomed the news. it does lift a layer of anxiety, but there is no absolute clarification in how developers are going to pay. but there is already concerned that house—builders won't pay when asked. well, they won't choose to pay. they will have to be dragged to the table to offer something up. i suspect it relies on showing will, whether it is by sampling the buildings, and showing that these buildings were not built to spec. the home builders federation said of the largest house—builders had already spent or committed £1 billion to remediate affected buildings, and that whilst house—builders were committed to playing their part, there were other organisations involved in the construction, which should also be involved in remediation costs. labour said the new measures appear far less significant than they sound. but making thousands of homes safe after the grenfell fire continues to be a huge financial challenge for the industry and government. simon browning, bbc news.
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at least 21 people have died in freezing temperatures in northeastern pakistan after their cars were trapped in heavy snow. the chief minister of punjab province has declared the mountain resort town of murree — where a thousand vehicles are still stranded — as a "disaster area" and has urged people to stay away. janey mitchell reports. a day trip to enjoy the spectacle of the first snowfall of the season turned to tragedy. tens of thousands, including families, flocked to the popular resort town after snow began falling on tuesday. many travelled from islamabad ill—equipped to deal with the blizzard conditions. the pakistani army has been brought in to help clear snow and rescue those trapped. and the hope is to begin air lifts when conditions allow. translation: helicopter service will soon be started,
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but the weather is not good right now. as soon as the weather gets bad there, god willing, we will start helicopter service to rescue any people stranded. many of the casualties died from hypothermia as temperatures fell to —8 celsius. others were reported to have been succeeded by exhaust fumes as they kept engines running to keep warm. —— they were reported to have been asphyxiated. vehicles were trapped as the narrow mountain roads became clogged with the sheer number of vehicles. others were blocked by fallen trees brought down by the weight of snow. local people are delivering blankets and food to those stranded. on friday, the government closed all roads leading to murree to stop any further influx. pakistan's prime minister has expressed his shocked and upset at the deaths. he suggested that the local administration was caught unprepared. he has ordered an inquiry to ensure such a tragedy does not happen again.
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the authorities in kazakhstan say they've arrested the former head of the domestic intelligence agency on suspicion of high treason. karim massimov was sacked from the national security committee by president tokayev on wednesday as violence that followed anti—government demonstrations escalated across the country. dozens of people have been killed in the protests. meanwhile, the us has questioned kazakhstan�*s decision to seek russian military aid to deal with an ongoing wave of violent unrest. we will have much more coming up for you in the next few minutes. right now we are going to pause and have a look at all the latest sport. were going to head over tojohn watson. the fa cup third round is well and truly under way, and a premier league side have been
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knocked out already burnley surrendered a 1—0 lead and were beaten by championship side huddersfield. matty pearson completed the turnaround for the terriers with a late winnerjust three minutes from full time. 2—1 it finished, so huddersfield into tomorrow's fourth round draw. premier league side crystal palace had a scare at championship club millwall. they had to come from behind to win 2—1 at the den. jean—philippe mateta heading home the winnerjust before the hour mark. it's the first time in three seasons that they've got past the third round. there was late drama at league two mansfield town... it was all square at 2—2 heading into injury time before mansfield's elliott hewitt turned the ball into his own net to gift championship side middlesbrough the victory. heartbreakfor them. here's a quick check on the matches that have already finished. a big shock with league two hartlepool coming from behnd to beat championship side blackpool. elsewhere wins for coventry and fulham. every goal across the weekend is available on the bbc sport app
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and bbc sport website. there are 21 ties being played across the day. there are 21 ties being played across the day. now to the cricket... england will need to bat out the final day in the fourth ashes test in sydney if they're to avoid slipping to a fourth straight defeat in the series. jonny bairstow could only add ten more runs to his impressive total before australian batsmen usman khawaja hit another century, helping to set england an unlikely target of 388 for victory. patrick gearey reports. 0nce ashes series are lost, the remaining tests are those of character. yesterday, jonny bairstow fought back. 0h, he's edged it. this morning he was caught behind. 113 runs scored, he had earned this exit. england were all out, trailing by 122, so now their troubled huddle had to slow australia down. mark wood could. he removed david warner
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and manus labuschagne, while jack leach finally found himself and some wickets, too. including steve smith, who almost counts double. but there was a bigger picture, and at the centre of the frame was usman khawaja. recalled to the team and stylishly torturing england's voters, he made a century in the first innings and made one even quicker in the second. for khawaja, for his family and his country, exhilarating. for england, exhausting. australia had declared 387 runs ahead, sending england's openers to the crease under darkening skies, trusting that they would provide their own punchline again. it never quite came. they weathered that storm, and with rain in the forecast will hope tomorrow they can be rescued by another. patrick gearey, bbc news. yes, there is a little bit of
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optimism for england for the first time in this series and i hope they can potentially avoid that whitewash. at the close of play, england's caretaker coach graham thorpe admits england are suffering with a number of injuries — but will fight on to try and salvage a draw on the final day. we've obviously got some blows to some fingers, but i'm sure the lads will take whatever they need to take to get themselves into a position where they are capable of performing tomorrow. so, they'll all bat and they will do their very best. i know that. yes, big final day to come. gloucester—hartpury have increased the pressure on the top four in the women's premier 15s with a bonus point win over leaders bristol. ellie underwood crashed over with her second try of the match to seal a 14—36 victory. gloucester are now up to fifth in the table. that's all the sport for now.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. you can follow all the very latest. i will have more for you a little bit later on. back to you, jane. we will take a look at a few stories and brief this afternoon. the family of a woman who has been missing since new year's day have said they are "shocked and distressed" by her disappearance. 28—year—old alice byrne was last seen leaving a friend's flat in marlborough street in the portobello area of edinburgh, between 8 o'clock and 10 o'clock last saturday morning. detectives believe she potentially headed in the direction of the promenade and beach. the family have urged anyone who has seen ms byrne or who has any information to come forward. two teenagers have been charged with manslaughter and arson after an 88—year—old woman was killed in a fire in east london. metropolitan police officers were called to reports of a fire
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at a residential address in late october, beforejosephine smith was pronounced dead at the scene. a firework was recovered from the scene. 18—year—old kai cooper from leatherhead, surrey, and a 15—year—old boy from southend, essex, will appear at thames magistrates' court later today. allegations of another party at downing street are to be included in the official investigation into events held at number ten during the pandemic. it comes after borisjohnson�*s former chief adviser, dominic cummings claimed a senior official invited people to "socially distanced drinks" in the garden, while restrictions were in place in may 2020. loud net —— now let's turn to space. nasa scientists will today begin the task of unfolding the second and final mirrored wing of the james webb space telescope.
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when complete, the telescope, which was sent in to orbit last month, will be able to look further into the cosmos than ever before. we have a couple of people to talk to about this. we have a couple of people to talk to about this. i'm joined now by our science correspondentjonathan amos. i know he will be able to explain far better than me exactly what is happening today. hi there, jonathan. how are you doing? yes, the james webb space telescope, the successor to hubble that was launched 30 years ago, hubble reaching its end of the lifetime, so we need a new big telescope in space, one that can do next—generation observations. it was launched two weeks ago on christmas day, but it is so big, they had to fold it up to get it into the rocket and into space. they have spent the past two weekss unfolding it, which is an extraordinary exercise in itself. many things could have gone wrong. many people worried that it would not unfold properly and we
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have arrived today at the very last deployment which is this giant six and a half metres across mirror. 0ne and a half metres across mirror. one side came out yesterday, they are opening the other side now. i can tell you that the last latch has been released and it will drive the motors very shortly and they will put it into position and they will then have to latch it down in the new position. then we have got a new telescope in space. we have a remarkable facility to look at the earliest stars and galaxies in the universe. to look at new planets that we are finding around other stars to look for the possibility that there is life on those planets. it has been quite a ride and we have got a way to go, but quite remarkable.— got a way to go, but quite remarkable. , ., , got a way to go, but quite remarkable. , ._ , ., remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing _ remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing it _ remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing it and _ remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing it and we _ remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing it and we are - remarkable. yes, even the way you are describing it and we are seeing| are describing it and we are seeing some pictures, the idea they had to create something that you fold up. we have been looking at images coming through from nasa and to
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explain as i understand it, there is no camera onboard the telescope. but the pictures that nasa is sending us, the specific image now is a real—time animation. am i getting that correct? real-time animation. am i getting that correct?— that correct? that is right. it is alwa s that correct? that is right. it is always nice _ that correct? that is right. it is always nice to _ that correct? that is right. it is always nice to have _ that correct? that is right. it is always nice to have something| always nice to have something visual, so they take the information sent from james webb they get a record of that and they use that information to drive this animation. it is kind of like being up there, but not really. why are there no cameras on board? well there is an great big shield on it. if you have got a big shield, you are going to create a massive great shadow, so i'm afraid even if we had cameras,
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we would not be able to see anything anyway because it would be in the dark. we have to rely on clever sensors. , , . ., ~ sensors. very, very clever. thank ou. let's speak to dr renske smit, ernest rutherford fellow at liverpool john moores university. a very good afternoon to you. how exciting is this? is it exciting or nerve—racking? it exciting is this? is it exciting or nerve-racking?— exciting is this? is it exciting or nerve-racking? it is now exciting. there has been _ nerve-racking? it is now exciting. there has been so _ nerve-racking? it is now exciting. there has been so much - nerve-racking? it is now exciting. i there has been so much nail-biting there has been so much nail—biting in the last few weeks, but i am so full of confidence that we will have a full telescope and it is exciting. assuming it all goes to plan, what happens next? how quickly can we start to learn things, to get data from this? what happens after that? there will be a few more weeks of cooling down. the son shields have been deployed very successfully and now that the scope is cooling down,
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once the first camera is on we will start to calibrate the mirrors. it we will see every star 18 times. it all needs to be aligned in order to get a perfect image and that will take a few more months. about six months from now we will have actual science data. i months from now we will have actual science data-— science data. i am speaking in lehman's _ science data. i am speaking in lehman's language. _ science data. i am speaking in lehman's language. you - science data. i am speaking in lehman's language. you are l science data. i am speaking in l lehman's language. you are the expert here. definitely not me, but this is about telling us as humanity things that we just did not know before about how the universe began? is it that massive, that fundamental?- is it that massive, that fundamental? , . , fundamental? yes, that is exactly the question _ fundamental? yes, that is exactly the question i _ fundamental? yes, that is exactly the question i am _ fundamental? yes, that is exactly the question i am most _ fundamental? yes, that is exactly the question i am most excited i the question i am most excited about. to look further back in time then we have ever been able to do, then we have ever been able to do, the time of the first stars and the first galaxies. it's about how did everything we have in the universe today how did it first come to be? wow. that slightly blows my mind. it
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starts sending data back after that cooling off period that you mention. presumably that is a very, very long job involving very many people, big team to analyse all of that and draw it altogether? filth. team to analyse all of that and draw it altogether?— it altogether? oh, yes, there is a whole team _ it altogether? oh, yes, there is a whole team for— it altogether? oh, yes, there is a whole team for each _ it altogether? oh, yes, there is a whole team for each instrument. | it altogether? oh, yes, there is a - whole team for each instrument. they will look at the data, calibrate everything. it is really months of work still. i everything. it is really months of work still. , , �* ., work still. i suppose i'm asking about collaboration _ work still. i suppose i'm asking about collaboration and - work still. i suppose i'm asking - about collaboration and cooperation. is this people from all over the world? different elements of your discipline? talk to us about the makeup and who is ultimately gathering all this information and who gives it to members of the public like me who understand very little of these things? for public like me who understand very little of these things?— little of these things? for the next two months _ little of these things? for the next two months it _ little of these things? for the next two months it will— little of these things? for the next two months it will be _ little of these things? for the next two months it will be largely - two months it will be largely operations in baltimore. where the
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telescope is operated. after that, there is a lot of international collaboration with people all over the world who are so excited to start to work on this science, including my team. i started start to work on this science, including my team. istarted in start to work on this science, including my team. i started in 2017 with a worldwide team preparing for the science images were going to get. the science images were going to tet. ., the science images were going to tet_ ., ., the science images were going to tet. ., ., ., ,, ., ., get. how long did it take to get to the oint get. how long did it take to get to the point today? _ get. how long did it take to get to the point today? the _ get. how long did it take to get to the point today? the telescope i get. how long did it take to get to l the point today? the telescope has been 20 years _ the point today? the telescope has been 20 years in — the point today? the telescope has been 20 years in the _ the point today? the telescope has been 20 years in the making. - the point today? the telescope has been 20 years in the making. i've l been 20 years in the making. i've personally been preparing for the last five years, but honestly i've been looking forward to this my entire career. this has always been the point we have been working towards. the hubble telescope was a wonderful instrument but could only do so much for us. so this new telescope has always been the promise that we have worked towards. wow. really fascinating to talk to you. let's hope we talk again when that data starts coming through. thank you so much. i have to bring
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you back down to earth, i'm afraid. let's take a look at the weather. hello there. the afternoon will slowly brighten from the west as the heavy, persistent rain that we have had this morning gradually starts to move off into the north sea. the exception, perhaps, through east anglia and southeast england where it will linger for much of the afternoon. but you can see the brightness developing. some frequent showers as well. some of these will be quite hefty across western scotland and northern ireland. temperatures through the afternoon will probably hover generally between 6 and 9 degrees. as the rain eases away, and skies continue to clear through the night, the temperatures will fall away and with some showers continuing in the far northwest, some of these will turn increasingly wintry once more. it does mean that there is a risk of some ice first thing on untreated surfaces. maybe a little bit of light, patchy frost, it but it also means we will start off sunday with certainly more sparkling sunshine around. the rash of showers moving out
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of scotland across the pennines as we go through the afternoon.

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