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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 8, 2022 11:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia because he had covid in december, according to court documents. explosions ring. days after violent and deadly protests erupted in kazakhstan, the former domestic intelligence agency chief is detained on suspicion of high treason. it comes as the us questions kazakhstan�*s decision to bring in russian troops to quell the violent unrest. one lesson of recent history is that once russians are in your house, it is sometimes very difficult to get them to leave. flat owners in the uk won't have to pay to remove dangerous cladding from lower height buildings under new government plans, the bbc understands.
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three white men who murdered ahmaud arbery in the us state of georgia are given life sentences — his family say they never lost faith in justice. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. lawyers acting for tennis star novak djokovic have released documents that say he had a vaccine exemption to enter australia, due to a recent covid infection. in the early hours of thursday morning djokovic was denied entry to australia after landing in melbourne this week to play in the australian open. he is currently in an immigration detention with a court challenge due on monday. but documents released by his legal team today claim
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that his first positive pcr test was recorded on 16th december. djokovic, who has said he is opposed to vaccination, had been granted a medical exemption to play in the tournament in a decision that infuriated many australians. our correspondent, shaimaa khalil, has the latest from melbourne, outside the hotel where djokovic is being held. the whole djokovic saga hinges on why was he given an exemption and if this is a valid exemption, why has he been told he could come all the way over here to australia, only to then be told he is not welcome and he has to be deported? this is essentially what his legal team are challenging and this is what the judge has to look at. from these legal documents, we understand that novak djokovic had tested positive for covid—19 on december 16th, so about a month ago, less than a month ago, and a recent covid—19 infection within the last six months is a valid reason for an exemption,
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according to australia's technical advisory on immunisation. these are the rules that tennis australia and the victorian government have abided by and have followed, and remember, the exemption was given by two medical panels, two independent medical panels who said that this was a valid reason. but when he showed up on wednesday he was told by the border authorities that he did not provide appropriate evidence and that a recent infection, in fact, is not a valid reason, so there is a clear contradiction in the information here and this again is what the court has to look at. why have the players been told something and why are the border authorities then going by different rules? which rules apply to who and when? and this is really then when... where the complications and the controversy have taken place and caught in the middle, of course, are those tennis players and officials and the world number one, who is still in that hotel,
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despite asking to be moved to a different facility with a tennis area, where he can practice because essentially this is why he is here. he is here to defend his title at the australian open. and this is what is going to happen on monday, essentially what the judge is going to look at, but whatever the outcome is this has been quite controversial. it has provoked a great deal of anger and essentially has been embarrassing for australia. well, absolutely, shaimaa, because some have said that actually the australian authorities�* response has been driven by the public outcry. that is right. this is, again, one thing that we have seen in those documents, that novak djokovic had been granted that exception by been granted that exemption by tennis australia, by the victorian government,
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state government, only for the federal government to revoke that because of the public outcry, referring there to the political handling of this whole situation. remember, scott morrison's government has been under a lot of political pressure because of the way that they handled covid—19, especially the omicron wave. many australians have been quite angry at the chaos at testing clinics, its skyrocketing numbers. it is an election year and observers have said the scott morrison government is using this, essentially to appear tough on borders and to say that rules apply equally to everyone, but the key question here is what rules? if the players have been told to follow a set of rules and they have — by tennis australia — and then the federal government have contradicted that, who should have given them that information and when? shaimaa khalilfrom melbourne there. let's speak to guy delauney, who's in the serbian capital, belgrade. thank you so much forjoining us. first of all, love him or loathe
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him, there is no doubt that novak djokovic inspires strong feelings from tennis fans. what has the reaction been like in his home nation of serbia?— reaction been like in his home nation of serbia? while, they very much love him _ nation of serbia? while, they very much love him here, _ nation of serbia? while, they very much love him here, as— nation of serbia? while, they very much love him here, as you - nation of serbia? while, they very much love him here, as you can i much love him here, as you can imagine, so we were out on friday afternoon, christmas day here in serbia and people instead of spending christmas afternoon walking the dog hundreds of them turned up in front of the national assembly in belgrade tojoin the in front of the national assembly in belgrade to join the djokovic family and showing their support for novak djokovic. and they were tying neon yellow tennis balls around a sign which says, know that, you are our heart, and instead of yellow ribbons heart, and instead of yellow ribbons he got yellow tennis balls instead. and then they would the papers of course are full of this idea that novak djokovic might be able to prove that he had covid at a particular time, which should have given him an exemption in terms of entering australia. and they have pictures of a basketball match she attended in belgrade on the 14th of december hugging a player from
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barcelona who later tested positive for coronavirus, saying, look, this is the moment when djokovic might have contracted coronavirus, so there is a lot of hope and optimistic messaging going on, slightly less outrage and slightly more hope, perhaps, that their champion is going to get out of the quarantine hotel and onto the kind of court he prefers. he quarantine hotel and onto the kind of court he prefers.— of court he prefers. he has said in the ast of court he prefers. he has said in the past that _ of court he prefers. he has said in the past that he _ of court he prefers. he has said in the past that he is _ of court he prefers. he has said in the past that he is opposed - of court he prefers. he has said in the past that he is opposed to - the past that he is opposed to vaccination. how that elicited much sympathy among serbian? weill. vaccination. how that elicited much sympathy among serbian?- vaccination. how that elicited much sympathy among serbian? well, a lot of serbians are _ sympathy among serbian? well, a lot of serbians are not _ sympathy among serbian? well, a lot of serbians are not vaccinated - of serbians are not vaccinated either. if you look at the vaccination rate for serbia, at the moment it is hovering just below the 50% mark. and sure, there are some people who have been vaccinated you are quite irritated with no job djokovic, some people saying, look, he is giving entirely the wrong message and it is not great also for the government, which is trying to persuade people to get vaccinated, but also they have been putting their support behind novak djokovic. what would be the icing on the cake
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for them would be if novak djokovic got himself out of this situation and got himself vaccinated. gut; and got himself vaccinated. guy delauney, _ and got himself vaccinated. guy delauney, thank _ and got himself vaccinated. guy delauney, thank you. the independent panel of experts that advises the government on vaccines says that a second covid booster — or fourth shot — is not needed for the time being. new data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after a boosterjab, protection against severe illness remains high in older adults. simonjones reports. the booster campaign is delivering results. do you have any allergies to anything that you're aware of? and you are fit and well today? that's according to thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which says there is no immediate need for a second booster dose for care home residents and the over—80s. the first dose is very, very important and gives so much protection that at this point in time, so right now, at the start of the new year, we don't need to rush into giving anybody a second booster dose right now.
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we might need to do so later on in the year, but not at this point in time. more than 35 million boosters and doses have now been administered across the uk. data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after receiving a third jab, protection against hospitalisation remains at about 90% for people aged 65 and over. protection against mild symptomatic infection is more short—lived. that drops to around 30% by about three months. some countries, such as israel, have already started offering fourth jabs, but in the uk, the priority remains getting first, second and third doses to those who have not yet had them. that will be kept under review. one thing that's changing is travel. fully vaccinated people arriving in the uk from abroad no longer need to take pre—departure tests. from tomorrow, post—arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateral flow tests. that's why today is being dubbed
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sunshine saturday, with travel agents predicting a big uptick in bookings from people who want to get away from it all. simon jones, bbc news. up to 500,000 flat owners across the uk will no longer be liable for the cost of replacing dangerous cladding on their properties, under new government proposals. the plans, set to be announced by the housing secretary, michael gove, would instead see developers forced to pay up to an additional £4 billion to help resolve the crisis, which has left many unable to sell their homes. newsnight�*s lewis goodall has more. it's estimated that more than half a million people are caught up in britain's fire safety crisis. and we can exclusively reveal the government's latest plans to deal with it. up until now, the government's approach breaks down as follows. dangerous cladding removal would be paid for by the building safety fund only for buildings over 18.5 metres in height. everything else would be covered either by
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developers paying or by a loan scheme for leaseholders. but we understand that michael gove, the levelling up secretary, will make the commitment on monday that up to £4 billion of extra funding will be available to remove dangerous cladding in buildings between 11 and 18.5 metres, and that leaseholders won't have to pay anything towards that cost — a significant shift. but gove will also make clear that money will come from developers, not from the taxpayer, and if developers won't pay voluntarily, he will threaten the force of law to make sure that they comply. but this change will cover cladding only, not the host of other building safety issues found in thousands of buildings since grenfell and experts wonder how mr gove will be able to extract the money. well, they won't choose to pay. they'll have to be dragged to the table to offer something up. and i suspect it relies on showing, whether it's by sampling the buildings and showing that these buildings weren't built to spec, because fire breaks and compartmentation have always been required by regulations —
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if they're not there, that's a product of conscious choice, or it's a product of negligence, for which the developer is responsible. so michael gove needs a big stick to beat them with, along those sorts of lines, that no, this is quite clearly evidence that this is your choices and your responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up secretary is unsuccessful, leaked documents from the treasury seen by newsnight show that if the government can't raise the money from developers, then it'll have to come from existing housing budgets. hardly ideal at a time of a wider housing shortage. the authorities in kazakhstan say they've arrested the former head of the domestic intelligence agency on suspicion of high treason. karim massimov was sacked from the national security committee by president tokayev on wednesday as violent anti—government demonstrations escalated across the country. dozens of people have been killed in the protests. meanwhile, the us has questioned kazakhstan�*s decision to seek
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russian military aid to deal with an ongoing wave of violent unrest. the first of about 2,500 russian—led troops have arrived there, though moscow says the deployment is temporary. russell trott has the latest. more troops and equipment on its way to kazakhstan. the intervention marks the first deployment by the eurasian military alliance of five former soviet republics and russia. after days of violence in which more than 20 protesters and also many security personnel have died, kazakhstan�*s government is seeking to regain control of the covenant. to regain control of the country. the us has this warning for the regime of its reliance on moscow. one lesson from recent history is that once russians are in your house it is sometimes difficult to get them to leave. in a televised broadcast
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to the nation, kazakhstan�*s president, kassym—jomart tokayev, said he had given orders to his security forces to shoot to kill without warning, describing the street the restrictions as coordinated attacks by foreign fled agents. events in kazakhstan are being closely watched by opposition groups and other former soviet republics, including relatives, and it's exiled opposition leader. it is shameful that... should not help other dictators to stay in power. russia says its deployment of troops is temporary. china has expressed support for what it calls strong measures taken to restore stability in kazakhstan, where it has significant investments. the us has advised some of its consular staff to leave, describing the country as in a state of emergency.
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russell trott, bbc news. nasa scientists will today begin the task of unfolding the second and final mirrored wing of the james webb space telescope. when complete, the telescope, which was sent in to orbit last month, will be able to look further into the cosmos than ever before. joining me now is dr emma curtis—lake, an astronomer from the who will be using the telescope to look for stars. thank you forjoining us. first of all, i think anything to do with spaceis all, i think anything to do with space is exciting, but tell us what is particularly exciting about this? oh, james webb is an amazing observatory and we are going to be able to look further back in time than hobble, we are going to be able to search back to the very first stars and galaxies to form in the early universe.— stars and galaxies to form in the early universe. stars and galaxies to form in the earl universe. ~ ., , ., ., early universe. well, to misquote an advert, early universe. well, to misquote an advert. you — early universe. well, to misquote an advert. you know. — early universe. well, to misquote an advert, you know, this _ early universe. well, to misquote an advert, you know, this telescope - early universe. well, to misquote an j advert, you know, this telescope can reach parts of the universe that others can't. how exactly, in layman
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terms, bearing in mind not everyone will have your specialist knowledge, in basic terms, how will it do that? well, it looks at the light in a different way to hobble, it looks at actually longer wavelength, at heat wave length objects in the early universe, they are actually moving away from us really quickly because the universe is expanding and when that happens the light gets shifted and it gets shifted out of what's hubble can see and the range our eyes could see, but into the range that james eyes could see, but into the range thatjames webb can see. so if it is really far away and moving away from us quickly, james webb will be able to see it when hubble couldn't. haw. to see it when hubble couldn't. now, this has been — to see it when hubble couldn't. now, this has been a _ to see it when hubble couldn't. now, this has been a long _ to see it when hubble couldn't. now, this has been a long time _ to see it when hubble couldn't. now, this has been a long time coming, and hasn't been an easy task. how much work has gone into this? filth. much work has gone into this? oh, well, much work has gone into this? oh, well. years — much work has gone into this? oh, well. years and _ much work has gone into this? (in well, years and years much work has gone into this? (31, well, years and years of much work has gone into this? 01, well, years and years of work. from my part, we have been planning what we are going to look at with james webb for the last five years but i
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have been contributing to. on the engineering side it has been decades in development and building. and engineering side it has been decades in development and building. find in in development and building. and in terms of- -- — in development and building. and in terms of... because _ in development and building. and in terms of... because obviously, - in development and building. and in terms of... because obviously, as l terms of... because obviously, as you say, it has been a while in the development. how much has it sort of setback and ability to discover what is out there in waiting for this to be developed?— is out there in waiting for this to be develo ed? , ., ,._ ., be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers — be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers who _ be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers who want _ be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers who want to _ be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers who want to look - be developed? yes, i would say that astronomers who want to look at - be developed? yes, i would say that| astronomers who want to look at the early universe, we have been stalled a little bit in what we can do. so the last major update that we had was when they upgraded the hubble backin was when they upgraded the hubble back in 2009 and that gave us a great boost, but then we have kind of been waiting around forjames webb ever since. bud of been waiting around forjames webb ever since.— of been waiting around forjames webb ever since. and what are you likel to webb ever since. and what are you likely to be — webb ever since. and what are you likely to be able _ webb ever since. and what are you likely to be able to... _ webb ever since. and what are you likely to be able to... you - webb ever since. and what are you likely to be able to... you sort - webb ever since. and what are you likely to be able to... you sort of l likely to be able to... you sort of touched on it earlier, what are you hoping you will be able to discover and find out, as a result of having this new telescope available? we are auoin to be this new telescope available? we are going to be able _ this new telescope available? we are going to be able to _ this new telescope available? we are going to be able to search _ this new telescope available? we are going to be able to search for - this new telescope available? we are going to be able to search for those i going to be able to search for those first galaxies in the universe,
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which is incredibly exciting, but for me in particular i am excited about looking for what hubble has missed and building up a story of how galaxies were forming from those very first stars and galaxies all the way through to half the present age of the universe. bud the way through to half the present age of the universe.— the way through to half the present age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being _ age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being able _ age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being able to _ age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being able to do _ age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being able to do that? - age of the universe. and how crucial is this in being able to do that? in i is this in being able to do that? in that... is this something that without it, we simply would not be able to reach parts of our cosmos? yes, exactly. there is no other planned observatory that is going to be able to see as far back in time as webb. �* , ., , ., ., as webb. and 'ust finally, one final thou~ht as webb. and 'ust finally, one final thought from — as webb. and just finally, one final thought from you, _ as webb. and just finally, one final thought from you, then, _ as webb. and just finally, one final thought from you, then, dr - as webb. and just finally, one final thought from you, then, dr emma | thought from you, then, dr emma curtis—lake, what do you hope? if you had an astronomer�*s wish list, what would you like to discover as a result of this? i what would you like to discover as a result of this?— result of this? i would love to see that the things _ result of this? i would love to see that the things we _ result of this? i would love to see that the things we are _ result of this? i would love to see that the things we are seeing - result of this? i would love to see| that the things we are seeing with hubble was only a small part of the picture and that we had so much more to find because that means we can ask so many questions we didn't even know were possible. filth.
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ask so many questions we didn't even know were possible.— know were possible. oh, well, thank ou,. you know were possible. oh, well, thank you.- you can _ know were possible. oh, well, thank you,. you can sense _ know were possible. oh, well, thank you,. you can sense the _ know were possible. oh, well, thank you,. you can sense the excitementl you,. you can sense the excitement in your voice, so thank you for sharing that with us. is dr emma curtis—lake. in the uk allegations of another party at downing street are set to be included in the official investigation into events held at number ten during the pandemic. it comes after borisjohnson's former chief adviser, dominic cummings, claimed a senior official invited people to "socially distanced drinks" in the garden, while restrictions were in place in may 2020. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has been following the story. dominic cummings has made one of his semi—regular contributions, publishing his blog, with a couple of key points about this ongoing investigation into social events that may or may not have happened, that may or may not have breached lockdown rules in place during 2020. specifically around an event which he claims invitations were sent out
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for on may 20th 2020, described as a socially distanced drinks, as you say, from a senior number ten official. he claims that he warned at the time that should not happen because they would be against the rules. but was subsequently told that it did go ahead. he has invited the official in charge of investigating these events to dig up the e—mail that he sent at the time. he also referred to the picture which is now widely available online, published by the guardian newspaper last month, showing people including himself and the prime minister on a terrace at 10 downing street having cheese and wine, on may 15th. he has added his voice to the defence of what was happening there, which the pm has said all along was a work setting, a work context, a meeting of the aftermath of a meeting that happened outside.
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a couple of interesting interventions there. we do not have a timeframe for this enquiry to wrap up but i would expect that quite soon. are a political correspondent, jonathan blake. three white men are beginning life sentences in the us state of georgia for murdering a blackjogger who ran through their neighbourhood. 25—year—old ahmaud arbery was chased in pick—up trucks and shot, in a case that became a focus of protests by the black lives matter movement. david willis reports. this man's death has been likened to a modern day lynching, three men hunted down and killing him in cold blood. footage of this incident led to nationwide protests after it emerged that despite being interviewed at the scene know the men involved had been arrested after local officials accept their plea of self—defence and deemed the killing of ahmaud arberyjustified. i can of ahmaud arbery 'ustified. i can only imagine... _ of ahmaud arbery 'ustified. i can
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only imagine... a _ of ahmaud arberyjustified. i can only imagine... a former- of ahmaud arberyjustified. i can only imagine... a former police i only imagine... a former police officer gregory _ only imagine... a former police officer gregory mcmichael, - only imagine... a former police officer gregory mcmichael, his | officer gregory mcmichael, his 33—year—old son, travis, and the man who filmed ahmaud arbery�*s death, william roddy brian, were eventually arrested and brought to trial and were eventually found guilty of murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment. murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment-— imprisonment. they chose to target m son imprisonment. they chose to target my son because _ imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they _ imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they did _ imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they did not - imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they did not want l imprisonment. they chose to target i my son because they did not want him in their community. these men deserve the maximum sentence. for their crimes. deserve the maximum sentence. for their crimes-— their crimes. what i'm going to do is i'm their crimes. what i'm going to do is im going _ their crimes. what i'm going to do is im going to _ their crimes. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit _ their crimes. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently - their crimes. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently for - their crimes. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently for one | is i'm going to sit silently for one minute — is i'm going to sit silently for one minute to — is i'm going to sit silently for one minute. ., , _, ., minute. to set in context the terror that he said — minute. to set in context the terror that he said ahmaud _ minute. to set in context the terror that he said ahmaud arbery - minute. to set in context the terror| that he said ahmaud arbery must've suffered as he was chased through a residential neighbourhood for more than five minutes, thejudge ordered a moment's silence. before sentencing all three men to life in prison. sentencing all three men to life in rison. ., ., sentencing all three men to life in prison-_ only - sentencing all three men to life in prison._ only william | prison. count one... only william roddy itrian _ prison. count one... only william roddy brian will _ prison. count one... only william roddy brian will be _ prison. count one... only william roddy brian will be eligible - prison. count one... only william roddy brian will be eligible for i roddy brian will be eligible for parole, but not until he has 82 years of age. ahmaud arbery�*s death
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paved the way to a period of national reckoning over the state of racial injustice in this country, one which culminated in nationwide protests over the death of george floyd. though these men received the maximum sentence, civil rights campaigners believe it will take more than that to influence attitudes and in many cases, going back generations. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. returning to the uk now... "shocking", "disgusting" and "a horror show". just some of the words being used to describe conditions in some of the flats in a privately owned block in portsmouth — where residents are suffering severe issues with damp and mould. the city council is now investigating what it can do to get action taken by the private owners. steve humphrey reports. so, it's pretty bad. it's been steadily growing this bad over the years, and it leaks, because it's leaking from here, behind the wall, and it soaks right through,
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that's why there's water damage all over this place. the mould in ian knights's flat has been getting worse and worse since he moved in 13 years ago. yeah, it's disgusting. you can't stay in there for more than ten minutes at a time. so, i try to be in and out as quickly as possible. ian, who is disabled, says up to now he is not been able says up to now he has not been able to get any help to sort out the mould. i haven't been able to contact my landlords for years. none of their numbers work. nobody knows how to get hold of them. ian is not alone. other residents in the 37 flats at windsor house are also having problems with mould and damp. the ceiling's had some issues with leaking for the last 9—10 months, and even though the ceiling has been replaced, it still continues to drip. there are people wiping down the walls, within a day, the black mould is back. nobody seems to be doing anything. this is why it has come to the stage now where we've got together as a collective, and we need help to get this sorted. they are also angry at the conditions of the communal areas. a broken front door lock means
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that the corridors have been used by drug addicts and rough sleepers. there's needles, there is rubbish, there's fly—tipping, you know? it's really quite bad. leah says the owner of her flats has tried to help. flat has tried to help. because of a freehold issue, they are unable to access the bits that they need to be able to get to to fix the underlying issues. this is a horror show. this is horrible. it's horrific. and as a result of photographs like that, footage like that, that i asked the council to investigate, there to investigate. there are various things we can do. one of the powers, for instance, is actually to do some repairs ourselves and recover the costs from the landlord. part of the problem with that, as the tenants have said, is who the landlord is, and it's a complex management structure, i understand, that owns this block. we are going to get to the bottom of it, because the tenants deserve it. i just want help. we just all of us want help. we want it rectified.
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that's the main thing, we do want it rectified, we want our flats to be livable. already today, city council officials have been to windsor house. ian knight's flat was amongst those that have been inspected. steve humphrey, bbc news, portsmouth. attempts have been made to get in touch with the owner of the building, but we've yet to hear back from them. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. it certainly wasn't the prettiest of starts to the weekend for many, with some very wet and windy weather around. big area of low pressure in the north atlantic has been driving things. that's pushing towards iceland, but it's throwing these weather fronts across us. notice, though, on this cold front, we will see some of the heaviest rain behind it, some cooler air pushes back in, but also some brighter weather, so the north and west, in particular, will see a little bit more sunshine developed through the afternoon, whereas to the south and east we've got the rain turning
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even heavierfor a time. in fact, there could be some lively gusts of wind, with the heaviest of the rain still pushing through parts of the midlands and southern england as we go through the afternoon, but towards the south—west, wales, northern england, should see sunshine develop, and sunny spells and a few showers across scotland and northern ireland through the rest of today. those showers turning increasingly wintry. it will be a gusty day, and the winds could make you feel cool once again across the north and the west, even though the sunshine comes out, temperatures actually drop through the afternoon to 3—5 degrees, just about holding to around 8—10 celsius, east anglia and the south—east cornerfor a time. but as that rain clears this evening, temperatures will drop once again. with the clearer skies across eastern areas, in particular, chance of frost. wintry showers out there in the west, the most frequent across parts of western scotland, and that could lead to some icy conditions, with temperatures at or above, only just above freezing, as we start tomorrow morning. but at least for sunday morning, if you've got cloud and rain today, eastern areas, in particular, much, much brighter day to come. east anglia and the south—east,
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especially, but we will see plenty of showers across central and southern scotland through the morning, northern ireland, too. they will transfer into northern england, north midlands and north wales for the second half of the day, and a weather front pushing towards the south—west will bring cloud, patchy rain, but for a fair few of you many will stay dry and sunny. as we go through into monday, high pressure starting to build up from iberia, but still some weather fronts on the chart here another weather system, but nowhere near as active as the one we have got today. we will bring some heavier rain to the north of scotland. elsewhere, patchy rain or drizzle, extensive low cloud in the west, some hazy sunshine in eastern areas after a bit of a chilly start, but many to the south and east will stay largely dry, just a few spots of light rain possible. the biggest thing, i think, to notice, other temperature to notice, are the temperatures starting to creep back to double figures across southern and western areas. it will creep up a little bit further into this coming week. some showers around on england and wales on tuesday, but for much of the time away from the far north it will be a dry week, but with some overnight frost and fog.
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see you soon.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia because he had covid in december, according to court documents. the us questions kazakhstan's decision to bring in russian troops to quell the violent unrest. flat owners in the uk won't have to pay to remove dangerous cladding from lower—height buildings under new government plans, the bbc understands. three white men who murdered ahmaud arbery in the us state of georgia are given life sentences — his family say they never lost faith in justice. now on bbc news, it's time for dateline london.

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