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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 8, 2022 6:00am-10:00am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today: hundreds of thousands of flat owners will not have to pay to replace unsafe cladding under new government plans. a fourth covid jab is not needed yet — uk experts say booster doses keep giving high protection against severe illness from the omicron variant. three white men begin life sentences in the us for murdering ahmaud arbery, a blackjogger who ran through their neighbourhood. it's looking like mission impossible for england in the fourth ashes test. and once again in sydney it's australia's usman khawaja, whose second century of this test is pushing the hosts towards another win.
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it may be a wet and windy start to the weekend for many, but as we go into the afternoon across many western areas we should see a bit more sunshine at times. it's saturday, the 8th of january. our top story: up to 500,000 flat owners across the uk will no longer be liable for the cost of replacing dangerous cladding on their properties, under new government proposals. the plans, set to be announced by the housing secretary michael gove, would instead see developers forced to pay up to an additional $4 billion to help resolve the crisis, which has left many unable to sell their homes. our policy editor lewis goodall has more. it's estimated that more than half a million people are caught up in britain's fire safety crisis. and we can exclusively reveal the government's latest plans to deal with it.
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up up until now, the government's approach breakdown as follows. dangerous cutting removal would be paid for by the building safety front only for buildings of 18.5 metres in height. everything else would be covered either by developers paying or by a loan scheme for leaseholders. but we understand that michael gove, the levelling up secretary, will make a commitment on monday that up to £4 billion of extra funding will be available to remove dangerous cladding and buildings between 11 and 18 one half metres, and that leaseholders will not have to pay anything towards that cost, a significant shift. but gove also made clear that money will come from developers, not from the taxpayer, and if developers won't pay voluntarily, he will threaten the force of law to make sure that they comply. but this change will cover cladding only, not the host of other building safety issues found in thousands of building since gran fell,. ~ , ., �* thousands of building since gran fell,. , . ., fell,. well, they won't choose to -a . fell,. well, they won't choose to pay- they _ fell,. well, they won't choose to pay- they will — fell,. well, they won't choose to pay. they will have _ fell,. well, they won't choose to pay. they will have to _ fell,. well, they won't choose to pay. they will have to be - fell,. well, they won't choose to | pay. they will have to be dragged fell,. well, they won't choose to - pay. they will have to be dragged to the table to offer something up. and
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i suspect it relies on showing, weather it is by sampling the buildings and showing that these buildings and showing that these buildings were not built to spec, because fire breaks and complementation have always been required by regulations, if they are not there, but as a product of conscious choice, or it is a product of negligence, for which the developer is responsible. so michael gove needs a big stick to beat them with along those sorts of lines, but no, this is quite clearly evidence that this is your choice and your responsibility to pay. find that this is your choice and your responsibility to pay.— responsibility to pay. and if the levellin: responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up _ responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up secretary _ responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up secretary is - levelling up secretary is unsuccessful, lease documents from the treasury seen by newsnight show that if the government cannot raise the money from developers, it will have to come from existing housing budgets, hardly ideal at a time of a wider housing shortage. that was lewis goodall reporting, and we'll get more on that from him just after 8:30am this morning. the independent panel of experts
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that advises the government on vaccines says that a second covid booster, orfourth shot, is not needed for the time being. new data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after a boosterjab, protection against severe illness remains high in older adults. simonjones reports. the booster campaign is delivering results. d0 the booster campaign is delivering results. , ., ., the booster campaign is delivering results. ., ., , results. do you have any allergies to anything _ results. do you have any allergies to anything that — results. do you have any allergies to anything that you _ results. do you have any allergies to anything that you are _ results. do you have any allergies to anything that you are aware - results. do you have any allergies| to anything that you are aware of? and who are fit and well today? that's according to the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which says there is no immediate need for a second booster dose for care home residents and the over 18 �*s. the dose for care home residents and the over 18 's. . dose for care home residents and the over 18 's. , .,, , dose for care home residents and the over18 's. , , , over 18 's. the first dose is very important _ over 18 's. the first dose is very important and _ over 18 's. the first dose is very important and give _ over 18 's. the first dose is very important and give so - over 18 's. the first dose is very important and give so much - important and give so much protection, but at this point in time, so right now, at the start of the new year, we don't need to rush into giving anybody a second booster dose right now. we might need to do so later on in the year, but not at
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this point in time.— this point in time. more than 35 million boosters _ this point in time. more than 35 million boosters and _ this point in time. more than 35 million boosters and doses - this point in time. more than 35| million boosters and doses have this point in time. more than 35 - million boosters and doses have now been administered across the uk. data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after receiving a dirtjab, protection against hospitalisation remains at about 90% for people aged 65 and over. protection against mild symptomatic infection is more short lived. that drops to around 30% by about three months. some countries, such as israel, have already started offering forth jabs, but in the uk, the priority remains getting first, second and third doses to those who have not yet had them. that will be kept under review. one thing that is changing as travel. a fully vaccinated people arriving in the uk from abroad noarlunga need to take predeparture from abroad noarlunga need to take predepa rtu re tests. from abroad noarlunga need to take predeparture tests. from tomorrow, post arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateralflow post arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateral flow tests. post arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateralflow tests. that is why today is being dubbed
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sunshine saturday, with travel agents predicting a big obtaining bookings from people who want to get away from it all. three white men are beginning life sentences in the us state of georgia for murdering a blackjogger who ran through their neighbourhood. 25—year—old ahmaud arbery was chased in pick—up trucks and shot dead, in a case that became became a focus of protests by the black lives matter movement. david willis reports. ahmaud arbery�*s death has been likened by his family to a latter—day lynching. three michael white men hunted down the unarmed jogger white men hunted down the unarmed jogger and killed him white men hunted down the unarmed joggerand killed him in white men hunted down the unarmed jogger and killed him in cold cloud. footage of the incident led to nationwide protests after it emerged that despite being interviewed at the scene, none of the men involved had been arrested after local officials arrest —— accepted the plea of self—defence defence has deemed the killing justified.
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former police officer gregory mcmichael, his 33—year—old sun travis the man who filmed ahmaud arbery�*s death, william roddy brian, would eventually arrested and brought to trial and found guilty of murder, aggregated assault and forced imprisonment. thea;t murder, aggregated assault and forced imprisonment. they chose to tar: et forced imprisonment. they chose to taruet m forced imprisonment. they chose to target my sun _ forced imprisonment. they chose to target my sun because _ forced imprisonment. they chose to target my sun because they - forced imprisonment. they chose to target my sun because they didn't i target my sun because they didn't want him in their community. these men deserved the maximum sentence for the crime. ahmaud never said a word to them. he never threatened them. hejust wanted word to them. he never threatened them. he just wanted to word to them. he never threatened them. hejust wanted to be word to them. he never threatened them. he just wanted to be left alone. them. he 'ust wanted to be left alone. ~ ., �* ., ., ., them. he 'ust wanted to be left alone. ., �* ., ., ., , them. he 'ust wanted to be left alone. ., �* ., ., �* alone. what i'm going to do is, i'm auoin to alone. what i'm going to do is, i'm going to sit — alone. what i'm going to do is, i'm going to sit silently _ alone. what i'm going to do is, i'm going to sit silently for— alone. what i'm going to do is, i'm going to sit silently for one - going to sit silently for one minuta _ going to sit silently for one minute. ., , _, ., minute. to set in context the terror he said ahmaud _ minute. to set in context the terror he said ahmaud arbery _ minute. to set in context the terror he said ahmaud arbery must - minute. to set in context the terror he said ahmaud arbery must have l he said ahmaud arbery must have suffered ups he was chased a residential neighbourhood for more than five minutes, thejudge ordered
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a moment's silence. before sentencing, all three men to life in prison. 0nly william bryan will be eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age. has eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age.— eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glen _ he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glen county _ he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glen county in _ he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glen county in front - he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glen county in front of- he is 82 years of age. as we stand j here in glen county in front of this courthouse, think about all the black people who have been lynched in the history of america, in georgia, who never, ever got their day in court. georgia, who never, ever got their day in court-— georgia, who never, ever got their day in court. ahmaud arbery's death -aved day in court. ahmaud arbery's death aved the day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way _ day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to _ day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to a _ day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to a period _ paved the way to a period of national reckoning over the state of racial injustice in this country, one which culminated in nationwide protests over the death of george floyd. though these men received the maximum sentence, civil rights campaigners believe it will take more than that to influence
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attitudes that in many cases go back generations. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. allegations of an additional party at downing street are set to be included in the official investigation into events held at number10. it comes after borisjohnson's former chief adviser dominic cummings claimed a senior official invited people to socially distanced drinks in the garden while restrictions were in place in may 2020. security forces in kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of protesters taking part in huge riots in its main city, almaty. the unrest began on sunday, when the cost of fuel was doubled. kazakhstan's neighbour russia has sent in paratroopers to support the government. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. caroline, what can you tell us?
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i think it is worth bearing mind, as you say, these protests have been going on for less than a week, they started off about fuel prices and then have spread to become more of an issue, a political backdrop to this protest, to the violence on the streets of kazakhstan, in particular, the biggest city in kazakhstan, almaty, is that the cost of living in kazakhstan has become expensive, but that has worsened during the course of the pandemic, and many people have said that is the reason why these protests have spread so quickly, they spread a lot faster than these people had anticipated, and almost seem to take many by surprise. we have seen images of burnt out cars in the city of almaty, burnt outbuildings,
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shopfront smashed out. we heard from the hasluck authorities, they say that in their words, they "liquidated 26 people involved. that kazakh. thousands more have been arrested. yesterday we had from the kazakh president that he believed terrorists were behind this incident, however, we have also had some counterarguments from protesters on the streets who said the violence came from the hasluck authorities, but it did not come from the protesters themselves. it is difficult to get information about exactly what is happening in kazakhstan at the moment, because the internet has been down. yesterday the president said it would be brought back in an patchy phases, but it has been used as a way of communicating and co—ordinating, that is one of the reasons why it was essentially removed. at the moment it is very difficult to get a full picture about what is happening on the ground and we are waiting for more developments later today. tributes have been paid to the american actor, sidney poitier, who has died at the age of 94.
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you will call me 'sir�* or 'mr thackeray'. the young ladies will be addressed as 'miss', the boys by their surnames. poitier was the first black man to win a best actor 0scar, and helped to break down many of hollywood's racial barriers, while paving the way for a generation of film stars. a host of prominent figures, including presidentjoe biden, barack 0bama and oprah winfrey have paid tribute to him. a year ago, most school pupils were being told to study from home and the bbc started its give a laptop appeal. we asked you to donate old devices, and the response was staggering. well over 100,000 laptops and tablets were handed over to families across the uk.
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however, the need has not gone away, as fiona lamdin has been finding out. this time last year, edwina and her four children were struggling with homeschooling on a phone. this was the moment when their family received a donated laptop. xyour received a donated laptop. your la -to- received a donated laptop. your la--to is received a donated laptop. your laptop isiust — received a donated laptop. your laptop isjust here _ received a donated laptop. your laptop is just here if _ received a donated laptop. your laptop isjust here if you - received a donated laptop. yolk- laptop isjust here if you would laptop is just here if you would like to come and grab it. film. laptop isjust here if you would like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! _ like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a _ like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a year _ like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a year on, _ like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a year on, we - like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a year on, we have i like to come and grab it. oh, my i goodness! a year on, we have been back to see — goodness! a year on, we have been back to see them. _ goodness! a year on, we have been back to see them. having _ goodness! a year on, we have been back to see them. having the - goodness! a year on, we have been| back to see them. having the laptop has made a — back to see them. having the laptop has made a lot _ back to see them. having the laptop has made a lot of— back to see them. having the laptop has made a lot of difference, - back to see them. having the laptop has made a lot of difference, not. has made a lot of difference, not just in my life, it has impacted positively in the life of my kids, because currently, they are able to assess all their work and all of that, it has been fantastic. it was a similar story — that, it has been fantastic. it was a similar story for _ that, it has been fantastic. it was a similar story for the _ that, it has been fantastic. it was a similar story for the adam - that, it has been fantastic. it was i a similar story for the adam twins, who relying paper handouts. they are now both at secondary school. it has made a huge — now both at secondary school. it has made a huge difference. _ now both at secondary school. it has made a huge difference. we - now both at secondary school. it us made a huge difference. we are still using the laptop we got a year ago
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today. using the laptop we got a year ago toda . ., , using the laptop we got a year ago toda. ., , _ , using the laptop we got a year ago toda. , today. primary schools, secondary schools and _ today. primary schools, secondary schools and colleges _ today. primary schools, secondary schools and colleges across - schools and colleges across england... is schools and colleges across england- - -_ schools and colleges across encland. .. . ~ , england... is the prime minister closed schools _ england... is the prime minister closed schools last _ england... is the prime minister closed schools last january, - england... is the prime minister closed schools last january, the| closed schools last january, the pandemic shone a light on the 1.7 million students who did not have access to devices or data. we noticed that _ access to devices or data. - noticed that children who had been doing the work online can back to school are much better place than those who hadn't. haifa school are much better place than those who hadn't.— school are much better place than those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for ou those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to — those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to that _ those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to that those _ those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to that those laptops - those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to that those laptops are l it for you to that those laptops are there now? it it for you to that those laptops are there now?— it for you to that those laptops are there now? , . , , , .. , there now? it is reassuring because we are having _ there now? it is reassuring because we are having to — there now? it is reassuring because we are having to work— there now? it is reassuring because we are having to work hard - there now? it is reassuring because we are having to work hard every i there now? it is reassuring because. we are having to work hard every day to keep the school open, with staff absences, every day we come in and have to think about how we are going to cover classes, and there remains a possibility that some children will have to be educated from home, so those laptops will come in handy. in the last year, over 100,000 devices like these have been donated. but as you can see, there is still demand.— is still demand. today, donated la to -s is still demand. today, donated laptops are _ is still demand. today, donated laptops are being _ is still demand. today, donated laptops are being handed - is still demand. today, donated laptops are being handed out i is still demand. today, donated laptops are being handed out at is still demand. today, donated - laptops are being handed out at the somali community centre in bristol. this is your laptop.—
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this is your laptop. thank you so much for that, _ this is your laptop. thank you so much for that, that'll_ this is your laptop. thank you so much for that, that'll help - this is your laptop. thank you so much for that, that'll help me. l much for that, that'll help me. murray's— much for that, that'll help me. murray's 23— much for that, that'll help me. murray's 23 and _ much for that, that'll help me. murray's 23 and is _ much for that, that'll help me. murray's 23 and is taking - much for that, that'll help me. | murray's 23 and is taking maths gcse. , ., ., murray's 23 and is taking maths gcse. ,., ., . ~ murray's 23 and is taking maths gcse. , a' ., murray's 23 and is taking maths gcse. ., i: gcse. good luck for you! 40 individuals _ gcse. good luck for you! 40 individuals and _ gcse. good luck for you! 40 individuals and families - gcse. good luck for you! 40 individuals and families are | gcse. good luck for you! 40 l individuals and families are on gcse. good luck for you! 40 - individuals and families are on our waiting list, each week. +, this is for your children. waiting list, each week. +, this is foryour children. + waiting list, each week. +, this is for your children.— for your children. + has four children. — for your children. + has four children, and _ for your children. + has four children, and has— for your children. + has four children, and has been - for your children. + has four children, and has been for. for your children. + has four - children, and has been for months. —— hassan. it is still going very strong. we are receiving donations almost every day, we are collecting, wiping, repurposing those laptops. shifter day, we are collecting, wiping, repurposing those laptops. after a cuick repurposing those laptops. after a quick lesson _ repurposing those laptops. after a quick lesson logging _ repurposing those laptops. after a quick lesson logging in, _ repurposing those laptops. after a quick lesson logging in, they- repurposing those laptops. after a quick lesson logging in, they are l quick lesson logging in, they are good to go, and so the hope that people will still keep giving while they need is very much there. what a difference it makes. to donate a laptop or device, head to bbc.co.uk/makeadifference, and click give a laptop.
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such a simple idea, isn't it? all of the best ones are. i thought if you hundred might�*ve come in staggering numbers. 15 minutes past six —— a few hundred. let's have a look at some of today's front pages. the daily telegraph leads with recommendations from government scientific advisers that fourth jabs are not currently needed. analysis from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation found three months after receiving a third jab, protection against hospitalisation among the over—65s remained at about 90%. so no force jabs for now. —— so no fourth jabs for now. the i is reporting that record numbers of staff left the nhs in 2021, with work—life balance cited as a key issue. the paper carries a testimony from a frontline nurse, who said the second wave of the pandemic "cost me my mental health and my marriage". the guardian's front page features a tribute to the hollywood legend sir sidney poitier, who has died at the age of 94.
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the adjoining story centres around fresh accusations from the former government advisor dominic cummings that there was a second lockdown—breaking party in the downing street garden, five days after borisjohnson and his staff were pictured having wine and cheese. those pictures that were in the papers just before christmas so that is part of the investigation also now. and the most—watched video on the bbc news website is the incredible story of a truck dangling over a cliff in china. you can see it there. my goodness! it was stuck like that for three days after the driver tried to reverse on a narrow mountain road. the driver and passenger managed to escape, and the vehicle was eventually hauled to safety. eventually. terrifying. it gives me the heebie—jeebies. three days! the kind of thing you dread when you go
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up kind of thing you dread when you go up a mountain. some of the inside pages, this is great, anne—marie used to be here to review the saturday papers, she has taken over rachel riley's role on countdown doing the numbers and letters and is well qualified, as reported. that's when she was 11, she studied at oxford at the age of 15, got a 0xford at the age of 15, got a masters at 20 and speak six different languages. you think the rest of herfamily different languages. you think the rest of her family would think she is a smarty but she is one of many, many in the family who are also prequalified. the mentor is 24, maths gcse at the age of six, —— samantha. as did peter. christina her sister has got degrees from oxford, university of pennsylvania, 0xford, university of pennsylvania, went to university at 11, and their
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dad is a professor. amazing. find went to university at 11, and their dad is a professor. amazing. and the thin with dad is a professor. amazing. and the thing with countdown _ dad is a professor. amazing. and the thing with countdown is _ dad is a professor. amazing. and the thing with countdown is it _ dad is a professor. amazing. and the thing with countdown is it is - dad is a professor. amazing. and the thing with countdown is it is the - thing with countdown is it is the mathematics but to do it in a way thatis mathematics but to do it in a way that is entertaining and engaging and that has been the key and we will check in with matt now for a look at the weather.— will check in with matt now for a look at the weather. morning. if you are watching — look at the weather. morning. if you are watching us _ look at the weather. morning. if you are watching us from _ look at the weather. morning. if you are watching us from your— look at the weather. morning. if you are watching us from your bed, - are watching us from your bed, staying a bit longer because it is not looking pretty. that and windy weather around to start the weekend but there with it, many areas in the north and west will turn brighter with a bit of sunshine although a future was later on. this is the picture from space with a lovely swell of cloud but under it, the brain. the back edge of it is getting closer to ireland. that's where you get into sunshine and showers which will follow, bringing cold air ahead of a brief, milder but windy spell across the country. the radar across the uk shows how extensive it is and with it, because it has been cold, across the hills of scotland quite a bit of snow lying around in the breeze butjust
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about all scenes of wet weather, like temperature in the east, heavier developing towards the west but northern ireland brightening up through the morning, scotland by the end of the morning some sunshine and a future was under the reign lingering in shetland but elsewhere, quite a band of intense rain before it clears, pushing through the midlands through the middle part of the day and setting across east anglia and the south—east into the end of the afternoon. early gusty winds with it, 40—50 miles an hour and temperatures after lifting briefly dropping into single figures for many. in this evening and overnight, a wet day all in all for the south—east corner whereas elsewhere, clear skies, the south—east corner whereas elsewhere, clearskies, do the south—east corner whereas elsewhere, clear skies, do clearer with some showers in the west, some wintry, it does mean an ice risk into tomorrow morning and temperatures hovering above freezing for many but especially parts of scotland northern england we will see temperatures drop below so a frosty start for some, i start for
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others, show is on sunday will be more frequent in the morning across western scotland, northern ireland into northern england north well through the afternoon but a lot of bright and soggy weather either side of that zone, certainly brighter for many across the south compared with today of cloud and battery ramil pushing towards west cornwall, isles of scilly and the channel islands. the cold front works across all into monday, a slow process but it means a milder night to take us through into monday morning although a little bit chilly down the eastern areas with some hazy sunshine, but overall cloud around to start the new week with outbreaks of rain and drizzle across western scotland and northern ireland and temperatures on the rise and indeed as we go through the rise and indeed as we go through the week ahead with high pressure building from the south, a lot more in the way of drier weather and temperatures holding steady at around 8—10 for the vast majority. positively balmy. around 8-10 for the vast ma'ority. positively balmy.�* positively balmy. how are we sellin: positively balmy. how are we
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spelling balmy? _ positively balmy. how are we spelling balmy? l— positively balmy. how are we spelling balmy? l or - positively balmy. how are we spelling balmy? l or an - positively balmy. how are we spelling balmy? l or an r - positively balmy. how are we spelling balmy? l or an r or| positively balmy. how are we - spelling balmy? l or an r or both? now on breakfast, it's time for click. that's it from us from ces. we'll be back in vegas next year. echoes: next year... next year... not a casino or convention centre in sight! thundering, powerful music plays.
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welcome to ces 2022 from vegas! it's been touch and go but we made it, and there's plenty of tech here. yeah, not as much as we were expecting, though, to be honest. in fact, quite a few big names pulled out quite late in the day due to you—know—what, which does mean that the world's biggest tech show feels somewhat smaller, doesn't it? there are still plenty of gadgets, though. yep, true. i'll be looking at a few for the home in a minute but in the meantime, do you fancy a brew? i think it's time for a tea break, don't you? you've been working hard already, clearly. very hard, yeah! this is the bru tea maker. now, you can put in any loose tea or tea bags and then you set it for exactly how long you want that tea to be brewing for, so it'll hopefully make you your perfect cuppa. my perfect cuppa is i'd say about 3.5 minutes. can you do that? ok, i shall try and oblige. it's got quite a handy self—cleaning function in there as well. with these machines, that's often the hassle, isn't it? 0k. set up a 3.5—minute
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interlude, please. yeah, actually. not a bad cup of...tea. where... ? 0h! she's gone. that should keep him busy for a bit. now, these days, we're having more food deliveries than ever, so could this be a solution? fresh portal allows you to set it to hot or cold so your delivery should be kept atjust the right temperature. the finished product will have uv—c lights to sanitise it and a camera to monitor yourfood, but the problem is you do need to cut a big hole in your house to put it in. and here's today's delivery, which is rather unusually some yogurt. one issue with deliveries as they often come with way more packaging than you need. that i'll be after later.
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but clear drop hopes to overcome the problem of not enough soft plastics being recycled with this, a device that compresses them. you can either put in there plastic bags like this or any soft packaging. this isjust a prototype — the finished product will be about two—thirds of this size — but this is what happens. and this is what the plastic comes out looking like once it's condensed. i've been told that this is probably the quantity that your average family would come up with over the course of two months and being like this instead of big, puffy bags does make it a lot easier to be ground down at a recycling facility. anyhow, i'll pop it there because i need to get to the kitchen. as it happens, i'm not much of a fan of plain yoghurt but there is a reason that i've got this here. first of all, let me pour some into the bowl. this is spoontek and the company claims that through a mild electric current that runs through it, your food should taste better.
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now, when i am using it, the food will be covering this silver dot here. and when i'm eating with it, my finger will naturally cover that silver bit at the back. so this light will come on to show that it's definitely working. to test it, i'm actually going to be blindfolded so that i can't tell the difference between this, the functioning spoon, and these two that don't. i'm going to put this on and 0mar, can you come over and just mix things up a bit so i don't know what spoon i'm using? 0k. it's here somewhere, i think. bleep. ok, this tastes like yoghurt. that tasted exactly the same as it did on the first spoon. um, strangely, that mouthful maybe sort of tasted a bit better? but i don't know. if i wasn't really thinking about it, i wouldn't notice a difference. it's not like you feel an electric current or anything. but i'm going to guess that this is the right spoon. musical flourish. it is. 0k. i was genuinely not expecting that! 0k, well, let's give it a go again.
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bleep. i think this is the spoon. buzzer blares. no. no! and i really thought it wasn't the first one. maybe it was luck, i guess, the first time. let's do it again. bleep. not feeling so sure this time. i'm going to go for this being the spoon. and it is! ok, that was two out of three. and it could be luck but i don't know! it was two out of three. the difference was so small, i wonder if it would be more substantial with something that tasted a bit stronger but i don't know! there's my really scientific test. and when it's time to leave the house, especially if you're going to be away for a while, then you may be concerned about security. and here's something that's taken things on a level from the old timer switch that makes it look like someone's in when the lights go on and off. let me just set it up. there we go. simple. it's got a sensor in it so it knows if its day or night. done.
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home shadows aims to create the illusion that there are people moving around in the room and to me, it did just look like a bit of a glitchy light, which i suppose would indicate someone was in. but it doesn't exactly look like this. upbeat electronic music plays. welcome to eureka park, where there's always something weird to see, including this. this is levita — a cabinet where you can make anything float. they've put perfumes and watches in here for retail shops but today, they've put my microphone inside. and because the founders are magicians, they won't tell me how this is done. i am going to need that back, please. really? yes. sure, ok. here it is. there you go for your microphone, sir. it's magic! laughter.
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as always, more and more things are getting connected to the internet. this is a smart tap. i can ask my voice assistant "alexa, ask moen for 500ml of water". alexa: wave over sensor to dispense 500ml now. | there we go! exactly 500ml — very clever. emily, does this mean if the wi—fi goes off, i can't make a cup of tea? absolutely not! you will always have tea. the motion control sensor will continue to operate. this is battle racing, a start—up from colombia which i think we can say is inspired by an italian—japanese plumber. i can even leave little traps here for the people racing behind me, and then off i go!
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this is flying magic cleaner. the idea is that once you've vacuumed your carpet, you can suck some more dust out of the air — not using magic, but using static electricity. there's a few companies here this year doing facial recognition for dogs, so let's give it a try. here's a dog. we hold that to the camera and it has identified it asjohn. now, what about this dog with the pretty hair clip? is that a different dog or the same dog? that is alsojohn. laughs. upbeat electronic music plays. what do alcohol and bitcoin both have in common? every high is followed by a crash. i've just met cecilia. this is a robot bartender.
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i put my cup here. show me your id. and she's asking me for id, because obviously i look under 21. cecilia, i'll have a metaverse please. oh, cecilia. you're breaking my heart. you're shaking my cocktails daily. ok, well, taste test. oh, very nice! is that pomegranate? thank you. and this is the perfect gadget for if you've been doing sports or exercise orjust walking around ces all day. it's cryosocks and it's going to give me instant deep cooling in my muscles from this canister here, so ijust give it a press... ah! oh, it is very cold! mmm.
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that was chris, and we haven't quite finished with weird and wonderful yet. oh good! you know that nice feeling you get when a baby nibbles your finger? no! no, me neither, but someone does, so meet amagami ham ham. stick yourfinger in its mouth. right. is this like i'm torturing a toy? this is quite strange. tell us what that's like. ooh! it's squeezing the end of my finger. it's kind of... yes, it is. ..dry — i don't know! it's weird. well, you enjoy that while i read the press release, which says it's designed to recreate the somewhat pleasing sensation that people get when human babies and pet animals softly bite on the fingers. it uses a special algorithm to randomly select from two dozen nibbling patterns to keep users interested — are you still interested? fascinated. most people like the nibbling sensation but know they need to teach their children or pets to stop it because kids and animals will otherwise bite them with full force eventually. amagami ham ham is a robot that frees humankind from the conundrum of whether to pursue or not pursue the forbidden pleasure. how's that for you? it's got quite excitable. can i take my finger out? yes, you may!
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and on that note, i think we'll leave it for ces for this week. it's good to be back, though, isn't it? it's very good to be back. it's been wonderful. super. ooh! as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. spencer, are you ok? thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. bye! good morning. welcome to breakfast. tens of thousands of trees are being planted _ tens of thousands of trees are being planted in _ tens of thousands of trees are being planted in the —
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tens of thousands of trees are being planted in the lake _ tens of thousands of trees are being planted in the lake district - tens of thousands of trees are being planted in the lake district valley. planted in the lake district valley to help _ planted in the lake district valley to help prevent— planted in the lake district valley to help prevent flooding - planted in the lake district valley- to help prevent flooding and improve habitats _ to help prevent flooding and improve habitats for _ to help prevent flooding and improve habitats for wildlife. _ to help prevent flooding and improve habitats for wildlife. let’s _ to help prevent flooding and improve habitats for wildlife.— habitats for wildlife. let's get some open — habitats for wildlife. let's get some open air, _ habitats for wildlife. let's get some open air, some - habitats for wildlife. let's get some open air, some fresh i habitats for wildlife. let's get i some open air, some fresh air. volunteers working with local farmers and the national trust to try to prove and protect the landscape. allison freeman is out and about. small saplings, but with a big part to play in helping the environment. these trees are some of thousands that are going to be planted to replicate the natural hedgerows, which not only help the event soil erosion as well as the run—off of water which causes floods, but soak up water which causes floods, but soak up carbon and provide habitat for wildlife. £220,000 of government money is funding the project, but a local community interest group is organising the planting. in local community interest group is organising the planting.— local community interest group is organising the planting. in three or four ears organising the planting. in three or four years i — organising the planting. in three or four years i would _ organising the planting. in three or four years i would think _ organising the planting. in three or four years i would think you - organising the planting. in three or four years i would think you would | four years i would think you would have a hedge getting on four feet high or something like that, and you would start to see that possum already and those berries that early on. so give it a sort of ten or 15 years and you will have a nice,
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established hedge that will be good for the birds, lots of nesting, lots of food for them, and hopefully, i mean, we got red squirrel around here, we can help the red squirrels. i think it would be really nice. the national trust _ i think it would be really nice. the national trust secured the funding for this scheme, which will see trees planted mainly on farmland in the lake district, an area where farmers have faced criticism from some for changing the natural face of the uplands. some for changing the natural face of the uplands-— of the uplands. what you can see here is the _ of the uplands. what you can see here is the cultural _ of the uplands. what you can see here is the cultural landscape - of the uplands. what you can see i here is the cultural landscape where this work can happen hand—in—hand, so it is absolutely not about conservation or farming, so it is absolutely not about conservation orfarming, it so it is absolutely not about conservation or farming, it is about finding the right path to have both. so this is a very to type of thing. while it will be mainly volunteers planting the trees, the funding has also secured employment. ajob planting the trees, the funding has also secured employment. a job for robbie, who lives nearby. also secured employment. a 'ob for robbie, who lives nearby._ also secured employment. a 'ob for robbie, who lives nearby. because i do often see — robbie, who lives nearby. because i do often see these _ robbie, who lives nearby. because i
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do often see these places, - robbie, who lives nearby. because i do often see these places, coming l do often see these places, coming back along, working, you see how they are doing. you sort of see which ones are going well and which ones are not. i get lots of satisfaction out of the stop the volunteers have planted 650 trees today, but over the next two years they are going to plant around 38,000 across the olds water area. the trees they have donated, the services — the trees they have donated, the services are free, why wouldn't the landowners — services are free, why wouldn't the landowners take advantage of what they are _ landowners take advantage of what they are doing? you landowners take advantage of what they are doing?— they are doing? you can see things deteriorating _ they are doing? you can see things deteriorating in _ they are doing? you can see things deteriorating in many _ they are doing? you can see things deteriorating in many ways, - they are doing? you can see things deteriorating in many ways, it - they are doing? you can see things deteriorating in many ways, it is i deteriorating in many ways, it is good _ deteriorating in many ways, it is good to— deteriorating in many ways, it is good to put— deteriorating in many ways, it is good to put something - deteriorating in many ways, it is good to put something back, i deteriorating in many ways, it is good to put something back, to| good to put something back, to actually— good to put something back, to actually work _ good to put something back, to actually work with _ good to put something back, to actually work with nature - good to put something back, toj actually work with nature rather than _ actually work with nature rather than against _ actually work with nature rather than against it. _ actually work with nature rather than against it. we _ actually work with nature rather than against it.— actually work with nature rather than against it. we can help out like this and _ than against it. we can help out like this and get a _ than against it. we can help out like this and get a nice - than against it. we can help out like this and get a nice day i than against it. we can help out like this and get a nice day out. | like this and get a nice day out. why is it important that you are doing this now? i why is it important that you are doing this now?— why is it important that you are doing this now? i think we are at crisis point. _ doing this now? i think we are at crisis point, where _ doing this now? i think we are at crisis point, where we've - doing this now? i think we are at crisis point, where we've got i doing this now? i think we are at crisis point, where we've got to l crisis point, where we've got to really figure out, protect italy in a cultural landscape like the lake district, how we are going to move forward. we know we are suffering catastrophic biodiversity loss, loss of species, loss of nature. these
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projects are really about preserving this landscape for future generations, and my family has been in this area for a long time, and i hope we will be for generations to come. �* ,., hope we will be for generations to come. . ,., ., hope we will be for generations to come. . ., . . hope we will be for generations to come. . ., r r , come. alison freeman, bbc news, the lake come. alison freeman, bbc news, the lake district- — isn't that gorgeous? if you're after beautiful pictures and fresher, is l beautiful pictures and fresher, is exactly what you got.— beautiful pictures and fresher, is exactly what you got. should we go now? you can _ exactly what you got. should we go now? you can go. _ exactly what you got. should we go now? you can go, enjoy _ exactly what you got. should we go now? you can go, enjoy ourselvesl exactly what you got. should we go | now? you can go, enjoy ourselves in now? you can go, en'oy ourselves in the countryside. i now? you can go, en'oy ourselves in the countryside. we i now? you can go, enjoy ourselves in the countryside. we will— now? you can go, enjoy ourselves in the countryside. we will put - now? you can go, enjoy ourselves in the countryside. we will put a - now? you can go, enjoy ourselves in the countryside. we will put a tape l the countryside. we will put a tape on, it will the countryside. we will put a tape on. it will be _ the countryside. we will put a tape on, it will be fine. _ the countryside. we will put a tape on, it will be fine. how _ the countryside. we will put a tape on, it will be fine. how is - the countryside. we will put a tape on, it will be fine. how is the i on, it will be fine. how is the cricket going?— on, it will be fine. how is the cricket going? time to hold onto our cricket going? time to hold onto your seats _ cricket going? time to hold onto your seats for — cricket going? time to hold onto your seats for the _ cricket going? time to hold onto your seats for the next - cricket going? time to hold onto your seats for the next hour i cricket going? time to hold onto your seats for the next hour or l cricket going? time to hold onto i your seats for the next hour or so. final— your seats for the next hour or so. final innings — your seats for the next hour or so. final innings of this fourth ashes test and — final innings of this fourth ashes test and they need to survive, first of all. _ test and they need to survive, first of all. and — test and they need to survive, first of all, and may be, you never know, .et of all, and may be, you never know, get 300, _ of all, and may be, you never know, get 300, they haven't gone over the serious _ get 300, they haven't gone over the serious thought so far. there is rain _ serious thought so far. there is rain forecast tomorrow, the main thing _ rain forecast tomorrow, the main thing at _ rain forecast tomorrow, the main thing at the — rain forecast tomorrow, the main thing at the moment is surviving the rest of— thing at the moment is surviving the rest of the _ thing at the moment is surviving the rest of the day. then sleep on it and get — rest of the day. then sleep on it and get through tomorrow. it is now
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and get through tomorrow. it is now a case of lasting _ and get through tomorrow. it is now a case of lasting the _ and get through tomorrow. it is now a case of lasting the last _ and get through tomorrow. it is now a case of lasting the last hour i and get through tomorrow. it is now a case of lasting the last hour or- a case of lasting the last hour or so, the weather is not great, the forecast, so that could help them. this comes a day after england hero jonny bairstow was finally out for 113 and the team was dismissed for 294. today australia spent most of the day extending their lead, dismantlement was meant larger comedy start of the show with his second test century of this test. unbeaten on 101, but when alex carey was dismissed by jack leach, australia decided to declare on 265 — six. the hosts may be thinking of that weather forecast tomorrow. england is now batting, early days so far, yes, so far so good. they are 13 without loss. a good start. why you sniggering, john? i am not sni: uterin! why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we _ why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we will _ why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we will be _ why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we will be so _ why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we will be so used i why you sniggering, john? i am not sniggering! we will be so used to i sniggering! we will be so used to losin: , sniggering! we will be so used to losing, welcome _ sniggering! we will be so used to losing, welcome england - sniggering! we will be so used to losing, welcome england are i sniggering! we will be so used to losing, welcome england are so i sniggering! we will be so used to i losing, welcome england are so used to losing the openers early on. you did with to losing the openers early on. gm, did with positive power yesterday. by did with positive power yesterday. by the time we talk about robbie in a few minutes we will see what happens. a few minutes we will see what ha ens. .. a few minutes we will see what ha ens. ., ., . a few minutes we will see what ha ens. .. ., . ~ ~
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a few minutes we will see what ha ens. .. .. . ~ ,, , a few minutes we will see what hauens. .. .. . ~ ~ , happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't _ happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't you? _ happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't you? he _ happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't you? he could - happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't you? he could put i happens. you would want mike is your doctor, wouldn't you? he could put a l doctor, wouldn't you? he could put a nice spin on it. the doctor, wouldn't you? he could put a nice spin on it— nice spin on it. the operations wouldn't go — nice spin on it. the operations wouldn't go too _ nice spin on it. the operations wouldn't go too well. - nice spin on it. the operations wouldn't go too well. good i nice spin on it. the operations i wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner- let's _ wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. let's get _ wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. let's get to _ wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. let's get to the _ wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. let's get to the fa. - wouldn't go too well. good bedside manner. let's get to the fa. the i manner. let's get to the fa. the weekend when _ manner. let's get to the fa. the weekend when the elite enter the competition and for the smaller teams, footballing dreams can come true. lives can change forever, potentially. it was not to be for wiltshire last night, knocked out by manchester city, who feel that a really strong side. bernardo silva with the opener, and two more goals following putting city in control. but there was a moment to favour for swindon, as harry mckirdy got one back. cue euphoria in the ground. but it was short—lived — cole palmer scoring city's fourth and booking their place in the fourth round. i think we started really welcome on the front foot. we were quite quick, good to score even one or two goals in the first half. there was moments that may be, towards the end on the first half, we were not as good as
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usually, and we allowed some counter—attacks that we would prefer that it didn't happen, but overall i think it was a good game, against a good opponent. we were happy with the performance and the result of that. i think in the limelight, sometimes you start — think in the limelight, sometimes you start doing things that you wouldn't — you start doing things that you wouldn't normally do. and it cost us, unfortunately. but really proud, especially— us, unfortunately. but really proud, especially in the second half, we du- especially in the second half, we dug in. _ especially in the second half, we dug in, scored a fantastic goal, thought— dug in, scored a fantastic goal, thought we had a penalty, so, you know, _ thought we had a penalty, so, you know. it _ thought we had a penalty, so, you know. it has — thought we had a penalty, so, you know, it has been a great cup run, fantastic— know, it has been a great cup run, fantastic to— know, it has been a great cup run, fantastic to play against manchester city tonight, a great night for the supporters but now returned back to league _ supporters but now returned back to league football. well, the majority of today's third round fixtures take place today, including defending champions leicester in action at home to watford. tonight, last year's beaten finalists chelsea face non—league chesterfield, who famously made the semifinals in 1997 and won't be taken lightly. you can lose any game in football. that is why the game is so popular. so you will never hear me say that
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we can't lose a game, this would be hugely arrogant. so we need to be ready and we need to have a strong squad and a squad that is ready to enjoy these minutes, because if you want to reach the next round you need to win. want to reach the next round you need to win-— need to win. novak d'okovic has thanked his * need to win. novak djokovic has thanked his supporters - need to win. novak djokovic has thanked his supporters on i need to win. novak djokovic has thanked his supporters on social media, saying that he can feel it. his brother has also been speaking out. he says the way in which the world number one has been treated by australian authorities affects many more people than simply tennis fans. hundreds of supporters gathered at a rally in belgrade to show support for djokovic, who was denied entry into australia by border authorities because of covid—19 vaccination regulations, and he's now in an immigration detention hotel awaiting a court hearing scheduled for monday to challenge his deportation. translation: wanted do we expect? we don't know. monday _ translation: wanted do we expect? we
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don't know. monday is _ translation: wanted do we expect? we don't know. monday is d-day. _ translation: wanted do we expect? we don't know. monday is d-day. monday i don't know. monday is d—day. monday is when the court will issue its final ruling. but this is no longer about tennis, about the tournament. now we only care about ending this. for the full truth to emerge, not only for his sake but for the sake of everybody else who finds themselves in a similar situation. this is a fight for all of us, and we can only wish that novak will stay strong and fight for us. iloathed stay strong and fight for us. what is he implying _ stay strong and fight for us. what is he implying there, _ stay strong and fight for us. what is he implying there, mike? stay strong and fight for us. what| is he implying there, mike? well, stay strong and fight for us. what i is he implying there, mike? well, it is he implying there, mike? well, it is far more — is he implying there, mike? well, it is far more than _ is he implying there, mike? well, it is far more than tennis, _ is he implying there, mike? well, it is far more than tennis, isn't - is he implying there, mike? well, it is far more than tennis, isn't it? i is far more than tennis, isn't it? it is political... is far more than tennis, isn't it? it is political. . .— is far more than tennis, isn't it? it is political... but there is more to it? well, _ it is political. .. but there is more to it? well, it— it is political... but there is more to it? well, it represents - it is political... but there is more to it? well, it represents the i to it? well, it represents the struggles _ to it? well, it represents the struggles and _ to it? well, it represents the struggles and the _ to it? well, it represents the struggles and the fight, i i to it? well, it represents the i struggles and the fight, i suppose, for people around the world, in terms of... it for people around the world, in terms of- - -_ for people around the world, in terms of... , , ,, terms of... it has become this kind of diplomatic _ terms of... it has become this kind of diplomatic issue _ terms of... it has become this kind of diplomatic issue now, _ terms of... it has become this kind of diplomatic issue now, between i of diplomatic issue now, between serbia and australia. this is something for you, really, john. your bristol team, rugby union, the premiership, on a losing streak. it has not been good. but _ premiership, on a losing streak. it has not been good. but they i premiership, on a losing streak. it has not been good. but they put l premiership, on a losing streak. it has not been good. but they put it riaht! has not been good. but they put it right! bristol _ has not been good. but they put it right! bristol cleaning _ has not been good. but they put it right! bristol cleaning a _ has not been good. but they put it right! bristol cleaning a bonus i right! bristol cleaning a bonus point victory over sale. andy uren with the fourth try.
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it finished 32—15 at ashton gate with the fans off their feet at the end. as far as as faras i'm as far as i'm aware, no more wickets at all for england so far. you as far as i'm aware, no more wickets at all for england so far.— at all for england so far. you could see how much _ at all for england so far. you could see how much that _ at all for england so far. you could see how much that victory - at all for england so far. you could i see how much that victory muttered, couldn't you? to the crowd there. brilliant. it couldn't you? to the crowd there. brilliant. .. couldn't you? to the crowd there. brilliant. ., . .. couldn't you? to the crowd there. brilliant. ., . ., .,' couldn't you? to the crowd there. brilliant. ., i ., ..f , brilliant. it got john off his feet. it takes more _ brilliant. it got john off his feet. it takes more than _ brilliant. it got john off his feet. it takes more than that. - a ban on most single—use plastics will come into effect in scotland from june this year. the legislation will ban the use of plastic cutlery, drink stirrers and food containers made from expanded polystyrene. campaigners welcome the move, but some say it doesn't go far enough. here's more from our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon. the evidence of our throwaway culture. this plastic is recyclable, but it is estimated about half of all plastic products produced are not. so in scotland, hundreds of millions of items of polluting plastic but can only be used once
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are about to be bound for good. it is really important to take the step not only to prevent obvious litter on our beaches and in our parks, i talked to kids during cop26 this year who said they couldn't play safely in our parks because they were covered in litter and they didn't feel like it was good place to play. so this is something we can all do. it also reduces our carbon footprint. it all do. it also reduces our carbon footrint. . all do. it also reduces our carbon footrint. , . . , footprint. it is estimated every ear in footprint. it is estimated every year in scotland, _ footprint. it is estimated every year in scotland, 300 - footprint. it is estimated every year in scotland, 300 million i year in scotland, 300 million plastic straws, 276 million pieces of plastic cutlery and 66 million polystyrene food containers are thrown away. these are the items which will be bound by the new legislation. which will be bound by the new legislation-— which will be bound by the new leaislation. ., . ., , legislation. could i get a double salted caramel _ legislation. could i get a double salted caramel and _ legislation. could i get a double salted caramel and mint - legislation. could i get a double i salted caramel and mint chocolate chip? i will get a tub.— chip? i will get a tub. some businesses, _ chip? i will get a tub. some businesses, like _ chip? i will get a tub. some businesses, like this - chip? i will get a tub. some businesses, like this one i chip? i will get a tub. some businesses, like this one in | businesses, like this one in portobello, have already switched to plant —based packaging. they are also urging customers to bring reusable containers instead. it is auoin to reusable containers instead. it is going to be _ reusable containers instead. it is going to be a _ reusable containers instead. it is going to be a bit _ reusable containers instead. it 3 going to be a bit of a culture change for people generally, you know? we are very used to using
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plastics, especially since the pandemic, i think, plastics, especially since the pandemic, ithink, the plastics, especially since the pandemic, i think, the takeaway sector has become a much larger part of the industry, so injune, the government wants businesses to completely eliminate single use plastics. we have tried to do that already, we're trying to be ahead of the curve. what we're trying to implement now is a culture among our customers. . ., . ., . . , customers. change to another areas, after callum. — customers. change to another areas, after callum, who _ customers. change to another areas, after callum, who is _ customers. change to another areas, after callum, who is seven, - customers. change to another areas, after callum, who is seven, worked i after callum, who is seven, worked out that the weight of bottles to school throws out every year was equivalent to that of a giant panda at edinburgh reserve. i equivalent to that of a giant panda at edinburgh reserve.— at edinburgh reserve. i would like metalwater— at edinburgh reserve. i would like metal water bottles _ at edinburgh reserve. i would like metal water bottles for _ at edinburgh reserve. i would like metal water bottles for every i metal water bottles for every schoolchild in scotland, lessons about the environment and to make a giant scotland wide schools equal groups. giant scotland wide schools equal a rou as. ,, ., giant scotland wide schools equal u-rous. , groups. some campaigners, while welcomin: groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the — groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the move _ groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the move to _ groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the move to ban i groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the move to ban most| welcoming the move to ban most single use plastics, say it doesn't go far enough. it is a good thing?
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any bit of plastic that is stopped from being wasted or used is a good thing. every single minute, a truckload of plastic is ending up in the ocean, and that isn't going anywhere anytime fast, and what we get from government and big business is really mixed messages on this, we have just seen recently a delay to the deposit return scheme, which is a really simple way of claiming back plastic. but a really simple way of claiming back lastic. �* . ., . plastic. but national deposit return scheme for — plastic. but national deposit return scheme for bottles _ plastic. but national deposit return scheme for bottles and _ plastic. but national deposit return scheme for bottles and cans i plastic. but national deposit return i scheme for bottles and cans delayed for now, but the ban on most single use plastics, which comes into force injune, will lead to many millions of pieces of plastic being removed from scotland's environment, helping to clean up its beaches and protect its natural beauty. every time you see that plastic waste washed up, it is horrible and you think every time that you need to cut down. find that you need to cut down. and before the _ that you need to cut down. jifuc before the pandemic that you need to cut down. inc before the pandemic we that you need to cut down. jifuc before the pandemic we were getting somewhere and suddenly, we had bigger things to think about and have maybe forgotten it for a while.
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it looks like matt has gone spider—man on us! it it looks like matt has gone spider-man on us!- it looks like matt has gone spider-man on us! it looks like matt has gone sider-man on us! ., spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb un- — spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb un- i — spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb up. i thought _ spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb up. i thought i _ spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb up. i thought i would - spider-man on us! it took me a while to climb up. i thought i would take i to climb up. i thought i would take you further afield, we have not been travelling so we are in new york. while we have had snow through the past few weeks, new york has had their first snowstorm of the season on friday morning so look at these glorious scenes, 15 centimetres there, 25 at laguardia airport and a massive snowstorm for those in kentucky and west virginia where there was as much as 15 inches, a0 centimetres of snow, and more sleet and snow for them to come later this weekend. it's due to this area of cloud, not coming our way, it will shoot towards iceland, but we have this cloud start the weekend right across the uk, bringing a wet and windy start to saturday for many but things will turn brighter and we will see skies clearfrom things will turn brighter and we will see skies clear from the west, sunshine and showers. as far as
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rainfall is concerned, very few areas avoid it. the white child, indication of snowfall across the highlands. we start to see the rain become less abundant across western areas with northern bright violent brightening up in the morning, lunchtime across parts of scotland but some showers still with blustery conditions with the rain and bursts of rain heavy pushing across western parts of england and wales late morning early afternoon, mid to late afternoon across east anglia and the south—east and this area will stay wet for much of the day and windy as well, gull�*s around southern and western coasts and for many will see the sunshine coming out, temperatures after lifting through the day will drop into single figures. but at least many of you will finish the day brighter than you start. the rain clears from the south—east night, pushes showers into the west and they will be on the wintry side later this afternoon and into the night, giving an ice risk as well because tonight into tomorrow morning, while it will not
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be as cold as recent mornings, it will be cold enough for a frost and some ice in places, especially scotland and northern england. sunday is a much brighter one than today though, the best of the sunshine across southern and eastern areas with frequent showers across south west scotland, northern ireland into the afternoon northern england and north wales and more cloud and battery rain and drizzle towards cornwall, isles of scilly but many will have a brighter day on sunday and going beyond that into next week this area of high pressure will build which means next week is looking dry for many after a bit of a cloudy and damp day on monday. good news, it has been a bit bleak this week. a, good news, it has been a bit bleak this week. �* , ., , , this week. a bit more sunshine around. these _ this week. a bit more sunshine around. these new _ this week. a bit more sunshine around. these new york - this week. a bit more sunshine l around. these new york pictures this week. a bit more sunshine - around. these new york pictures were areat. i around. these new york pictures were great- i said — around. these new york pictures were great. i said spider-man, _ around. these new york pictures were great. i said spider-man, i— around. these new york pictures were great. i said spider-man, i do - around. these new york pictures were great. i said spider-man, i do not - great. i said spider—man, i do not know if there is a spider—man review this week but now it is time for the film review.
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hello, and a veyr warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases is anna smith. a very warm welcome. nice to see you again. what have you been watching? i have a varied menu for you. i have a film set in one night over a little restaurant called boiling point and starring stephen graham. then we go for a slice of licorice pizza by paul thomas anderson and finally, a film starring benedict cumberbatch called the electrical life of louis wain. that looks like something for everyone. tell us about boiling point. a fascinating film shot in one take and it's about stephen graham who struggles with this family and financial woes in a busy night in a restaurant. really an ensemble drama, so everybody working together in a restaurant trying to make a busy night work. let's have a little look.
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hey, my friday, it's going to be busy, which is good, and we picked some more covers up today. what? so, we're looking at about 100. so, we've got to turn the tables over, but obviously not make people feel rushed, yeah? which we can do. we've got a proposal in tonight. they're going to be sat on here, table 13, so, yeah, treat them like royalty. and a celebrity chef in, alexander skye. who? he's going to be sat in the front. alastair... alastair skye. yeah, yeah, him. he's going to be sat at the front, a bottle of chateau sat on his table, billy, yeah? copy that. good, swearing. brilliant! really loud. there's no way you can hear me from back there. well, you're not out here. i'm out here, and i can hearyou, so let'sjust bring it down, yeah? you're filthy. good. anything else on the bar that we're low on? low on cointreau, low on prosecco, low on bitters. i'lljust give them halves for tonight. ok, so we're low on quite a lot. good, anything else from you guys? no, just we need to push the veg and we need to push the fish. -
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0k, push veg, push fish. we need to take a selfie for the instagram. hey! i feel very slightly tense in a good way. a stressful film, shot in one take and you can feel that authenticity and it's written and directed by philip barantini, so he knows as he used to be a chef. you can feel this is authentic and actually what goes on behind—the—scenes and of course they milk a lot of drama out of the situation. it almost feels like a lot of episodes of fawlty towers put together in a really serious way because you have the food critic in and the proposal and a potential allergy. everything is kind of stacking up against them, but it just feels real. that's real because the restaurant industry is so pressurised. we've all watched behind the scenes documentaries and read books and stephen graham, who doesn't love him as an actor? and i'm thinking he was cast
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for a reason, but obviously no plot spoilers, but that in itself makes me think something tough is going to happen. he is a very great dramatic actor and of course very good at improvisation which also happens quite a lot in this actually. there were several takes and each one was probably quite different, but this is terrific and it's good to see stephen graham at the centre of a movie because quite often he is playing the bit parts or supporting artist but he's the centre of the story here and it's great. known for television, and here he is in a film and this point about it was filmed in one take. is it really the case because we know they can be tweaked a bit and they can be spliced? not the longest film, but to do it in one take is extraordinary. it really is very unusual, as films like birdman have claimed it but they have been edited and there was a film called victoria which i love which did it in one take and this is a similar idea. they generally did four takes and took the best one. it's amazing. —— they genuinely did. definitely one to watch. now take us back to the 1970s.
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indeed, this is paul thomas anderson's film licorice pizza based on his recollections and also the recollections of a friend who was a child star and they went on to become active as a producer. —— a bit of an entrepreneur and a producer. and it stars cooper hoffman, son of philip seymour hoffman who worked with paul thomas anderson a lot before he passed away, and in this movie, he plays gary, who is 15 years old and he thinks it's a good idea to chat up a woman of 25 who is here played by alana haim, so the basic premise of will they, won't they becomes a conventional friendship developing over time and it's a kind of episodic structure as you can see with a lot of cameos from the likes of bradley cooper and some of the characters are based on real life and some are not. there is a kind of hollywood personality in this, sean penn pops up, so it's got an unusual structure but it's a very light touch for paul thomas anderson. i think it's one of his lighterfilms.
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one of his lighter films, but i feel really mixed about this because that central premise of 15—year—old boy and a 25—year—old woman — that just doesn't work. that central conceit does not work, even though there are lots of other things about the film that are terrific, particularlyjust the way it feels and the way you feel. like, i was very young in the time it was set, but you feel everything you see and read about the '70s is that you're totally back in that period. it's very vivid, but i agree it is set up as a romantic comedy but it's not romantic to me because i didn't really believe in this relationship. you can't believe in it. this plays into stalker tropes as well because this boy who is a persistent and he is causally calling her and she tells him she is not at all interested and he persists and persists, and he even phones up and does not speak on the end of the phone which is kind of stalker behaviour but often in these kind of male—skewed romantic comedies, this was seen as quaint and appealing and cute whereas there inverse is rarely true in film. i did have a problem with that. yes, and enjoyed it but halfway through, i loved the first a5 minutes and then i started doing
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this and that's never a good sign. and you talked about an episodic structure, but it dragged in the middle and picked up at the end, but it really drags in the middle and is too long. i've seen it twice and i enjoyed it more the second time because i prepared for it and relaxed into it, and if you relax into it, it's very funny. laugh out loud moments, good laughs, but, yeah, if you want a normal structure, you might be disappointed. don't go for the structure. what's your third choice this week? the electrical life of louis wain. i had not heard of him i thought, but i saw pictures of cats with the big eyes who play snooker, and i realised i did know who he was. in his film, he's played by benedict cumberbatch and he goes through his struggling artist phase as we start up and he's trying to get work, scribbling away and in the scene we're about to see, he meets tobyjones's editor who offers him some work. why were you throwing peanuts at a bull? i heard they like peanuts - and that it calms them down.
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but it didn't work. trouble with these show calves, huge egos. - it's a good job you can draw, mrwain, orwe would have parted ways some time ago. and don't think i haven't noticed the state of your visage. oh, this wasn't from| the bull, sir william. i've just come from a boxing class with the greatjim meese. - boxing? mmm. so, when did you draw this? 0n the train, from memory. all of them? mm—hm. so, how fast do you work, exactly? oh, just let me show you... hums. i'll be frank with you, mr wain. one of our speediest and most prolific staff illustrators has been poached by a rival publication. do you think you'd be up to it? yes, obviously. i don't find this work very taxing, sir william. - i do it to pay the bills— and to provide for the five hungry and precocious sisters that i live at home with, -
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until i get married, of course. —— until they get i married, of course. as a matter of fact, i find _ the whole thing rather inconvenient. it is a good watch? i'm not sure what to make of that. cumberbatch is great as that sort of eccentric character, but what i like about it is they went on to the relationship with his wife, played by claire foy. they went on and adopted a stray cat and he has an obsession with cats. normally, it's a man's best friend dog film, but you see a film this romantic about a couple's relationship with a cat, i thought was charming. charming? it goes on to deal with mental health in a way that is rather quirky and works on some levels, but to me it was the relationship with claire foy and i think it's a lovely watch. your best 0ut this week. titane's still out and this is the palme d'0r winner which shocked the world.
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it even unusual film. i it even unusualfilm. i like it even unusual film. i like about this is this is by a feminist female director. she did a film called raw. it is a body horror about a woman who goes on the run, but it also explores a lot about gender, about parenthood and there's kind of a serious relationship drama at its core as well, so i think if you get past the gore, you are in luck. that's a good warning was to be to get past the gore... let's hold that thought because a quick thought about the best dvd or streaming because a really intriguing documentary is out. the rescue is from the directors of free solo, about the football team in the thai cave who were rescued and it really is an incredible story, and they talked to two british men who were cave divers who had to kind of problem—solve along with a lot of other people throughout the world that were trying to figure out exactly how to get these boys out. and it's a real lesson in strategy and working together, and it's very inspiring. everyone remembers, we all followed that a story and you don't have to be a newsjunkie
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to know about that. everyone was gripped by that story, to hear how the rescuers did it i think sounds fascinating. even when you know what happened, it's riveting. i was gripped. i recommend that. a good recommendation. good to see you, thank you very much indeed and enjoy your cinema going whatever you choose to go and see this week. see you very soon. bye— bye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. 0ur headlines today: hundreds of thousands of flat owners will not have to pay to replace unsafe cladding under new government plans. a fourth covid jab is not needed yet — uk experts say booster doses keep giving high protection against severe illness from the omicron variant. hollywood remembers the actor sidney poitier,
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whose films in the '50s and '60s shone a light on racism and social predjudice. it's looking like mission impossible for england in the fourth ashes test. and once again in sydney, it's australia's usman khawaja, whose second century of this test is pushing the hosts towards another win. as we go into the afternoon across many western areas we will see a bit more sunshine at times. i'll have yourfull more sunshine at times. i'll have your full forecast more sunshine at times. i'll have yourfull forecast year more sunshine at times. i'll have your full forecast year on breakfast. it's saturday, the 8th of january. our top story: up to 500,000 flat owners across the uk will no longer be liable for the cost of replacing dangerous cladding on their properties, under new government proposals. the plans, set to be announced
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by the housing secretary michael gove, would instead see developers forced to pay up to an additional £a billion to help resolve the crisis, which has left many unable to sell their homes. newsnight�*s lewis goodall has more. it's estimated that more than half a million people are caught up in britain's fire safety crisis. and we can exclusively reveal the government's latest plans to deal with it. up until now, the government's approach breaks down as follows. dangerous cladding removal would be paid for by the building safety fund only for buildings over 18.5 metres in height. everything else would be covered either by developers paying or by a loan scheme for leaseholders. but we understand that michael gove, the levelling up secretary, will make the commitment on monday that up to £a billion of extra funding will be available to remove dangerous cladding and buildings between 11 and 18.5 metres, and that leaseholders won't have to pay anything towards that cost — a significant shift. but gove will also make clear that money will come from developers,
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not from the taxpayer, and if developers won't pay voluntarily, he will threaten the force of law to make sure that they comply. but this change will cover cladding only, not the host of other building safety issues found in thousands of building since grenfell and experts wonder how mr gove will be able to extract the money. well, they won't choose to pay. they'll have to be dragged to the table to offer something up. and i suspect it relies on showing, whether it's by sampling the buildings and showing that these buildings weren't built to spec, because fire breaks and compartmentation have always been required by regulations — if they're not there, that's a product of conscious choice, or it's a product of negligence, for which the developer is responsible. so michael gove needs a big stick to beat them with, along those sorts of lines, that no, this is quite clearly evidence that this is your choices and your responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up secretary is unsuccessful, leaked documents from the treasury seen by newsnight show that if the government can't raise the money from developers,
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then it'll have to come from existing housing budgets. hardly ideal at a time of a wider housing shortage. that was lewis goodall reporting, and we'll get more on that from him, just after 8:30am. the independent panel of experts that advises will also hear from the will also hearfrom the people living in these properties, what their reaction to this news. fin living in these properties, what their reaction to this news. on the face of it it — their reaction to this news. on the face of it it is _ their reaction to this news. on the face of it it is great _ their reaction to this news. on the face of it it is great news - their reaction to this news. on the face of it it is great news for - face of it it is great news for people waking up to him that is relevant, but as lewis was implying there, no doubt there will be a lot of legal wrangling and hoops to jump through when they get that sorted. the independent panel of experts that advises the government on vaccines says that a second covid booster, orfourth shot, is not needed for the time being. new data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after a boosterjab, protection against severe illness remains high in older adults. simonjones reports.
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the booster campaign is delivering results. do you have any allergies to anything that you're aware of? and you are fit and well today? that's according to thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which says there is no immediate need for a second booster dose for care home residents and the over—80s. the first dose is very, very important and gives so much protection that at this point in time, so right now, at the start of the new year, we don't need to rush into giving anybody a second booster dose right now. we might need to do so later on in the year, but not at this point in time. more than 35 million boosters and doses have now been administered across the uk. data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after receiving a third jab, protection against hospitalisation remains at about 90% for people aged 65 and over.
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protection against mild symptomatic infection is more short—lived. that drops to around 30% by about three months. some countries, such as israel, have already started offering fourth jabs, but in the uk, the priority remains getting first, second and third doses to those who have not yet had them. that will be kept under review. one thing that's changing is travel. fully vaccinated people arriving in the uk from abroad no longer need to take pre—departure tests. from tomorrow, post—arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateral flow tests. that's why today is being dubbed sunshine saturday, with travel agents predicting a big uptick in bookings from people who want to get away from it all. simon jones, bbc news. security forces in kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of protesters taking part in huge riots in its main city,
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almaty. the unrest began on sunday, when the cost of fuel was doubled. kazakhstan's neighbour russia has sent in paratroopers to support the government. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. caroline, what can you tell us? good morning. difficult to ascertain exactly what has been going on in kazakhstan overnight because of course there is still very patchy internet, lots of websites are still down. we have not had much today from the kazakh authorities about what happened. yesterday the kazakh president said that security trips were regaining control of almaty, the largest city in kazakhstan. we now know that thousands of people have been arrested and, in the authorities' words, at least 26 people have been "liquidated". the only thing we have heard this morning is that there has been a
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statement from the national security committee which said because arc —— kazakh authorities detained the former head of the committee on suspicion of treason, somebody cold karim massemov. that suggests there is an internal power struggle going on within because it's done, at the moment we don't know because we are still waiting for more information, but people are certainly speculating that more will develop soon. three white men are beginning life sentences in the us state of georgia for murdering a blackjogger who ran through their neighbourhood. 25—year—old ahmaud arbery was chased in pick—up trucks and shot in a case that became became a focus of protests by the black lives matter movement. david willis reports. ahmaud arbery's death has been likened by his family to a latter—day lynching. three white men hunted down the unarmed jogger and killed him in cold blood. footage of the incident led to nationwide protests after it emerged that, despite being
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interviewed at the scene, none of the men involved had been arrested after local officials accepted their plea of self—defence and deemed the killing justified. former police officer gregory mcmichael, his 33—year—old son, travis, and the man who filmed ahmaud arbery's death, william 'roddie' bryan, were eventually arrested and brought to trial and found guilty of murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they didn't want him in their community. these men deserve the maximum sentence for their crimes. ahmaud never said a word to them. he never threatened them. he just wanted to be left alone. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently for one minute.
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to set in context the terror that he said ahmaud arbery must have suffered as he was chased through a residential neighbourhood for more than five minutes, thejudge ordered a moment's silence before sentencing all three men to life in prison. 0nly william 'roddie' bryan will be eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glynn county in front of this courthouse, think about all the black people who have been lynched in the history of america, in georgia who never, ever got their day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to a period of national reckoning over the state of racial injustice in this country, one which culminated in nationwide protests over
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the death of george floyd. though these men received the maximum sentence, civil rights campaigners believe it will take more than that to influence attitudes that in many cases go back generations. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. allegations of another party at downing street are set to be included in the official investigation into events held at number ten during the pandemic. it comes after borisjohnson's former chief adviser, dominic cummings claimed a senior official invited people to "socially distanced drinks" in the garden, while restrictions were in place in may 2020. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now. jonathan, what more do we know? another year, but the same questions remain, don't they? more questions about alleged parties? goad remain, don't they? more questions about alleged parties? good morning. yes, 'ust about alleged parties? good morning. yes. just when — about alleged parties? good morning. yes. just when you — about alleged parties? good morning. yes, just when you thought _ about alleged parties? good morning. yes, just when you thought you - about alleged parties? good morning.
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yes, just when you thought you had . yes, just when you thought you had heard the last of drinks at downing street, dominic cummings published a blog, a former senior adviser to the prime minister, of course, yesterday, offering friendly advice to the senior civil servant, sue grey, who is now charged with leading the investigation, the enquiry into several events that may or may not have broken the rules in 2020, when london was at various points under strict restrictions, banning social mixing. in particular he is talking as you say about an event on may 20, when an invitation went out to what was described as socially distanced drinks. mr cummings says he wondered time, along with another official, this could potentially breach lockdown regulations, and suggested sue grey should dig up the email that he sent in warning, and also the invitation itself. we understand her investigation will extend to cover it will also, we are told, look into
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the now infamous picture which the guardian newspaper published last month, which showed the prime minister, mr cummings himself and other at ten setting out on the terrace with bottles of wine and a cheese board, but has been described as a work meeting by the prime minister and others, and dominic cummings has added his voice to the defence of what was happening in that picture, saying that at the time, staff are encouraged to hold meetings outside because the pandemic of course meant that was safer and that particular event was, in his words, in no sense a party. jonathan, while you are with us, away from the cut and thrust of the day—to—day of normal politics, if you like, politics of all sides were united in the past hour, paying tribute to labour mp peterjackson only? tribute to labour mp peterjackson onl ? , , . , . tribute to labour mp peterjackson onl? , , ., tribute to labour mp peterjackson onl? , , . , only? yes, this was a real shock when the _ only? yes, this was a real shock when the news _ only? yes, this was a real shock when the news came _ only? yes, this was a real shock when the news came through i only? yes, this was a real shock when the news came through to | only? yes, this was a real shock i when the news came through to us yesterday, jack tony, 73, died suddenly at his home. —— s, los
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angeles. ——jack suddenly at his home. —— s, los angeles. —— jack dromey. suddenly at his home. —— s, los angeles. ——jack dromey. not suddenly at his home. —— s, los angeles. —— jack dromey. not a household name but certainly a prominent labour figure, household name but certainly a prominent labourfigure, somebody prominent labour figure, somebody well liked prominent labourfigure, somebody well liked and well—respected in the labour party in the trade union movement because he was a senior official in the transport general workers union before he came to parliament, but also beyond that, and i think what strikes you when you look at the tributes to jack dromey, husband of harriet harman, the former labour deputy leader, was that they come from all sides of the political spectrum and they are particularly heartfelt and particularly heartfelt and particularly warm. to give you a flavour of that, some conservative mps paying tribute to him, nadine dorries, culture secretary, saying he was a kind gentleman who never let his politics getting the way of his good nature, and the trade minister penny mordaunt, saying that parliament lost a giant.— parliament lost a giant. jonathan wa , parliament lost a giant. jonathan way. thanks _ parliament lost a giant. jonathan way. thanks for— parliament lost a giant. jonathan way, thanks forjoining _ parliament lost a giant. jonathan way, thanks forjoining us. i secondary pupils in england went back to school this week, with new rules aimed slowing the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus. the new advice, which brings england in line with scotland and northern ireland, requires the use of face coverings in the classroom for
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all students and staff, as well as a requirement to take two lateral flow tests each week. elsewhere in wales, whilst the guidance around the use of face coverings is the same as the rest of the uk, testing is being encouraged at least three times per week. so, what do students make of the new measures? and their teachers? it can be hard sometimes to hear the teachers because of the masks and they are two metres apart so you can't always hear everything they say but overall i think it is ok. obviously it is a bit awkward and it feels _ obviously it is a bit awkward and it feels a _ obviously it is a bit awkward and it feels a bit — obviously it is a bit awkward and it feels a bit hot but i can understand why we _ feels a bit hot but i can understand why we wear it. and it's good that we are _ why we wear it. and it's good that we are i — why we wear it. and it's good that we are. ~' �* , why we wear it. and it's good that we are. ~ �* , . why we wear it. and it's good that we are. ~ 2 . . we are. i think it's great that we are back in _ we are. i think it's great that we are back in school _ we are. i think it's great that we are back in school but _ we are. i think it's great that we are back in school but the i we are. i think it's great that we are back in school but the mask| are back in school but the mask situation — are back in school but the mask situation is _ are back in school but the mask situation is quite _ are back in school but the mask situation is quite inaudible - are back in school but the mask situation is quite inaudible i. are back in school but the mask. situation is quite inaudible i can see why— situation is quite inaudible i can see why we — situation is quite inaudible i can see why we have _ situation is quite inaudible i can see why we have to _ situation is quite inaudible i can see why we have to wear - situation is quite inaudible i can see why we have to wear it - situation is quite inaudible i can
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see why we have to wear it to i see why we have to wear it to prevent — see why we have to wear it to prevent vulnerable _ see why we have to wear it to prevent vulnerable people i see why we have to wear it to prevent vulnerable people ini prevent vulnerable people in different— prevent vulnerable people in different families _ prevent vulnerable people in different families getting i prevent vulnerable people in i different families getting covid. i find it— different families getting covid. i find it quite — different families getting covid. i find it quite distracting _ different families getting covid. i find it quite distracting when- different families getting covid. i| find it quite distracting when your teachers — find it quite distracting when your teachers are _ find it quite distracting when your teachers are wearing _ find it quite distracting when your teachers are wearing a _ find it quite distracting when your teachers are wearing a mask- find it quite distracting when your teachers are wearing a mask andi find it quite distracting when your. teachers are wearing a mask and you can't really _ teachers are wearing a mask and you can't really seem _ teachers are wearing a mask and you can't really see... i'm _ teachers are wearing a mask and you can't really see... i'm quite - teachers are wearing a mask and you can't really see... i'm quite a - can't really see... i'm quite a visual— can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner _ can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner so— can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner so i— can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner so i like - can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner so i like to i can't really see... i'm quite a visual learner so i like to see| can't really see... i'm quite a . visual learner so i like to see in alla _ visual learner so i like to see in all:. ., , ., , visual learner so i like to see in all:. ., , ., y , ., visual learner so i like to see in all:. y all:. lots of my friends are happy to wear masks _ all:. lots of my friends are happy to wear masks and _ all:. lots of my friends are happy to wear masks and it _ all:. lots of my friends are happy to wear masks and it makes i all:. lots of my friends are happy to wear masks and it makes it i all:. lots of my friends are happy l to wear masks and it makes it safer for everyone but we all crack on and get everything done.— get everything done. crack on, they have been cracking _ get everything done. crack on, they have been cracking on _ get everything done. crack on, they have been cracking on for _ get everything done. crack on, they have been cracking on for so - get everything done. crack on, they have been cracking on for so long i have been cracking on for so long though. have been cracking on for so long thouuh. ~ . , though. when we look back at these, ou aet though. when we look back at these, you get back — though. when we look back at these, you get back a _ though. when we look back at these, you get back a few — though. when we look back at these, you get back a few years _ though. when we look back at these, you get back a few years and - though. when we look back at these, you get back a few years and we i though. when we look back at these, you get back a few years and we willl you get back a few years and we will look back and we cannot believe it was schooling in 2022. fir look back and we cannot believe it was schooling in 2022.— look back and we cannot believe it was schooling in 2022. or we will be used to it. was schooling in 2022. or we will be used to it- it's _ was schooling in 2022. or we will be used to it. it's tricky _ was schooling in 2022. or we will be used to it. it's tricky for _ used to it. it's tricky for teenagers, isn't it? we're joined now by becky arnold, geadteacher at framingham earl high school in norwich, and also geoff barton, from the association of school and college leaders. we heard their young people on the whole get it but they are saying it's annoying and you cannot understand everything being said in
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class. how has it gone down in your school? ,. class. how has it gone down in your school? . , .,, class. how has it gone down in your school? . , . school? the same as those children said, the school? the same as those children said. they are _ school? the same as those children said, they are cracking _ school? the same as those children said, they are cracking on, - school? the same as those children said, they are cracking on, a - school? the same as those children said, they are cracking on, a great i said, they are cracking on, a great phrase _ said, they are cracking on, a great phrase from — said, they are cracking on, a great phrase from that young man, that's what they— phrase from that young man, that's what they are doing. children do not like wearing a mask and they would prefer— like wearing a mask and they would prefer to— like wearing a mask and they would prefer to have it off so they can communicate more easily with their teachers _ communicate more easily with their teachers and peers but they understand why they are doing it so children— understand why they are doing it so children are wearing their masks and we've _ children are wearing their masks and we've had _ children are wearing their masks and we've had a — children are wearing their masks and we've had a really high level of compliance from students, and those who are _ compliance from students, and those who are medically exempt, we are aware _ who are medically exempt, we are aware of— who are medically exempt, we are aware of those students and we are not challenging those students because we know why they are not wearing _ because we know why they are not wearing a — because we know why they are not wearing a mask but it is difficult and we — wearing a mask but it is difficult and we have children sitting in classes — and we have children sitting in classes wearing thick winter coats and masks — classes wearing thick winter coats and masks and it is not the picture that we _ and masks and it is not the picture that we want to see in a classroom but we _ that we want to see in a classroom but we are — that we want to see in a classroom but we are doing it because we want school _ but we are doing it because we want school to _ but we are doing it because we want school to stay open and we know that school _ school to stay open and we know that school is _ school to stay open and we know that school is the — school to stay open and we know that school is the best place for young people _ school is the best place for young people to — school is the best place for young people to be both for their learning and their— people to be both for their learning and their welfare and also supporting their parents so that their— supporting their parents so that their parents can be back at work and doing — their parents can be back at work and doing what they need to do so we are all— and doing what they need to do so we are all cracking on. and
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and doing what they need to do so we are all cracking on.— are all cracking on. and what about ou, how are all cracking on. and what about you. how are _ are all cracking on. and what about you. how are you — are all cracking on. and what about you, how are you because - are all cracking on. and what about you, how are you because on i are all cracking on. and what about you, how are you because on top . are all cracking on. and what about| you, how are you because on top of looking after young people, you have to think about making sure they have done their lateral flow test and about enhanced ventilation. it's a lot of pressure! it about enhanced ventilation. it's a lot of pressure!— about enhanced ventilation. it's a lot of pressure! it is, i started my head ship in _ lot of pressure! it is, i started my head ship in january _ lot of pressure! it is, i started my head ship in january 2020 - lot of pressure! it is, i started my head ship in january 2020 so i lot of pressure! it is, i started my head ship in january 2020 so my. head ship injanuary 2020 so my entire _ head ship injanuary 2020 so my entire period as a head teacher has been _ entire period as a head teacher has been involved with hovea does well so it has— been involved with hovea does well so it has been really difficult but -- covid — so it has been really difficult but -- covid as— so it has been really difficult but —— covid as well. i come into this profession— —— covid as well. i come into this profession because i wanted to help young _ profession because i wanted to help young people so now that it is about their safety — young people so now that it is about their safety and the health and that is fine _ their safety and the health and that is fine and — their safety and the health and that is fine and i'm prepared to do it but it— is fine and i'm prepared to do it but it is— is fine and i'm prepared to do it but it is taking advice from people like geoff— but it is taking advice from people like geoff and people at the norfolk county _ like geoff and people at the norfolk county counsel and people in my trust. _ county counsel and people in my trust, taking advice from them and making _ trust, taking advice from them and making sure that doing as much as we can to _ making sure that doing as much as we can to make _ making sure that doing as much as we can to make school a safe place where _ can to make school a safe place where children can come and moan. geoff, _ where children can come and moan. geoff, thinking about the bigger picture, i mean, lots of kids have now been vaccinated. lots of kids have had covid. i wonder, are these
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measures actually working? how convinced are you that masks in the classroom are making a difference? it's a good question, john. i am a humble _ it's a good question, john. i am a humble english _ it's a good question, john. i am a humble english teacher— it's a good question, john. i am a humble english teacher my - humble english teacher my backgrounds— humble english teacher my backgrounds are _ humble english teacher my backgrounds are probably. humble english teacher my i backgrounds are probably not humble english teacher my - backgrounds are probably not the best person — backgrounds are probably not the best person to _ backgrounds are probably not the best person to make _ backgrounds are probably not the best person to make an- backgrounds are probably not the| best person to make an evaluation backgrounds are probably not the i best person to make an evaluation on public— best person to make an evaluation on public health — best person to make an evaluation on public health but _ best person to make an evaluation on public health but all— best person to make an evaluation on public health but all i— best person to make an evaluation on public health but all i would _ best person to make an evaluation on public health but all i would say- best person to make an evaluation on public health but all i would say is i public health but all i would say is this _ public health but all i would say is this it _ public health but all i would say is this it feels — public health but all i would say is this. it feels to _ public health but all i would say is this. it feels to me _ public health but all i would say is this. it feels to me at _ public health but all i would say is this. it feels to me at the - public health but all i would say is this. it feels to me at the end i public health but all i would say is this. it feels to me at the end of. this. it feels to me at the end of this. it feels to me at the end of this week— this. it feels to me at the end of this week where _ this. it feels to me at the end of this week where one _ this. it feels to me at the end of this week where one week - this. it feels to me at the end of this week where one week ago, | this. it feels to me at the end of| this week where one week ago, i this. it feels to me at the end of- this week where one week ago, i went to walk— this week where one week ago, i went to walk my— this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog — this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a _ this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a week— this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a week ago _ this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a week ago and - this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a week ago and in i this week where one week ago, i went to walk my dog a week ago and in the| to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour— to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i _ to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i had — to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i had 12— to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i had 12 phone _ to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i had 12 phone calls- to walk my dog a week ago and in the one hour i had 12 phone calls from i one hour i had 12 phone calls from journalists — one hour i had 12 phone calls from journalists asking _ one hour i had 12 phone calls from journalists asking the _ one hour i had 12 phone calls from journalists asking the same - one hour i had 12 phone calls from journalists asking the same thing, j journalists asking the same thing, how bad _ journalists asking the same thing, how bad will— journalists asking the same thing, how bad will it — journalists asking the same thing, how bad will it be? _ journalists asking the same thing, how bad will it be? what - journalists asking the same thing, how bad will it be? what other. how bad will it be? what other problems? _ how bad will it be? what other problems? i_ how bad will it be? what other problems? i get— how bad will it be? what other problems? i get to _ how bad will it be? what other problems? i get to the - how bad will it be? what other problems? i get to the end i how bad will it be? what other problems? i get to the end ofi how bad will it be? what other- problems? i get to the end of those this week— problems? i get to the end of those this week and — problems? i get to the end of those this weekand i_ problems? i get to the end of those this week and i hear— problems? i get to the end of those this week and i hear that _ problems? i get to the end of those this week and i hear that young i this week and i hear that young people — this week and i hear that young pe0ple do— this week and i hear that young pe0ple do not_ this week and i hear that young people do not like _ this week and i hear that young people do not like wearing - this week and i hear that young . people do not like wearing masks this week and i hear that young - people do not like wearing masks but rick ties_ people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it _ people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is — people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is one _ people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is one way— people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is one way they _ people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is one way they stay - people do not like wearing masks but rick ties it is one way they stay in - rick ties it is one way they stay in education — rick ties it is one way they stay in education and _ rick ties it is one way they stay in education and i— rick ties it is one way they stay in education and i listen _ rick ties it is one way they stay in education and i listen to - rick ties it is one way they stay in education and i listen to becky i education and i listen to becky reminds— education and i listen to becky reminds us_ education and i listen to becky reminds us to _ education and i listen to becky reminds us to come _ education and i listen to becky reminds us to come into- education and i listen to becky - reminds us to come into education not expecting _ reminds us to come into education not expecting it— reminds us to come into education not expecting it to _ reminds us to come into education not expecting it to be _ reminds us to come into education not expecting it to be easy- reminds us to come into education not expecting it to be easy or- reminds us to come into education not expecting it to be easy or be . not expecting it to be easy or be like this— not expecting it to be easy or be like this but— not expecting it to be easy or be like this but nevertheless - not expecting it to be easy or be like this but nevertheless with l not expecting it to be easy or be i like this but nevertheless with the ntotal— like this but nevertheless with the moral purpose _ like this but nevertheless with the moral purpose that _ like this but nevertheless with the moral purpose that we _ like this but nevertheless with the moral purpose that we are - like this but nevertheless with the moral purpose that we are going i like this but nevertheless with the| moral purpose that we are going to do it and _ moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks— moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks is— moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks is one _ moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks is one way- moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks is one way we - moral purpose that we are going to do it and masks is one way we cani do it and masks is one way we can .et do it and masks is one way we can get more — do it and masks is one way we can get more people _ do it and masks is one way we can get more people in— do it and masks is one way we can get more people in school, and i get more people in school, and remind — get more people in school, and remind ourselves— get more people in school, and remind ourselves young - get more people in school, and remind ourselves young people get more people in school, and - remind ourselves young people are playing _ remind ourselves young people are playing an — remind ourselves young people are playing an important _ remind ourselves young people are playing an important role _ remind ourselves young people are playing an important role in - remind ourselves young people arei playing an important role in protect each other— playing an important role in protect each other and _ playing an important role in protect each other and their— playing an important role in protect each other and their teachers, - playing an important role in protect each other and their teachers, and i playing an important role in protect| each other and their teachers, and i think— each other and their teachers, and i think they— each other and their teachers, and i think they will— each other and their teachers, and i think they will look _ each other and their teachers, and i think they will look but _ each other and their teachers, and i think they will look but almost - think they will look but almost coming — think they will look but almost coming then—
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think they will look but almost coming then a's _ think they will look but almost coming then a's point- think they will look but almost coming then a's point earlier. think they will look but almost . coming then a's point earlier but it's unbelievable, _ coming then a's point earlier but it's unbelievable, almost - coming then a's point earlier but it's unbelievable, almost like - coming then a's point earlier but i it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees _ it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees of— it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees of the _ it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees of the second _ it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees of the second world - it's unbelievable, almost like those evacuees of the second world war, thinking _ evacuees of the second world war, thinking look— evacuees of the second world war, thinking look at _ evacuees of the second world war, thinking look at what _ evacuees of the second world war, thinking look at what we _ evacuees of the second world war, thinking look at what we did - evacuees of the second world war, thinking look at what we did and i thinking look at what we did and achieved — thinking look at what we did and achieved and learned, _ thinking look at what we did and achieved and learned, we - thinking look at what we did and achieved and learned, we were. thinking look at what we did and . achieved and learned, we were part of this— achieved and learned, we were part of this covid — achieved and learned, we were part of this covid generation _ achieved and learned, we were part of this covid generation and - achieved and learned, we were part of this covid generation and i - achieved and learned, we were part of this covid generation and i thinki of this covid generation and i think all credit— of this covid generation and i think all credit to — of this covid generation and i think all credit to those _ of this covid generation and i think all credit to those young _ of this covid generation and i think all credit to those young people i of this covid generation and i think. all credit to those young people and staff in _ all credit to those young people and staff in school— all credit to those young people and staff in school and _ all credit to those young people and staff in school and people _ all credit to those young people and staff in school and people leaving i staff in school and people leaving them _ staff in school and people leaving them like — staff in school and people leaving them like becky— staff in school and people leaving them like becky is— staff in school and people leaving them like becky is in— staff in school and people leaving them like becky is in norfolk. - staff in school and people leaving| them like becky is in norfolk. find them like becky is in norfolk. and i'm the teachers _ them like becky is in norfolk. i'm the teachers you mentioned, them like becky is in norfolk.- i'm the teachers you mentioned, what is the state of play this week in terms of staff insert, people isolating because of covid? i do for staff absences. the isolating because of covid? i do for staff absences.— staff absences. the crisis may be a --oular staff absences. the crisis may be a pepular kick _ staff absences. the crisis may be a popular kick catastrophe, - staff absences. the crisis may be a popular kick catastrophe, i - staff absences. the crisis may be a popular kick catastrophe, i am - staff absences. the crisis may be a popular kick catastrophe, i am a i popular kick catastrophe, i am a negotiator. _ popular kick catastrophe, i am a negotiator. -- _ popular kick catastrophe, i am a negotiator, —— apocalyptic. - popular kick catastrophe, i am a negotiator, —— apocalyptic. noti popular kick catastrophe, i am a . negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools— negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools and — negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools and colleges _ negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools and colleges are _ negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools and colleges are open - negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all schools and colleges are open it . negotiator, —— apocalyptic. not all. schools and colleges are open it and some _ schools and colleges are open it and some will— schools and colleges are open it and some will not — schools and colleges are open it and some will not be _ schools and colleges are open it and some will not be opening _ schools and colleges are open it and some will not be opening yet - schools and colleges are open it and some will not be opening yet —— - schools and colleges are open it and some will not be opening yet —— i. schools and colleges are open it and i some will not be opening yet —— i am an english— some will not be opening yet —— i am an english teacher, _ some will not be opening yet —— i am an english teacher, after— some will not be opening yet —— i am an english teacher, after all. - some will not be opening yet —— i am an english teacher, after all. a - an english teacher, after all. a snapshot — an english teacher, after all. a snapshot was _ an english teacher, after all. a snapshot was taken _ an english teacher, after all. a snapshot was taken of - an english teacher, after all. a snapshot was taken of a - an english teacher, after all. a snapshot was taken of a small| an english teacher, after all. a - snapshot was taken of a small number of primary— snapshot was taken of a small number of primary schools _ snapshot was taken of a small number of primary schools earlier— snapshot was taken of a small number of primary schools earlier in _ snapshot was taken of a small number of primary schools earlier in the - of primary schools earlier in the week— of primary schools earlier in the week that — of primary schools earlier in the week that suggested _ of primary schools earlier in the week that suggested there - of primary schools earlier in the week that suggested there mayi of primary schools earlier in the i week that suggested there may be about— week that suggested there may be about 10%— week that suggested there may be about 10% of— week that suggested there may be about 10% of staff, _ week that suggested there may be about 10% of staff, the _ week that suggested there may be i about 10% of staff, the government is planning — about10% of staff, the government is planning for— about 10% of staff, the government is planning for 25% _ about 10% of staff, the government is planning for 25% of— about 10% of staff, the government is planning for 25% of staff- about 10% of staff, the government is planning for 25% of staff off - about 10% of staff, the government is planning for 25% of staff off and i is planning for 25% of staff off and while _ is planning for 25% of staff off and while we _ is planning for 25% of staff off and while we have _ is planning for 25% of staff off and while we have some _ is planning for 25% of staff off and while we have some people - is planning for 25% of staff off and | while we have some people saying guite _ while we have some people saying quite rightly— while we have some people saying quite rightly that _ while we have some people saying quite rightly that schools - while we have some people saying quite rightly that schools must - while we have some people saying quite rightly that schools must say open _ quite rightly that schools must say open at _ quite rightly that schools must say open at all — quite rightly that schools must say open at all costs, _ quite rightly that schools must say open at all costs, quite _ quite rightly that schools must say open at all costs, quite right, - quite rightly that schools must say open at all costs, quite right, the i open at all costs, quite right, the trouble _ open at all costs, quite right, the trouble is — open at all costs, quite right, the trouble is you _ open at all costs, quite right, the trouble is you have _ open at all costs, quite right, the trouble is you have to _ open at all costs, quite right, the
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trouble is you have to have - trouble is you have to have teachers. _ trouble is you have to have teachers, qualified - trouble is you have to have i teachers, qualified teachers, trouble is you have to have - teachers, qualified teachers, who can teach— teachers, qualified teachers, who can teach the _ teachers, qualified teachers, who can teach the young _ teachers, qualified teachers, who can teach the young people - teachers, qualified teachers, who can teach the young people and l can teach the young people and that's— can teach the young people and that's where _ can teach the young people and that's where the _ can teach the young people and that's where the issue - can teach the young people and that's where the issue is - can teach the young people and. that's where the issue is because can teach the young people and - that's where the issue is because we do not _ that's where the issue is because we do not have — that's where the issue is because we do not have lines— that's where the issue is because we do not have lines of— that's where the issue is because we do not have lines of people - that's where the issue is because we do not have lines of people around l do not have lines of people around the block— do not have lines of people around the block outside _ do not have lines of people around the block outside every _ retired teachers, ofsted inspectors who could play— retired teachers, ofsted inspectors who could play a _ retired teachers, ofsted inspectors who could play a part in this, and i who could play a part in this, and supply— who could play a part in this, and supply teachers _ who could play a part in this, and supply teachers saying _ who could play a part in this, and supply teachers saying i - who could play a part in this, and supply teachers saying i will - who could play a part in this, and supply teachers saying i will step| supply teachers saying i will step in, supply teachers saying i will step in. so _ supply teachers saying i will step in. so next — supply teachers saying i will step in, so next week— supply teachers saying i will step in, so next week i— supply teachers saying i will step in, so next week i think- supply teachers saying i will step in, so next week i think will- supply teachers saying i will step in, so next week i think will be . supply teachers saying i will step i in, so next week i think will be the critical_ in, so next week i think will be the critical one — in, so next week i think will be the critical one in — in, so next week i think will be the critical one in terms _ in, so next week i think will be the critical one in terms of— in, so next week i think will be the critical one in terms of absence - critical one in terms of absence rates _ critical one in terms of absence rates and — critical one in terms of absence rates and all _ critical one in terms of absence rates and all the _ critical one in terms of absence rates and all the more - critical one in terms of absence rates and all the more reason i critical one in terms of absence | rates and all the more reason if critical one in terms of absence - rates and all the more reason if one of those _ rates and all the more reason if one of those mitigations _ rates and all the more reason if one of those mitigations alongside - of those mitigations alongside testing — of those mitigations alongside testing and _ of those mitigations alongside testing and ventilation - of those mitigations alongside testing and ventilation is - of those mitigations alongside testing and ventilation is the i of those mitigations alongside i testing and ventilation is the face coverings. — testing and ventilation is the face coverings. then _ testing and ventilation is the face coverings, then a _ testing and ventilation is the face coverings, then a range - testing and ventilation is the face coverings, then a range of- testing and ventilation is the face coverings, then a range of things| coverings, then a range of things hopefully— coverings, then a range of things hopefully will _ coverings, then a range of things hopefully will minimise _ coverings, then a range of things i hopefully will minimise disruption, particularly — hopefully will minimise disruption, particutarty for— hopefully will minimise disruption, particularly for those _ hopefully will minimise disruption, particularly for those young - hopefully will minimise disruption, i particularly for those young people who wiii— particularly for those young people who will be — particularly for those young people who will be worrying _ particularly for those young people who will be worrying about - particularly for those young people who will be worrying about their. who will be worrying about their exams — who will be worrying about their exams in — who will be worrying about their exams in the _ who will be worrying about their exams in the summer. - who will be worrying about their exams in the summer.- who will be worrying about their exams in the summer. becky, what im act exams in the summer. becky, what impact does — exams in the summer. becky, what impact does it _ exams in the summer. becky, what impact does it have _ exams in the summer. becky, what impact does it have on _ exams in the summer. becky, what impact does it have on learning - impact does it have on learning itself because i'm thinking about subjects where that visible verbal communication is really important, heavy languages or drama, music. it must be having an impact on how much they are learning. it must be having an impact on how much they are learning.— they are learning. it does have an im act they are learning. it does have an impact but _ they are learning. it does have an impact but you — they are learning. it does have an impact but you have _ they are learning. it does have an impact but you have to _ they are learning. it does have an j impact but you have to remember they are learning. it does have an - impact but you have to remember that this is— impact but you have to remember that this is not— impact but you have to remember that this is not the first time we've had masks _ this is not the first time we've had masks in — this is not the first time we've had masks in the classroom so for us as teachers. _ masks in the classroom so for us as teachers. we — masks in the classroom so for us as teachers, we have this as a period
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of learning — teachers, we have this as a period of learning last year and we have learned — of learning last year and we have learned quite a lot from it so actually, _ learned quite a lot from it so actually, teachers for music and drama _ actually, teachers for music and drama have workarounds for everything they are doing and our music— everything they are doing and our music department and drama department are fabulous and i determined that the children will still experience those subjects and if they— still experience those subjects and if they have to make adaptations, they will. — if they have to make adaptations, they will, but we are by no means of stopping _ they will, but we are by no means of stopping any subjects. we are carrying — stopping any subjects. we are carrying on withjust having workarounds so with drama, where the children— workarounds so with drama, where the children are _ workarounds so with drama, where the children are rehearsing, they are rehearsing — children are rehearsing, they are rehearsing wearing their masks but performance, we can organise the room _ performance, we can organise the room so _ performance, we can organise the room so that actually we can have a performance space and distance the children— performance space and distance the children so— performance space and distance the children so they can take off their masks _ children so they can take off their masks if— children so they can take off their masks if need be for a short period of time _ masks if need be for a short period of time to— masks if need be for a short period of time to do a short performance and then— of time to do a short performance and then put their masks back on. it and then put their masks back on. sounds like and then put their masks back on. it sounds like you are cracking on, as we heard. i don't suppose you have a choice. becky arnold, geoff partin. thank you so much for your time this morning. thank you so much for your time this morninu. ,, ., thank you so much for your time this mornin. ,, ., . ., . ,, thank you so much for your time this morninu. ,, ., . ., . ,, ., morning. shall we crack on with the weather? matt _
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morning. shall we crack on with the weather? matt was _ morning. shall we crack on with the weather? matt was on _ morning. shall we crack on with the weather? matt was on a _ morning. shall we crack on with the weather? matt was on a skyscraper| morning. shall we crack on with the l weather? matt was on a skyscraper in new york 30 minutes ago. you weather? matt was on a skyscraper in new york 30 minutes ago.— new york 30 minutes ago. you have come down — new york 30 minutes ago. you have come down to _ new york 30 minutes ago. you have come down to earth. _ new york 30 minutes ago. you have come down to earth. very _ new york 30 minutes ago. you have come down to earth. very good - come down to earth. very good morning. if you have any outdoor jobs today, my best advice is to leave them till later because i wet and windy start to the day across much of the uk but things will gradually turn brighterfrom much of the uk but things will gradually turn brighter from the west as we go through the morning and into the afternoon with one or two spots especially wet, the south—east and east anglia where the rain comes and goes but heaviest is here, the darker band of blue across western areas. snow across the mountains of scotland. western scotland, northern ireland seeing the back edge of the morning's rain and sunny spells and increasing wintry showers. northern england brightens up around lunch, well some southwest after heavy rain late morning into the afternoon you should see things get better. showers are still around but the heaviest rain by the end of the afternoon from the south—east midlands through east anglia and the south—easterly gusty winds attached. temporarily lifting the temperature in the middle of the data by the end
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of the afternoon the sunshine is back for some of you, 4— nine celsius the general highs. rain clears east anglia south—east as we have through the evening and into the night clear styles across eastern areas, cholesterol punctuated by some showers in the west and some will be on the wintry side with a bit of sleet and snow. the risk of ice of course where those temperatures only a few degrees above freezing into tomorrow morning. a cold start to tomorrow morning. a cold start to tomorrow morning with a much brighter start compared with today, some sometime times across many southern eastern areas, plenty of showers particularly western island, northern scotland and north—west england and northway while later, call in the breeze but nothing unusual at this in january. call in the breeze but nothing unusual at this injanuary. thank you matt. now it's time for ros atkins to take an in—depth look at the events leading up to the now infamous us capitol riots, a year on. you will know what happened in washington onjanuary you will know what happened in washington on january six last year. we all watched the storming of the
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captiol shop america, shocked the world. this is the story of what happened that day and what has happened that day and what has happened since. at the heart of the violence in the home of america public democracy, a belief that that democracy was not working. i public democracy, a belief that that democracy was not working. i believe this election — democracy was not working. i believe this election was _ democracy was not working. i believe this election was stolen. _ democracy was not working. i believe this election was stolen. by _ democracy was not working. i believe this election was stolen. by joe - this election was stolen. byjoe biden and, and... his democratic friends. �* . ., ., , friends. believe the election was stolen was _ friends. believe the election was stolen was widespread _ friends. believe the election was stolen was widespread among i stolen was widespread among republican supporters. it still is. and the idea has been relentlessly pushed by donald trump, for the election he predicted it would be pregnant once he had lost, carried on. . . pregnant once he had lost, carried on, , , ., pregnant once he had lost, carried on. , , ., , on. this is a case where they were stealin: on. this is a case where they were stealing an — on. this is a case where they were stealing an election, _ on. this is a case where they were stealing an election, they - on. this is a case where they were stealing an election, they are - stealing an election, they are trying to rig an election, and we cannot let that happen.- trying to rig an election, and we cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt. — cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt, this _ cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt, this is _ cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt, this is not _ cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt, this is not true - cannot let that happen. unless there is any doubt, this is not true and - is any doubt, this is not true and there is no evidence of widespread electoral fraud and no evidence of that fraud affected who won but a lack of evidence was not stopping the president or his supporters and so when donald trump called on
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people they had to washington on january six, they did, in the thousands. this was the day congress would certify the results. we now know this was also the day sometime supporters were trying to stop that from happening. at around noon president trump addressed a rally near the white house. and president trump addressed a rally near the white house.— president trump addressed a rally near the white house. and we fight. we fi . ht near the white house. and we fight. we fight like — near the white house. and we fight. we fight like hell. _ near the white house. and we fight. we fight like hell. and _ near the white house. and we fight. we fight like hell. and if _ near the white house. and we fight. we fight like hell. and if you - near the white house. and we fight. we fight like hell. and if you don't . we fight like hell. and if you don't fight like hell, you are not going to have a country anymore. dozens of time sopporters _ to have a country anymore. dozens of time supporters responded _ to have a country anymore. dozens of time supporters responded by - to have a country anymore. dozens of| time supporters responded by walking to the capital building, some were clear on their intentions. freedom! chara e the clear on their intentions. freedom! charge the capital! _ clear on their intentions. freedom! charge the capital! at _ clear on their intentions. freedom! charge the capital! at around - clear on their intentions. freedom! charge the capital! at around 2pm, the crowd turned _ charge the capital! at around 2pm, the crowd turned violent, - charge the capital! at around 2pm, the crowd turned violent, the - the crowd turned violent, the storming of the captiol had begun. as the attack develops, police officers defended the lockdown debating chambers while the politicians took cover. protesters assaulted officers with pipes and bars. the office of house speaker nancy pelosi was ransacked. and vice president mike pence, who was overseeing the certification ofjoe biden's victory, was rushed out of
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the building. while all of this was happening, there was silence from the president, eventually hours after the attack began president trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent — trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent election. _ trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent election. but _ trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent election. but we - trump did release a video. this was a fraudulent election. but we can't. a fraudulent election. but we can't buy into the hands of these people. we have to have peace. 50 go home. we have to have peace. 50 go home. we love you. you are very special. in time, they did go home at the attack would claim five lives, scores of police officers were injured, there was millions of dollars' worth of damage. and many people were clear who was responsible. this is one republican strategist. this responsible. this is one republican strateuist. . . responsible. this is one republican strateuist. , , , strategist. this is perhaps the worst day _ strategist. this is perhaps the worst day in — strategist. this is perhaps the worst day in america - strategist. this is perhaps the worst day in america since - strategist. this is perhaps the | worst day in america since 9/11 strategist. this is perhaps the - worst day in america since 9/11 and i don't use that kind of rhetoric lightly. all of this was preventable from the beginning. and so, the president does their significant, significant blame for this. in president does their significant, significant blame for this. in time, the house of _ significant blame for this. in time, the house of representatives - significant blame for this. in time, - the house of representatives charged mr trump with incitement of insurrection, making him the only president in us history to be
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impeached twice. the jurors president in us history to be impeached twice. thejurors in this impeachment trial america's senators and already, many of the president of migrant party had condemned him. there is no question, none, but president trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking events of the day. but morally responsible for provoking events of the day.— morally responsible for provoking events of the day. but in the end, enou:h events of the day. but in the end, enough republican _ events of the day. but in the end, enough republican senators - events of the day. but in the end, | enough republican senators chose events of the day. but in the end, - enough republican senators chose not to vote for a conviction. but i would not be the only trial connected to january six. justice department had begun its own investigations. in the past year, over 700 people had been arrested and charged, more than 70 have already sentenced. in the us attorney—general says the work is not done. attorney-general says the work is not done. .,. ., , ., attorney-general says the work is not done. ., , ., .«r not done. the actions we have taken thus far will — not done. the actions we have taken thus far will not _ not done. the actions we have taken thus far will not be _ not done. the actions we have taken thus far will not be our _ not done. the actions we have taken thus far will not be our last. - not done. the actions we have taken thus far will not be our last. the - thus far will not be our last. the justice department remains committed to holding alljanuary six perpetrators at any level
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accountable under law. that is a criticism of _ accountable under law. that is a criticism of the _ accountable under law. that is a criticism of the department - accountable under law. that is a criticism of the department of l criticism of the department of justice, though, that it is focused on the rioters themselves and less on the rioters themselves and less on those who may have organised, funded or incited them. the department refutes that criticism and also, its not the only source of scrutiny of these events. in the aftermath of january six, republicans and democrats in congress called for an independent investigation. for example, szeremeta lindsey graham, a staunch supporter, told fox news: —— senator. but a proposalfor exactly that was blocked by the republicans. instead, the democratic majority in the house of representatives, the lower house, set up a committee comprised of seven democrats and two republicans. it began hearing testimony injuly and its vice chair is the republican and fierce trump critic liz cheney. if is the republican and fierce trump critic liz cheney.— critic liz cheney. if those responsible _ critic liz cheney. if those responsible are - critic liz cheney. if those responsible are not - critic liz cheney. if those responsible are not held| responsible are not held accountable, and if congress does not act responsibly, this will remain a cancer on our constitutional republic.
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remain a cancer on our constitutional reublic. ~ , . constitutional republic. well, since jul . constitutional republic. well, since july. hundreds— constitutional republic. well, since july, hundreds of— constitutional republic. well, since july, hundreds of people _ constitutional republic. well, since july, hundreds of people have - constitutional republic. well, since | july, hundreds of people have been interviewed in private, most agreed to talk, some had to be subpoenaed, and two key people refused to take part. the first, stephen bannon, donald trump of my former presidential adviser who is out of the white house long before january six but not out of politics. and in his pod cast, the day before the attack, he said: for this, and for other reasons, the january six committee wants to talk to him but stephen bannon did not want to talk and is now being charged with criminal contempt of congress. the committee's democrat chair explained why. committee's democrat chair explained wh . ., ., , committee's democrat chair explained wh. ., ., , committee's democrat chair explained wh. , ., why. no-one in this country, no matter how _ why. no-one in this country, no matter how well _ why. no-one in this country, no matter how well the _ why. no-one in this country, no matter how well the or - why. no-one in this country, no matter how well the or how - why. no-one in this country, no - matter how well the or how powerful is above the law. for how wealthy. left unaddressed, this defiance may encourage others to follow stephen bannon down the same path. to which, stehen bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon _ bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon has— bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon has said _ bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon has said this: - bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon has said this: if - bannon down the same path. to which, stephen bannon has said this: if the .
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stephen bannon has said this: if the administrative state was to take me on, bring it, because we are here to fight this and we will go on offence and you stand by, 0k? the second person to defy the committee's subpoenaed was president trump's former chief of staff mark meadows who has also been found in contempt of congress and may face criminal charges. mr matos had handed over thousands of pages of records but then refused to co—operate further but even that material was revelatory. we saw text messages he had received during the attack fox news host laura ingram wrote: and there was also a message from the present�*s son, read out by liz cheney. . donald trump present�*s son, read out by liz cheney. . donald trumer texted cheney. . donald trumertexted again cheney. . donald trumer texted again and cheney. . donald trumertexted again and again. urging action by the president, quote, we need an oval office address. he has to leave now. in his ——it is gone too far and gotten out of hand. and quote. other messages were received the day before the attack. fox news host
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sean hannity said: you could argue he was right to be concerned. and the committee is requesting an interview with mr hanadi, but there is one key figure whose testimony and evidence relieved —— remains elusive. mirko ——mr hannity. i , president trump has perhaps unsurprisingly refused to co—operate. he has taken legal action to block the release of official white house communication records and these delays mean it's not certain the committee will finish its work before the mid—term elections in november and the politics of this remain far from predictable. while many condemned what happens onjanuary six, the idea that underpinned it remains. one year on from the storming of the capital, polls show two—thirds of republicans believe voter fraud capital, polls show two—thirds of republicans believe voterfraud help joe biden to win. given that they
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did not happen, that raises profound questions about the tumour and parties in the world's most high—profile democracy and the democrats argue harm is already being done. the democrats argue harm is already being done-— being done. the root cause of january six — being done. the root cause of january six is _ being done. the root cause of january six is still— being done. the root cause of january six is still with - being done. the root cause of january six is still with us - being done. the root cause of. january six is still with us today. it is the big lie. pushed by donald trump. that is undermining faith in our political system. but trump. that is undermining faith in our political system.— our political system. but for all of this criticism, _ our political system. but for all of this criticism, for _ our political system. but for all of this criticism, for all _ our political system. but for all of this criticism, for all the - this criticism, for all the convictions of those involved in the right, donald trump remains the dominant political figure in the republican party. it remains the case he believes america's democracy is red, as to his supporters, and if you believe that, you would be furious. you would be outraged. and so, the emotion that drove january six remains. and there is no reason to think it will not manifest itself again.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. we're reflecting this morning on the incredible life of the actor sir sidney poitier, who has died at the age of 94. the star broke down hollywood's racial barriers and became the first black man to win an oscar for best actor. his success paved the way for generations of other black artists. we're joined now by the journalist kj matthews, who is in los angeles. kj. kj, thanks forjoining us. how is he being remembered there? all kinds of amazing tributes i see? you being remembered there? all kinds of amazing tributes i see?— amazing tributes i see? you know, as ou recall, amazing tributes i see? you know, as you recall. it— amazing tributes i see? you know, as you recall. it has _ amazing tributes i see? you know, as you recall, it has been _ amazing tributes i see? you know, as you recall, it has been another- you recall, it has been another celebrity death that happened here just a couple of days ago, obviously, so when we found out that sidney poitier died everybody was not surprised because he was elderly, but a very, very hurt. he is such an icon and a legend. here in hollywood. it wasjust is such an icon and a legend. here
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in hollywood. it was just so sad to hear about. in hollywood. it was just so sad to hearabout. he in hollywood. it was just so sad to hear about. he did so much on screen and off screen for race relations but also for hollywood, in a time when there was no me too, there was no diversity and inclusion, there was no movement going on. —— me too. he came and moved things in hollywood for all black people. this was a nu hollywood for all black people. this was a guy who _ hollywood for all black people. this was a guy who grew up in a tomato farm, well, we say tomato, you say tomato, the bahamas?— farm, well, we say tomato, you say tomato, the bahamas? right, people don't know that _ tomato, the bahamas? right, people don't know that he _ tomato, the bahamas? right, people don't know that he was _ tomato, the bahamas? right, people don't know that he was actually - don't know that he was actually raised in the bahamas, but he was actually born in miami. his parents were from the bahamas, they were tomato farmers, and when he came here he really had no money. he didn't come from an established family, he came here and made his luck work, knew that he wanted to be a great example for black people in america, he didn't want to take on stereotypical roles, which was very daring for somebody like him because you have to remember in the 19505
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and 19605, that is all that was for black people here in america. very stereotypical roles. he was one of the black actors that found a way around that, and that was really shocking during that time. i around that, and that was really shocking during that time. i wonder where that daring, _ shocking during that time. i wonder where that daring, that _ shocking during that time. i wonder where that daring, that courage - shocking during that time. i wonder where that daring, that courage to l where that daring, that courage to challenge, came from? you where that daring, that courage to challenge, came from? you know, in an interview — challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that _ challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that he _ challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that he did _ challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that he did a _ challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that he did a couple - challenge, came from? you know, in an interview that he did a couple of l an interview that he did a couple of decades ago, he said it was really a teacher that he had taught him how to dream, and made him believe that he really could become anything that he really could become anything that he wanted to become. 50 he really credits that teacher with sparking a fire. irate credits that teacher with sparking a fire. ~ . . credits that teacher with sparking a fire. ~ ., , ,., credits that teacher with sparking a fire. ~ ., , ,. ,., fire. we are seeing some pictures of him bein: fire. we are seeing some pictures of him being applauded _ fire. we are seeing some pictures of him being applauded and _ fire. we are seeing some pictures of him being applauded and lauded, i fire. we are seeing some pictures of| him being applauded and lauded, but also celebrates his most famous roles. in those roles you never wanted to be the victim, there was always a sort of pride and positivity about the parts he was playing. he was progressive? yes. playing. he was progressive? yes, very progressive- _ playing. he was progressive? yes, very progressive. he _ playing. he was progressive? yes, very progressive. he was - playing. he was progressive? is:
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very progressive. he was the first blackmail to win an oscar. so he knew that the world 's blackmail to win an oscar. so he knew that the world '5 eyes were on him. he knew that he was opening the doors for many blacks to come. so he always wanted to make sure that he was not playing the stereotypical roles that were offered too many black people at that time, and i think he took his position very seriously, and in an interview he did, ithink it seriously, and in an interview he did, i think it was 1988, he said, you know, besides this shoeshine boy, he was really the only black on many film what's in the 19605, so he knew he had a lot of people looking up knew he had a lot of people looking up to him and didn't want to let them down. he up to him and didn't want to let them down-— up to him and didn't want to let them down. ., , .., .,. .,,, them down. he does come across in them down. he does come across in the interviews _ them down. he does come across in the interviews that _ them down. he does come across in the interviews that i _ them down. he does come across in the interviews that i have _ them down. he does come across in the interviews that i have seen - them down. he does come across in the interviews that i have seen in i the interviews that i have seen in the interviews that i have seen in the last few hours as a serious chap, what kind of tributes have been paid to him?— chap, what kind of tributes have been paid to him? oprah winfrey said one of the greatest _ been paid to him? oprah winfrey said one of the greatest has _ been paid to him? oprah winfrey said one of the greatest has fallen. - been paid to him? oprah winfrey said one of the greatest has fallen. she i one of the greatest has fallen. she couldn't believe it, you know, she said he was a friend, he was a confidant, she looked up to him, he really changed so much of the world,
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particularly in america, and of course you may remember that the presidential medal of freedom was given to him by president barack obama, so barack obama had given it 0bama, so barack obama had given it to him as well on instagram. so many tributes, although hollywood, people saying, you know, they loved his films, they loved what he was able to do, and really, to be honest with you, there would be no denzel washington, no oprah winfrey, they would certainly be no will smith, if it were not for sidney poitier. he really opened the doors for all of them. , . ~ really opened the doors for all of them. , ., ,, ,., really opened the doors for all of them. , ., ,, y., really opened the doors for all of them. , ., ,, . really opened the doors for all of them. , . ~' . ., really opened the doors for all of them. , ., . ., ., them. kj, thank you so much for all that this morning. _ them. kj, thank you so much for all that this morning. always _ them. kj, thank you so much for all that this morning. always great i them. kj, thank you so much for all that this morning. always great to i that this morning. always great to talk to you. thanks for us live from los angeles. talk to you. thanks for us live from los angeles— that is what you call a career, making a mark.— that is what you call a career, making a mark. it making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am — making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am and _ making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am and mike _ making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am and mike has _ making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am and mike has joined i making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it is 7:38am and mike has joined us i making a mark. yes, quite a cv. it l is 7:38am and mike has joined us for is 7:38am and mike hasjoined us for the sport.
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force the draw, may be. even pull off mission impossible, with the final few overs of the day intact, no wickets fell, after being sent a whopping 388 runs to win the fourth test in sydney. this comes after a day when england hero jonny bairstow was finally out for 113 and the team all out for 294. once ashes series are lost, the remaining tests are those of character. yesterdayjonny bairstow character. yesterday jonny bairstow fought character. yesterdayjonny bairstow fought back. this morning, he was caught behind, 113 runs scored, he had earned this. england were all
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out, trailing by 122, so now they are troubled hubble had to slow australia down. mark wood could. he removed david warner and marnus labuschagne, while jack leach finally found himself in some wickets two. including steve smith, who almost counts double. but there was a bigger picture, and at the centre of the frame was usman khawaja. recall to the team and this tirelessly torturing england's bowlers. he made a century in the first innings and made one even quicker in the second. usman khawaja, for his family and country, exhilarating. for england, exhausting. australia had declared 387 runs ahead, sending england's openers to decrease under darkening skies, trusting that they provide their own punchline again. never quite came. they weathered that storm, but with rain in the forecast, they will hope tomorrow it
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can be rescued by another. patrick geary, bbc news. a bit of breaking news on the novak djokovic situation. it surrounds the details of his vaccine exemption application. australian court documents showed that djokovic presented evidence of having had covid—19 within the past month, he sought exemption on these grounds, and that was granted. then his visa was revoked. meanwhile his brother says that the way the world number one has been treated australian authorities affects many more people than simply tennis fans, and there has been this rally of support, hundreds gathering in belgrade to show their support to djokovic, he was denied entry into australia by border authorities because of the covid—19 vaccination regulations. he is now that immigration detention hotel in australia, waiting a court hearing scheduled for monday, to challenge his deportation. but as a little update for you this morning, more details as to why the exemption was given at first, but then
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revoked. next to fa cup third round weekend, when the elite enter the competition, and for the smaller teams, a chance forfootballing dreams to come true and lives can change forever. it wasn't to be in wiltshire, though, for league two swindon town, as they were knocked out by manchester city — who fielded a really strong side, and it finished 4—1 at the county ground. chesterfield had the most glamorous match, about the european champions chelsea. in the w town, this brings back memories of the time they so newly created one of the most famous of the most famous fa cup stories of all time and almost met chelsea in the actual final. all time and almost met chelsea in the actualfinal. i have been to chesterfield this week to see what it all means. the town with a crooked spire has finally got the fa cup tie that a cruel twist of fate help to deny them over two decades ago. it could have been one of the greatest fa cup fairytales ever, 1997, chesterfield, than a third tier side, had defied all the odds getting to the semifinals. they were to—1 up
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against premier league middlesborough, on course to face chelsea in the final. when a third goal for them was disallowed, even though the ball had seemingly crossed the line. commentator: looks to me like it went over the line.— went over the line. middlesborough fou . ht went over the line. middlesborough fought back. _ went over the line. middlesborough fought back, ending _ went over the line. middlesborough fought back, ending chesterfield's i fought back, ending chesterfield's dreams. i fought back, ending chesterfield's dreams. ~' .., , dreams. i think when it comes around, dreams. i think when it comes around. it _ dreams. i think when it comes around. it is— dreams. i think when it comes around, it is what _ dreams. i think when it comes around, it is what could i dreams. i think when it comes around, it is what could have i dreams. i think when it comes i around, it is what could have been, with jonathan howard's around, it is what could have been, withjonathan howard's goal, was it over the line, was it not? if you look at replays, the linesman is flagging for the call, but there is so much going on, pandemonium. it wasjust an emotional so much going on, pandemonium. it was just an emotional rollercoaster. walking out of old trafford to a sea of red under seal loop, the buildup to the game, the town went absolutely crazy.— to the game, the town went absolutely crazy. to the game, the town went absolutel cra . ., , absolutely crazy. even though they had lost it was _ absolutely crazy. even though they had lost it was a _ absolutely crazy. even though they had lost it was a life _ absolutely crazy. even though they had lost it was a life changing i absolutely crazy. even though they had lost it was a life changing cup l had lost it was a life changing cup run for players like kevin davis, snapped up by premier league southampton with his newfound fame. we were on the frank skinner show, going on tv, it was kinda something new for all of us, really. the fa
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cup gives it a platform to go onto better things. cup gives it a platform to go onto betterthings. in cup gives it a platform to go onto better things-— better things. in the years since, chesterfield _ better things. in the years since, chesterfield have _ better things. in the years since, chesterfield have struggled i better things. in the years since, chesterfield have struggled at i chesterfield have struggled at times, and now fallen out the football league. but they still made their mark around the world. it was here that walking football was created 11 years ago, and has since spread across the planet, opening up the beautiful game to older generations. this week in chesterfield, even the snow wasn't going to stop the senior spa rides warming upfortheirtrip going to stop the senior spa rides warming up for their trip to chelsea. ~ ., ., , warming up for their trip to chelsea-— warming up for their trip to chelsea. ~ ., ., , ., , ., m chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably — chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably give _ chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably give them _ chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably give them a _ chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably give them a game i chelsea. we are ready to chelsea. we can probably give them a game at i can probably give them a game at this pace — can probably give them a game at this pace. we can probably give them a game at this ace. ~ . ., ., ,, this pace. we gave the world walking football, this pace. we gave the world walking football. now — this pace. we gave the world walking football, now we _ this pace. we gave the world walking football, now we will _ this pace. we gave the world walking football, now we will give _ this pace. we gave the world walking football, now we will give the - this pace. we gave the world walking football, now we will give the world i football, now we will give the world fa cup _ football, now we will give the world fa cup shots~ — football, now we will give the world fa cup shots. just _ football, now we will give the world fa cup shots-— fa cup shots. just like in 1997, fa cu fever fa cup shots. just like in 1997, fa cup fever is _ fa cup shots. just like in 1997, fa cup fever is gripping _ fa cup shots. just like in 1997, fa cup fever is gripping chesterfield l cup fever is gripping chesterfield again. notjust the diehard fans in the club shop, and the 6000 who will leave on coaches from pubs and their homes this morning, the warm glow is being felt right across the town for businesses been given a boost and
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lifting the spirits of the whole community. lifting the spirits of the whole community-— lifting the spirits of the whole communi . y., , , ., ,., community. everyone is buzzing about it, community. everyone is buzzing about it. everyone — community. everyone is buzzing about it. everyone is — community. everyone is buzzing about it, everyone is talking _ community. everyone is buzzing about it, everyone is talking about _ community. everyone is buzzing about it, everyone is talking about it, - it, everyone is talking about it, can't believe we are competing with chelsea. it can't believe we are competing with chelsea. . can't believe we are competing with chelsea. , , , , ,., , chelsea. it 'ust brings everybody touether. chelsea. itjust brings everybody together. friends, _ chelsea. itjust brings everybody together. friends, families, i chelsea. itjust brings everybody together. friends, families, alli chelsea. itjust brings everybody i together. friends, families, all the together. friends, families, allthe young _ together. friends, families, allthe young people from all over. you know, young people from all over. you know. talking — young people from all over. gm. know, talking about what we do on the weekend, we will probably go for a pint after. it is the history of the fa cup that makes it so special, there is plenty of that here from 1950, when chelsea —— chesterfield took chelsea to a replay. go to 1955, and chesterfield were the first waiting ever to win at stamford bridge, whether returned today. it stamford bridge, whether returned toda . . . , today. it means everything. the -la ers today. it means everything. the players who _ today. it means everything. the players who have _ today. it means everything. the players who have dreamt i today. it means everything. the players who have dreamt of i today. it means everything. the players who have dreamt of a i today. it means everything. the i players who have dreamt of a game like that, to play in a game like that, it is like changing. the main thing is that we represent the club to sort of reinvigorated community, really. in to sort of reinvigorated community, reall . .., .,, ., to sort of reinvigorated community, reall. ., , really. in contrast to chelsea's billionaire _ really. in contrast to chelsea's billionaire owner, _ really. in contrast to chelsea's billionaire owner, chesterfield| really. in contrast to chelsea's i billionaire owner, chesterfield are now owned by its community trust, a charity set up initiallyjust now owned by its community trust, a charity set up initially just to now owned by its community trust, a charity set up initiallyjust to get the club involved in the community.
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we are now in 50 schools, several million a year, that we turnover. and we are now owning the club, which was not, we'd never even dreamt of, the club was up for sale, it appeared nobody was buying it, we didn't quite know where it was going, so wejust didn't quite know where it was going, so we just sort of stepped into the breach, really. we never thought we would be going to the champions league, but 18 months later, probably even 18 years later, to be honest. later, probably even 18 years later, to be honest-— to be honest. chesterfield is run each month _ to be honest. chesterfield is run each month on _ to be honest. chesterfield is run each month on an _ to be honest. chesterfield is run each month on an amount i to be honest. chesterfield is run each month on an amount that i to be honest. chesterfield is run i each month on an amount that would not even pay a week's salary for some of the chelsea players. but this is the fa cup, and in chesterfield, down never stop doing things at their own pace. so, the walking football is in good voice, and you can watch that much on the bbc website, and the iplayer this evening at 5:30pm. the other game on the bbc today is hull the everton, five games across the weekend, finishing with manchester versus aston villa on monday night.
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thank you, mike. looks a little bit chilly there. thank you, mike. looks a little bit chilly there-— chilly there. i've got to give a shout out _ chilly there. i've got to give a shout out to _ chilly there. i've got to give a shout out to tim _ chilly there. i've got to give a shout out to tim jones, i chilly there. i've got to give a shout out to tim jones, the l shout out to tim jones, the cameraman. my goodness. he suffered in the cold and the snow. before his art. you can't wear gloves when you're operating a camera. i bet art. you can't wear gloves when you're operating a camera. i bet he didn't moan. _ you're operating a camera. i bet he didn't moan, either. _ you're operating a camera. i bet he didn't moan, either. tim _ you're operating a camera. i bet he didn't moan, either. tim never- you're operating a camera. i bet he l didn't moan, either. tim never does. but you did. you are known for it. do you know how what i am. yes, because i'm just able —— just as well. let's see about cold, wet, drizzly but going to continue. not much in the way of snow in the forecast because things turn milder next week but out there, some snow on the hills of scotland and if you're about to head out, that and windy across most areas but bear with it. especially across the north and the west, things will turn brighter through this morning and into the start of the afternoon. this is the picture from space, the clear weather is here, rushing down through the north atlantic hind this mass of cloud and underneath it, something a little bit more mild at the moment in between these two weather fronts but with it, the moment in between these two weatherfronts but with it, some
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the moment in between these two weather fronts but with it, some of the gusty is of the winds, the strongest and heaviest rain on the cold front which at the moment extends across parts of eastern scotland, down through into the west of england and wales and you can see this darker blue zone, rain and drizzle coming and going before that arrives and then at the back edge of becoming western scotland, northern ireland, the cloud will breakthrough this morning with son is not developing with a few showers by turning entry as the cold air pushes back and later on but running up this afternoon to northern england dwells in the south—west after a speu dwells in the south—west after a spell of heavy rain in particularly squally winds, it doesn't like it is going to be a rather wet day for most of the south—east midlands east anglia and the south—east heaviest rain for you will come later in the day with the strongest of winds as well. those winds as i said. to switch around a bit more westerly later on so with the pig in the midday into the afternoon, temperatures dropping into single figures for the vast majority but mostly summer day with the vast majority of times, sometimes in the west —— peak. in the west will continue to seek showers through the night with a mixture of rain held sleet and snow in places too. delete
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icy conditions as temperatures drop positive freezing, especially northern england and across scotland, may be below in a few areas but certainly, a bright start in eastern parts tomorrow morning, much better than this morning. plenty of sunshine around, some in up plenty of sunshine around, some in up and is staying dry through the day, heading over the southwest later with a bit more in the way of rain and drizzle but some showers, winter in places, central southern scotland, northern ireland for the morning into northern england, not well to be afternoon, but some of you will get through sunday completely dry, a vastly improved is tingly in the south is compared to what your experience today. a little cool tomorrow, milder s—type to try to push its way back in, was undermined in england with it weather fronts, undermined in england with it weatherfronts, these undermined in england with it weather fronts, these not undermined in england with it weatherfronts, these not as much undermined in england with it weather fronts, these not as much of the features that once we got today, they will just be the features that once we got today, they willjust be a bit of patchy light rain and drizzle and then heaviest of the raim scotland, monday could stay in some hazy sunshine across eastern areas for a time but overall a fairly cloudy day, temperatures starting to creep up. double figures for the vast majority and is centres are going to next week as high pressure builds up from the south, a lot more in the way of dry weather than we have seen
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over the past week or so. and temperatures will hold steady. slightly milder than normal at about 8-11. slightly milder than normal at about 8—11. news camera operators across the country punch the air with joy. tim will be happy. thank you, matt. ten minutes to eight. we'll be back with the headlines at 8:00. now it's time for newswatch. hello, and welcome to the first newswatch of 2022, with me, samira ahmed. why, just after ghislaine maxwell's conviction, did bbc news interview jeffrey epstein's former lawyer, who has himself been accused of abuse? and was it right after that guilty verdict to hear from ghislaine maxwell's brother, ian, who insists she is innocent? the trial of ghislaine maxwell on charges of helping the late jeffrey epstein to abuse girls was avidly followed in the media around the world.
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so when she was found guilty in a new york court last week, it was, of course, breaking news on the bbc news channel. a few minutes after the verdict came in, the channel interviewed this man. the government was very careful who it used as witnesses. it did use as a witness the woman who accused —— it did not use as a witness the woman who accused prince andrew, accused me, accused many other people, because the government didn't believe she was telling the truth. in fact, she — virginia giuffre — was mentioned in the trial as somebody who brought young people to epstein for him to abuse. although this was not made clear on air, alan dershowitz used to be a lawyer forjeffrey epstein and, as he mentioned there, he has, along with epstein, been accused of abuse by virginia giuffre, a charge he denies. many viewers expressed shock at the interview, with michael mcelfresh contacting us to say:
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and john moyes added: well, the following day, the bbc acknowledged that those criticisms had a point, putting out this statement. there has been no further word yet on that but, in the meantime, there have been more objections to another bbc interview about this case, and it took place on new year's eve on radio 4's today programme and clips of it were shown during the day on the news channel. the guest — ghislaine maxwell's
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brother, ian, who challenged the version of events set out in court by her accusers. i'm not saying that they are lying. i mean, they — you know, it may well be that they victims of jeffrey epstein. but i do not accept that they were victims of ghislaine. that's my position, and that's also her position. again, many listeners and viewers were concerned. kate hahamis wondered: again, the bbc put out a statement in response, but this time defending the broadcast. it said: it added:
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we did want to talk to someone at the bbc about those two interviews but were told they had nothing to add to the statements we've heard. we can, though, hear more on this now from newswatch viewer sarah churchwell, who is professor of american literature and public understanding of the humanities at london university. sarah, you saw that interview with alan dershowitz, what was your concern? i was horrified. i was really, really outraged. and it was the phrase "formidable conflicts" in your description sticks with me from the other viewer. he has multiple conflicts of interest in this case and he is himself directly implicated, as he said. so not only did he not comment impartially on the maxwell verdict, he didn't comment on the maxwell verdict at all. he took the opportunity to charge virginia giuffre who has accused him of abuse, and to say that the verdict somehow vindicated him. so it was — it was problematic on multiple levels because at
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no point for a uk audience — or an audience who doesn't know who alan dershowitz is and what his very complex relationship with this case is — theyjust took him as the "constitutional lawyer" that he was described as — as an impartial, neutral expert — when, in fact, he is personally implicated in the case and has been accused of criminal wrongdoing — a very serious criminal wrongdoing. could he have been a suitable guest if enough context had been given about his connections and his conflicts of interest? i think he could have been but it is notjust that he was a guest, it is that he wasn't challenged, either. he was just given the air time put his case out there. and even when he said "this has cleared me", at no point was that taken up or challenged. if he had been interviewed where it had been made very clear that he represented epstein, that he acted for him in the non—prosecution agreement in florida that has been so controversial, and then he had been challenged, and he had been, you know, robustly interviewed, then i think that that would have been acceptable. but the problem was that none
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of those things happened. and we should say, of course, alan dershowitz, you know, absolutely denies any involvement in abuse. now, the bbc have said they are investigating what went on — you heard that statement. will that do? well, i guess it depends on what the outcome of the investigation is. my personal concern watching it was that at no point did the presenter say, "wait a minute — are you implicated? "what is your implication?", even if the presenter hadn't known until that moment — which, of course, they should have done. but even if, you know, you get to that point, i would still expect a bbc journalist to hear somebody say, "this verdict has cleared me personally" and then to ask some of the obvious follow—up questions so, for me, it will very much matter what the result of the investigation is. now, two days later ian maxwell, ghislaine's brother, was on the today programme defending him. what did you think of that decision? —— was on the today programme defending her. well, again, it seemed to me as if there were, it was again, a problematic decision for me. i think that it felt like preferential treatment,
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and i understand that they are saying that there was somebody there to challenge ian maxwell's position and that the story was actually about their decision to appeal, but i have to agree, again with your viewer, who said that, you know, is this now going to be the standard practice for people who are convicted of child sex trafficking? because, at what point, you know, are we actually saying that the bbc is going to bring on the relatives and the interested parties in a criminal case in order to defend against a verdict that is, you know, a lawful verdict that has been made? do you think the bbc needs to rethink the interviews they do on stories like this? i do, actually. i think that there was an effort here to create balance, which, of course, is very, very important for the bbc to do. but this feels to me like false balance, because what you are actually doing is allowing people who have been convicted of wrongdoing — this is not people who are charged, people who have been convicted of wrongdoing — for their surrogates and proxies to argue that that conviction was somehow
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problematic or overturned — or should be overturned. then, at that point, the balance in question is somebody defending a criminal or arguing that it wasn't criminal. well, that is not balance. that is not a balanced coverage of a criminal verdict in a society that obeys the rule of law. sarah churchwell, thank you so much. the difficulties tennis star novak djokovic has faced in trying to enter australia and the argument that has prompted over covid vaccinations has been widely covered this week across bbc news. some viewers considered the airtime it was given to be unwarranted, particularly in comparison with that given to the violence in kazakhstan — although the bbc has pointed out that the latter has featured across its output, including on the main bulletins. dr david pearson had this to say about djokovic.
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on wednesday, bbc one bulletins brought news of a notable achievement. here is clive myrie on the news at 6. a british army officer has become the first woman of colour to complete a solo expedition to the south pole. captain preet chandi, who is 32, trekked 700 miles in a0 days, pulling all her equipment on a sledge. in the report that followed, captain chandi spoke about herself as an asian woman and how she wanted to inspire others with similar backgrounds. nevertheless, viv whitten, among other viewers, was unhappy with the phrase "the first woman of colour" used in that introduction, and recorded this video. it was inspiring to hear some positive non—covid news about the brave young woman who had recently trekked to the south pole.
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but totally unnecessary and irrelevant to describe her as a "woman of colour". we haven't even noticed her skin colour. this bbc bias is simply inverse or woke racism, which encourages division and undermines our civil society. last saturday, the news channel broadcast live the funeral service for archbishop desmond tutu, who died on boxing day.
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as ever, on newswatch, we will be monitoring how well bbc news satisfies competing constituencies under m5 turness when she takes up her post. in the meantime we'll be speaking to the outgoing director of news, fran unsworth, in two weeks time. and do send us any questions or comments you would like us to put to her, or any of your
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opinions about what you see, read or hear on bbc news on tv, radio, online or social media. you can email. you can find us on twitter. you can also call us. and do have a look at previous interviews on our website. that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today. hundreds of thousands of flat owners will not have to pay to replace unsafe cladding under new government plans.
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a fourth covid jab is not needed yet — uk experts say booster doses keep giving high protection against severe illness from the omicron variant. tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia due to a recent covid infection, his lawyers say in court documents. and it's 'sunshine saturday�* — the day travel firms hope for record breaking holiday bookings. it looks like mission impossible for england in the fourth ashes test. after australia's usman khawaja, scored a second century, in sydney, leaving england's batsmen needing over 350 to win on the final day... i will have the full weather forecast later. it's saturday the 8th of january. our top story. up to half—a—million flat owners
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across the uk will no longer be liable for the cost of replacing dangerous cladding on their properties, under new government proposals. the plans, set to be announced by the housing secretary michael gove, would instead see developers forced to pay up to an additional four billion pounds — to help resolve the crisis, which has left many unable to sell their homes. newsnight�*s lewis goodall has more. it's estimated that more than half a million people are caught up in britain's fire safety crisis. and we can exclusively reveal the government's latest plans to deal with it. up until now, the government's approach breaks down as follows. dangerous cladding removal would be paid for by the building safety fund only for buildings over 18.5 metres in height. everything else would be covered either by developers paying or by a loan scheme for leaseholders. but we understand that michael gove, the levelling up secretary, will make the commitment on monday that up to £4 billion of extra funding will be
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available to remove dangerous cladding in buildings between 11 and 18.5 metres, and that leaseholders won't have to pay anything towards that cost — a significant shift. but gove will also make clear that money will come from developers, not from the taxpayer, and if developers won't pay voluntarily, he will threaten the force of law to make sure that they comply. but this change will cover cladding only, not the host of other building safety issues found in thousands of building since grenfell, and experts wonder how mr gove will be able to extract the money. well, they won't choose to pay. they'll have to be dragged to the table to offer something up. and i suspect it relies on showing, whether it's by sampling the buildings and showing that these buildings weren't built to spec, because fire breaks and compartmentation have always been required by regulations — if they're not there, that's a product of conscious choice, or it's a product of negligence, for which the developer is responsible. so michael gove needs
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a big stick to beat them with, along those sorts of lines, that no, this is quite clearly evidence that this is your choices and your responsibility to pay. and if the levelling up secretary is unsuccessful, leaked documents from the treasury seen by newsnight show that if the government can't raise the money from developers, then it'll have to come from existing housing budgets. hardly ideal at a time of a wider housing shortage. that was lewis goodall reporting, and we'll get more on that from him, just after half—past—eight this morning. tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter
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australia. these papers have been released injust the last few minutes. he did get this vaccine exemption certificate from the state of victoria. he is now in this hotel detention awaiting his appeal against deportation on monday. on the australian open rules it does say that if you have had covid within the last six months that could be a reason for getting a vaccine exemption certificate. his lawyers have now got this court document that includes information that he did return a positive covid pcr result on the 16th of december last year, well within the last six months, suggesting he did have covid. it would be the second time
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because we also know he had it in june 2020, potentially a different variance. that would be why his lawyers and he thought that he was going to get the vaccine exemption, because he had had it so recently, and so he did not need to prove having the vaccine, enough to satisfy at the time the state, but does that satisfy the federal government, regarding vaccinations and exemptions? because they look after immigration. this is the crux of the matter as to why there is this sudden change. i guess it will all now be what the subsequent paperwork says, with his documents, when he arrived at check in, whether that was all right. december the 16th is the crucial day, according to the lawyers documents, that's positive pcr test. court hearing on monday. thank you. breaking news there that
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novak djokovic�*s lawyers in court said they presented evidence that he had covid back in december. a fourth covid jab is not yet needed in the fight against omicron, according to uk experts. the independent panel that advises the government says the first boosterjab continues to provide high protection against severe disease amongst older adults. it says the decision will be kept under review. three white men are beginning life sentences in the us state of georgia for murdering a black jogger who ran through their neighbourhood. 25—year—old ahmaud arbery was chased in pick—up trucks and shot, in a case that became became a focus of protests by the black lives matter movement. david willis reports. ahmaud arbery's death has been likened by his family to a latter—day lynching. three white men hunted down the unarmed jogger
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and killed him in cold blood. footage of the incident led to nationwide protests after it emerged that, despite being interviewed at the scene, none of the men involved had been arrested after local officials accepted their plea of self—defence and deemed the killing justified. former police officer gregory mcmichael, his 33—year—old son, travis, and the man who filmed ahmaud arbery's death, william 'roddie' bryan, were eventually arrested and brought to trial and found guilty of murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they didn't want him in their community. these men deserve the maximum sentence for their crimes. ahmaud never said a word to them.
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he never threatened them. he just wanted to be left alone. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently for one minute. to set in context the terror that he said ahmaud arbery must have suffered as he was chased through a residential neighbourhood for more than five minutes, thejudge ordered a moment's silence before sentencing all three men to life in prison. only william 'roddie' bryan will be eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glynn county in front of this courthouse, think about all the black people who have been lynched in the history of america, in georgia who never, ever got their day in court.
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ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to a period of national reckoning over the state of racial injustice in this country, one which culminated in nationwide protests over the death of george floyd. though these men received the maximum sentence, civil rights campaigners believe it will take more than that to influence attitudes that in many cases go back generations. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. allegations of another party at downing street are set to be included in the official investigation into events held at number ten during the pandemic. it comes after borisjohnson's former chief adviser, dominic cummings claimed a senior official invited people to "socially "distanced drinks" in the garden, while restrictions were in place in may 2020. our political correspondent, jonathan blake joins us now.
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the investigation continues by the senior official now charged with looking into claims of various social events which may or may not have reached lockdown rules in place at the time during 2020 in downing street. and the latest event that she will be looking into has come to light thanks to dominic cummings, the prime minister's former senior adviser, making one of his now fairly regular interventions, publishing a blog talking about an event on may 20 2020, in which invites were sent out describing as a socially distanced drinks. he said he warned at the time, along with others, that that may be against the rules. nevertheless it seems that the event went ahead. the snow falls under the remit of the investigation. he has also defended the picture which the guardian newspaper published last month,
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taken five days earlier in may of 2020, showing the prime minister, dominic cummings, and others on the terrace with cheese and wine. that has always been described as a work setting by the prime minister and others in at number ten, meetings happen, not a social event. dominic cummings has added his voice to the defence of what was happening there, saying it was in no sense a party, and at the time staff are being encouraged to have meetings outside rather than inside because it was safer during the pandemic. away from the cut and thrust of politics, really striking tributes from all sides, all parties in the last few hours, to the labour mp jack dromey, whose death was announced last night. shock and sadness across the political divide, reacting to that news, which came out of the blue yesterday, that's jack dromey, labour mp and trade union activist before that, had died at the age of
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73. he was married to harriet harman, former deputy leader of the party. there have been tributes from across the house from the prime minister down, from every party, people paying tributes with real warmth and real sadness at the loss of someone who regardless of your political views was well liked and well—respected. security forces in kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of protesters taking part in huge riots in its main city, almaty. the unrest began on sunday, when the cost of fuel was doubled. kazakhstan's neighbour russia has sent in paratroopers to support the government. our correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. ostensibly these rights beginning because of the price of fuel, but much more to it than that? yes there is a level of economic but also political discontent as well in kazakhstan. the fact that there was
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a cap on fuel prices, that was then removed by the kazakhstan authorities, that sparked this level of protest. that cap has been reintroduced for the next six months. that did not stop the protest. it could not stop the flow of what had spread across the country at that stage. we have seen a lot of images from the biggest city in kazakhstan, almaty. we have seen burnt out cars and buildings, smashed up shop fronts, as the violence has grown there. we have heard from the authorities that they have arrested over 4000 people in connection to the protests, that they have, in their own words, liquidated 26 people at least. relatively little coming out today. at the moment the internet is still patchyif at the moment the internet is still patchy if not down. we are waiting to hear more developments about how the situation is on the ground. tributes have been paid to the american actor,
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sidney poitier, who has died at the age of 94. poitier was the first black man to win a best actor oscar, and helped to break down many of hollywood's racial barriers, while paving the way for a generation of film stars. a host of prominent figures, including presidentjoe biden, barack obama and oprah winfrey have paid tribute to him. today is what's known as sunshine saturday in the travel industry — the most popular day for brits to book their summer holidays. and this year, it coincides with the government easing travel restrictions.
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since the government relaxed the testing rules for vaccinated travellers earlier this week, bookings have soared. at easyjet there's been an increase of 200 per cent compared to last week. jet2 saw bookings rise by 150 per cent in a day on thursday, and tui said it experienced a "strong uptick". jet2 says demand has returned to pre—covid levels. the holiday company saw a "huge spike" in bookings after the government announcement on wednesday. british airways says searches for holidays on its website are up by nearly 40 per cent compared to last week. spain is one of the most popular destinations — easyjet says flights to tenerife, alicante, malaga and lanzarote are most in demand.
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and easyjet has put more than a million more seats on sale from london gatwick, for summer this year. richard slater from the association of british travel agents, says he's feeling optimistic. we have seen an instant boost in customers. people are not worried about getting stuck overseas. here to talk us through the latest on travel restrictions is the independent�*s travel correspondent, simon calder. where are you this morning? i am at gatwick airport in west sussex. inside the boundaries of crawley, soon to be the uk's newest city, we will see about that. although the travel industry is certainly chirpy than it was one week ago, things are by no means
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back to normal. i am here at the north terminal because the larger south terminal is mothballed at the moment. they simply don't need it. while there is plenty of people flying in and out, the caribbean flights are just arriving, with all those lucky people who not only have had a week in the sun, but they also have not had to take that predeparture test, the departures are not as busy as they might be, because we are band from france. they would normally be dozens of flights from airports across the uk to france, those have been cancelled because the french have closed their frontiers to as at the moment. and of course, as you have been reporting at some length, australia still does not want tourists just yet. remind anyone watching who perhaps miss the detail this week, why are things so much easier from this monday compared to last monday?
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they are now much easier because you do not need that predeparture test. a5 do not need that predeparture test. as you heard from the travel association that was putting an off association that was putting an off a lot of people off, because you do not want to take a test before you fly back to the uk, discover that you are covid positive, and had to isolate and somebody else's country, quite possibly at great expense and inconvenience. new do still need a test on the day you arrive, or one of the two following days, and until 4am tomorrow it is a pcr test, after that it 4am tomorrow it is a pcr test, after thatitis 4am tomorrow it is a pcr test, after that it is a lateral flow test. that is much cheaper and much faster. crucially, also, you do not need to self—isolate. anybody who turned up before 4am yesterday it has to go into quarantine at home until they get a negative result. there are a couple of hundred passengers whose flights into gatwick airport
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yesterday morning at 13 minutes to four. they waited quarter of an hour longer to touch down they would not have needed to self—isolate. effectively a batch of where we were at last october. from tomorrow at 4am will be back to how we were in november. not completely clear of testing, but a lot of people feeling more confident. it is less expensive to take one test rather than to. what mood your tips be? it is important to remember that this could change again. that is exactly right. _ that this could change again. that is exactly right. that _ that this could change again. trisgt is exactly right. that is unfortunately the problem. we do not know once you get another variance, we have no idea if the government is good to do the scene. remember, these rules came in very suddenly in late november and early december.
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the advice as always is book a package holiday through a human travel agent and you will get professional expertise and gold—plated consumer protection. all the way through that miserable 22 months of this pandemic the main problem that people have had has been if they have put together a trip themselves rather than using a travel agent who could give them the latest advice and booking a package holiday so that you know either you will get the trip you booked or you will get the trip you booked or you will get the trip you booked or you will get a full refund. and i guess it is being mindful of that, if you are doing lateral flow, it is £25, if you had to do an extra pcr, it pumps up to £65, per person. sure. it is still a significant amount. £25 for a family of four ads £100 to the cost of a trip. i have found them as cheap as £7 50 this morning but for that i have to click and collect, go to west bromwich to pick up my test. £25 tests are much
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more common. lateralflow, from tomorrow morning. things will get easier. but we are still not anything like where we were in 2019 when people with just travel they wanted, when they wanted. just across to the queue for the innsbruck flights, people are standing in a mile long clew —— queue with loads of pieces of paper, the need to have a pcr test, they need to prove they have been boosted. that is coming down the line. the next question constitutes what constitutes a fully vaccinated. the rules are easier for those who are fully back seat of coming back into the uk but they have not changed at all for unvaccinated people, they still need multiple tests and to self—isolate for ten days. can you underline the rules for under 18 is an under trails and how that differs, if at all? if you are under 18 then you are
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treated as fully vaccinated even if you have not been vaccinated, but you have not been vaccinated, but you are still going to have to test if you are five or over in england, wales, or northern ireland, but only if you are 11 or over in scotland. nobody said this was going to be easy. we will let you go. you have got all the way to west bromwich to go to collect that £7 50 test. or you could fly. direct flight. another important thing to say is that you need to check the rules of the country you are going to. it is no point booking feeling content of your lateral flow on the way back. over in austria it is very strict. sunshine saturday for the travel industry. what about the rest of as? here's matt with a look
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at this morning's weather. we will see something brighter as we go through the day. wet and windy weather clears. some sunshine and showers later on. there will be a future showers, they will be a bit wintry. heaviest of rain in eastern scotland, down through western england and wales. the rain on and off through the day. heaviest of the rain in the afternoon. most of the rain in the afternoon. most of the rain gets out of the way through the day. there will still be a few showers. gu5ty winds across the country, that heaviest band of rain. this afternoon temperatures will drop back to single figures. eastern
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areas largely drive it later. showers in the west throughout tonight. some snow in places, particularly further north. temperatures close to or below freezing. the chance of ice on sunday morning. sunday morning, much drier and brighter. some showers in the west. the bulk of those in the morning. west and south—west scotland and northern ireland, they will push down to northern england north midlands in the afternoon. some patchy rain and drizzle. a cool day tomorrow. weather fronts this time not producing near as much rain as there are the fans we have seen today. monday, patchy rain and drizzle, extensive low clouds, there will be some cloud in eastern areas
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during the morning. temperatures on monday are starting to creep up. still single figures for eastern areas, back to double digits in the west. it will be like that too much of this coming week. some lights rain particularly for england and we are is on tuesday. after that, driest conditions in the south. a year ago most school pupils were being told to study from home and the bbc started its "give a laptop" appeal. we asked you to donate old devices, and the response was staggering. well over 100,000 laptops and tablets were handed over to families across the uk.
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however, the need has not gone away, as fiona lamdin has been finding out. this time last year, edwina and her four children were struggling with home schooling on a phone. this was the moment when their family received a donated laptop. your laptop isjust here if you'd like to come and grab it. oh, my goodness! a year on, we've been back to see them. having the laptop has made a lot of difference, notjust in my life, it has impacted positively in the lives of my kids, because currently, they're able to access schoolwork and all of that, it's been fantastic. it was a similar story for the adam twins, who were relying on paper hand—outs. they're now both at secondary school. it's made a huge difference. we're still using the laptop
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we got a year ago today. primary schools, secondary schools and colleges across england... we noticed that children who had been doing the work online came back to school in a much better place than those who hadn't. how reassuring is it for you to know that those laptops are there now? it is reassuring, because we are having to work hard every day to keep the school open, with staff absences, every day we come in and we have to think about how we're going to cover classes, and there remains the possibility that some children will have to be educated from home, so those laptops will come in handy. in the last year, over 100,000 devices like these have been donated. but as you can see, there's still demand. today, donated laptops are being handed out at the somali community centre in bristol. this is your laptop. thank you so much for that, that'll help me. i mara is 23 and is taking maths gcse.
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use it for your gsce, good luck for you! the waiting list is quite long. 40 individuals and families are on our waiting list, each week. hassan, this is for your children. yes, for my, children, yeah. hassan has four children, and has been waiting for months. they need more, but maybe they give me the only one. it's still going very strong. we are receiving donations almost every day, we are collecting, wiping, repurposing those laptops. and after a quick lesson logging in, they're good to go, and so the hope that people will still keep giving while they need is very much there. we see the need is there, how do we meet the need and continue meeting it? let's speak now to paul finnis from the learning foundation
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and digital poverty alliance. what more do we need to do? there is hue what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts — what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to _ what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to do _ what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to do still, _ what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to do still, and - what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to do still, and i - what more do we need to do? there is huge amounts to do still, and i was i huge amounts to do still, and i was just going to say, it's brilliant seeing that piece aboutjust how many people did respond at the time, and the bbc were doing some great work raising donations for refurbished laptops and community groups, is plain that work, but the reality is there is still a huge amount of work to be done, and lots of organisations we work with like currys and amazon and a whole variety of other organisations donating refurbished, in the main, so a nice circular economy, the reality is there are still millions of schoolchildren still disconnected or not having what they need. i was or not having what they need. i was auoin to or not having what they need. i was going to ask — or not having what they need. i was going to ask about _ or not having what they need. i was going to ask about that, _ or not having what they need. i was going to ask about that, because getting the hardware for the laptop is one thing, but connecting it,
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being able to use it to link up with your school, using the internet, that's a different challenge altogether.— that's a different challenge altoaether. ~ , ,., , ~ that's a different challenge altoaether. ~ , , ,, ., altogether. absolutely. i think that was what was _ altogether. absolutely. i think that was what was happening _ altogether. absolutely. i think that was what was happening in - altogether. absolutely. i think that was what was happening in 2021 i was what was happening in 2021 particularly in 2022, where people were doing whatever they could, finding old laptop they didn't need any more, through to the dfe providing 1.3 million devices to schoolchildren, but the reality is, as i'm sure you are a regular user of your devices, a device without connectivity, for instance, is only so good. connectivity is absolutely urgent. also, there are loads of people out there, that have a device in some connectivity, but not the support to use this as well, so it's a very complicated jigsaw, and it cannot be fixed just by giving schoolchildren and their families a laptop, there needs to be more, just to say this is why we launched the digital property alliance, they were
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four years providing support for families enabling them to use technology to support their learning, we kept finding this bill numbers of schoolchildren disconnected at home are not having the connectivity they needed, when we launch this in 2017 no one really understood just had big the problem was, now of course the pandemic is shown just how urgent and how major theissue shown just how urgent and how major the issue is. just shown just how urgent and how ma'or the issue is— the issue is. just spell out the size of the _ the issue is. just spell out the size of the challenges - the issue is. just spell out the size of the challenges that i the issue is. just spell out the | size of the challenges that that creates for a child who does not have the connectivity, when you cannot get online or send e—mails or submit your homework, what is the impact on that kid?— submit your homework, what is the impact on that kid? well, one of the issues is that — impact on that kid? well, one of the issues is that there _ issues is that there is a very clear link between digital, what we call digital poverty and poverty itself. so, these young people and families that we are talking about are often having numerous other issues on things they have to contend with, so
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the reality is that these young people are struggling with education as it is, then having to force to be doing that remotely makes life even more difficult for them. we know full well that a young person who is connected and has a laptop either in school as part of the way they receive their learning or at home is going to be in a substantially better position in terms of their 0 and a—level results than those who are disconnected, but there was a piece of research done last year that showed that something like one in five children and young people, that's the group 8—24, was still disconnected, still didn't have a laptop or desktop computer, and that tells you it's notjust about school are about learning that it's about life and getting ready for work where technology and understanding of technology becomes ever more
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important. of technology becomes ever more im ortant. ~ ,,., , of technology becomes ever more imortant. ~ , , ., of technology becomes ever more imortant. , ., important. absolutely. thanks so much, important. absolutely. thanks so much. last _ important. absolutely. thanks so much, last time _ important. absolutely. thanks so much, last time we _ important. absolutely. thanks so much, last time we did _ important. absolutely. thanks so much, last time we did a - important. absolutely. thanks so much, last time we did a piece i important. absolutely. thanks so | much, last time we did a piece on this story about connectivity the line dropped out, it all went wrong so, so i'm glad it all worked out this morning. so, so i'm glad it all worked out this morning-— so, so i'm glad it all worked out this morninu. . ~ ,, , . to donate a laptop or device head to bbc.co.uk/makeadifference, and click "give a laptop". you have just seen you havejust seen how you have just seen how much of a difference it makes. they take them, they refurbish them, wipe them and get all the data. flat owners could be spared the cost of removing dangerous cladding from their properties, under new government plans which would instead see developers expected to foot the bill. it comes as up to half a million homeowners face mounting costs for maintenance and repairs carried out in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. we're joined now by newsnight�*s lewis goodall, who has been closely following developments on this story — lewis,
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what more do we know? it is important, because up to now ministers have insisted the only people who should receive help are those in buildings with the height of over 18.5 metres for dangerous cladding removal, and i understand on monday michael gove, the levelling up secretary, will tell the house of commons at that threshold would be brought down to 11 metres. so, if you're in a building, and you're a leaseholder, lets not forget so many thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of them facing potentially ruinous bills and on mortgage above flats as a result of dangerous cladding, you will be in a position to say that will no longer be coming out of your pocket. michael gove will also say that it will be for developers to pay and not the taxpayers to pay, and that potentially opens a different can of worms, because that means up to £4 billion he is going to try and extract from developers who hitherto
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historically have been reluctant to pay, they already pay a small levy for associated cost, he will be asking them to dip in their pockets again, they have been very reluctant to do so in the past. this again, they have been very reluctant to do so in the past.— to do so in the past. this has been an incredibly _ to do so in the past. this has been an incredibly stressful _ to do so in the past. this has been an incredibly stressful time - to do so in the past. this has been an incredibly stressful time for i an incredibly stressful time for those affected. to what extent does this rectify all of the issues for all of the people involved? it’s all of the people involved? it's been all of the people involved? it�*s been enormously stressful. i've interviewed interviewed now lots of people affected, its hundreds of thousands of people, it has been ruinous, the mental health is devastated, they have had to go through the pandemic alongside all of this, and it has been devastating for them, and i've spoken to lots of leaseholders about this, it will be welcome news, but we should caveat it. this is only four people, it will only help people in buildings requiring problems over 11 metres. there are building smaller than 11 metres with fire safety problems, and fire safety problems are not
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limited to cladding problems. there's a whole suite, whole array of other problems that have been thrown up and discovered as part of the post grenfell checks, whether it's another an adequate fire safety, there is someone i spoke to yesterday who described michael gove or two on monday was very clear, it will only be to do with cladding, and is really clear yet if you are not affected exclusively by cladding, but one of the many problems, what you will be able to do, because the cost will be substantial.— do, because the cost will be substantial. ., , ., ,, ., substantial. finally, work at the im act be substantial. finally, work at the impact be on — substantial. finally, work at the impact be on house _ substantial. finally, work at the impact be on house building, i substantial. finally, work at the | impact be on house building, for example, the industry more widely. that is exactly what i'm sure developers will say, they will say to ministers, look, if you're going to ministers, look, if you're going to take this out of our pockets it will affect our dividends, it will
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affect our profits, and that means we will build for the fewer homes. they will also say, they've made this point many times before, not withoutjustification, government is turning around and saying you should be footing the bill for this, they will say, well, maybe we have made mistakes, but most developers will tell you, met many people may raise an eyebrow at this, but it was built to spec at the time. they may say this is a regulatory failure going back decades, they have failed to create a regulatory system which works in which is clear, there so why don't you put your hands on your pocket as well?— pocket as well? sounds complicated, i susect pocket as well? sounds complicated, i suspect these _ pocket as well? sounds complicated, i suspect these champagne _ pocket as well? sounds complicated, i suspect these champagne will i pocket as well? sounds complicated, i suspect these champagne will be i i suspect these champagne will be nicer residence for now. the news that steps have been moved forward for those served in force to remove cladding. we're joined now by darren matthews and his neighbour mandy sanhu — just two of those who have faced bills of tens of thousands of pounds as a result of the cladding crisis.
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how do you feel this morning, because as lewis was explaining, it's not going to go away quickly, is it? ., it's not going to go away quickly, isit? ., ,, �*, ~ it's not going to go away quickly, isit? ., �*, ,, ., is it? no, because it's, like, how many users _ is it? no, because it's, like, how many users are _ is it? no, because it's, like, how many users are going _ is it? no, because it's, like, how many users are going to - is it? no, because it's, like, how many users are going to take i is it? no, because it's, like, how. many users are going to take still? we didn't know before, and now we still don't know, so until the plans are in place and we have got more details, we need clarification. ltruilmt details, we need clarification. what has it been like? _ details, we need clarification. what has it been like? it's _ details, we need clarification. what has it been like? it's been - details, we need clarification. what has it been like? it's been very i has it been like? it's been very stressful- _ has it been like? it's been very stressful. i— has it been like? it's been very stressful. i can't _ has it been like? it's been very stressful. i can't tell _ has it been like? it's been very stressful. i can't tell you. i has it been like? it's been very stressful. i can't tell you. we l stressful. i can't tell you. we don't sleep, don't eat, and darren make sure i eat every day, checks up on me, bless him, so, yeah, it's one of them at the moment.— of them at the moment. because ou're in of them at the moment. because you're in adjoining _ of them at the moment. because you're in adjoining flats _ of them at the moment. because you're in adjoining flats in - you're in adjoining flats in manchester? taste you're in adjoining flats in manchester?— you're in adjoining flats in manchester? ~ ., manchester? we are in the same development. — manchester? we are in the same development, a _ manchester? we are in the same development, a couple _ manchester? we are in the same development, a couple that i manchester? we are in the same i development, a couple that support. to tell me about the emotional turmoil you are going through. potentially, what you've been looking at in terms of cost, the
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financial of this? in looking at in terms of cost, the financial of this?— looking at in terms of cost, the financial of this? in terms of cost so far, financial of this? in terms of cost so far. we've _ financial of this? in terms of cost so far, we've had _ financial of this? in terms of cost so far, we've had bills _ financial of this? in terms of cost so far, we've had bills from i financial of this? in terms of cost i so far, we've had bills from hundred and 1500 _ so far, we've had bills from hundred and 1500 for— so far, we've had bills from hundred and 1500 for their apartment, we've had meetings of the freeholder and at the _ had meetings of the freeholder and at the moment actions on hold pending — at the moment actions on hold pending the announcement from gove, which _ pending the announcement from gove, which we _ pending the announcement from gove, which we are _ pending the announcement from gove, which we are welcoming cautiously. your block — which we are welcoming cautiously. your block of flats comes within this bracket? taste your block of flats comes within this bracket?— your block of flats comes within this bracket? ~ ., , this bracket? we are 13.5 metres, we are in the new _ this bracket? we are 13.5 metres, we are in the new category. _ this bracket? we are13.5 metres, we are in the new category. prior- this bracket? we are 13.5 metres, we are in the new category. prior to i are in the new category. prior to the announcements being made, our only option _ the announcements being made, our only option would have been to take out a _ only option would have been to take out a loan _ only option would have been to take out a loan on the new scheme, which in real— out a loan on the new scheme, which in real terms— out a loan on the new scheme, which in real terms would have cost £101,000, plus interest, and it would — £101,000, plus interest, and it would have taken hundred and 61 years _ would have taken hundred and 61 years to — would have taken hundred and 61 years to repay. so, would have taken hundred and 61 years to repay-— would have taken hundred and 61 years to repay. so, basically, you thou~ht years to repay. so, basically, you thought you _ years to repay. so, basically, you thought you were _ years to repay. so, basically, you thought you were going - years to repay. so, basically, you thought you were going to - years to repay. so, basically, you thought you were going to have i years to repay. so, basically, you| thought you were going to have to pay for it yourselves as resident, and this potentially means the developers will have to pay the bill
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somehow, but as we've heard from developers this morning, there are many questions about whether that is going to be possible, whether they haveit going to be possible, whether they have it the money to do it themselves, whether they will agree to do it themselves, and the knock—on for the housing market. what are your thoughts on that! a. what are your thoughts on that! bit... i can't say the words... what are your thoughts on that! a| bit... i can't say the words... tax? yeah. so. — bit... i can't say the words... tax? yeah. so, that's _ bit... i can't say the words... tax? yeah. so, that's her _ bit... i can't say the words... tax? yeah. so, that's her neighbours i yeah. so, that's her neighbours sa er, yeah. so, that's her neighbours saer, t yeah. so, that's her neighbours saper, t completing _ yeah. so, that's her neighbours saper, t completing the - yeah. so, that's her neighbours saper, t completing the work. i saper, t completing the work. you feel like you've been here before? i you feel like you've been here before? ., ., ., ., , before? i thought it would not only aood news before? i thought it would not only good news for _ before? i thought it would not only good news for a — before? i thought it would not only good news for a long _ before? i thought it would not only good news for a long time, - before? i thought it would not only good news for a long time, until i good news for a long time, until it's actually taken, i won't believe it's actually taken, i won't believe it till i see it sort of thing. i it till i see it sort of thing. i guess the government is now saying, ultimately, you won't be paying it. so until the knock on the door of the letter arrives a layer of anxiety has been removed? it’s anxiety has been removed? it's lifted a layer —
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anxiety has been removed? it's lifted a layer of anxiety, that is no clarification on whether developers will pay, for what i understand from mr gove cosmic statement, with the best will in the world. _ statement, with the best will in the world. this — statement, with the best will in the world, this issue is not going to be resolved. — world, this issue is not going to be resolved, needs to be enshrined in law, resolved, needs to be enshrined in law. it _ resolved, needs to be enshrined in law. it has — resolved, needs to be enshrined in law. it has a — resolved, needs to be enshrined in law, it has a legal obligation, with proper— law, it has a legal obligation, with proper stipulations to the building industry— proper stipulations to the building industry that they have to pay, leaseholders are the only innocent party _ leaseholders are the only innocent party in _ leaseholders are the only innocent party in this, freeholders and developers are ultimately dizz responsible, we know that successive housing _ responsible, we know that successive housing ministers have said that, in that leaseholders are not responsible. they have to put it in specific _ responsible. they have to put it in specific ways that developers are going to — specific ways that developers are going to pay in the same way that they had — going to pay in the same way that they had a — going to pay in the same way that they had a victorian module in australia — they had a victorian module in australia where leaseholders are left alone, and any negotiations to rebuilding, repairs were between the develop _ rebuilding, repairs were between the develop of— rebuilding, repairs were between the develop of the freeholders. they said they sympathise, _ develop of the freeholders. tie: said they sympathise, they say develop of the freeholders. ti91 said they sympathise, they say is
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the main priority, and they say they will have followed the rules of the time and they can't shoulder the cost. can they understand that? i cost. can they understand that? i understand that, but why should we? we didn't— understand that, but why should we? we didn't build them, we didn't give them _ we didn't build them, we didn't give them the _ we didn't build them, we didn't give them the specifications and design, report— them the specifications and design, report the _ them the specifications and design, report the prof city properties in good _ report the prof city properties in good faith, that we are moving to safe. _ good faith, that we are moving to safe, secure homes, that we are paying _ safe, secure homes, that we are paying reasonable amounts for. years down _ paying reasonable amounts for. years down the _ paying reasonable amounts for. years down the line we are finding out that there — down the line we are finding out that there are no fire breaks, there is a number— that there are no fire breaks, there is a number of fire safety issues that we — is a number of fire safety issues that we are _ is a number of fire safety issues that we are being expected to pay for. that we are being expected to pay for, , :, that we are being expected to pay for, ., :, that we are being expected to pay for. ., ., ., for. so, some are tough for me. in our for. so, some are tough for me. in your block— for. so, some are tough for me. in your block today, _ for. so, some are tough for me. in your block today, when _ for. so, some are tough for me. in your block today, when you - for. so, some are tough for me. in your block today, when you see i for. so, some are tough for me. in | your block today, when you see one another chats, but with a movie like this morning compared to the sum yesterday before we had about this? cautiously optimistic. taste yesterday before we had about this? cautiously optimistic.— cautiously optimistic. we are a step forward. 0k, forward. ok, a step forward. and you have developed a great friendship, that's a tiny positive take from it. and you got a lift here, one of you. you drive? we a cab. filth.
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and you got a lift here, one of you. you drive? we a cab.— you drive? we a cab. oh, that's treat! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. thank you, good morning, this shot from a weather watcher sums it up, it will be a day that brightens up from the west, the range from scotland and northern ireland already on its way out, then very school the gusty winds, that's heading towards the south—east corner, so hear the rain will get heavier as we go through the afternoon, but to the north and west of england and wales much brighter sunshine and showers, that will be there from late morning onwards across much of scotland and northern ireland. the show is turning increasingly wintry. cauldro a weighing, temperatures for five celsius after briefly increasing, 9 or10 celsius after briefly increasing, 9 or 10 over the south, south—east
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will gradually clear away, and a touch of frost around, showers and the west, sleet and snow, that could lead to icy conditions into tomorrow morning for one or two of you, tempers close to freezing, parts of scotland minus 12—4 , the south—east the bulk of the bulk of this days rain, and showers on sunday for parts of southern scotland, northern ireland, drifting into northern england and wales, crowded out the sicilian west conall, two, cooled a bit on what was going to next week. what's the weather in sydney? it could be crucial, couldn't it? it's not a good focus, but not many interruptions today, the focus
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wasn't too good, so england can't rely on that. wasn't too good, so england can't rely on that-— rely on that. they haven't scored over 300. _ rely on that. they haven't scored over 300. but — rely on that. they haven't scored over 300, but the _ rely on that. they haven't scored over 300, but the way _ rely on that. they haven't scored over 300, but the way they i rely on that. they haven't scored - over 300, but the way they finished, they've survived the last few overs of the force they were given some hope. a glimmer of hope, maybe. maybe even pulling of mission impossible with the opening batsmen survive few overs of the day. after being set a whopping 388 runs to win the lith test in sydney they finished the day on 30 without loss, after another day of australian domination with the bat. patrick gearey rounds it all up. once ashes series are lost, the remaining tests are those of character. today, jonny bairstow fought back. 0h, he's edged it. this morning he was caught behind. 113 runs scored, he had earned this exit. england were all out, trailing by 122, so now their troubled huddle had to slow australia down. mark wood could.
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he removed david warner and manus labuschagne, while jack leach finally found himself and some wickets, too. including steve smith, who almost counts double. but there was a bigger picture, and at the centre of the frame was usman khawaja. recalled to the team and stylishly torturing england's voters, he made a century in the first innings and made one even quicker in the second. for khawaja, for his family and his country, exhilarating. for england, exhausting. australia had declared 387 runs ahead, sending england's openers to the crease under darkening skies, trusting that they would provide their own punchline again. it never quite came. they weathered that storm, and with rain in the forecast will hope tomorrow they can be rescued by another. patrick gearey, bbc news.
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that's the cricket. as for the novak djokovic news this morning, look get the update later, but the court documents show that he had a positive result on the 16th of december, suggesting he heads covid, and one of the initial rules regarding covid vaccination exemptions was that if you have it in the last six months, so that review what he thought he would get the exemption, but the federal immigration laws are different, so it had as big as a revoked, but he has a hearing on monday, but that information has just come out, he waits in the hotel for the weekend. it will hinge on the pcr result. also, at 930, build up to the third round of the fa cup going to chesterfield. i went there this
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weekend. a ban on most single—use plastics will come into effect in scotland from june this year. the legislation will ban the use of plastic cutlery, drink stirrers and food containers made from expanded polystyrene. campaigners welcome the move, but some say it doesn't go far enough. here's more from our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon. the evidence of our throwaway culture. this plastic is recyclable, but it is estimated about half of all the plastic products produced are not. so, in scotland, hundreds of millions of items of polluting plastic that can only be used once are about to be banned for good. it is really important to take the step not only to prevent all this litter on our beaches and in our parks — i talked to kids during cop26 this year who said they couldn't play safely in our parks because they were covered in litter and they don't feel like it's a good place to play. so this is something we can all do. it also reduces our carbon footprint. it is estimated every year in scotland, 300 million
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plastic straws, 276 million pieces of plastic cutlery and 66 million polystyrene food containers are thrown away. these are the items which will be bound by the new legislation. could i get a double scoop of salted caramel and a mint chocolate chip? would you like a cone or a tub? i will get a tub today. some businesses, like this one in portobello, have already switched to plant—based packaging. they are also urging customers to bring reusable containers instead. it is going to be a bit of a culture change for people generally, you know? we are very used to using plastics, especially since the pandemic, i think, the takeaway sector has become a much larger part of the industry, so injune, the government wants businesses to completely eliminate single use plastics. we have tried to do that already, we're trying to be ahead of the curve. what we're trying to implement now is a culture change among our customers.
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change too in other areas, after callum, who is seven, worked out that the weight of bottles to school throws out every year was equivalent to that of a giant panda at edinburgh reserve. i would like metal water bottles for every schoolchild in scotland, lessons about the environment and to make a giant scotland wide schools equal groups. some campaigners, while welcoming the move to ban most single use plastics, say it doesn't go far enough. it is a good thing? any bit of plastic that is stopped from being wasted or used is a good thing. every single minute, a truckload of plastic is ending up in the ocean, and that isn't going anywhere anytime fast, and what we get from government and big business is really mixed messages on this, we have just seen recently a delay to the deposit return scheme, which is a really simple way of claiming back plastic.
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that national deposit return scheme for bottles and cans delayed for now, but the ban on most single use plastics, which comes into force injune, will lead to many millions of pieces of plastic being removed from scotland's environment, helping to clean up its beaches and protect its natural beauty. lovely bit of sunshine there. let's hope it makes a difference, terrible to see that plastic washed up. he's best known to millions for his role as arthur weasley in one of the biggest film franchises of all time, harry potter. many of us know him from "the fast show" as well, but since 2012 mark williams has also been delighting mystery fans in bbc 0ne�*s father brown, which will air its one—hundredth episode next week. he'lljoin us in a moment, but let's just take a look at the show... she screams.
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0h...0h...! what happened ? i came to fetch some acetone for dr muthomi. that thing was in here. he had a knife. fetch the doctor, quickly. i'm scared, father. god is with you. and so am i. that's who you want in a crisis. mark williams joins us now. you need to get some books, mark. i know, it's an imaginary library, you see. �* , . , know, it's an imaginary library, you see. �* , ., , ., , know, it's an imaginary library, you see. �*, .,, .y ., know, it's an imaginary library, you see-_ yeah. i see. it's a bit harry potter. yeah, there's some _ see. it's a bit harry potter. yeah, there's some amazing _ see. it's a bit harry potter. yeah, there's some amazing books - see. it's a bit harry potter. yeah, l there's some amazing books there, you can have anything you like. you are so well— you can have anything you like. you are so well read! _ you can have anything you like. you are so well read! thank _ you can have anything you like. you
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are so well read! thank you. - you can have anything you like. you are so well read! thank you. 100 i are so well read! thank you. 100 e - isodes are so well read! thank you. 100 episodes of _ are so well read! thank you. 100 episodes of father _ are so well read! thank you. 100 episodes of father brown. - are so well read! thank you. 100 episodes of father brown. yeah. are so well read! thank you. 100 - episodes of father brown. yeah. that is a remarkable _ episodes of father brown. yeah. that is a remarkable canon _ episodes of father brown. yeah. that is a remarkable canon of _ episodes of father brown. i'sz—i that is a remarkable canon of work, episodes of father brown. is—i that is a remarkable canon of work, isn't it? ., , ., , �* it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quite sunk in that _ it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quite sunk in that we've _ it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quite sunk in that we've done - it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quite sunk in that we've done it - it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quitel sunk in that we've done it yet, it? yeah, it is. it hasn't quite - sunk in that we've done it yet, and it's the bbc centenary. �*igg sunk in that we've done it yet, and it's the bbc centenary.— sunk in that we've done it yet, and it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the eo - le it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the people who _ it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the people who have _ it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the people who have not _ it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the people who have not seen - it's the bbc centenary. 100 for 100. the people who have not seen it, i the people who have not seen it, tell us about your character, tell us about father brown. , father priest as the priest first and foremost, he has the desire to solve crimes, is not to solving a puzzle like sherlock holmes and those who done its, it's a much more emotional element to, and that makes him keener, i think. element to, and that makes him
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keener, ithink. is element to, and that makes him keener, i think. is a element to, and that makes him keener, ithink. is a bit like jessica fletcher, everyone gets a bit nervous when you turn up somewhere?— bit nervous when you turn up somewhere? ~ ., �* , ., ~ somewhere? well, no, he's not like that. he somewhere? well, no, he's not like that- he is— somewhere? well, no, he's not like that. he is able _ somewhere? well, no, he's not like that. he is able to _ somewhere? well, no, he's not like that. he is able to move _ somewhere? well, no, he's not like that. he is able to move around - somewhere? well, no, he's not like| that. he is able to move around with ease, really. people are not scads of him, perhaps they should be. i5 ease, really. people are not scads of him, perhaps they should be. is a of him, perhaps they should be. is a reat fun of him, perhaps they should be. is a great fun to — of him, perhaps they should be. is a great fun to film? it's a great cast in the setting are beautiful, and the costumes and the sets, just think it must be a lovely thing to work on. yellow it is, apart from the fact that you don't get to do every day... apart from the work there? ., ,., ., every day... apart from the work there? ., ., ., ,, , there? yeah, part of the workbook, it's wonderful. _ there? yeah, part of the workbook, it's wonderful. what _ there? yeah, part of the workbook, it's wonderful. what is _ there? yeah, part of the workbook, it's wonderful. what is a _ there? yeah, part of the workbook, it's wonderful. what is a reality, - it's wonderful. what is a reality, the shooting _ it's wonderful. what is a reality, the shooting schedule _ it's wonderful. what is a reality, the shooting schedule on - it's wonderful. what is a reality, the shooting schedule on a - it's wonderful. what is a reality, the shooting schedule on a job | it's wonderful. what is a reality, i the shooting schedule on a job like that? i imagine it is straight deadlines, you had to turn up pretty quickly? deadlines, you had to turn up pretty cuickl ? ., , ., , quickly? yeah, we shoot an episode in seven working _
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quickly? yeah, we shoot an episode in seven working days, _ quickly? yeah, we shoot an episode in seven working days, which - quickly? yeah, we shoot an episode in seven working days, which are i quickly? yeah, we shoot an episode in seven working days, which are “l in seven working days, which are 11 to 12 hours long, so that's six, seven, eight, nine pages of dialogue, so, yeah, we work hard. i was watching your harry potter reunion this week, which is great. i really enjoyed it. what's it like from your point of view to get the cash back together, to your family back together?— cash back together, to your family back to . ether? ., ., back together? yeah, meeting all the u-rown-u back together? yeah, meeting all the grown-up children, _ back together? yeah, meeting all the grown-up children, having _ back together? yeah, meeting all the grown-up children, having had - back together? yeah, meeting all the grown-up children, having had no - grown—up children, having had no responsibility whatsoever for them growing up was amazing, really! they were brilliant. everyone was really good form, and it's not something that happens much in our industry, unions, once it's gone it's gone, but there was something really, really nice about that. i but there was something really, really nice about that.— really nice about that. i really en'o ed really nice about that. i really enjoyed that- _ really nice about that. i really enjoyed that. everybody - really nice about that. i really enjoyed that. everybody was| really nice about that. i really - enjoyed that. everybody was dressed u - , enjoyed that. everybody was dressed u, so enjoyed that. everybody was dressed u - , so that enjoyed that. everybody was dressed op. so that helps. — enjoyed that. everybody was dressed up, so that helps, as _ enjoyed that. everybody was dressed up, so that helps, as well. _ enjoyed that. everybody was dressed up, so that helps, as well. there's i up, so that helps, as well. there's something — up, so that helps, as well. there's something very — up, so that helps, as well. there's something very special _ up, so that helps, as well. there's something very special about - up, so that helps, as well. there's something very special about that | something very special about that generation that they've all been really successful, and they all seem to have kept their feet on the
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ground, and done some really interesting work.— ground, and done some really interesting work. yet, i'm going back to the _ interesting work. yet, i'm going back to the work _ interesting work. yet, i'm going back to the work thing - interesting work. yet, i'm going back to the work thing is - interesting work. yet, i'm going back to the work thing is that i interesting work. yet, i'm going i back to the work thing is that when they were doing father brown... i mean, not father brown, harry potter, when they were doing it, they were working hard, as well, the work rate is extraordinary, so that's what granted them, i think, the fact that they realised, were made to realise by turning up, that it didn't come free, it wasn'tjust a little bit of acting here and there, it is good, hard, solid craft. ~ �* ., ., ., craft. when you're out and about, and i think— craft. when you're out and about, and i think i _ craft. when you're out and about, and i think i probably _ craft. when you're out and about, and i think i probably know- craft. when you're out and about, and i think i probably know the i and i think i probably know the answer to this, is a harry potter, is it father brown is the fast show that people shout quotes at you from? i that people shout quotes at you from? ~' ., that people shout quotes at you from? ~ ., ~ ., from? i never know. i never know. i was stood — from? i never know. i never know. i was stood on _ from? i never know. i never know. i was stood on a _ from? i never know. i never know. i was stood on a platform _ from? i never know. i never know. i was stood on a platform once i from? i never know. i never know. i was stood on a platform once in i was stood on a platform once in clapham junction was stood on a platform once in claphamjunction and was stood on a platform once in clapham junction and a train pulled in, and i was still right by the driver only just turned in, and i was still right by the driver onlyjust turned to me when and when you ain't seen me, right? which i thought it was good. i never
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know. we which i thought it was good. i never know. ~ , ., ., which i thought it was good. i never know. ~ ., ., know. we will let you go and get some books- _ know. we will let you go and get some books. thank _ know. we will let you go and get some books. thank you - know. we will let you go and get some books. thank you very i know. we will let you go and get i some books. thank you very much! just imagine- _ some books. thank you very much! just imagine. we _ some books. thank you very much! just imagine. we will _ some books. thank you very much! just imagine. we will use _ some books. thank you very much! just imagine. we will use our- some books. thank you very much! just imagine. we will use our brain | just imagine. we will use our brain power. thank you so much forjoining us this saturday morning. congratulations on the hundreds at the side. father brown is on bbc one weekdays at 1:45pm and available on the iplayer. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. 0ur headlines today. tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia due to a recent covid infection, his lawyers say in court documents. hundreds of thousands of flat owners will not have to pay to replace unsafe cladding under new government plans. a fourth covid jab is not needed yet — uk experts say booster doses keep giving high protection against severe illness from the omicron variant. and we meet britain's rarest species of bat making their home in a derelict stable block in sussex.
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this afternoon we should see more sunshine. i will have the weather forecast later. it's saturday the 8th of january. our top story. the tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia due to a recent covid infection, his lawyers say in court documents. the papers have been released in just the last hour, and say he first recorded a positive pcr test on the 16th of december. let's get the latest on this breaking story now with our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil. how much more do we know how much more do we know because how much more do we know because of how much more do we know because of this information?
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this information that has just emerged from the court documents that the lawyer submitted to the court essentially hints at the question at the heart of this controversy. remember the anger around novak djokovic getting the exemption in the first places that people were asking why it was he granted that exemption? now we know why. we know that he reportedly tested positive for covid on december 16, that is less than one month ago, and according to health officials, a recent infection is one officials, a recent infection is one of the valid reasons for you to get an exemption. we also know from those documents that the lawyer said that he was granted that exemption by tennis australia and it was revoked by the federal authorities because of the public outcry, as they have put it. which means they are touching a little bit on how the government is handling this politically, how scott morrison on wednesday said that this was up to the victoria state governments, and
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then turned around and said, rules were rules, and no one was above the law. this is essentially what the judges going to have to look at in detail on monday. he is going to have to those arguments, the chronology and the timing of what happened is going to be crucial, but also who knew what, did tennis australia provide this kind of information to the players, to the victorian government, and to the federal authorities, victorian government, and to the federalauthorities, or victorian government, and to the federal authorities, or that he just tell the players and leave them to come here to face the situation. either way novak djokovic is still in that hotel behind me, waiting for that decision on monday, whether he will remain in australia and defend his title, or whether he will be forced to leave. just to be clear, if this is the case as the document suggests that he did have covid less than one month ago, should he have been exempt and been allowed into the country? that is according to the rules.
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because one of the rules of you apply for an exemption and getting it is a recent covid—19 vaccination within the last six months. according to those documents his pcr test, the positive test that was returned was as recently as december 16. if that is the case, his exemption was legitimate. but whether or not this information was given to the federal authorities, was given to the border authorities, whether they approved it, whether they knew about it, this is at the heart of this. there seems to be this monumental lack of communication between those in charge, whether it is tennis australia, the state government, or the federal government. all of them now want to bet now want different things, all that will be decided in the court on monday. many thanks. up to half—a—million flat owners across the uk will no longer
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be liable for the cost of replacing dangerous cladding, under new government proposals. the plans, set to be announced by the housing secretary michael gove, would instead see developers forced to pay up to an additional £4 billion to help resolve the crisis, which has left many unable to sell their homes. the independent panel of experts that advises the government on vaccines says that a second covid booster — or fourth shot — is not needed for the time being. new data from the uk health security agency shows that — three months after a boosterjab — protection against severe illness remains high in older adults. simonjones reports. the booster campaign is delivering results. do you have any allergies to anything that you're aware of? and you are fit and well today? that's according to thejoint committee on vaccination
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and immunisation, which says there is no immediate need for a second booster dose for care home residents and the over—80s. the first dose is very, very important and gives so much protection that at this point in time, so right now, at the start of the new year, we don't need to rush into giving anybody a second booster dose right now. we might need to do so later on in the year, but not at this point in time. more than 35 million boosters and third doses have now been administered across the uk. data from the uk health security agency shows that three months after receiving a third jab, protection against hospitalisation remains at about 90% for people aged 65 and over. protection against mild symptomatic infection is more short—lived. that drops to around 30% by about three months. some countries, such as israel, have already started
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offering fourth jabs, but in the uk, the priority remains getting first, second and third doses to those who have not yet had them. that will be kept under review. one thing that's changing is travel. fully vaccinated people arriving in the uk from abroad no longer need to take pre—departure tests. from tomorrow, post—arrival pcr test are being replaced by lateral flow tests. that's why today is being dubbed sunshine saturday, with travel agents predicting a big uptick in bookings from people who want to get away from it all. simon jones, bbc news. three white men are beginning life sentences in the us state of georgia for murdering a black jogger who ran through their neighbourhood. 25—year—old ahmaud arbery was chased in pick—up trucks and shot, in a case that became a focus of protests by the black lives matter movement. david willis reports. ahmaud arbery's death has been likened by his family
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to a latter—day lynching. three white men hunted down the unarmed jogger and killed him in cold blood. footage of the incident led to nationwide protests after it emerged that, despite being interviewed at the scene, none of the men involved had been arrested after local officials accepted their plea of self—defence and deemed the killing justified. former police officer gregory mcmichael, his 33—year—old son, travis, and the man who filmed ahmaud arbery's death, william "roddie" bryan, were eventually arrested and brought to trial and found guilty of murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment. they chose to target my son because they didn't want him in their community. these men deserve the maximum sentence for their crimes.
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ahmaud never said a word to them. he never threatened them. he just wanted to be left alone. what i'm going to do is i'm going to sit silently for one minute. to set in context the terror that he said ahmaud arbery must have suffered as he was chased through a residential neighbourhood for more than five minutes, thejudge ordered a moment's silence before sentencing all three men to life in prison. only william "roddie" bryan will be eligible for parole, but not until he is 82 years of age. as we stand here in glynn county in front of this courthouse, think about all the black people who have been lynched in the history of america, in georgia who never, ever got
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their day in court. ahmaud arbery's death paved the way to a period of national reckoning over the state of racial injustice in this country, one which culminated in nationwide protests over the death of george floyd. though these men received the maximum sentence, civil rights campaigners believe it will take more than that to influence attitudes that in many cases go back generations. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. allegations of another party at downing street are set to be included in the official investigation into events held at number ten during the pandemic. it comes after borisjohnson's former chief adviser, dominic cummings, claimed a senior official invited people to socially distanced drinks in the garden, while restrictions were in place in may 2020. our political correspondent, jonathan blake joins us now.
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this is a new claim from dominic cummings who was very much at the heart of the operation in downing street back in early 2020, about another event which is going to be investigated for potentially breaking lockdown restrictions at the time. in a blog post published yesterday he talked about invitations going out for socially distanced drinks in downing street for 20th of may. he warned, he says, at the time, that this was not a goodidea at the time, that this was not a good idea and may have been against the rules. it has now transpired that the senior civil servant whose job it is now to investigate these claims to see if any rules were broken will look into that as part of a now extended list of events which may have broken the rules.
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dominic cummings also talked about an e—mail he sent which she says she should dig up as evidence of what happened, warning against that event taking place. he has also gone to defence of an event five days earlier on the terrace of downing street with prime minister and others having cheese and wine, it has always been defended as a work meeting, he says that is the case as well, because at the time people were encouraged to have meetings outside because of the pandemic. politicians seem to be putting their party differences aside to pay tribute to jack dromey, the labour mp who has died. yes, his death was announced yesterday afternoon and it came as a real shock, yesterday afternoon and it came as a realshock, not least yesterday afternoon and it came as a real shock, not least because he was speaking in parliament on thursday, in a debate about the settlement of afghan refugees in the uk. he was in birmingham to hear circular keir
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starmer make his new year speech on tuesday. he was a prominent figure in the labour party. a former trade unionist. he was elected in 2010, he held various senior roles in the front bench team for ed miliband and jeremy corbyn, although i did not support him in the leadership of the party. and most recently, shadow immigration minister under keir starmer. you only have to look at the tributes being paid by politicians on all sides to see how much he was respected. security forces in kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of protesters taking part in huge riots in its main city, almaty. the unrest began on sunday, when the cost of fuel was doubled. kazakhstan's neighbour, russia, has sent in paratroopers to support the government. our correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. do things look set to calm down?
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yes. the situation about what is happening currently on the ground in almaty is difficult to ascertain. internet has been at best patchy and for a large out—of—town has been turned off during the course of these protests, which started less than a week ago and spread rapidly across the country. they began because a cap on certain types of fuel was removed. that cap was then put on for the next six months. that still did not manage to calm the feeling on the streets, protests continue to expand that we have seen violent scenes in almaty, the biggest city in kazakhstan. burnt out cars, burnt out buildings, smashed up shop fronts. we are still waiting to hear further developments about what exactly is developing on the ground but since the protests have been going on there have been rumours swirling that they could be a power struggle happening in kazakhstan at the moment. this morning we have heard that the former head of the national security
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committee has been detained on suspicion of treason. he is an ally of the former president, who was in powerfor 30 years until of the former president, who was in power for 30 years until 2019. the rumours will still not be quelled by the fact that there is a dynamic situation going on and more will develop shortly, i am sure. thank you. tributes have been paid to the american actor, sidney poitier, who has died at the age of 94. you will call me sir stop the young ladies will be addressed as miss. the boys by their surnames. poitier was the first black man to win a best actor oscar, and helped to break down many of hollywood's racial barriers, while paving the way for a generation of film stars. a host of prominent figures, including presidentjoe biden, barack obama and oprah winfrey have
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paid tribute to him. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. i have scaled my mountain, scaled my skyscraper. we have seen snow here recently. look at some of these images that have just come from new york, theirfirst winter images that have just come from new york, their first winter storm images that have just come from new york, theirfirst winter storm of the season. central park, 15 centimetres of snow fell. more on the outskirts of the city. parts of kentucky and west virginia, a0 centimetres of snow fell in the space of a day. many interstates were littered with crashed and abandoned vehicles. this is the area of cloud and low pressure responsible, now pushing on the north atlantic, it will not hit as directly, it will push up towards
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greenland and iceland. we have got that area of cloud, that is bring in mild, wet and windy conditions across the country, compared to the past few days. chillier and brighter conditions are set to develop in the west. at the moment we have a band of heavy rain pleading from eastern scotland, then across northern england, wales. rain and result coming and going ahead of it. once thatis coming and going ahead of it. once that is clear, scotland and northern ireland, cloud will start to break up ireland, cloud will start to break up to the rest of this morning, some sunny spells, best of those in the afternoon, a few wintry showers. brighter in the afternoon in northern england, wales, southwest. towards south—east england it will stay cloudy and wet. gusty winds. temperatures dropping later back to four or five celsius after briefly lifting this morning. showers in the west will turn wintry tonight, particularly in scotland and
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north—west england. eastern areas, clearer skies. temperatures dropping down to freezing or a roundabout there. the chance of frost and ice again as we go back into sunday morning. much better day for eastern areas on sunday. parts of east anglia should see sunny spells. showers in the west. bulk of those through the morning. another cool feeling the. although temperatures are slightly above where we would be at this stage injanuary. on monday, this wedge of milder area in from the west. eastern areas will start off chilly and frosty but with hazy sunshine. lots of cloud across the country on monday. temperatures start to climb into double figures.
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into next week they will remain like that. but it does mean by night there will be some frost. your brother in kentucky will be jealous of our warmth. he is at the moment. lots of you have been getting in touch with questions about school restrictions and the impact of omicron. so let's get some answers now from our regular panel of experts, professor linda bauld and dr chris smith. nearly 200,000 cases per day across the uk. what are you sensing now compared to a few days ago? has omicron peaked?
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i think it has. levels are coming down. the data is patchy, with public holidays it takes time for numbers to catch up. that is probably why there was a bit of a surge after christmas. i have been at pains to emphasise many times through this, it has consequences that matter, not the number of cases. we should be looking very carefully at how many people become unwell, how many people become severely unwell and need to go to hospital, how many people pass away. those numbers paint a more reassuring picture across the board in many contexts, both in hospitals and in care homes. we are going to see data reinforcing the reassuring picture that the vaccines are doing theirjob. we are not seen anything like the rates of hospitalisations are consequences that we saw this time last year. despite high numbers i am fairly reassured and fairly optimistic. if we are peaking and it is starting
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to come down again in the charts, that could change as kids go back to school after the christmas break, students going back to campuses, people going to work if they have to, we get more mixing again? that is correct. look at some of the data on— that is correct. look at some of the data on peoples contacts. in scotland _ data on peoples contacts. in scotland average contacts around five per— scotland average contacts around five per week. people who respond to the survey, _ five per week. people who respond to the survey, that declined over the christmas — the survey, that declined over the christmas period. people saw more people _ christmas period. people saw more people in— christmas period. people saw more people in their own homes but less i”
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in cases in younger age groups. we are facing a lot of absences in the teachers — are facing a lot of absences in the teachers workforce, as we are in the nhs and _ teachers workforce, as we are in the nhs and elsewhere. that is a concern _ nhs and elsewhere. that is a concern. the third one, we are still waiting _ concern. the third one, we are still waiting for— concern. the third one, we are still waiting for news on vaccines for younger— waiting for news on vaccines for younger children, and now 12—15 -year-otds_ younger children, and now 12—15 —year—olds are waiting for their third _ —year—olds are waiting for their third. children are back in school, students — third. children are back in school, students are going back to university, that is brilliant. chris. _ university, that is brilliant. chris. you _ university, that is brilliant. chris, you talk about consequences, and the vaccine is mitigating the consequences, or that is what we could be done to the current situation. at what point can we say the vaccines have worked there for isolating for ten days did not become necessary any more? irate isolating for ten days did not become necessary any more? we have alread not become necessary any more? we have already got good _ become necessary any more? we have already got good evidence _ become necessary any more? we have already got good evidence about i become necessary any more? we have already got good evidence about the i already got good evidence about the effectiveness of these vaccines. that was further reinforced by data emerging this week showing that people who have had a vaccine, for many weeks afterwards art 90% protected against severe disease. that is what we must keep our i focused on. it is protection against
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severe disease. we neverfool ourselves we could prevent or stop covid. we can't. it is an endemic infection it will continue to circulate for years to come, but we could knock on the head its most severe consequences, loss of life, severe consequences, loss of life, severe disease, hospitalisation, thatis severe disease, hospitalisation, that is with the vaccines come into their own. we are into a regime now where the impact of covid when it gets to a vulnerable person is about the same as flu. with flute we protect the vulnerable, we take steps to do good infection control measures in hospitals. the government could go further and spent a fraction of what you're spending on testing on building decent infection control facilities and hospitals. that would also safeguard against future pandemics. but this is analogous to how we handle the flu. we should go forward with the mindset we know who the vulnerable are, we know how to attenuate the attack of this virus
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of these vaccines, with drugs we also have available. we need to focus on getting life restored to normal as much as possible to minimise the impact on other aspects of society. i think we are beginning to see that confidence returning now. that is very encouraging indeed. linda, we know that rules have changed today when it comes to travel, when you leave your forehead this nation to go back to the uk, they have now scrapped that first test before you leave, although you will still have to test on your arrival in the uk. somebody�*s got in touch anonymously to say, does the scrapping of the predeparture test mean you could be sitting next to someone on a long flight who has covid? it someone on a long flight who has covid? ., , . .,, covid? it does increase the risk. but the government _ covid? it does increase the risk. but the government is - covid? it does increase the risk. but the government is weighing | covid? it does increase the risk. i but the government is weighing up different— but the government is weighing up different challenges, different harms — different challenges, different harms. the way the predeparture test worl
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negative, which i did, on the way back, _ negative, which i did, on the way back, and — negative, which i did, on the way back, and that could have been through— back, and that could have been through pcr or lateral flow supervise and paid for, then i know that i_ supervise and paid for, then i know that i don't— supervise and paid for, then i know that i don't have the virus at the time _ that i don't have the virus at the time i_ that i don't have the virus at the time i get — that i don't have the virus at the time i get the test. but they could have picked up the virus in the day between _ have picked up the virus in the day between having that test are getting on the _ between having that test are getting on the plane. clearly it will have reduced — on the plane. clearly it will have reduced the risk a bit. what i would say about— reduced the risk a bit. what i would say about air travel, there are rigorous — say about air travel, there are rigorous procedures in place. people must _ rigorous procedures in place. people must wear— rigorous procedures in place. people must wear face coverings unless they are eating _ must wear face coverings unless they are eating or drinking. there are a lot of— are eating or drinking. there are a lot of procedures in the airport. i would _ lot of procedures in the airport. i would not — lot of procedures in the airport. i would not regard it as necessarily a super— would not regard it as necessarily a super risky— would not regard it as necessarily a super risky activity compared to many— super risky activity compared to many activities that we do in our daily— many activities that we do in our daily lives — many activities that we do in our daily lives. and removing that requirement is to dry and get that economy, — requirement is to dry and get that economy, that sector, more back on its feet, _ economy, that sector, more back on its feet, to _ economy, that sector, more back on its feet, to build peoples confidence. it is weighing up different risks and benefits. another— different risks and benefits.
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another question. the answer to updating the vaccine question is that that is being worked on at the moment. but as we have seen, with all multiple iterations and variants this virus is a moving target. even if we did have an up—to—date vaccine today, it potentially is going to be out of date, by that definition, any matter of months, when the next variant p°p5 of months, when the next variant pops up. at the moment the vaccines we have work incredibly well despite the fact that we are now two years, yes, amazing isn't it, downstream from when we first began to report about the emergence of this new and interesting virus that was coming out of one corner of one city in one country, and now look where we are. those vaccines work because the immune response you make, despite the fact the virus changes a bit, it
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still makes a comprehensive enough response to mean that if you do meet the virus, albeit in the form of a different variant, you have still got enough recognition in your underlying immune response to defend you against severe disease. we are not updated the vaccines yet because to do so does take time, it does take checking, it does take effort on the part of the companies to make sure that they produce one that is safe and effective. that cannot be done overnight, but it is certainly on the table. a number of different vaccine campaigns and manufacturers are already working on this as well as looking further into the future, what they are doubling vaccine 2.0, the idea that we would make vaccines that do not need to be updated because they target parts of the virus that never change. this means we potentially have vaccines that look at variants that don't even exist yet. that again takes time to do but is definitely in the works. that leads on to this question.
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herd immunity is a sound epidemiological and medical term. herd immunity is a sound epidemiologicaland medicalterm. it epidemiological and medical term. it means epidemiologicaland medicalterm. it means that by enough people in the population being immune to a particular infectious disease the number of people who are in the publish and who are susceptible is that so few that the chances of someone who is infected running into someone who is infected running into someone who is infected running into someone who is in effect a ball and passing on the infection diminishes to such an extent that whenever the infectious disease is cannot maintain a chain of transmission. but to do that you do need a population where at the level of immunity in the population, and the duration of that immunity is sufficiently high that you can achieve blockage of the chain of transmission. the problem with
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coronavirus, as a family of viruses, is that the family of vaccines we have got a natural infection do not produce significant enough long—term infection. which means unless we are back and continuously we cannot achieve complete protection but what we can do is to achieve long—term protection against severe disease. people might catch the infection, they may pass on the infection, but there are very few consequences, certainly on the skill of what we have seen in the past. that is properly the direction we're heading in. that is analogous to what happens with the common cold or the flu. we do update peoples immunity with flu vaccines but we sustain in the population level of trust mission of the flu because it is impossible to completely block it and achieve perfect long—term protection because it is a moving target and the immunity you produce in response is not that long lived. so, when people say we will reach
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this tipping point of herd immunity, do not understand what that means, will never get there with this particular virus? it’s will never get there with this particular virus? it's unlikely, without a _ particular virus? it's unlikely, without a very _ particular virus? it's unlikely, without a very regular- particular virus? it's unlikely, j without a very regular vaccine update strategy, that we were to achieve a point we have zero covid, and that is why many countries have accepted that is probably going to be the way to go. countries like australia or new zealand that previously had policy of keeping covid out pending max —— mass vaccination, it is endemic. we have to think differently, and think in terms of protecting the vulnerable while tolerating a level of transmission in society without consequences, i know, it's impossible to achieve, we think, probably, herd immunity, but if you think of herd immunity is being enough people protect is that we don't have pressure on the nhs or severe levels of disease and the publisher, we are already there in
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many respects. publisher, we are already there in many respects-— publisher, we are already there in many respects. questionnaire from chris, who sounds _ many respects. questionnaire from chris, who sounds a _ many respects. questionnaire from chris, who sounds a little _ chris, who sounds a little frustrated, he is asking, why are the number of cases in hospital not published with details about who is vaccinated and who is not vaccinated? so chris and the rest of us can get a sense of who is really becoming unwell because of this. thanks, chris has asked a question which _ thanks, chris has asked a question which has — thanks, chris has asked a question which has come up a few times, and itiust _ which has come up a few times, and it just shows — which has come up a few times, and itjust shows how which has come up a few times, and it just shows how much which has come up a few times, and itjust shows how much people which has come up a few times, and it just shows how much people want this information. what i would say is that— this information. what i would say is that what you see on a daily dashboard isjust a snapshot of is that what you see on a daily dashboard is just a snapshot of the material— dashboard is just a snapshot of the material that the government and other— material that the government and other public health agencies are collecting on the country. the information chris is interested in does _ information chris is interested in does exist. — information chris is interested in does exist, and it is published in different— does exist, and it is published in different briefings. in a technical briefing — different briefings. in a technical briefing that uk health security agency— briefing that uk health security agency publishes, they do that the variance _ agency publishes, they do that the variance of concern and in general, so you _ variance of concern and in general, so you can — variance of concern and in general, so you can find out. i don't know if there _ so you can find out. i don't know if there is— so you can find out. i don't know if there is a — so you can find out. i don't know if there is a brand—new one, there was one available — there is a brand—new one, there was one available just before christmas, in scotland — one available just before christmas, in scotland we published the figures on a table _
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in scotland we published the figures on a table for weekly analysis report, — on a table for weekly analysis report, so— on a table for weekly analysis report, so they do exist, but is 'ust report, so they do exist, but is just not— report, so they do exist, but is just not a — report, so they do exist, but is just not a headline in the newspaper. what i would say about is there more _ newspaper. what i would say about is there more people in hospital at the moment— there more people in hospital at the moment who have had a vaccine over double _ moment who have had a vaccine over double vaccinated than there are people _ double vaccinated than there are people who have been unvaccinated, but the _ people who have been unvaccinated, but the reason for that is at the peak— but the reason for that is at the peak in — but the reason for that is at the peak in hospital are still by and large _ peak in hospital are still by and large older and more vulnerable in most _ large older and more vulnerable in most cases, the vaccines are really good _ most cases, the vaccines are really good against risk, but not perfect, and when — good against risk, but not perfect, and when you do these reports by age standardised risk by going to hospital, the latest figures from scotland, for example, your 12.5 times— scotland, for example, your 12.5 times more _ scotland, for example, your 12.5 times more likely to end up in hospital— times more likely to end up in hospital with covid—19 if you're unvaccinated, compared to if you have _ unvaccinated, compared to if you have had — unvaccinated, compared to if you have had a — unvaccinated, compared to if you have had a booster, and just a final point _ have had a booster, and just a final point on _ have had a booster, and just a final point on that for me, another piece of analysis— point on that for me, another piece of analysisjust shows point on that for me, another piece of analysis just shows the progress the vaccines have made, as chris is saying. _ the vaccines have made, as chris is saying, through the pandemic. so, in the second _ saying, through the pandemic. so, in the second wave injanuary saying, through the pandemic. so, in the second wave in january 2021, saying, through the pandemic. so, in the second wave injanuary 2021, you risk going _ the second wave injanuary 2021, you
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risk going into hospital was about 12%. _ risk going into hospital was about 12%. as— risk going into hospital was about 12%. as we — risk going into hospital was about 12%, as we got more doses and it became _ 12%, as we got more doses and it became more effective, admission to hospital— became more effective, admission to hospital with 4%, and now in the omicron — hospital with 4%, and now in the omicron wave in scotland specifically, but this will be more generalisable, positive cases about 1% generalisable, positive cases about i% end _ generalisable, positive cases about i% end up— generalisable, positive cases about 1% end up in hospital, so please get the vaccine, — 1% end up in hospital, so please get the vaccine, on the pieces are still there. _ the vaccine, on the pieces are still there. we — the vaccine, on the pieces are still there, we have seen uptakes slow bit after christmas. if you have not had after christmas. if you have not had a little _ after christmas. if you have not had a little bit _ after christmas. if you have not had a little bit after christmas. if you have _ a little bit after christmas. if you have not— a little bit after christmas. if you have not had your booster, it is still _ have not had your booster, it is still waiting for you and i hope people — still waiting for you and i hope people take it up.— still waiting for you and i hope people take it up. finally, can you see wh , people take it up. finally, can you see why. the _ people take it up. finally, can you see why, the picture _ people take it up. finally, can you see why, the picture linda - people take it up. finally, can you see why, the picture linda was i see why, the picture linda was painting, numbers being 18 times higher if you are unvaccinated, can you see why lots of people who are vaccinated are arguing it's time now to get back to normal and live alongside the spires? that to get back to normal and live alongside the spires? that has to be our long-term _ alongside the spires? that has to be our long-term aim, _ alongside the spires? that has to be our long-term aim, and _ alongside the spires? that has to be our long-term aim, and we - alongside the spires? that has to be our long-term aim, and we are i our long—term aim, and we are beginning to move towards that. i think the mindset of those policy makers, politicians, but also the general public, is one that we are in a position and to defend ourselves against this. we had the
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data to show that we are doing that, we are tolerating really high levels of virus in society, but they are not translating into consequences are quite a scale that they were historically. that shows that we are moving in the right direction, confidence will begin to come back, then people are beginning to understand that we can live alongside us, we can stop its most major impacts. it will take a little while, but i do feel pretty optimistic these days, i think we are seeing the beginning of the end of this thing. he are seeing the beginning of the end of this thing-— of this thing. he said it! we are seeinr of this thing. he said it! we are seeing the _ of this thing. he said it! we are seeing the beginning _ of this thing. he said it! we are seeing the beginning of- of this thing. he said it! we are seeing the beginning of the i of this thing. he said it! we are| seeing the beginning of the end of this thing. he said it! we are i seeing the beginning of the end of this thing. can be quite that in a year's time? i this thing. can be quite that in a year's time?— this thing. can be quite that in a ear's time? ., , ., ., ., year's time? i hope i am not going to do a michael— year's time? i hope i am not going to do a michael fish _ year's time? i hope i am not going to do a michael fish moment i year's time? i hope i am not going l to do a michael fish moment there, there is going to be a hurricane! i do want to feel much more optimistic now, and if you look at where we are now, and if you look at where we are now, compared to where world this time last year, january 2021, the number of people who are heading off to hospital was stupendously high. we are seeing daily death rates of 1500 people dying per day with very,
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very many fewer cases than we are seeing per day now. that's down to this extraordinary vaccine effort, as well as the fact that omicron does appear to be a bit less severe than delta. so, i think we are in good shape. than delta. so, i think we are in good shape-— than delta. so, i think we are in good shape. than delta. so, i think we are in aood shae. ., , ., good shape. so, tony on twitter, has chris deliberately _ good shape. so, tony on twitter, has chris deliberately picked _ good shape. so, tony on twitter, has chris deliberately picked that - chris deliberately picked that jumper to match his paint? yes. absolutely- _ jumper to match his paint? yes. absolutely. colour— jumper to match his paint? iezs absolutely. colour coordination. that's the only time you've given us a brief answer, chris! that's the only time you've given us a briefanswer, chris! iiigt that's the only time you've given us a brief answer, chris!— a brief answer, chris! not as brief as that one! _ a brief answer, chris! not as brief as that one! linda, _ a brief answer, chris! not as brief as that one! linda, have - a brief answer, chris! not as brief as that one! linda, have you i a brief answer, chris! not as brief as that one! linda, have you got. a brief answer, chris! not as brief. as that one! linda, have you got any words on chris's _ as that one! linda, have you got any words on chris's tanked _ as that one! linda, have you got any words on chris's tanked up - as that one! linda, have you got any words on chris's tanked up this i words on chris's tanked up this morning? words on chris's tanked up this mornin: ? �* ., words on chris's tanked up this mornin: ? . ., �* , morning? aiee how can't quite seem, but if he has — morning? aiee how can't quite seem, but if he has matching, _ morning? aiee how can't quite seem, but if he has matching, i _ morning? aiee how can't quite seem, but if he has matching, i haven't i but if he has matching, i haven't matching — but if he has matching, i haven't matching this week, but clearly we cant need — matching this week, but clearly we cant need to confer, because we need to confer— cant need to confer, because we need to confer during the dark months of winter~ _ to confer during the dark months of winter. ., .. to confer during the dark months of winter. ., ~' , ., , to confer during the dark months of winter. ., ~ , ., , . to confer during the dark months of
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winter. ., ,, ,, , . ., , winter. thank you very much, lovely to see you — winter. thank you very much, lovely to see you as _ winter. thank you very much, lovely to see you as ever. _ to see you as ever. he is matching me, it's perfect. not just thrown together, you know! shame about mike! i haven't painted any walls to match my time yet. do you want an england record? fanfares. england's opening batsmen, haseeb hameed and crawley, have made 30 without loss, it's a new record. that is that spirit. this defiant opening stand will give england a glimmer of hope of maybe forcing the draw, and who knows, even pulling off mission impossible, after being set 388 runs to win the ath test in sydney. bear in mind, they are yet to get past 300 in a single innings as yet in this series. and earlier it had been another day of australian domination with the bat, as the hosts look to go a—0 up in the series. patrick gearey rounds it all up.
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once ashes series are lost, the remaining tests are those of character. yesterday, jonny bairstow fought back. oh, he's edged it. this morning he was caught behind. 113 runs scored, he had earned this exit. england were all out, trailing by 122, so now their troubled huddle had to slow australia down. mark wood could. he removed david warner and manus labuschagne, while jack leach finally found himself and some wickets, too. including steve smith, who almost counts double. but there was a bigger picture, and at the centre of the frame was usman khawaja. recalled to the team and stylishly torturing england's voters, he made a century in the first innings and made one even quicker in the second. for khawaja, for his family and his country, exhilarating. for england, exhausting. australia had declared 387 runs ahead, sending england's openers
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to the crease under darkening skies, trusting that they would provide their own punchline again. it never quite came. they weathered that storm, and with rain in the forecast will hope tomorrow they can be rescued by another. patrick gearey, bbc news. next a reminder of that novak djokovic development. his lawyer's court documents state that he returned a positive pcr test result on december 16th and this was the basis of the vaccine exemption application, which he thought would allow him to play in the australian open, where he is the reigning champion. having covid within the last six months was originally given by tennis australia as a reason for getting a vaccine exemption, but his visa was revoked by immigration officials and he now waits for his appeal hearing against his deportation, which is on monday. next to fa cup 3rd round weekend, when the elite enter the competition, and for the smaller teams a chance for footballing dreams to come true and lives
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can change forever. it wasn't to be in wiltshire though for league two swindon town as they were knocked out by manchester city, who fielded a really strong side, and it finished a—1 at the county ground — bernardo silva with the opener. two more goals followed to put city in control — but there was a moment to remember for swindon as harry mckirdy got one back — this is what a moment of cup glory can mean. but it was short—lived — cole palmer scoring city's fourth and booking their place in the fourth round. the majority of the other ties are today, and of the four non—league sides left in the competition, chesterfield have the most glamorous match, away at european champions chelsea. in the derbyshire town, this brings back memories of the time when they so nearly created one of the most famous fa cup stories of all time, and almost met chelsea in the final. i've been to chesterfield this week to see what it means. the town with the crooked spire has finally got the fa cup tie that
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a cruel twist of fate helped deny them over two decades ago. it could have been one of the greatest fa cup fairy tales ever. 1997, chesterfield, then a third tier side, had defied all the odds getting to the semifinals. they were 2—1 up against premier league middlesbrough, on course to face chelsea in the final. when a third goal for them was disallowed — even though the ball seemingly crossed the line. that looked to me like it went over the line. i thought that was in. middlesbrough fought back, and ended chesterfield's dreams in a replay. i think when it comes round it's what could have been, you know, withjonathan howard's goal, was over the line, was it not? i think it seemed like, you know, if you look at replace, if you look at replays, the linesman's flagging for the goal, but there's so much going on, pandemonium, if you look back it was just an emotional roller—coaster. you know, you go from playing
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in front of 3000, a000, and then walking out at old trafford, a sea of red, a sea of blue, you know, the build—up to the game, the town just went absolutely crazy. it's one of the best fa cup semifinals probably there ever has been, really. even though they had lost, it was a life changing cup run for players like kevin davies, snapped up, then, by premier league southampton with his new—found fame. we were on the frank skinner show, and getting boots thrown at you to wear on tv, so it was something new for all of us, really. you know, the luck of the draw, the fa cup, like i said before, give you that platform to go onto better things. in the years since, chesterfield have struggled at times and now fallen out of the football league. but they have still made their mark around the world. it was it was here that walking football was created 11 years ago, and has since spread across the planet, opening up the beautiful game to older generations — and this week in chesterfield even the snow wasn't going to stop the senior spireites warming up for their trip to chelsea. any weather, we are ready for chelsea! we can probably give them a game in this place! we gave the world walking football, and now we givel the world fa cup shot. just like in '97, fa cup fever
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is gripping chesterfield again. notjust the die—hard fans in the club shop... come on, spireites! are you ready for saturday? ..and the 6000 who will leave on coaches from pubs and their homes this morning, but the one glow is being felt right across the town, giving businesses a new year boost and lifting the spirits of the whole community. everyone's buzzing about it, everyone's talking about it. i can't believe that, you know, we are competing with chelsea. 0h, itjust brings everyone together, you know? friends, families and all the young people from young ages and all over. you know, we are all talking about what we are going to do on the weekend and probably go for a and not after. it is the history of the fa that makes it so special. there's plenty of that here. this is a programme from 1950 when chesterfield took chelsea to a replay. go back to 1905, and chesterfield with a first away team ever to win at stamford bridge, where they return today. it means everything. it means everything to the players
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have dreamt of a game like that, to play in a game like that, and it can be life changing, but the main thing is that we represent the club right, to so to reinvigorate the community, really. in contrast to chelsea's billionaire owner, chesterfield are now owned by its community trust, a charity set up initiallyjust to get the club more involved in the community. we are now in, what, 50 schools, and several million a year with turnover, and we now own the club, which was not in the... we had never even dreamt of. the club was up for sale, it appeared that no one is buying it, and we didn't quite know where it was going, so we just sort of stepped into the breach, really, i never thought we would be going to the champions of europe 18 months later — probably even 18 years later, to be honest. chesterfield is run each month on an amount that wouldn't even pay a week's salary for some of the chelsea players. but this is the fa cup, and in chesterfield they will never stop doing things at their own pace. oh, spireites, we love you!
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the walking football spireites in fine voice. you can watch that on the red button. that was a lovely piece, that was great. made me want to get straight on her back. thank you. "shocking", "disgusting" and "a horror show". just some of the words being used to describe conditions in some of the flats in a privately owned block in portsmouth — where residents are suffering severe issues with damp and mould. people living in "windsor house" say communal areas have also been used by drug addicts and rough sleepers. the city council is now investigating what it can do to get action taken by the private owners. steve humphrey reports. so, it's pretty bad. it's been steadily growing despite over the years, and it leaks, because it's leaking from here, behind the wall, and it soaked right through, that's why there's water damage
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all over this place. the mould in ian knights's flat has been getting worse and worse since he moved in 13 years ago. yeah, it's disgusting. you can stay in there for more than ten minutes at a time. so, i try to be in and out as quickly as possible. ian, who is disabled, says up to now he is not been able to get any help to sort out the mould. i haven't been able to contact my landlords for years. none of the numbers work. nobody knows how to get hold of them. ian is not alone. other residents in the 37 flats at windsor house are also having problems with mould and damp. the ceiling's had some issues with leaking for the last 9—10 months, and even though the ceiling has been replaced, it still continues to drip. there are people wiping down the walls, within a day, the black mould is back. nobody seems to be doing anything. this is why it has come to the stage now where we've got together a collective, and we need help to get this sorted. they are also angry at the conditions of the communal areas. a broken front door lock means
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that the corridors have been used by drug addicts and rough sleepers. there's needles, there is rubbish, there's fly—tipping, you know? it's really quite bad. leah says the owner of her flats is try to help. because of a freehold issue, they are unable to access the bits that they need to be able to get to to fix the underlying issues. this is a horror show. this is horrible. it's horrific. and as a result of photographs like that, footage like that, that i asked the council to investigate, there are various things we can do. one of the powers, for instance, is actually to do some repairs ourselves and recover the costs from the landlord. part of the problem with that, as the tenants have said, is who the landlord is, and it's a complex management structure, i understand, that owns this block. we are going to get to the bottom of it, because the tenants deserve it. i just want help. we just all of us won't help. we just all of us want help. we want it rectified.
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that's the main thing that we do want it rectified, we want our clients to be livable. already today, city council officials have been to windsor house. ian knight's flat was amongst those that have been inspected. steve humphrey reporting. attempts have been made to get in touch with the owner of the building, but we've yet to hear back from them. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we've been talking about sunshine on saturday, so where better than the algerian desert for a bit of sunshine? that is what you would probably think, but take a look at this footage from yesterday in algeria. it was the desert covered in snow. now, the snow is not completely unusual here, but as in europe, the cold air has been pushing its way southwards in causing this wintry scene is to
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form. as here in the uk, the cold air has now been cut off. we had this big swell of cloud in the north atlantic is going to start to dragon something a bit milderfor now atlantic is going to start to dragon something a bit milder for now at least, but something cooler pushing in, a package the weather system you can just say, that will introduce brighter weather took the north—west through today, but the further south and east you are, it's been a wet day so far, get ready for it to stay wet and feeling windy. gusts of 30-a0 wet and feeling windy. gusts of 30—a0 miles an hour, ring clearing away from nose and eastern scotland and down to the south—west, it's down here that winds will be strongest, the rain off for the heavy strain arrives, but scotland and northern ireland, the rain will break up, a few showers as temperatures drop, then later in the afternoon northern england and wales, potentially worth millions of the south—west could see some sunshine at times, too. staying cloudy and wet with the heaviest in east anglia and the south—east of an
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in, in temperatures up to about 10 degrees, but they'll start to drop in northern and western parts, dantas 305 celsius by the end of the day. that leads into a chilly night tonight, southern and eastern areas will be clear, isolated showers, shower is coming and going across western areas, rain, hailand shower is coming and going across western areas, rain, hail and sleet, temperatures dropping either side of them, close to freezing, chunks of ice around as we head into tomorrow morning, so tomorrow morning will be a bit chilly to start, especially in the east and south, a much brighter start and a much brighter day by and large, staying dry with sunny spells. showers in the west, most frequent into the afternoon across northern england, later in the day across the south—west, west conall, isles of scilly, we will see some cloud and patchy rain. that's milder air trying to push in with these weather fronts, air trying to push in with these weatherfronts, so air trying to push in with these weather fronts, so progress air trying to push in with these weatherfronts, so progress made on monday, these weather fronts
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weatherfronts, so progress made on monday, these weatherfronts not going to produce the amount of rain we are seeing today. heaviest rain on monday, north and west of scotland, patchy rain and drizzle with extensive cloud across many western areas, the crowds that enough where it will stay largely dry, temperatures starting to creep up, they will creep up further through the week, with just a few showers around on tuesday, in the south at least to stay dry, but here frost and fog, enjoy your saturday. nice to see you, matt. it's just gone 9:50am, we move onto another story. tens of thousands of trees are being planted in a lake district valley to help prevent flooding and improve habitats for wildlife. if you need to think about going outdoors, these pictures are great. volunteers are working with local farmers and the national trust to try to protect the landscape. alison freeman reports. small saplings, but with a big part to play in helping the environment. these trees are some of thousands that are going to be planted
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to replicate natural hedgerows, which not only help to prevent soil erosion as well as the run—off of water which causes floods, but soak up carbon and provide habitat for wildlife. £220,000 of government money is funding the project, but a local community interest group is organising the planting. in three or four years i would think you'll have a hedge getting on for sort of four or five feet high, or something like that, and you would start to see that blossom already and those berries that early on. so give it a sort of 10 or 15 years and you'll have a nice, established hedge that will be good for the birds, lots of nesting, lots of food for them, and hopefully, i mean, we've got red squirrel around here, we've planted hazels in here, get the hazelnuts, we can help the red squirrels. i think it will be really nice. the national trust secured the funding for this scheme, which will see trees planted mainly on farmland around oldswater the lake district, an area where farmers have faced criticism
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from some for changing the natural face of the uplands. what you can see here is the farmed cultural landscape where this work can happen hand—in—hand, so it's absolutely not about conservation or farming, it's about finding the right path to have both. so this is dogrose, a very twiggy type of thing. while it will be mainly volunteers planting the trees, the funding has also secured employment. a job for robbie, who lives nearby. because i do often see these places, coming back along, just working, you see how they are doing. you sort of see which ones are going well and which ones aren't. yeah, i get lots of satisfaction out of that. the volunteers have planted 650 trees today, but over the next two years they're going to plant around 38,000 across the oldswater area. the trees are donated, the services are free, why wouldn't the landowners take
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advantage of what everybody's doing? you can see things deteriorating in many ways, so to put something back, to actually work with nature rather than against it, is wonderful. we can help out like this and get a nice day out. why is it important that you are doing this now? i think we are at crisis point, where we've got to really figure out, particularly in a cultural landscape like the lake district, how we're going to move forward. we know we're suffering catastrophic biodiversity loss, loss of species, loss of nature. these projects are really about preserving this landscape forfuture generations, and my family's been in this area for a long time, and i hope we will be for generations to come. alison freeman, bbc news, the lake district. beautiful. absolutely. let's all get out there at some
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point if we can in the next few days. another wildlife story for you, out and about were also staying in. britain's rarest species of bat — "greater horseshoe" bats — have been discovered in west sussex for the first time in 100 years. now two charities — the vincent wildlife trust and sussex bat group — are fundraising to turn the derelict stable they were found in into a special maternity unit, after they showed signs of breeding. let's talk now to bat conservation officer, tom kitching. that's the stables, is it? good morning- _ that's the stables, is it? good morning. this _ that's the stables, is it? good morning. this is _ that's the stables, is it? good morning. this is the _ that's the stables, is it? good morning. this is the stables i that's the stables, is it? (ems morning. this is the stables behind me, as you can see, it's not the best state of repair, so as you say we are trying to raise money to provide a more secure home for these bats. �* ., ., provide a more secure home for these bats. . ., ., .,
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bats. and what are pouring -- what are they up — bats. and what are pouring -- what are they up to _ bats. and what are pouring -- what are they up to in — bats. and what are pouring -- what are they up to in there? _ bats. and what are pouring -- what are they up to in there? they're i are they up to in there? they're hunkering _ are they up to in there? they're hunkering down _ are they up to in there? they're hunkering down for— are they up to in there? they're hunkering down for winter i are they up to in there? they're hunkering down for winter and i hunkering down for winter and hibernating. the reason this is such an important site as we are about 100 miles from the core range of these bats, so not only is it a great new story for these bats, it's a new part of the country from where we are used to seeing them, so if we can fix this building up it would be a great conservation new story. stand a great conservation new story. and that's we ought _ a great conservation new story. and that's we ought are talking about, turning it into a maternity place to boost the numbers?— turning it into a maternity place to boost the numbers? yes, the wildlife trust managers _ boost the numbers? yes, the wildlife trust managers other— boost the numbers? yes, the wildlife trust managers other sites _ boost the numbers? yes, the wildlife trust managers other sites like i trust managers other sites like these across the country, we have thousands of bats of this species breeding there, so we're hoping that's what we can achieve here at the time. taste that's what we can achieve here at the time. ~ ., ., , ,., the time. we are ad'usting some ictures the time. we are ad'usting some pictures at the time. we are ad'usting some pictures of them i the time. we are adjusting some pictures of them now, _ the time. we are adjusting some pictures of them now, look i pictures of them now, look absolutely amazing, such a shame that the numbers have diminished. what makes a derelict building like the one behind you, how do you improve it to make it betterfor
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breeding? improve it to make it better for breedin: ? ~ , ., improve it to make it better for lneeding?— improve it to make it better for breedin: ? ~ , ., ,_ breeding? well, they are quite fussy bats in breeding? well, they are quite fussy loats in terms — breeding? well, they are quite fussy bats in terms of _ breeding? well, they are quite fussy bats in terms of what _ breeding? well, they are quite fussy bats in terms of what buildings i breeding? well, they are quite fussy bats in terms of what buildings they| bats in terms of what buildings they like, similarto us bats in terms of what buildings they like, similar to us really, they need a solid roof, so they need shelter, they like natural materials like the natural slate you can see behind me and the stone walls. this provides good temperatures for them and it means in the some of the referral get nice and warm and they like to leave their babies there when they are feeding at night, catching large moths and insects, they need lots of food, egg and sex that they are feeding, so a nice warm maternity roost like that and wean their pups and have a better chance of surviving. thea;r wean their pups and have a better chance of surviving.— wean their pups and have a better chance of surviving. they sang quite ic . picky. also, i was just thinking, that sort of environment, you wouldn't think it would be that difficult to find it, but i guess a lot of derelict buildings get knocked down, and
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reduce the amount of space that is appropriate for bill breeding. thea;r appropriate for bill breeding. they do, this is quite _ appropriate for bill breeding. they do, this is quite an _ appropriate for bill breeding. tie: do, this is quite an old appropriate for bill breeding. tie do, this is quite an old traditional style building, which is what they like, it's around hundred and 50 years old, is modern buildings for this type of bat are not suitable. they need open windows i can fly into, this is quite a large back, quite different from what you would see in most urban settings where they will crawl into peoples roof tiles or in a church or something like that. despite needs a big open window to fly in, and then they will hang upside down, like a pair inside the roof space. hang upside down, like a pair inside the roof space-— the roof space. tom, thank you so much. the roof space. tom, thank you so much- good _ the roof space. tom, thank you so much. good luck _ the roof space. tom, thank you so much. good luck to _ the roof space. tom, thank you so much. good luck to your _ the roof space. tom, thank you so l much. good luck to your campaign, thanks forjoining us. it has been an eye—opener, hasn't it? it really has. i thought when he said they need circumstances similar to humans, i was thinking romantic music and if few candles. whale music, the usual. it is interesting, i suppose the challenge is renovating it but not stoping them in the process. thank you for joining us this morning at breakfast. will be back tomorrow
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from 6am. but tomorrow! see you.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. tennis star novak djokovic had a vaccine exemption to enter australia because he had covid in december, according to court documents. days after violent and deadly protests erupted in kazakhstan, the former domestic intelligence agency chief is detained on suspicion of high treason. it comes as the us questions kazakhstan's decision to bring in russian troops to quell the violent unrest: one lesson of recent history is that once russians are in your house it is sometimes very difficult to get them to move.
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flat owners in the uk won't have to pay to remove

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