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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 7, 2022 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the giant of hollywood, sir sidney poitier, has died aged 94. he was the first black man to win the oscar for best actor. he was my generation's sort of icon. there was no one really before him who had the kind of stature. the aftermath of days of unrest in kazakhstan. security forces are ordered, to shoot to kill protestors. novak djokovic has thanked fans for their support and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims that the grand slam champion is being held captive afterfailing to meet vaccine entry requirements.
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hello and welcome if you have just joined us. hello and welcome if you have “ust “oined us. , ., ., ., joined us. great to have your company _ joined us. great to have your company this— joined us. great to have your company this friday. - the award—winning actor sidney poitier, whose groundbreaking films in the 1950s and 60s shone a light on racism and social predjudice, has died. he was 94. he was the first black man to win an oscar for best actor, and his success paved the way for generations of other black artists. his films, including to sir with love, in the heat of the night, and guess who's coming to dinner, reflected an america struggling with issues of racism and prejudice, at the height of the civil rights movement.
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his impact ultimately, transcended the silver screen. our correspondent, lizo mazimba looks back on the life, of a hollywood icon. # in the heat of the night...# sidney poitier�*s virgil tibbs, a man of authority... i'm a police officer. ..intelligence and a steely determination never to back down. the kind of qualities that defined poitier on screen and off. he made his cinema debut playing a doctor, a man of status, something almost unheard of for black performers then. and with roles like an escaped convict in the defiant ones and a struggling husband in a raisin in the sun, he tackled prejudice head on. maybe i'll get down on my black knees. all right, mr charlie. all right, mr great white father.
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you just give us that money and we won't come out there and dirty up your white folks' neighbourhood. the era of course meant he had a burden his white counterparts rarely had to carry. the weight of being a symbol. but he bore it with dignity. in lilies of the field, playing a travelling handyman, helping build a group of nuns a new chapel. the winner is sidney poitier. he won the academy award, the first black performer ever to receive the oscar for a leading role. in the years that followed he became hollywood's biggest star, redefining how audiences saw black characters, with films like to sir, with love. you will call me sir or mr thackeray. the young ladies will be addressed as miss, the boys by their surnames. some of what i am was reflected in those movies. and on top of that i brought to it some of my values. so it was in a way, i was saying to the audience, this is who i am. look at me.
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more controversial was his role as a highly gifted hugely successful doctor engaged to a white woman in guess who's coming to dinner. i love your daughter. there's nothing i wouldn't do to try and keep her as happy as she was the day i met her. some criticised it, saying the impression it gave was of an interracial relationship that was only acceptable because his character was so perfect and accomplished. it was still a huge box office hit. he also directed �*80s comedy stir crazy, the first movie from an african—american film—maker to pass the blockbuster $100 million mark in the united states. what are you doing? ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. and when he was well into his 80s, an honorary oscar. hollywood recognition for a star
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who blazed a trail for so many... they call me mr tibbs. ..and who entertained millions more. sidney poitier, one of the greats. his death announced today at the age of 94. let's take a look at some of the tributes which have been paid by actors and directors to sidney poitier. the actor don cheadle said he was the standard bearer for generations of actors and directors. he is irreplaceable. denzel washington said he was a gentle man who opened doors which had been closed for years. spike lee said he was a proud, dignified, handsome and strong black man, a gamechanger who impacted lives with a positive force.
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and steve mcqueen said �*with his caribbean heritage and american birth, sidney poitier was an icon to the black diaspora. his family of course were from the bahamas. he was someone to be proud of, he was someone who dared, he was someone to love and he was someone to cherish. the author and playwright, bonnie greer, says sidney poitier�*s impact on society in the 1950s and 60s was enormous, and that the actor and activist was a true one—off. it is very difficult, maybe even impossible, to talk about sidney poitier now in the sense that we don't know any more the world that didn't have sidney poitier. he was my generation's sort of icon. there was no one really before him who had the kind of stature and i was a really little kid when he started working in the movies but what was amazing about him was that he
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was of a generation, the last of the great powerhouse generation, kirk douglas died i think last year, but he was in that generation. charlton heston, burt lancaster, sidney poitier and tony curtis. this kind of generation that came out of theatre in the 1950s and late 1940s, we forget that to have this incredible black man in their midst was really ground—breaking because he was able to kind of move along the same trajectory. paul robeson a generation ago was not allowed that trajectory but sidney poitier was able to be in that same trajectory they were in that the burt lancaster was then, that tony curtis was in. so when he won that oscar it kind of made sense to us because he was part of that sort of arc.
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the president of kazakhstan, has ordered his security forces to use lethal force on protestors, without warning. days of unrest and mass demonstrations began this week, after a sudden rise in fuel prices. the cap on prices was removed on sunday. the authorities say dozens of people have been killed and hundreds injured. russian troops have arrived to support the government, and the security forces say order has largely been restored. from kazakhstan�*s largest city, almaty, our correspondent abdu—jilal abdu—rasulov, has the very latest. the aftermath of riots in kazakhstan�*s largest city, almaty. the army of catholics the standing guard here on the streets of almaty. after days of violence and many protesters killed the state security forces seem to be back in control and when we came close to them the warning not to approach is very
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clear. today the president was clear. any unrest will be met with lethal force.— clear. any unrest will be met with lethal force. terrorists continue to dama . e lethal force. terrorists continue to damage state _ lethal force. terrorists continue to damage state and _ lethal force. terrorists continue to damage state and private - lethal force. terrorists continue to j damage state and private property and use weapons against civilians. i have given the order to shoot, to kill without warning. the president ortra s kill without warning. the president portrays the _ kill without warning. the president portrays the protesters _ kill without warning. the president portrays the protesters as - portrays the protesters as terrorists sowing chaos. they say their movement is peaceful and blame their movement is peaceful and blame the authorities for provoking violence. the crisis was triggered by a sharp rise in fuel prices but the corrupt authoritarian regime is unpopular. these were the scenes on the streets yesterday and it is not clear how many people died. the authorities say dozens of protesters have been killed. violent clashes by night as well here in the heart of
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almaty. some of the biggest clashes took place here at the former presidential residence. you can see here all the cars were set on fire. you can hearagain here all the cars were set on fire. you can hear again the shots, military and police officers are firing in the air to warn people not to approach the square because they close the square in order to prevent people from gathering. many people fear that the violence will drag on. along with protests many shops were looted. this 22—year—old man says that while he supports the demands of the protesters he wants looters to be stopped. it is not clear yet if the violence is over how much damage has been done to the authority of kazakhstan�*s hardline leader. novak djokovic has thanked people "around the world," for their support as he awaits a decision on his
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deportation from australia. the world number one men's tennis player, remains in immigration detention in melbourne, ahead of the australian open, after being denied entry to the country on wednesday. government officials say he isn't being held captive, and is free to leave any time. shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne. this is the immigration detention hotel where novak djokovic is being kept. adnan chopani has been here forfive months now, after being moved from another facility. i live in level two and djokovic lives in level one. that is the food we have been served every day by the canteen. we found a maggot and mould on the bread and we've been reporting it but unfortunately, there has been no action taken. outside the hotel, there was dancing and music, but also anger and frustration among novak djokovic's supporters. it's unclear if the tennis star will remain here until monday,
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when his legal team will challenge the cancellation of his visa. novak djokovic is waiting for a court decision on whether he'll be able to stay and compete in the australian open, or be deported. whatever happens, this has gone way beyond tennis. the world number one is now at the centre of a political and diplomatic storm. djokovic arrived on wednesday with an exemption, granted by tennis australia and the state of victoria. but the border force has revoked his visa, saying he did not meet the rules of entry. his mother dijana said on thursday that he was being kept like a prisoner. australia's home affairs minister, karen andrews, hit back, saying there was nothing stopping him from leaving. mr djokovic is not being held captive in australia. he is free to leave at any time that he chooses to do so and border force will actually facilitate that. the tennis star posted on instagram, thanking his fans around the world. another player has now had her visa cancelled.
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renata voracova from the czech republic is understood to be detained in the same hotel as djokovic. the australian open is one of the biggest sporting events here but it's turning into a big international embarrassment for the government. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. in the us, three white men who were convicted of chasing and then murdering ahmaud arbery, a black man, in the state of georgia, have been sentenced to life in prison. travis mcmichael, his father gregory, and their neighbor roddy bryan, were convicted of felony murder. they had chased mr arbery while he was jogging, before he was shot to death. their defence had claimed they feared he was planning to commit a crime. the mcmichaels will spend life in prison without the possibility of parole — roddy bryan, will serve life but does have the possibility of parole. here's georgia superior courtjudge, timothy walmsley, outlining some of the evidence from the trial:
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there is a frame where if he is 20 yards out, that may be because, 30 yards out, that may be because, 30 yards out, that may be because, 30 yards out, it is the frame of travis mcmichael lifting the to at ahmaud arbery. and you watch that with context, and when i say context, after hearing the evidence in this case and thinking about a young man running at that point for almost five minutes, and it is a chilling, truly disturbing scene. stay with us on news, still to come. we will have a full summary of all the national and international sport, a busy international sporting weekend coming up, all to come on bbc news, do stay with us. new data
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suggests there is no immediate need for a fourth covid job. the independent panel of experts has said three months after the third injection there is still good protection for older people. people 60 and above _ protection for older people. people 60 and above have _ protection for older people. people 60 and above have over _ protection for older people. people 60 and above have over 9096 - 60 and above have over 90% protection against being hospitalised and most importantly they are protected for up to three months from their booster dose, so that's a really good news. the boaster is not only working but working for a long period of time. but what happens after three months? we don't know that yet because not enough time has passed and we are continuing to review the data and to look at the situation with the current covid wave. it may be that people will need another booster dose which is a second booster dose but certainly not the case at the moment.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines sidney poitier, the first black man to win the oscar for best actor, has died aged 94. order has been restored to the streets of the main city in kazakhstan, where troops have been told to shoot without warning if there are further disturbances. a team of british cancer specialists, says a new form of personalised treatment, is producing promising results in adults with leukaemia. it involves reprogramming a patient�*s immune system to attack cancer cells. the teams at university college london and university college hospital say it may offer hope for patients, for whom other treatments have failed. our medical editor, fergus walsh, the story. coming out of the deep freeze — a new frontier in cancer treatment. phil has been living with leukaemia for more than 20 years. feeling ok? i'm fine, yeah. inside this bag are his own immune cells which have been genetically engineered to fight his cancer, and now drop by drop
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are being infused back into his body at university college hospital, london. all other cancer treatments have failed to stop his leukaemia returning. car—t is his best hope. it's a living drug inside me now. it's a medicine which lives in me and itjust replicates inside the bone marrow. every time it sees a sort of cancer cell, zap. fingers crossed? fingers crossed, yeah. car—t stands for chimeric antigen receptor t—cell therapy. part of the patient�*s own immune system, there t—cells, are removed from their blood. in a laboratory, these cells are modified. a gene is added to enable them to recognise their own cancer. this army of t—cells is multiplied and then infused back into the patient. a new protein on the surface of the t—cells locks on to the cancer, earmarking it for destruction.
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car—t therapy is part of a revolution in cancer treatment which harnesses the power of the patient�*s own immune system to tackle their disease. there is a long way to go, but increased understanding of the genetics of cancer is delivering more and more targeted therapies with better outcomes. car—t is already available on the nhs for leukaemia patients up to the age of 25, but not for older adults because it's proved too toxic. scientists at university college london have refined car—t to reduce side effects, and after more trials hope it will be licensed for older patients. absolutely transformative. probably the biggest breakthrough in the last 20 years in _ malignant blood cancers. it'sjust an absolutel delight to be able to offer new therapies to these i patients who otherwise have no
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treatment options available to them. claire from hampshire had car—t therapy two years ago after standard leukaemia treatment failed. as long as everything goes ok, the biopsies come less frequent. she's still in remission. i don't think i'd be here if i hadn't had car—t. i was very, very lucky that the trial was there at the time. so if the car—t option hadn't been available i would have had a probably a finite amount of time left. in years to come, car—t may be able to treat tumours in the brain, prostate and liver, giving more cancer patients like claire and phil a brighterfuture. fergus walsh, bbc news. the weekend is upon us and that
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means lots of sport and now all the details. the fa cup third round is now under way, the first of the 32 games is into the second half, pep guardiola missing after a positive covid test, his manchester city side adit league 2 swindon and no upset on the cards, currently going the way of the premier league leaders. 2-0 at way of the premier league leaders. 2—0 at half—time and gundogan just made it three. they manchester city defender benjamin mendy has been released on bail ahead of his trial for rape and assault. he has been held since november last year, he will have to surrender his passport and have no contact with any of the people he is accused of attacking. he has been charged with seven counts of rape and one of sexual assault relating to five women.
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transfer news to bring you, philippe coutinho is back in the premier league, joining aston villa from barcelona on loan till the end of the season with an option to buy. he made a £142 million move from liverpool in 2018 but struggled to make the same impact in spain, now reuniting with aston villa boss stephen gerard, his captain at liverpool. newcastle have made their first signing under the new owners, kieran trippierfrom first signing under the new owners, kieran trippier from atletico madrid. he has played for both eddie howe before at burnley and signed for $16 million. a second tennis players had their visa cancelled by australian authorities. renata vorocova joins novak djokovic in being denied into the country because of vaccination status with the visas of other players being investigated. novak djokovic fans have been protesting outside the hotel he is confined in. the appeal
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against the decision want to be held until monday. an earlier, novak djokovic posted a message on social media saying... the former us open champion madden shell which says he has sympathy for novak djokovic. == has sympathy for novak d'okovic. -- marin has sympathy for novak djokovic. » marin cilic. it is difficult to say something constructively objectively in the australian government should or should have not decided this earlier or not, their own decisions, but looking at the situation, it is definitely incredible that this happened the way it did, especially to novak djokovic and that this is still going on. definitely feeling very sorry for him and hope that this is going to be resolved very soon. in this is going to be resolved very soon. y _, y this is going to be resolved very soon. , soon. in sydney, jonny bairstow will return to the — soon. in sydney, jonny bairstow will return to the crease _ soon. in sydney, jonny bairstow will return to the crease and _ soon. in sydney, jonny bairstow will return to the crease and the - soon. in sydney, jonny bairstow will return to the crease and the viewers time after giving some
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respectability to england's batting. he scored his first century of this ashes series and then go hurtling for defeat after day three when they slumped to 36—4 but a crucial partnership betweenjonny bairstow and ben stokes who made 66 steadied the ship and kept them alive for now and the sport test. still in pole position. i and the sport test. still in pole osition. ., and the sport test. still in pole osition. . ., , , ., position. i am absolutely over the moon to be _ position. i am absolutely over the moon to be honest _ position. i am absolutely over the moon to be honest with _ position. i am absolutely over the moon to be honest with you. - position. i am absolutely over the moon to be honest with you. the | moon to be honest with you. the hardest one so far. just as you say with the circumstances, butjust put the draft in and obviously that partnership with ben is a big one. it was tough out there and i am really delighted with it. the first two hours. _ really delighted with it. the first two hours. so — really delighted with it. the first two hours, so more _ really delighted with it. the first two hours, so more to _ really delighted with it. the first two hours, so more to this - really delighted with it. the first| two hours, so more to this whole test _
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two hours, so more to this whole test series. — two hours, so more to this whole test series, wasjust relentless that bowling as i have seen from australian — that bowling as i have seen from australian cricket. nine maidens. incredible — australian cricket. nine maidens. incredible bowling, and as we have been _ incredible bowling, and as we have been waiting for throughout the series. — been waiting for throughout the series, great fight back, ben stokes courageous with his side, jonny bairstow— courageous with his side, jonny bairstow a _ courageous with his side, jonny bairstow a brilliant test 100, a knock — bairstow a brilliant test 100, a knock on — bairstow a brilliant test 100, a knock on the thumb, so i really courageous effort.— knock on the thumb, so i really courageous effort. england with work to do auoin courageous effort. england with work to do going into _ courageous effort. england with work to do going into day _ courageous effort. england with work to do going into day four. _ courageous effort. england with work to do going into day four. feels - to do going into day four. feels like you have been saying that after every test match this series! never mind, it will all soon be over. a letter, posted to a man in northern ireland, with no surname or address on the envelope, just his first name and a 57 word biography, has amazingly managed to find its way to the right place. our ireland correspondent, emma vardy has more.
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"feargal, lives across the road from the spa. "his ma and da used to own it." no house number, no street name, a few things much more personal than that. the first thing i noticed was the amount of detail on the envelope and basically, my biography. "moved to waterford after he got married." despite nothing more than a short story and half a postcode, yesterday this letter found its way straight to feargal lynn. i laughed so much. right through it all, to playing guitar, through to, "friends with the fellow who owns the butchers in waterford." feargal had taken to writing letters to people over lockdown as a way to brighten the gloom. but never expected such a strange reply. the letter was from an old friend in belfast, who perhaps could have found out his address but thought this way was a bit more fun. we were talking about the pandemic, we were talking about mental health and the need to brighten the mood a bit. did she actually expect it to reach you? i think she just took a punt. "plays guitar and used
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to run disco in the "poker hall. " it happened to be that feargal�*s local postman was also a childhood friend. we've had some strange addresses over the years but this is the most bizarre. the first line, "feargal who lived across from the spa." the number of times we played in his front garden as wee boys, i knew right away who it was. this could give other people ideas, if they don't know an address. that would be a nightmare! and inside the letter, just a cheery hello and a recipe for coleslaw that feargal had been asking about, but it meant much more than that. so much letters these days, it's meaningless, it's financial, it's this demand and it's so nice to receive something so personal. "friends of the fellow who runs the butchers "in waterford to bt44, northern ireland." so, could letters make a comeback over e—mail in future, as something a lot more enjoyable? well, we'll keep you posted! emma vardy, bbc news.
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you are watching bbc news. good evening. it was a pretty wintry end to the week in many parts of the uk, snow brought disruption for some although brought beautiful scenes as well and that is how it looked in east dunbartonshire. through tonight, ice could be a hazard for a time but it will turn milder and also wetter through the second half of the night. under clear skies the temperature plummeting, ice and southern scotland and northern england. but then we see cloud bringing rain and from the west and the smell of snow bumping into the cold but turning back to reign as the temperature climbs. by the end of the night, belfast, cardiff, plymouth, 8—10. a much milder start but with cloud and outbreaks of rain. this front to bring us a pretty unsettled day of whether and brisk winds but sandwiched between
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these weather fronts we have this wedge of milder air so a different feel to things, outbreaks of heavy rain pushing his words, or intending to organise itself into bands in this last band fishing eastwards is particularly likely to give some really intense downpours with thunder and lightning and squally gusty winds which could get up to 40-50 gusty winds which could get up to 40—50 mph or more in exposed spots. rainbow queer, showers turning wintry as the temperature drops away again, 5—10 at 3pm. chilly on saturday night with someone three showers around particularly towards the west briton to sunday, you have to squint at the map to see it but there is a bump on the isobars and a ridge of high pressure trying to build its way in. there will still be some but not too many, a decent amount of dry weather and spells of
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sunshine. temperature between 4—10 and behind me the next weather system bringing cloud and rain from the west. but the story for next week is for things to settle down. high pressure building up from the south and establishing itself strongly across the southern half of the uk particularly so a lot of dry weather and spells of sunshine, chance of rain in the north and feeling milderfor all of chance of rain in the north and feeling milder for all of us. now it is time for the media show. hello. welcome to the media show. we have reached the one—year anniversary of the storming of the capital in washington, dc. it was a pivotal moment for america and for
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its media. we have seen some us generalists criticised for overemphasizing its importance and obsessing about it. others say generalists in the us have not found a way of describing the significance of what happened and i are getting too much space to the idea that the us in was stolen. it is exploitive issues and many more with five guests. our media correspondent for national radio and a tech journalist based here in the uk. robert costa is from the washington post and susanis is from the washington post and susan is chief congressional correspondent at the washington examiner. i wonderfor our correspondent at the washington examiner. i wonder for our viewers who do not know your publication, tell us about it. we who do not know your publication, tell us about it.— tell us about it. we are a news website in _ tell us about it. we are a news website in a — tell us about it. we are a news website in a magazine - tell us about it. we are a news website in a magazine based l tell us about it. we are a news| website in a magazine based in washington, dc and our team of reporters cover breaking news in congress and the white house and politics in general and elections and we have a t—mobile opinion colonists added into the mix. we and we have a t-mobile opinion colonists added into the mix. we are crateful for colonists added into the mix. we are grateful for you _ colonists added into the mix. we are grateful for you joining _ colonists added into the mix. we are gratefulfor youjoining us. _ colonists added into the mix. we are grateful for you joining us. our- gratefulfor you joining us. our final guest is editor in chief of
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