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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 7, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at two... staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england have risen by 40% in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe. nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. novak djokovic remains in this australian hotel, awaiting a court decision on his entry to the country. a government minister has said the grand slam champion is free to leave the country any time. addressing the nation, kazakhstan�*s president says he's given the order to fire without warning, and thanks president putin for sending russian troops. protesters have now left the streets.
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two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families. and, whatever happened to roly, zammo and gripper? grange hill, a tv staple for 30 years, is being turned into a film. good afternoon. staff absences caused by covid are making hospital care unsafe — that's the warning from the main nursing union, the rcn. absences are up more than 40% in a week in england, and about one in eight hospitals are in a critical incident, which means they're struggling to provide core services. the armed forces have been called in to help — 200 personnel have been deployed
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in the capital, with another 1800 around the rest of the uk. our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. like many hospitals, kingston in south—west london has been tackling a rise in covid admissions over christmas and a busy a&e. that has been compounded by growing staff absences. 4% of staff here are off work due to covid, and that is having a big impact on morale. checking in is important. we learned that in the first wave — in the first five minutes, you check that everyone is ok and it goes a long way. the emotional support is key to allow people to be their best selves when they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england are occupied by patients who are fit enough to be discharged but need support from social care. 95—year—old jean brownlee had a fall on christmas day. she is still waiting for a care package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i could be at home now.
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i admit i can't see to do what i used to do, but i would be in my own environment. life would be much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity whilst seeing a sharp rise in staff shortages. i6 trusts are still in critical incident mode. the latest nhs data shows more than 35,000 staff at acute trusts were off each day on average, due to covid, after the 2nd of january. —— up to. that is 4% of the workforce and up 41% on the previous week. but there are regional differences. the north—east and yorkshire was hardest hit. there were more than 7,000 covid absences, which is 5% of staff and up by 79% on the previous week. in london, there were over 5,000 covid absences, or 3% of staff. that is down by 4% on the week before. these figures are really stark. outside of health care, staffing shortages are closing shops and cancelling trains.
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but nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they're finding themselves being spread thinner and thinner, but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. the situation is not safe. from assisting paramedics to helping teams at testing sites and vaccination centres, more than 1,800 service personnel have already been deployed across the uk. around 90 are preparing to assist three health boards in scotland, while in england, 200 army medics and soldiers are being deployed across hospitals in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure on our nhs. it is our duty to be a sticking plasterfor the nhs to help get through a time of extraordinary crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there are early signs that cases may be slowing in london, it's too soon to know the full impact of the new omicron variant on hospitals. 7,000 army forces personnel are on standby if more
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reinforcements are needed. katharine da costa, bbc news. 0ur health correpondent nick trigglejoins me. nick, the nhs always has a winter crisis. what's different this time 7 winter, it is very difficult, especially the start of the yeah, the start of january, and especially the start of the yeah, the start ofjanuary, and in previous winters we have reported delays to operations, operations being cancelled, critical incident cue being declared, even temporary treatment centres being set up outside a&e units. but this is difficult, it is worse, we can see that in a chart on ambulance performance. this shows that the delays ambulances face when they drop off their patients at a&e. the dark orange is this winter, the light orange is two years before.
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the last winter before the pandemic hit. as you can see, in the most recent week 23% of patients who were brought to a&e in an ambulance faced a wait of over 30 minutes outside a&e, two years ago the same week it was 18%. that is because covid brings with it some very unique challenges. as reported, staff absences are rising, we are seeing double the normal number of absences we would expect to see. secondly, the share numbers coming into hospital. you do expect at this time of year about 1000 admissions a day for all type of respiratory infections, but we are seeing double that for covid alone. some of those normal winter pressures are much lower, flu rates are much lower, we have fewer than 50 patients in hospital with the loo at the moment in england. what matters now is when
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these covid infection du peak, it will make a difference to just how bad the winter to be —— flew at the moment. bad the winter to be -- flew at the moment. ' . . bad the winter to be -- flew at the moment. , . . , ., moment. official figures from the national office _ moment. official figures from the national office of _ moment. official figures from the national office of statistics - moment. official figures from the national office of statistics about| national office of statistics about the prevalence of the virus. the infection rates have been climbing, driven by the 0micron variant. we saw this during december until christmas, and now approaching 4 million people christmas, and now approaching 4 million impl— christmas, and now approaching 4 million people infected with covid. this is different _ million people infected with covid. this is different from _ million people infected with covid. this is different from the - million people infected with covid. this is different from the daily - this is different from the daily figures we get because this is surveillance programme, estimated from the random sample they are testing. but when you think about the peak last winter, whenjust testing. but when you think about the peak last winter, when just over 1 million people are infected at that peak, you can see just how high infection levels are, and even though it is causing mild illness, as we have been discussing, we're
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seeing those precious hospitals increasing. —— those pressures. wales' first minister mark drakeford has confirmed there won't be any changes to the coronavirus rules in the welsh government's latest review. the first minister warned "the storm of 0micron" had arrived in wales as positivity rates hit "astronomically high" levels. increasing. i was last here just before christmas, and since then the public health situation in wales has changed dramatically. at that time the 0micron variant was still an approaching storm, coming towards us on the horizon. today that storm is fully upon us. 0micron is now the dominant form of the virus in wales, and cases are rising rapidly and everyday. the outcome of this week's
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review means that we will be staying at alert level the ave you changes to introduce this week. —— alert level number two. every past days we have made some changes to the testing regime and the self isolation rules. because cases of coronavirus are so high in the community at the moment, we no longer need routinely to take a follow—up pcr test after a positive lateral flow test result. 0ur wales correspondent hywel griffith is in cardiff. no changes to the coronavirus restrictions, any surprise? lilo. no changes to the coronavirus restrictions, any surprise? no, but --erhas restrictions, any surprise? no, but perhaps what _ restrictions, any surprise? no, but perhaps what many _ restrictions, any surprise? no, but perhaps what many people - restrictions, any surprise? no, but perhaps what many people were i perhaps what many people were expecting was a suggestion that there be no changes for at least two weeks while many thought that we might be approaching the peak of the 0micron wave, the highest figures
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doing this pandemic becomes the case rates. he suggested the modelling suggested to him that the peak would be another ten to 1a days away, and on that basis he couldn't fit see coming down from the current uncertain level to restrictions for at least another two weeks, that means another two weeks of closures for nightclubs. another two weeks of the rule of six being in place and hospitality, bars and restaurants, and may be at least another two weeks of major sporting events being held behind closed doors. he also spoke about the impact on the health service, something which is a concern across the uk, he suggested that the sickness and absence rate due to isolation in some parts of the welsh nhs was as high as 16%, actual hospitalisations relating to covid had gone up by 43% injust the last week. the covid had gone up by 4396 in 'ust the last week. , ~ , ., , last week. the first minister was uuite last week. the first minister was quite critical _ last week. the first minister was quite critical of _ last week. the first minister was quite critical of the _ last week. the first minister was quite critical of the uk _ last week. the first minister was l quite critical of the uk government as well, what did he have to say?
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particularly when people asked him what impact they thought those restrictions were happy- what impact they thought those restrictions were happy would have in wales given _ restrictions were happy would have in wales given the _ restrictions were happy would have in wales given the case _ restrictions were happy would have in wales given the case rate - restrictions were happy would have in wales given the case rate here l restrictions were happy would have | in wales given the case rate here is overall higher than in england. he suggested that the uk government hadn't made changes in england, therefore it was an outlier with the rest of the uk and many parts of europe, indeed the rest of the world. he said that borisjohnson's government was stuck in something of a political paralysis, that was the reason he suggested that no extra measures had been added in england when they were in scotland, northern ireland and wales. we must remember mark drakeford isjust ireland and wales. we must remember mark drakeford is just first minister wales, mark drakeford is just first ministerwales, he mark drakeford is just first minister wales, he is leader of the welsh labour government, so there is political point scoring going on, but certainly people in wales are very conscious of the fact that there are more restrictions here than over the border, and harassed some cases of people we know going over the border to enjoy themselves and nightclubs, something you are
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not likely to do here in wales for a few weeks yet. and you can check how your local nhs services are coping using the bbc nhs tracker for emergency treatment. it allows you to find out how your local services are coping this winter, and how that compares to the situation before the pandemic. the president of kazakhstan has ordered security forces to �*fire without warning', during a violent crackdown on anti—government protests. the president blamed what he called �*foreign—trained terrorists' for demonstrations which have been going on since sunday in the main city of almaty; the unrest was sparked by a big increase in the price of fuel. at least 26 people have been killed. rayhan demeytrie sent this report. the aftermath of riots in kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. businesses and government buildings gutted. security forces have permission to shoot to kill those the president of kazakhstan calls terrorists and bandits. translation: the militants have
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not laid their arms, _ they continue to commit crimes or are preparing for them. the fight against them must be pursued till the end. whoever does not surrender will be destroyed. what started as peaceful nationwide protests against the rising cost of fuel turned violent, the worst of it in almaty. translation: it's really frightening because we feel in danger _ and we are not protected by our state. this has shown the failure of the state in general. the total number of dead and injured is not yet known. this is the russian military deployed to kazakhstan, part of a moscow—led military block requested by the kazakh president to end unrest in his country. but many in kazakhstan are concerned about russian troops on the ground and what role they will play. normal life has been disrupted.
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with internet blackouts, they cannot use their bank cards. cash is in short supply. protesters wanted real change, political and economic reforms. those demands, for now, have been drowned out by the gunfire. rayhan demeytrie, bbc news. 0ur correspondent abdujalil abdurasulov is in kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. some of the biggest clashes took place here at the former presidential residence and the mayor's office, the buildings were burnt out and you can see these cars were also set on fire. you can hear the shots, maybe it is the military and police officers firing into the air to warn people not to approach the square, because they closed the square in order to prevent people from gathering. it is still not clear who those people who clashed with police forces are. protesters say that their
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movement is peaceful, and it was the authorities who provoked violence. but many people now hope that the order can be restored very quickly. we have not seen any signs of protest taking place in almaty today but we cannot say it is quiet because we heard shooting and some explosions. earlier today when we drove past we saw some dead bodies inside cars. maybe these people tried to storm in and drive through the police cordon during clashes or maybe they were simply caught up during the stand—off. the headlines on bbc news... staff absences in the nhs hospitals in england have risen 40% in a week — according to the latest figures. nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely.
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novak djokovic has thanked people for their support — and remains in this australian hotel — the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive — after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements. it's emerged that a second tennis player has had her visa cancelled in the run up to the australian open, as exemptions given to competitors are re—examined in a row about covid rules. it comes after the men's world number one novak djokovic was barred from entering the country on wednesday. in a message posted in to his supporters on social media this afternoon the world number one wrote... he's still inside in an immigration hotel pending a court decision on monday. shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne:
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this is the immigration detention hotel where novak djokovic is being kept. another player has been here for five months. this kept. another player has been here for five months.— for five months. this is the food we have been served _ for five months. this is the food we have been served every _ for five months. this is the food we have been served every day. - for five months. this is the food we have been served every day. we . for five months. this is the food we l have been served every day. we have found the mould on the bread and we have been reporting it, unfortunately there is no action being taken. unfortunately there is no action being taken-— unfortunately there is no action bein: taken. , ., ., being taken. outside a hotel, there was dancing — being taken. outside a hotel, there was dancing and _ being taken. outside a hotel, there was dancing and music _ being taken. outside a hotel, there was dancing and music but - being taken. outside a hotel, there was dancing and music but also - being taken. outside a hotel, there l was dancing and music but also anger and frustration amongst novak djokovic's approache —— supporters. it is unclear if the tennis tower remain here until monday, when his legal team will challenge the cancellation of his visa. novak djokovic is waiting for a court decision on whether he will be able to stay and compete in the australian open or be deported. whatever happens, this has gone way beyond tennis. the world number one
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is now at the centre of a political and diplomatic storm. djokovic arrived on wednesday with an exemption granted by tennis australia and the state of victoria. but the border forces revoked australia and the state of victoria. but the borderforces revoked his visa, saying he did not meet the rules of entry. his mother said on thursday that he was being kept like a prisoner. australia's home affairs minister hit back, saying there was nothing stopping him from leaving. mr djokovic is not being held captive in australia, he is free to leave at any time he chooses to do so, and border force will facilitate that. �* ., , ., ., so, and border force will facilitate that. �* ., ., ., , that. another player has now had his visa cancelled. _ that. another player has now had his visa cancelled. the _ that. another player has now had his visa cancelled. the czech _ that. another player has now had his visa cancelled. the czech republic i visa cancelled. the czech republic player is understood to be detained in the same hotel as djokovic. the australian open is one of the biggest sporting events here, but it is turning into a big international embarrassment for the government. labour has accused the prime minister of apparent corruption,
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following an investigation into the refurbishment of his downing street flat. messages between borisjohnson and lord brownlow, who helped pay for the renovation, were published yesterday. the messages appear to show the prime minister offering support for a great exhibition, plans for a cultural festival which were being backed by lord brownlow. let's speak to our political correspondentjonathan blake. to be clear, labour�*s accusation is that this is a case of cash for influence. that this is a case of cash for influence-— that this is a case of cash for influence. . , , , ., , influence. that is essentially the thrust of the _ influence. that is essentially the thrust of the argument, - influence. that is essentially the thrust of the argument, yes. - influence. that is essentially the thrust of the argument, yes. wej influence. that is essentially the - thrust of the argument, yes. we are dealing with the fallout from the investigation into the funding arrangements for the refurbishment of the flat above number 10 downing street where boris johnson lives with his wife and their children. an exchange of messages from november 2020, which have come to light this week, as a result of an investigation by the electoral
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commission, and also an investigation by the prime minister's own independent adviser on ministers interests. they show an exchange between the prime minister and one, a conservative party donor, who was passed with setting up a trust —— lord brownlow, in order to refurbished flat. whether the designer that they had chosen, lord brownlow asked, could get on with the job and start asking for and getting approvals as he put it, he mentioned as aps follow—up the great exhibition plan, something which lord brownlow is a trustee of the royal albert hall had been advocating to hold a big festival, reinventing the famous event in the 19th century in the uk, and there was subsequently a meeting between lord brownlow and the culture secretary at the time. today number
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ten has said that meeting was set up to the usual official channels, all entirely appropriately, and that in the end the event didn't happen. but labour are suggesting or saying that it is irrelevant whether the event ended up happening not, the important thing here is they say that lord brownlow had access to the prime minister as a result of his role in arranging funding for the renovation of the flat, and that therefore it is inappropriate for him to use that channel asking an occasion to raise his own ideas and have access to the prime minister on that basis. 50 have access to the prime minister on that basis. , ., that basis. so the ministerial adviser is _ that basis. so the ministerial adviser is not _ that basis. so the ministerial adviser is not going - that basis. so the ministerial adviser is not going to - that basis. so the ministerial| adviser is not going to reopen theirs, he will not take any further action, does this stop here or is labour calling on anybody to reopen it? labourare labour calling on anybody to reopen it? labour are calling now, as they had done in november, after the initial invitation clear boris
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johnson then for a separate enquiry by the parliamentary commissioner for standards, and that would be in accordance with the mps code of conduct, because up until now boris johnson has been investigated to see whether he had complied with the ministerial code of conduct as a separate set of rules for mps, which runs in parallel to that which they have to abide by at all times, there is no indication as to whether the investigation is going to happen or not. but whilst downing street will doubtless hope that a line has been drawn under this affair to an extent, with the possible changes the prime minister has mooted to the independent adviser on ministerial interests, powers being beefed up a bit, also continued calls from the government's political opponents for further enquiries, probably isn't the last we are going to hear about
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this. let's get more on on the situation with the coronavirus pandemic in the uk. john burn—murdoch is a data journalist for the financial times — he's been providing insight into coronavirus statistics. lots of us have been following you on social media, looking at your graphs and in—depth examination of the data will start where would you say we are in this particular wave of the pandemic? i say we are in this particular wave of the pandemic?— of the pandemic? i think at the moment we — of the pandemic? i think at the moment we are _ of the pandemic? i think at the moment we are pretty - of the pandemic? i think at the moment we are pretty much i of the pandemic? i think at the moment we are pretty much atj of the pandemic? i think at the - moment we are pretty much at this stage where the next week or so is going to be critical, particularly in parts of northern england, around greater manchester, where hospitals are coming under pressure. there are signs that london may have weathered the worst of the 0micron storm in terms of both cases and hospitalisations, so if we see other parts of the country start to turn that corner as well without things getting any worse than they are, in terms of hospital pressure, i think
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we can all perhaps breathe a sigh of relief that we may emerge from this one. ., , ., relief that we may emerge from this one. . _,. relief that we may emerge from this one. ., , ., . .., , ., one. that is a critical question, the pressure — one. that is a critical question, the pressure on _ one. that is a critical question, the pressure on hospitals, - one. that is a critical question, - the pressure on hospitals, whether the pressure on hospitals, whether the nhs can cope.— the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced ruestion, the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced question, whereas _ the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced question, whereas last _ the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced question, whereas last winter - the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced question, whereas last winter it i the nhs can cope. yes, a nuanced i question, whereas last winter it was almost a straightforward situation, thereby large numbers of people getting severely ill with covid in hospital, and that was essentially the sole challenge, a large challenge but the sole challenge facing the nhs. now the numbers of people in hospital with covid is lower than last winter but the overall number of people in hospitalised much higher because the nhs are now trying to work through that huge backlog of treatments that had built up of the last couple of years. added to that that we have very large numbers of nhs staff of six, self isolating due to covid, there is a squeeze from two sides. covid is playing a bigger role but not as simple as last year. haifa covid is playing a bigger role but not as simple as last year. how does the uk compare _
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not as simple as last year. how does the uk compare to _ not as simple as last year. how does the uk compare to other— not as simple as last year. how does the uk compare to other countries i the uk compare to other countries that have a similar rate of vaccination? it is a tricky one, in terms of cases we are seeing vaccines being a huge- vaccines being a huge help, seciall vaccines being a huge help, specially those _ vaccines being a huge help, specially those who - vaccines being a huge help, specially those who have i vaccines being a huge help, | specially those who have had vaccines being a huge iain specially those who have had three doses, but people who have been vaccinated are still much more likely to be infected during this wave down during previous waves, so elsewhere in western europe we have seen cases to record highs, true in places like spain, italy, france, most of europe recording record case numbers or will be soon. in terms of those more severe outcomes like hospitalisations, it will take another week or two before we start seeing what that looks like on continental europe. if we look across the atlantic to the us, there are early signs that the us may fear slightly worse during this wave because of its substantially lower vaccine uptake especially with those third doses. this vaccine uptake especially with those third doses. , , ., , ., third doses. this might be a strange ruestion to third doses. this might be a strange question to ask— third doses. this might be a strange question to ask somebody _ third doses. this might be a strange question to ask somebody who - third doses. this might be a strange question to ask somebody who is i third doses. this might be a strange question to ask somebody who is an expert on statistics, but how useful
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is the data? how accurate is it in presenting us with a picture —— picture of what is going on? good ruestion picture of what is going on? good question we _ picture of what is going on? good question we should _ picture of what is going on? good question we should all _ picture of what is going on? good question we should all be -- - picture of what is going on? (limp. question we should all be —— we should always be posting this. the data is still very useful, expensive when it comes to hospitals, it paints an accurate picture of the amount of projective parts of the country, it is backdated that has shown how much worse things are in greater manchester at the moment than elsewhere in the country. i think it is right that we broaden this conversation over the coming weeks. covid on an individual basis, there is less risk of people becoming very severely ill now that there has been doing earlier waves, that riley is causing some people to ask, are we talking about the same threat, this a risk as we were a year ago are back in march 2020? i think the specific numbers we pay more or less attention to may well
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change and that is a good thing, we shouldn't assume that numbers that are useful now will remain so forever. ., ~ are useful now will remain so forever. ., ,, , ., benjamin mendy, the manchester city footballer, has been actually granted bail ahead of his trial under the conditions of his bail, he will have to live at his home address and not have contact with any of the people that he is accused of attacking and he is also being told he has to surrender his passport by midnight tonight. the attorney general says she is "carefully considering" whether to refer the edward colston statue case to the court of appeal. four people were cleared of the charge of criminal damage at bristol crown court this week. the case followed protests last june, during which a statue of the 17th—century slave trader was pulled down
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and thrown into the water at bristol harbour. police in west london have arrested a 13—year—old boy on suspicion of murder after a man was stabbed to death. dariusz wolosz, who was 46, was attacked in hillingdon in the early hours of tuesday morning. a postmortem examination found that he died from wounds to his chest and groin. one of scotland's two remaining nuclear power stations, hunterston b in north ayrshire, is being permanently switched off this lunchtime, after running 21 years longer than originally planned. more than 100 jobs will be lost. environmental campaigners called the closure "inevitable" now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. snow and ice have been causing some problems across parts of the uk today. wintry look and feel to the weather, temperatures at five o'clock between one and eight celsius, very quickly dropping
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through the evening, briefly down to -80 through the evening, briefly down to —80 celsius and parts of eastern scotland under clear skies. as the cloud and rain suites its way from the west, briefly with some snow on its leading—edge, temperature start to climb, milderair its leading—edge, temperature start to climb, milder air pushing in. its leading—edge, temperature start to climb, milderair pushing in. by the end of the night the milder air tied up with this cloud, outbreaks of rain, very heavy thundery rain at times pc eastwards, some squally gusty wind, cold air and showers returning from the west as we head towards the end of the day. temperatures around three o'clock in the afternoon between five and 10 celsius. sunday, still some shower surround, some wintry, a lot of dry weather for many, temperature surround, some wintry, a lot of dry weatherfor many, temperature is between six and 10 celsius.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: staff absences in the nhs hospitals in england have risen 40 percent in a week — according to the latest figures. novak djokovic thanks people for their support — and remains in this australian hotel after the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive. addressing the nation.
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kazakhstan's president says he's given the order to fire without warning — and thanks president putin for sending russian troops. protesters have now left the streets. two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families. sport now and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's austin halewood. good afternoon. well, at long last, fans of english cricket finally have something to cheer about in australia. for the first time on this ashes tour, an english batter has made a century. jonny bairstow reached his ton during the final over of the day, to give some respectability to england's first innings. but it still might not be enough to save the 4th test in sydney, with australia still 158 runs ahead at the close of play, as patrick gearey reports. at a drizzly sydney, the weather soaked up more time in the test. for england, not nearly enough.
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australians have spent weeks mopping up, after all. haseeb hameed, beaten by michell starc for six. sydney was in pink to support the jane mcgrath cancer foundation. late wife of the great glenn who used to regularly do this to englishmen. the tormentor of zak crawley was scott boland, playing in his second test, having waited his whole career for these moments. joe root, england's captain, his ninth test wicket already. england's sad procession trudged on, surrounded, surrendering. three wickets for no runs, 36—4 by lunch. afterwards, it got surreal. ben stokes was given out leg before wicket. it turned out there was no leg and plenty of wicket. bails still on, stokes still in. but he was facing the pace with pain. a side injury kept him from bowling but not batting, battling. jonny bairstow went with him, both swatted 50s. here was the fight england had spoken about. and here was the counterpunch. stokes, trapped by nathan lyon. jos buttler followed.
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but bairstow wasn't done. together with mark wood, he made sure england wouldn't be made to bat again. and then in the final over of the day, he passed 100. it's too late to save the series. it might still be too little to save the match. but at long last, england have something to celebrate. patrick gearey, bbc news. yes, a brilliant innings from bairstow, however he and jos buttler both picked up hand injuries on day three, so wicket—keeper sam billings has been added to the squad as cover. bairstow, though, is still hoping he can add more runs to his first century in over three years. he can add more runs to his first i he can add more runs to his first am absolutely ovt honest i am absolutely over the moon, to be honest with you, it is the hardest one so far i think. as you say, with the circumstances. butjust put the graft in and obviously that partnership with ben was a big one and yeah, it was tough out there and
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i am really delighted with it. another tennis player has had their visa cancelled by australian authorities. czech renata voracova joins novak djokovic in being denied entry into the country, because of their vaccination status — with the visas of other players being investigated too. well, fans have been protesting outside the hotel they are confined to in melbourne — where they had been hoping to play in the australian open later this month. djokovic's appeal against the decision won't be heard until monday. and in the last hour djokovic has posted a message on social media. phillippe coutinho is back in the premier legaue. the brazilian midfielder hasjoined aston villa from barcelona, on loan until the end of the season, and there's an option to buy too. coutinhojoined barcelona in a £142 million move from liverpool in 2018.
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he was brilliant at anfield but struggled to make the same impact in spain, however he's reuniting with villa boss steven gerrard, who was his captain at liverpool. and newcastle have been busy too. they've confirmed their first signing since their new owners took over. england full—back kieran trippier has joined from atletico madrid. he's played for boss eddie howe before at burnley and joins for £12 million. but newcastle fans will be hoping he's the first of many to come and help the club battle against relegation from the premier league. that's all the sport for now. let's return to our top story and the rising level of staff absences at hospital trusts across the country fuelled by coronavirus. in the midlands, the latest figures from nhs england show more than 4200 staff were absent due to covid
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on the 2nd ofjanuary, up week—on—week from around 2400 — that's a 77% rise. giles latcham has been to russells hall hospital in dudley to see the impact it's having there. like many hospitals, russells hall is at a pinch point, the number of patients here with covid stands at 74, and that has doubled in the space of a week. the number of staff isolating with covid or other illnesses is running at 12%, and that amounts to a major challenge. we're really keen to keep going with our restoration and recovery plans. at the moment e have managed to do that. but i think if the numbers start to go up more then we're going to have to risk assess and look at what elective cases can't go ahead in our hospital. but at the moment, we are continuing to do everything. my plea to the public will be come to hospital as an emergency only if you need to. but please use the 111 service first.
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the public are aware of the alternative pathways, nhs, 111, government websites, general practice and community out there that can help and maybe sometimes should be the first port of call for any concerns rather than turning up at an emergency department that is already overstretched and working to capacity. unlike other hospitals russells hall who hasn't had to declare a critical incident. but staff admit they are daunted by what lies ahead in the next few weeks. it worries me. it worries my colleagues. it worries staff. i think we have to just take each day as it comes, you know, just do our best, encourage people to to do all the right things, which is, you know, getting their vaccinations, getting their boosters.
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the number of adults living with dementia could triple over the coming decades. researchers say growing and ageing populations are the main causes — but add that there are also other reasons, like obesity and smoking, which can be tackled. i'm joined now by professor sirjohn hardy, chair of molecular biology of neurological disease at university college london institute of neurology. good afternoon. thanks forjoining us. this is a very big study of dementia across nearly 200 countries. i realise you didn't take part in the study yourself but you are a leading expert on the field. what is your reaction to the findings?— findings? the findings are completely _ findings? the findings are completely credible. - findings? the findings are completely credible. this | findings? the findings are i completely credible. this is findings? the findings are - completely credible. this is what everyone who works on dementia is expecting because of the ageing population increasing. it is very important study but not surprising
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its conclusions. i important study but not surprising its conclusions.— its conclusions. i wondered if you can help us _ its conclusions. i wondered if you can help us through _ its conclusions. i wondered if you can help us through the - its conclusions. i wondered if you can help us through the statistics because the fear is that the number of adults living with dementia could triple and yet people are getting healthier and they are living longer. is it because we have more old people that there is likely to be more dementia? it is slightly complicated- — be more dementia? it is slightly complicated. there _ be more dementia? it is slightly complicated. there are - be more dementia? it is slightly complicated. there are more . be more dementia? it is slightly - complicated. there are more people and of course they are living longer as you say but as they get into those very high energies that is when they are developing dementia. that is one part of it. the other part of it is that a lot of the increase is in the second and third world where the population is ageing to an enormous extent and where there haven't yet been such great improvements in health and in those populations are things you have just mentioned, smoking and diabetes and
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vascular problems in general, are increasing for those reasons. find increasing for those reasons. and there are lifestyle _ increasing for those reasons. and there are lifestyle changes that people can make to reduce their risk of getting dementia. yes. people can make to reduce their risk of getting dementia.— of getting dementia. yes, for sure. it seems based _ of getting dementia. yes, for sure. it seems based upon _ of getting dementia. yes, for sure. it seems based upon data - of getting dementia. yes, for sure. it seems based upon data from - of getting dementia. yes, for sure. i it seems based upon data from north america and from here in the uk at the age specific incidence of dementia has gone down about 20 or 30% over the last 30 years and we believe that is largely to do with what we might call heart health, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, smoking cessation and so on, so those are the things we can do and the other things i believe are going to make a difference is i think we are getting closer to effective treatments for disease. fascinating. effective treatments for disease. fascinating-— fascinating. when i talk about effective treatments, -
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fascinating. when i talk about effective treatments, and - fascinating. when i talk about effective treatments, and you | fascinating. when i talk about - effective treatments, and you have seen this with covid, there are two aspects. the first is getting treatment and the second is having a treatment and the second is having a treatment which you can get to second and third world populations cheap enough and geographically spread enough so that there is both the research problem there and also the research problem there and also the logistic problem if we managed to get reasonably priced treatments. most people would assume that if somebody gets dementia there is no effective treatment for it but you see that may not be too far away? i am optimistic. research is going well. i think we have a much better understanding of the disease than we certainly had ten years ago, so i think i am optimistic. i do not want to overstate it. i have been aware that i might have said something similar ten years ago because i was
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optimistic then. i am perhaps more optimistic then. i am perhaps more optimistic now but we still have to deliver on that optimism. iloathed optimistic now but we still have to deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe _ deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe are _ deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe are we _ deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe are we talking? - deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe are we talking? i - deliver on that optimism. what sort of timeframe are we talking? i am i of timeframe are we talking? i am talkin: of timeframe are we talking? i am talking five — of timeframe are we talking? i am talking five years. _ of timeframe are we talking? i am talking five years. that _ of timeframe are we talking? i am talking five years. that is - of timeframe are we talking? i —n talking five years. that is what i am talking. really that is not a promise, that is optimism. find am talking. really that is not a promise, that is optimism. and how im ortant promise, that is optimism. and how important would _ promise, that is optimism. and how important would you _ promise, that is optimism. and how important would you say _ promise, that is optimism. and how important would you say it - promise, that is optimism. and how important would you say it is - promise, that is optimism. and how important would you say it is for - important would you say it is for scientists and the medical establishment to address the issue of dementia, given these numbers and these productions of numbers going up? it these productions of numbers going u . ? , ., ., , , these productions of numbers going up? it is enormously important. it is really enormously _ up? it is enormously important. it is really enormously important - up? it is enormously important. it| is really enormously important that we deal with this. here in the uk of course we are worried about long—term care and the economic effects of long—term care on families and without thinking about
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the emotional impact on the patient and theirfamilies these the emotional impact on the patient and their families these are societal urgencies, really. i mean, ithink it societal urgencies, really. i mean, i think it is one of the most important areas of research myself and we have to beat these diseases. thank you very much indeed. from university college london. the former prime miniser theresa may hasjoined renewed calls for a hillsborough law to "break the cycle" of injustice for bereaved families. relatives of those who died at hillsborough have been taking part in an online event to call for changes to the justice system to prevent others going through what they experienced. 97 men, women and children died in the disaster in the fa cup semifinal between liverpool and nottingham forest, in sheffield in 1989. margaret aspinall, whose son james was among the victims, said new legislation will help others get the justice they deserve.
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these families deserve justice. the hillsborough law will not do any good for the hillsborough families but we are here today for us all united to change things because there was 97 victims died at hillsborough deserve the respect and a hillsborough law in honour of their name and if that does any good for the likes of other people going forward that is all that matters. they have not died in vain. theresa may says legislation needs to be changed, so that people affected by disasters are treated more fairly by the justice system. what happened at hillsborough, the death of 97 liverpool fans failed by the state, was tragedy enough for theirfamilies, but what the state, was tragedy enough for their families, but what followed was injustice heaped on injustice,
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years of beating their heads against a brick wall of government and the legal and judicial system, which added until pain and suffering. i have been struck in the case of hillsborough but in other cases at the way in which the state and its various forms act to defend itself from blame. the very bodies we expect to protect and support the public seek instead to protect themselves. what matters now is that themselves. what matters now is that the government response to the report and then acts, putting the interests of bereaved families first rather than the reputation of government departments. if we can change the system so that others do not have to suffer in the way that the hillsborough families did then it will be a valuable legacy for the 97. some older pupils in england are refusing to take lateral flow tests and wear face coverings in classrooms as they head back to school — according to both
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parents and children. charities say they are worried about the effects on vulnerable students of this advice being ignored. however, other parents say masks impact on their children's learning. mark tilling is the headteacher of high tunstall school in hartlepool. hejoins me now. good afternoon. how much of an issue as wearing masks has been in your school? it as wearing masks has been in your school? . , as wearing masks has been in your school? ., , ., , ., , , school? it has not been an issue at all. our school? it has not been an issue at all- our young _ school? it has not been an issue at all. our young people _ school? it has not been an issue at all. our young people are - school? it has not been an issue at all. our young people are very - all. our young people are very compliant. we have had young people wearing masks really all the way through the pandemic when we have been opened, so since october we had them back on in corridors and communal areas and this week with us to put them back on in classrooms and they have been very compliant. young people always have to be reminded, but certainly it doesn't seem to be an issue for us. haste reminded, but certainly it doesn't seem to be an issue for us. have you heard it is an — seem to be an issue for us. have you heard it is an issue _ seem to be an issue for us. have you heard it is an issue for _ heard it is an issue for neighbouring schools? i heard it is an issue for neighbouring schools? heard it is an issue for neirahbourin schools? . . neighbouring schools? i have heard there have been _ neighbouring schools? i have heard there have been issues _ neighbouring schools? i have heard there have been issues across - neighbouring schools? i have heard there have been issues across the l there have been issues across the country and i think it is about how you work with families and educating
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young people making sure they understand the reasons why wearing a mask is important and working together. our young people are desperate to be in school and do not want to be at home, they want to be here being educated. they are working with us to keep the school open. working with us to keep the school 0 en. ~ . working with us to keep the school 0 en, . ., ., , working with us to keep the school oen.. . working with us to keep the school oen. ~ ., , ., open. what has the impact been on the staff? because _ open. what has the impact been on the staff? because lots _ open. what has the impact been on the staff? because lots of - open. what has the impact been on the staff? because lots of are - the staff? because lots of are reporting people going off with covid. has that been an issue in school? . ., , , , school? yeah, it has been very challenging _ school? yeah, it has been very challenging this _ school? yeah, it has been very challenging this week. - school? yeah, it has been very challenging this week. 157 - school? yeah, it has been veryj challenging this week. 157 staff school? yeah, it has been very - challenging this week. 157 staff and about 30 were of this week. it is challenging us because we have all the young people and, 1100, we are educating them but the staff are supporting each other, covering for each other, spending as much time as they can, working together and making sure we work and educate the children as best we can. it is tough
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but what we have to do is sustain us and over the next few weeks. bbout and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your — and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your staff? _ and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your staff? yes. _ and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your staff? yes. not - and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your staff? yes. not all- and over the next few weeks. about 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of. 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. _ 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some _ 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some of— 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some of it - 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some of it is - 2596 of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some of it is covid. j that is covid. some of it is covid. we have bereavements and things like that. 20% of the staff often people are working together, part—time staff coming in full time, staff have given up break times. just working together as a team to nature our children get educated the best we can. . , our children get educated the best we can. ., , ., , , our children get educated the best wecan. .,._ , we can. time has only 'ust started so ou we can. time has only 'ust started so you might * we can. time has only 'ust started so you might have _ we can. time has only 'ust started so you might have to _ we can. time has onlyjust started so you might have to cope - we can. time has onlyjust started so you might have to cope with i we can. time has onlyjust startedl so you might have to cope with this for a few weeks.— for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a lona for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term- — for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term. we _ for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term. we have _ for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term. we have tested i for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term. we have tested all the children this week so the testing centre has been open under young people have been down and tested and we have caught about 20 other young people before they have come into school positive. the young people in the staff are working together. there is a great
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atmosphere. kids are pleased to be here. it is going to be a tough time. ,., ., .~' here. it is going to be a tough time. a ., here. it is going to be a tough time. ., i. here. it is going to be a tough time. ., ., time. good luck to you for the term ahead. time. good luck to you for the term ahead- head _ time. good luck to you for the term ahead. head teacher— time. good luck to you for the term ahead. head teacher of _ time. good luck to you for the term ahead. head teacher of high - time. good luck to you for the term | ahead. head teacher of high tunstall in hartlepool. one in 10,000 babies are affected by a genetic disorder called spinal muscular atrophy, which causes muscle weakness. most babies with the condition won't live beyond the age of two without intervention. but last year, the world's most expensive drug was approved for use on the nhs to fight it — and already the life of one—year—old edward has been transformed. zoe conway has been to meet him and his mum, megan. he's just my little boy, just completely in awe of him, he's like the strongest little baby i know. i'm just so proud of him. he's just doing so well. edward was born with the genetic condition spinal muscular atrophy. it causes progressive muscle weakness. as a baby, edward became floppy, he couldn't move his legs. doctors feared that one day he might
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lose the ability to breathe. and then along came the most expensive drug in the world — zolgensma. it costs £1.8 million, although the nhs got a discount and approved it for use last may. this is edward being given zolgensma via a drip last august. the one—off treatment lasted an hour. in that time, his life was transformed. his muscle tone is a lot stronger. he's almost feeling like a child that doesn't have sma. he can roll, he can hold his head. i mean, honestly, it's endless, what he can do, compared to what he was doing before treatment. it's incredible. # if you see a crocodile...#. the earlier a baby is given the drug, the better — ideally before the symptoms start. it wasn't clear whether edward would qualify for it. the thought of actually losing him was very, very, very real. and so it makes you appreciate every
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single little thing — every tantrum i appreciate because he can... he's got the strength to be a naughty boy, you know? and it's all those things that ijust didn't even think he would ever be able to do. row, row, row... spinal muscular atrophy can be detected in newborns using a simple heel—prick blood test. the condition affects one in 10,000 babies. great 0rmond street is calling for all newborns to be given the test. this is three—year—old lena's preferred mode of travel — whizzing by in the lap of her 16—year—old sister, amelia. they both have sma — although a different type from edward's. lena was treated as a baby with zolgensma — the drug came too late for amelia. lena is our little miracle. we knew that if we give lena the drug before any symptoms, it will be the best
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effect, any case. that's why the pre—screening, it's so important. i think it's amazing. i wasn't able to walk from the age of one and a half. i wasn't able to run, i wasn't able to even crawl. so, yeah, it's quite amazing. zolgensma has only been on the market for five years, so it's still unclear what effect it will have over the longer term, but the hope is that children like lena will forever be free of this disease. zoe conway, bbc news. the duchess of cambridge will reach a milestone on sunday when she celebrates her 40th birthday. it's more than ten years since catherine middleton married into the royal family — and took on the role of future queen. so how has the public role and image
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of the duchess changed over the last decade? 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. a duchess at 40, a time to reflect a decade after her public life officially began. and it started here on anglesey, her first royal engagement still as kate middleton. katie griffiths, then just five, presented a photo to the royal couple. i remember i was really excited because i was meeting a real prince and princess. i thought they were going to be showing up in a massive dress and all that like prince charming and cinderella. the move from private, contained kate middleton to a public royal duchess of cambridge has had its challenges, adjusting to the attention, finding her voice. this, the duchess' first ever speech in 2012. you have all made me feel so welcome. i feel hugely honoured to be
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here to see this wonderful centre. almost ten years later, she is more confident and direct. addiction is not a choice. no—one chooses to become an addict. but it can happen to any one of us. well, the speech she gave last year was a landmark for us to have somebody in the royal family with credibility saying exactly those same messages, takes it out to a much wider audience. the duchess of cambridge has had to learn on the job, knowing there is an even bigger role ahead. i think she hasjust grown up. now she has a certain gravitas, | she certainly has got a stature| within the royal family. now, i think you look— at her when she walks into a room and she holds the room. when you are photographed and filmed this often, what you wear matters. she's taken a few more risks over the last few years and has really realised that if she makes a statement with her clothes that can really help
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elevate her position. i think one of kate's recent fashion successes was thejenny packham dress that she wore to the james bond premiere. she looked better than any bond girl. kate knows when to step up and how to do it. and there will be more stepping up in the decade ahead for the duchess who will one day be queen. daniela relph, bbc news. now, many of us remember the tv drama grange hill for its gritty storylines and very catchy theme tune. it first aired in 1978, running for 30 years — and now it's going to be turned into film, with some of the original characters expected to return as grandparents. jayne mccubbin has been chatting to some of the original cast members:
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grange hill theme music. there was the theme tune... bom bom bom bom, ba—na ba—na nah nah, bam ba—na ba—na—na, bow bow bow... there was the gritty realism... move your arm, fat man. it was just like a real british show, wasn't it, showing kids in their natural habitats, so to speak. yeah, cheeky and naughty. what's he talking about? it's not true. controversial storylines. did you just say no in school? idid. good girl. just say no! now, like an unheard of decent school dinner, there is going to be a second helping. my name is neil mattocks, i am a higher level teaching assistant, i run a podcast about grange hill called sausage on a fork. the very first episode i remember watching, i was about six years old and there was lads fighting on the telly, and ijust thought, this is amazing. this is like nothing i've ever seen. i'm alison valentine and i played fay in grange hill, fay lucas. the biggest thing which caused the biggest stir was my thing,
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i'm not sure what it was, with my teacher, mr king. my name is lee macdonald - and i played zammo in grange hill. i so, the transformation from thisl happy—go—lucky zammo character, to stealing off of roland, i licking the drugs off the floor in one of the scenes at the end, you know, was horrific. - zammo! drown, you scum. the bbc expelled grange hill after a 30—year run in 2008, but open auditions for the nextgen grange hill silver screen stars start soon. my name is celynjones, i'm the co—writer of grange hill the movie and in a previous life i also played mr green in grange hill, the english teacher. sir phil redmond suggested that it was time to bring back grange hill.
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i think bringing back grange hill was sort of like the bat signal, that he couldn't ignore from wayne manor any longer! by taking the best of the old and mixing with the new, they hope it pulls in the parents for nostalgia and their teens for a new edgy outing. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. snow and ice have been causing some problems across parts of the uk today. a wintry look and feel to the weather with temperatures at five o'clock between one and 8 degrees. very quickly dropping away through the evening, down 2—8 for parts of eastern scotland under clear skies. as this cloud and rain sweeps then briefly with some snow temperatures will start to climb. milder air
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pushing on. that milder air tied up with this cloud and outbreaks of rain. some very heavy thundery rain at times pushing eastwards with some squalid gusts of wind up to 50 mph or more in places. colder air and showers returning from the west as we get towards the end of the day. around 3pm between five and 10 degrees. sunday they will still be some showers around. some of them could be wintry. temperatures between six and 10 degrees.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england have risen by 40% in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe. nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. novak djokovic has thanked people for their support and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements. addressing the nation. kazakhstan's president says he's given the order to fire without warning, and thanks president putin for sending russian troops. protesters have now left the streets.
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two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families. good afternoon. staff absences caused by covid are making hospital care unsafe — that's the warning from the main nursing union, the rcn. absences are up more than 40% in a week in england, and about one in eight hospitals are in a critical incident, which means they're struggling to provide core services. the armed forces have been called in to help — 200 personnel have been deployed in the capital, with another 1800 around the rest of the uk. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa reports. like many hospitals,
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kingston in south west london has been tackling a rise in covid admissions over christmas, and a busy a&e. that has been compounded by growing staff absences. 4% of staff here are off work due to covid, and that is having a big impact on morale. checking in is really important. we learned that in the first wave — in the first five minutes, you check that everyone is ok and it goes a long way. the emotional support is key to allow people to be their best selves when they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england are occupied by patients who are fit enough to be discharged but need support from social care. 95—year—old jean brownlee had a fall on christmas day. she is still waiting for a care package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i could be at home now. i admit i can't see to do what i used to do, but i would be in my own environment. life would be much more pleasant.
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hospitals are reaching capacity whilst seeing a sharp rise in staff shortages. 16 trusts are still in critical incident mode. the latest nhs data shows more than 35,000 staff at acute trusts were off each day on average, due to covid, up to the 2nd of january. that is 4% of the workforce and up 41% on the previous week. but there are regional differences. the north east and yorkshire was hardest hit. there were more than 7,000 covid absences, which is 5% of staff and up by 79% on the previous week. in london, there were over 5,000 covid absences, or 3% of staff. that is down by 4% on the week before. these figures are really stark. outside of health care, staffing shortages are closing shops and cancelling trains. but nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they're finding themselves being spread thinner and thinner, but they can't keep doing that indefinitely.
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the situation is not safe. from assisting paramedics to bolstering teams at testing sites and vaccination centres, more than 1,800 service personnel have already been deployed across the uk. around 90 are preparing to assist three health boards in scotland, while in england, 200 army medics and soldiers are being deployed across hospitals in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure on our nhs. it is our duty to be a sticking plasterfor the nhs to help get through a time of extraordinary crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there are early signs that cases may be slowing in london, it's too soon to know the full impact of the new omicron variant on hospitals. 7,000 army forces personnel are on standby if more reinforcements are needed. katharine da costa, bbc news. earlier i spoke to our health correspondent, nick triggle, who talked us
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through the figures. in previous winters we have reported delays to operations, operations being cancelled, critical incidents being declared, even temporary treatment centres being set up outside a&e units. but this is difficult, it is worse, we can see that in a chart on ambulance performance. this shows that the delays ambulances face when they drop off their patients at a&e. the dark orange is this winter, the light orange is two years before, the last winter before the pandemic hit. as you can see, in the most recent week 23% of patients who were brought to a&e in an ambulance faced a wait of over 30 minutes outside a&e, two years ago, the same week, it was 18%. that is because covid brings with it some very unique challenges. as reported, staff absences are rising, we are seeing
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double the normal number of absences we would expect to see. secondly, the sheer numbers coming into hospital. you do expect at this time of year about 1000 admissions a day for all type of respiratory infections, but we are seeing double that for covid alone. some of those normal winter pressures are much lower, flu rates are much lower, we have fewer than 50 patients in hospital with the flu at the moment in england. what matters now is when these covid infection do peak, it will make a difference to just how bad the winter could be. official figures from the national office of statistics about the prevalence of the virus. the infection rates have been climbing, driven by the 0micron variant.
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we saw this during december until christmas, and now approaching 4 million people infected with covid. this is different from the daily figures we get because this is surveillance programme, estimated from the random sample they are testing. but when you think about the peak last winter, when just over 1 million people were infected at that peak, you can see just how high infection levels are, and even though it is causing milder illness, as we have been discussing, we're seeing those pressures on hospitals increasing. the health secretary sajid javid has been speaking to reporters after a visit to a hospital in central london. he says the nhs is in for a tough few weeks i have been meeting with the staff at king's college hospital in london, hearing about the excellent work they have been doing in caring
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for their patients, saving lives and delivering vaccinations. i want to thank them and workers throughout the nhs up and down the country for the nhs up and down the country for the amazing work they had been doing throughout this pandemic, but particularly during these current challenging times. although as a country, it is a very difficult period for us, we are any stronger position than we were this time last year, thanks to the vaccination cue, testing, we have boosted more people in this country than any other country in europe, we have more antivirals per head than any other country in europe, testing more than any other country in europe, that is helping. despite all that, we are still seeing rising hospitalisations, particularly with case rates rising in older age groups, that is of concern. i think we have to be honest when we look at the nhs, it will be a rocky few weeks ahead. this is a reminder,
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there is a role for all of us in helping in this pandemic, and the best thing that anyone can do, if they haven't already, is please get boosted or get your first or second jab if you haven't had that. when i visited the ic unit in this hospital today, i was told that they estimate around 70% of those patients are unvaccinated. it is really is a reminder to us all of the importance of getting vaccinated to protect yourselves, yourfamily of getting vaccinated to protect yourselves, your family and of getting vaccinated to protect yourselves, yourfamily and loved ones. yourselves, your family and loved ones. �* yourselves, your family and loved ones. ~ , ., yourselves, your family and loved ones. ., . yourselves, your family and loved ones. ., ones. are you feeling reassurance at all that there — ones. are you feeling reassurance at all that there are _ ones. are you feeling reassurance at all that there are fewer _ ones. are you feeling reassurance at all that there are fewer people i all that there are fewer people needing ventilation, early signs suggesting mortality significantly lower? ~ . ., , , lower? when we look omicron versus the previous — lower? when we look omicron versus the previous waves, _ lower? when we look omicron versus the previous waves, there _ lower? when we look omicron versus the previous waves, there is - the previous waves, there is encouraging signs, we know 0micron is less severe, both intrinsically and we certainly know what you get boosted your chance of hospitalisation, latest analysis shows it is almost 90% less than
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what was dealt and. this is good news but we also know it is highly infectious. the 0ns estimated last week they think about one in 15 people in london were infected, we haven't seen infection rate like that before, so all that taken together means that with this high infection rate, despite the lower severity, we are seeing hospitalisation. we should remain cautious and people are doing that, thatis cautious and people are doing that, that is why the prime minister has said we're sticking with plan b for now, but also i cannot stress enough the importance of vaccinated, already over 75% of people, adults in the country that are eligible, are boosted, but we need more people to come forward, we have got the vaccines, the centre here today is “p vaccines, the centre here today is up and running, plenty of people there, wejust up and running, plenty of people there, we just need up and running, plenty of people there, wejust need more up and running, plenty of people there, we just need more at more people to come forward to keep getting boosted.— getting boosted. what are you heafina getting boosted. what are you hearing from _ getting boosted. what are you | hearing from northamptonshire getting boosted. what are you - hearing from northamptonshire where we hear about a major incident? has
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we hear about a major incident? s piercing we hear about a major incident? is piercing across the country in this last week, we're seeing more parts of the nhs, northamptonshire, lincolnshire, manchester, declaring critical incidents, and given the pressures that hospitals are facing around the country, especially workforce pressures, like other workforces, if they are infected and needing to self—isolate, this is understandable. but it is all part of trying to work together, providing the nhs every support eight needs to get through this very difficult time.— difficult time. there have been re orts difficult time. there have been reports today _ difficult time. there have been reports today that _ difficult time. there have been reports today that you - difficult time. there have been reports today that you were i difficult time. there have been i reports today that you were opposed to the primers the's decision to relax testing rules for international travel. are you worried that doing so makes future lockdown more likely? —— prime minister's decision. i lockdown more likely? -- prime minister's decision.— lockdown more likely? -- prime minister's decision. i want it to be made as easy _ minister's decision. i want it to be made as easy as _ minister's decision. i want it to be made as easy as possible, - minister's decision. i want it to be made as easy as possible, it i minister's decision. i want it to be i made as easy as possible, it should always be a palestine proportionate approach, the approach we have taken, announcing this week —— balanced and proportionate. people
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on their return should take a lateral flow test and fdr positive to take a pcr test, this is the right balance and proportionate approach. for more information about the prevalence of covid, it has been revealed that england's covid r number is 1.2 — 1.5, revealed that england's covid r number is 1.2 —1.5, previously it was 1—1.2. that suggests that the incidence of covid has gone up, the r number measuresjust incidence of covid has gone up, the r number measures just how much one person who is positive with covid might infect other people, so if it goes up to suggesting that it is more prevalent. it has gone up from 1-1.2, more prevalent. it has gone up from 1—1.2, up to more prevalent. it has gone up from 1-1.2, up to 1.2-1.5. joining me now is dr denise langhor, an a&e consultant and medicine lead for the british medical association. good afternoon. we heard the hell 60
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talk about a rocky few weeks, if i can speak to you first, in your day—to—dayjob as a a&e consultant, how do things feel on the ground at the moment?— the moment? things are certainly feelin: the moment? things are certainly feeling very _ the moment? things are certainly feeling very tough _ the moment? things are certainly feeling very tough for— the moment? things are certainly feeling very tough for us - the moment? things are certainly feeling very tough for us at i the moment? things are certainly feeling very tough for us at the i feeling very tough for us at the moment, we always struggle in winter, we talk about winter pressure every year, we know it will be busier in emergency medicine, but right now we are really feeling like it is under immense strain. we are dealing with all the usual winter illnesses that we normally see, there is a huge backlog of care, people are coming to the emergency department because they are reaching crisis point for untreated illnesses. with the 0micron rate rising, it is putting us under immense pressure. i rising, it is putting us under immense pressure. rising, it is putting us under immense ressure. , , . . , immense pressure. i missed that last bit, did immense pressure. i missed that last bit. did you — immense pressure. i missed that last bit. did you say _ immense pressure. i missed that last bit. did you say you — immense pressure. i missed that last bit, did you say you had _ immense pressure. i missed that last bit, did you say you had a _ immense pressure. i missed that last bit, did you say you had a high - bit, did you say you had a high incidence of staff illness? yes. bit, did you say you had a high incidence of staff illness? yes, the whole nhs — incidence of staff illness? yes, the whole nhs at _ incidence of staff illness? yes, the whole nhs at the _ incidence of staff illness? yes, the whole nhs at the minute - incidence of staff illness? yes, the whole nhs at the minute is - incidence of staff illness? yes, the
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whole nhs at the minute is reallyl whole nhs at the minute is really suffering the staff illness. we know across the north west starting the 2nd of january we across the north west starting the 2nd ofjanuary we had over 7300 staff members off across the nhs, which works out about 9% of the workforce, half of those are off with covid. as covid rates rise, it is inevitable that staff sickness rates rise, nhs staff like everybody else are not immune. it is a real struggle, we are busier than we have ever been, we have less staff than we have ever had, we really are stretched to the absolute limit to cope at the moment. haifa stretched to the absolute limit to cope at the moment.— cope at the moment. how well protected _ cope at the moment. how well protected to — cope at the moment. how well protected to staff _ cope at the moment. how well protected to staff members i cope at the moment. how well. protected to staff members feel cope at the moment. how well- protected to staff members feel when it comes to covid? do they feel they have enough equipment, enough ppe to protect themselves?— protect themselves? looking back at the very start — protect themselves? looking back at the very start of _ protect themselves? looking back at the very start of this _ protect themselves? looking back at the very start of this pandemic, i protect themselves? looking back at the very start of this pandemic, we l the very start of this pandemic, we had real struggles nationally with getting the right equipment we needed to protect staff. this situation certainly is better now,
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we have better guidance in place, however the bma feel that the current guidance needs to be expanded really, we know that fap three mask are the really tight fitting close filtering facemask that nhs workers can wear, they are being used in areas for certain procedures when dealing with covid patients, but we would like to see those masks been worn in all areas where covid is suspected or might be present. we know that busy a&e waiting rooms, gp practices where people are showing up not taken swaps, we would like to see further roll—out of those high filtering mask for staff. roll-out of those high filtering mask for staff.— roll-out of those high filtering mask for staff. and there are not enou:h mask for staff. and there are not enough of _ mask for staff. and there are not enough of those? _ mask for staff. and there are not enough of those? i _ mask for staff. and there are not enough of those? i think - mask for staff. and there are not enough of those? i think it i mask for staff. and there are not enough of those? i think it is... i mask for staff. and there are not i enough of those? i think it is... we follow the government _ enough of those? i think it is... we follow the government guidance, i follow the government guidance, every trust is what they are told, they follow the guidance being set by the government. 0n the ground, people are concerned, they see their colleagues catching covid and going off sick for seven or ten days or
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longer. there is a realfear on the ground that we need to be doing everything we can to keep our workforce healthy. the nhs is nothing without its star. when we talk about hospital beds, we don't mean a physical bed with a mattress, we mean the workforce that looks after that bed, the workforce needed to take care of the person. protecting the workforce absolutely has to be the highest priority at the moment. has to be the highest priority at the moment-— has to be the highest priority at the moment. . ~ , ., , . and you can check how your local nhs services are coping using the bbc nhs tracker for emergency treatment. it allows you to find out how your local services are coping this winter — and how that compares to the situation before the pandemic. wales' first minister mark drakeford has confirmed there won't be any changes to the coronavirus rules in the welsh government's latest review. the first minister warned "the storm of 0micron" had arrived in wales
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as positivity rates hit "astronomically high" levels. mr drakeford says now isn't the time to make changes with case rates increasing. i was last here just before christmas, and since then the public health situation in wales has changed dramatically. at that time the 0micron variant was still an approaching storm, coming towards us on the horizon. today that storm is fully upon us. 0micron is now the dominant form of the virus in wales, and cases are rising rapidly and every day. the outcome of this week's review means that we will be staying at alert level two. there are no new changes to introduce this week. over the past days we have made some changes to the
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testing regime and the self—isolation rules. because cases of coronavirus are so high in the community at the moment, we no longer need routinely to take a follow—up pcr test after a positive lateral flow test result. 0ur wales correspondent, hywel griffith, has been telling us the latest update has thrown up some suprises. perhaps what many people were expecting was a suggestion that there be no changes for at least two weeks while many thought that we might be approaching the peak of the 0micron wave, the highest figures during this pandemic in terms of case rates. he suggested the modelling suggested to him that the peak would be another ten to 14 days away, and on that basis he couldn't foresee coming down from the current uncertain level to restrictions for at least another two weeks, that means another two weeks of closures
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for nightclubs. —— alert level two. another two weeks of the rule of six being in place in hospitality, bars and restaurants, and maybe at least another two weeks of major sporting events being held behind closed doors. he also spoke about the impact on the health service, something which is a concern across the uk. he suggested that the sickness and absence rate due to isolation in some parts of the welsh nhs was as high as 16%, actual hospitalisations relating to covid have gone up by 43% in just the last week. the first minister was quite critical of the uk government as well, what did he have to say? particularly when people asked him what impact they thought those restrictions would have in wales given the case rate here is overall higher than in england. he suggested that the uk government hadn't made changes in england, therefore it was an outlier with the rest of the uk and many parts of
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europe, indeed the rest of the world. he said that borisjohnson's government was stuck in something of a political paralysis, that was the reason he suggested that no extra measures had been added in england when they were in scotland, northern ireland and wales. we must remember mark drakeford is notjust first minister of wales, he is leader of the welsh labour government, so there is political point—scoring going on, but certainly people in wales are very conscious of the fact that there are more restrictions here than over the border, and there have been some cases of people we know going over the border to enjoy themselves in nightclubs, something you are not likely to do here in wales for a few weeks yet. the president of kazakhstan has ordered security forces to �*fire without warning', during a violent crackdown on anti—government protests. the president blamed what he called �*foreign—trained terrorists' for demonstrations which have been going on since sunday in the main city of almaty. the unrest was sparked by a big increase in the price of fuel.
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at least 26 people have been killed. rayhan demeytrie sent this report. the puppies. you returning with the puppies. you must have been amazed and thought you were not going to see her again. we the aftermath of riots in kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. were not going to see her again. , were pretty overwhelmed with three businesses and government puppies but it was such a thing out buildings gutted. of the blue to get a phone call to security forces have permission to shoot to kill those the president of kazakhstan calls say that cassie was with a vet in terrorists and bandits. chichester after eight years. it is translation: the militants have hard to believe to be honest. horse not laid their arms, _ hard to believe to be honest. how was she found? _ they continue to commit crimes hard to believe to be honest. how or are preparing for them. was she found? she _ hard to believe to be honest. how was she found? she went - hard to believe to be honest. how was she found? she went into - hard to believe to be honest. how was she found? she went into the j hard to believe to be honest. how - was she found? she went into the vat because she — was she found? she went into the vat because she had _ was she found? she went into the vat because she had a _ was she found? she went into the vat because she had a litter _ was she found? she went into the vat because she had a litter of _ was she found? she went into the vat the fight against them must be because she had a litter of puppies. l pursued till the end. because she had a litter of puppies. i think they went into have the whoever does not surrender puppies chipped but the vet was will be destroyed. what started as peaceful nationwide suspicious about the age of the dog because cathy is nine and that is protests against the rising cost of fuel turned violent, really great to have puppies. there the worst of it in almaty. was a suspicion _ really great to have puppies. there translation: it's really frightening was a suspicion the _ really great to have puppies. there was a suspicion the puppies - because we feel in danger _ really great to have puppies. there was a suspicion the puppies are not hers? ., , , , , . , and we are not protected by our state. this has shown the failure was a suspicion the puppies are not hers? ., ,�* hers? no, the puppies are hers. but because they _ hers? no, the puppies are hers. but because they were _ hers? no, the puppies are hers. but because they were suspicious - hers? no, the puppies are hers. but because they were suspicious that l hers? no, the puppies are hers. but because they were suspicious that is when they scanned for the chap and
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of the state in general. the company had her down as a stolen this is the russian military deployed to kazakhstan, part of a moscow—led military block dog. i the company had her down as a stolen do. , the company had her down as a stolen do _ , ., the company had her down as a stolen do. , ., , , . . requested by the kazakh president dog. i see. you must be a great believer in _ to end unrest in his country. dog. i see. you must be a great believer in having _ dog. i see. you must be a great believer in having dogs - dog. i see. you must be a great i believer in having dogs microchips like that because otherwise you but many in kazakhstan are concerned would not have got her back. without about russian troops on the ground and what role they will play. the microchip — would not have got her back. without the microchip we _ would not have got her back. without the microchip we would _ would not have got her back. without the microchip we would never- would not have got her back. without the microchip we would never have i the microchip we would never have seen her again so that is 100%. the normal life has been disrupted. with internet blackouts, microchip makes it 100% essential to they cannot use their bank cards. have that. ., . , , cash is in short supply. microchip makes it 100% essential to have that. ., , , protesters wanted real change, have that. how has she settled back into family life? _ have that. how has she settled back into family life? she _ have that. how has she settled back into family life? she looks _ into family life? she looks really political and economic reforms. happy. those demands, for now, have been into family life? she looks really ha . _ ., into family life? she looks really ha . . ., . ., , into family life? she looks really ha-- . ,, . . , into family life? she looks really ha.--,, . . , ,, into family life? she looks really ha... . . , ,, , happy. she certainly has. she is drowned out by the gunfire. en'o inc happy. she certainly has. she is enjoying herself— happy. she certainly has. she is enjoying herself out _ happy. she certainly has. she is enjoying herself out on - happy. she certainly has. she is enjoying herself out on her- happy. she certainly has. she is i enjoying herself out on her walks. rayhan demeytrie, bbc news. can you lower the screen a little bit so we can see her a little bit 0ur correspondent better? . , ., ., ,. abdujalil abdurasulov is kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. better? can you lower the screen? there she is- _ some of the biggest clashes took better? can you lower the screen? there she is. isn't _ better? can you lower the screen? there she is. isn't she _ better? can you lower the screen? there she is. isn't she lovely? - better? can you lower the screen? l there she is. isn't she lovely? what about her puppies? have you still place here at the former presidential residence and the mayor's office, got them? the buildings were burnt out about her puppies? have you still not them? ., . and you can see these cars were also set on fire. got them? no, we have given the -u- ies got them? no, we have given the puppies to _
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got them? no, we have given the puppies to family _ got them? no, we have given the puppies to family and _ got them? no, we have given the puppies to family and friends. - got them? no, we have given the l puppies to family and friends. they must be very _ puppies to family and friends. they must be very happy _ puppies to family and friends. they you can hear the shots, must be very happy to have them. maybe it is the military they are over the moon. they are and police officers firing absolutely gorgeous. we would have loved to have kept one but it was into the air to warn people not to approach the square, overwhelming for us because we have because they closed the square in order to prevent people from gathering. it is still not clear got cassie and another dog as well. who those people who clashed with police forces are. how does cassie get on with the protesters say that their other dog?— movement is peaceful, and it was the authorities who provoked violence. other dog? cassie gets on really well with charlie. _ but many people now hope other dog? cassie gets on really well with charlie. he _ that the order can be other dog? cassie gets on really well with charlie. he seems - other dog? cassie gets on really well with charlie. he seems to l well with charlie. he seems to tolerate cassie as well. the only restored very quickly. time they get a little bit of a tussle is when it is feeding time we have not seen any signs of protest taking and if one finishes the ball first place in almaty today but we cannot the other one wants to go to the say it is quiet because we heard other bill. and then they have to shooting and some explosions. leave a lot down and they have a earlier today when we drove past we saw some dead bodies inside cars. maybe these people tried to storm little bark. leave a lot down and they have a little bark-— in and drive through the police leave a lot down and they have a little bark. . ., , �* little bark. that doesn't sound too bad. cordon during clashes or maybe little bark. that doesn't sound too bad- thank _ little bark. that doesn't sound too they were simply caught up during bad- thank you — little bark. that doesn't sound too bad. thank you so _ little bark. that doesn't sound too bad. thank you so much _ little bark. that doesn't sound too bad. thank you so much for - little bark. that doesn't sound too | bad. thank you so much for talking the stand—off. to us.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. i'm joined now by shahida tulaganova, a journalist and a filmmaker, a heart—warming story. i am not sure originally from uzbekistan. her latest project is an investigation you will have found the weather of corruption in kazakhstan. heart—warming. this was the scene a short time ago for a weather watcher good afternoon. some very strong with the snow coming down. the snow really coming down at the moment. language from the president, calling the temperature dropping we will see the protesters bandits and ice for a time and then things terrorists and armed criminals, who changed with milder wetter weather arriving by tomorrow morning. are the protesters?— frequent wintry showers. the area of are the protesters? protest started eacefull , are the protesters? protest started peacefully. we _ are the protesters? protest started peacefully, we saw _ rain, sleet and snow has moved are the protesters? protest started peacefully, we saw people - are the protesters? protest started i peacefully, we saw people protesting without any violence. but according across wales and through the to some reports, there were buses midlands into the london area and the south—east of england over the coming with thugs, that sparked the next hour or two. behind that you violence and clashes. that is what can see the sky is clear and each others feet and we will see ice becoming a concern for a time. people say, eyewitnesses say from different parts of kazakhstan, not only in almaty, the biggest city, briefly a bill of snow but this will but other places in the protests mostly be rain because temperatures were taking place. i believe there will be climbing through the night. was some criminal element involved ten in plymouth by the end of the in the protests, who wanted to do night. it will be turning milder.
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wetter and windier thanks to this something bad like looting for frontal system which is going to make for a pretty unsettled day on example, which we have seen violence saturday with outbreaks of heavy in almaty airport, business centre rain, strong winds, butjust wedged is being looted, etc. this is not a between these weather fronts we have thing that peaceful protesters do. a zone of milder air, so a different there has been a major crackdown by feel to borrow money, lots of cloud, the government, with the president outbreaks of rain, but i milder start to the day. the last band of saying that security forces can fire without warning. he is being backed rain pushing eastwards is up without warning. he is being backed particularly likely to bring some up by russian forces. tell us a bit heavy thundery rain and some squalid gusty winds up to a0 or 50 mph or more about the links between kazakhstan and russia. first more. the rain clearing to leave a more about the links between kazakhstan and russia. first of all, kazakhstan. _ mixture of sunshine and showers. it kazakhstan and russia. first of all, kazakhstan, like _ kazakhstan and russia. first of all, kazakhstan, like other _ kazakhstan and russia. first of all, kazakhstan, like other countries i kazakhstan and russia. first of all, kazakhstan, like other countries of| kazakhstan, like other countries of the former soviet union, where once will be turning colder again as tomorrow afternoon wears on. through part of the one country, the ussr, tomorrow afternoon wears on. through tomorrow evening we will see further showers packing in from the west and kazakhstan is any difficult political situation, send raised some of those will be wintry and a between russia and china, two big relatively chilly night in prospect. sunday the city of high pressure countries. 0n between russia and china, two big countries. on top of that about 17% tries to exert an influence. that of the population are ethnic means there will be fewer showers on russians, which gives russia some sunday. there will be some
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sort of upper hand because northern particularly across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, territories of kazakhstan go to some of these could be wintry over russia and a populated with ethnic high ground. many places dry on sunday with spells of sunshine. a russians and other non—charset band of cloud and rain pushing in from the west by the very end of the people. every now and then some day. next week things are set to right—wing russian politician comes change. high pressure expected to build quite strongly especially up right—wing russian politician comes up with a statement saying, we have across the southern half of the uk to take over this territory, this is which means many of us will see dry our territory, and in kazakhstan weather next week, some spells of they do not react badly on that sunshine and it will feel milder. feeling less wintry as we get into because i happens. it is tricky, for next week. kazakhstan to manoeuvre between russia and china, but given the size of the population and the size of the country of kazakhstan itself, they have to be diplomatic in their relationship with russia. idrui’eiiii they have to be diplomatic in their relationship with russia. well what has happened _ relationship with russia. well what has happened in — relationship with russia. well what has happened in kazakhstan i relationship with russia. well what has happened in kazakhstan have i has happened in kazakhstan have taken russia by surprise? i believe so, it took everyone _ taken russia by surprise? i believe today at five —
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so, it took everyone by _ taken russia by surprise? i believe so, it took everyone by surprise, i so, it took everyone by surprise, including russia, i don't think there's dealing with kazakhstan situation is something on mr putin's the giant of hollywood, sir sidney poitier, has died aged 9a. he was the first black man to win mind, he was more preoccupied with nato and ukraine. the situation the oscar for best actor. developed so quickly that they had to react, it was obvious at a 100%. he is so influential. the certain stage that the current first black actor twin and oscar and president of kazakhstan couldn't pave the way for so many in the control the security ministries and couldn't control the situation in industry to make their own mark, the country, even though he attempted to do so. in immediate denzil washington paid tribute to him when he won an oscar the first help was needed, and therefore i think he didn't have much choice but time. to appeal to the help of russia and staff absences in the nhs in england rise by a0% its allies, who are now in in a week becasue of covid. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe. nurses can't stop helping kazakhstan, securing some strategic their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves buildings. i don't think that being spread thinner and thinner. russian troops will shoot, if any but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. shooting will take place i believe it will be done by the kazakhstan security service police, etc, i think the peacekeepers of whatever you call these people will be just
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there to prevent any violence in the airport and other buildings of strategic importance.- airport and other buildings of strategic importance. good to talk to ou, strategic importance. good to talk to you. thank _ strategic importance. good to talk to you, thank you. _ the deputy leader of the labour party angela rayner has written to the prime minister's standards adviser, lord geidt, raising "serious questions and concerns" about the findings of his investigation on the downing street refurbishment. messages between borisjohnson and lord brownlow, who helped pay for the renovation, were published yesterday. the messages appear to show the prime minister offering support for a great exhibition — plans for a cultural festival which were being backed by lord brownlow. ms rayner says lord geidt�*s failure to revise his conclusions in light of those messages raises a number of serious concerns and questions. dave penman is the general secretary of the first division association, which is the union representing senior civil servants. good afternoon. that letter has just
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gonein good afternoon. that letter has just gone in from the shadow depth leader, we will come to that in a moment, but first of all i want to ask you about this whole episode and what you think it says about the role of lord guide. it is interesting, there is a lot of speculation around whether once these messages were disclosed, with a he would have designed, what he has chosen to do is use this episode to potentially strengthen his powers, it is clear from the exchange of letters how angry he is about what happened, but also that he appears to be extracting from the prime minister concessions around the powers of the independent adviser in the future and he expects them to be brought forward in the next couple of months, and anyone in that position faces a choice as his predecessor did, you can resign or potentially exploit a situation to try and strengthen your independence. we will see, depending
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on what the outcome of that is, whether lord geidt has made a wise choice and for the longer—term created a stronger independent authority overseeing the ministerial code. , , ., code. interesting, he is an independent _ code. interesting, he is an independent advisor i code. interesting, he is an independent advisor but i code. interesting, he is an i independent advisor but cannot launch an investigation without the prior minister's seaso, is that right? prior minister's seaso, is that ri . ht? , , prior minister's seaso, is that ritht? , , ., right? yes, the test of whether something _ right? yes, the test of whether something in — right? yes, the test of whether something in standards - right? yes, the test of whether something in standards is i right? yes, the test of whether| something in standards is about their independence, if you require their independence, if you require the prime minister's seaso to investigate the prime minister, there is an obvious conflict and the committee for standards and public life in their report in november made clear that it's one of the reforms that need to come forward as well as the ability to make a decision on the ministerial code, rather than simply relying on the prime ministerfor that rather than simply relying on the prime minister for that greater independence is hopefully what lord geidt has been able to extract from the prime minister, but we really need to wait and see. he has a
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timeframe because he says he expects that to be done before his annual report in april, so in its couple of months we will find out how much the prime minister has been prepared to give up in terms of those powers and create a truly independent ministerial code.— create a truly independent ministerial code. create a truly independent ministerialcode. . , ., ministerial code. certainly from the role of lord — ministerial code. certainly from the role of lord geidt, _ ministerial code. certainly from the role of lord geidt, is _ ministerial code. certainly from the role of lord geidt, is this _ ministerial code. certainly from the role of lord geidt, is this furore i role of lord geidt, is this furore about the refurbishment of the downing street flat, which is not going away, labour is making sure of that, the letter has been sent from angela rayner, deputy leader —— deputy labour leader, saying that if these new messages that have come to light have annoyed him, why is he not reopening the case? in opposition you clearly want to make the most in opposition you clearly want to make the most of in opposition you clearly want to make the most of this. in opposition you clearly want to make the most of this. that revolution damning revelation with the potential linking of the two you can see why you would want to exploit that. lord geidt deals with that and his letters and has made clear he has looked at that
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exchange. he has referenced the fact there are some elements of his report he might have changed or done differently but his overall conclusion is the same that the prime minister didn't breach the ministerial code. you can agree or disagree but he has dealt with it and ultimately he is an independent adviser and that is the point of having someone independent and if he makes that decision he is somebody you have to respect, the fact he has done that, but you can understand the politics of it and why labour want to keep us on the front pages. thank you. sidney poitier, the first black man to win a best actor 0scar, has died aged 94. born in the bahamas, he won the academy award in 1964 for his role in lillies of the field. he was made a knight commander of the british empire by the queen
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in 1974 and in 2016 he was given a bafta fellowship award for his outstanding contribution to film. lizo mzimba looks back at his life. sidney poitier�*s virtual tips, a man of authority. intelligence and a steely determination, never to back down. the kind of qualities that defined sidney poitier on screen and all. he made his cinema debut playing a doctor, a man of status, something almost unheard of for black performers then. with roles like an escaped convict and a struggling husband he tackled prejudice head on.— struggling husband he tackled prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my _ prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my black _ prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my black knees. - prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my black knees. all i prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my black knees. all right, j down on my black knees. all right, mr great white father, give us that money and we will come out there and dirty are pure white folks neighbourhood. the dirty are pure white folks neighbourhood.— dirty are pure white folks neithbourhood. . .,
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dirty are pure white folks neithbourhood. . . . neighbourhood. the era meant he had a bid in his white _ neighbourhood. the era meant he had a bid in his white counterparts - a bid in his white counterparts rarely had to carry, the wet of being a symbol, but he bought it with dignity. in wellies of the field playing a travelling handyman helping build a group of nuns a chapel. he won the academy award, the first black performer ever to receive the oscar for a leading role. in the years that followed he became hollywood's megastar, redefining how audiences saw black characters, with films like to serve with love. , ., ., , characters, with films like to serve with love. , ., . , , with love. the young ladies will be addressed as _ with love. the young ladies will be addressed as nice. _ with love. the young ladies will be addressed as nice. the _ with love. the young ladies will be addressed as nice. the boys i with love. the young ladies will be addressed as nice. the boys with i addressed as nice. the boys with their surnames.— addressed as nice. the boys with their surnames. more controversial was his role — their surnames. more controversial was his role as _ their surnames. more controversial was his role as a — their surnames. more controversial was his role as a highly _ their surnames. more controversial was his role as a highly gifted i was his role as a highly gifted hugely successful doctor engaged to a white women in guess who is coming to dinner. i a white women in guess who is coming to dinner. ., , ., ., to dinner. i love your daughter. there is nothing _ to dinner. i love your daughter. there is nothing i _ to dinner. i love your daughter. there is nothing i wouldn't i to dinner. i love your daughter. there is nothing i wouldn't try i to dinner. i love your daughter. i there is nothing i wouldn't try to do to keep others happy as she was the day i met her.—
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the day i met her. some said the relationship _ the day i met her. some said the relationship is _ the day i met her. some said the relationship is only _ the day i met her. some said the relationship is only acceptable i relationship is only acceptable because the character was so perfect and accomplished. it was still a huge box office hit. he was also a trailblazer behind the camera. 1980s dc trailblazer behind the camera. 1980s d* crazy, which he directed, the first film from an african—american film—maker ever to pass the blockbuster $100 million mark in the united states.— blockbuster $100 million mark in the united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier- — united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. when _ united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. when he _ united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. when he was - united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. when he was well- sidney poitier. when he was well into his 80s. _ sidney poitier. when he was well into his 80s, an _ sidney poitier. when he was well into his 80s, an honorary- sidney poitier. when he was well into his 80s, an honorary oscar. | into his 80s, an honorary 0scar. hollywood recognition for a star who blazed a trail for so many. thea;r blazed a trail for so many. they call me mr _ blazed a trail for so many. they call me mr tibbs. _ blazed a trail for so many. they call me mr tibbs. and - blazed a trail for so many. they i call me mr tibbs. and entertained millions more. _ call me mr tibbs. and entertained millions more. sidney _ call me mr tibbs. and entertained millions more. sidney poitier, i call me mr tibbs. and entertained| millions more. sidney poitier, one of the greats.
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sidney poitier, who's died. sport, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. 3—0 down in the ashes, england's cricketers have had little to smile about in australia so far, but day three of the fourth test has changed the mood, even if it won't change the overall result. jonny bairstow�*s gutsy century rescuing england — when it looked like things were imploding. they dug in to reach 258—7 by the close of play in sydney, but still trailing australia by 158 runs. patrick gearey was watching. at a drizzly sydney, the weather soaked up more time in the test. for england, not nearly enough. australians have spent weeks mopping up, after all. haseeb hameed, beaten by michell starc for six. sydney was in pink to support the jane mcgrath cancer foundation. late wife of the great glenn who used to regularly do this to englishmen.
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the tormentor of zak crawley was scott boland, playing in his second test, having waited his whole career for these moments. joe root, england's captain, his ninth test wicket already. england's sad procession trudged on, surrounded, surrendering. three wickets for no runs, 36—4 by lunch. afterwards, it got surreal. ben stokes was given out leg before wicket. it turned out there was no leg and plenty of wicket. bails still on, stokes still in. but he was facing the pace with pain. a side injury kept him from bowling but not batting, battling. jonny bairstow went with him, both swatted 50s. here was the fight england had spoken about. and here was the counterpunch. stokes, trapped by nathan lyon. jos buttler followed. but bairstow wasn't done. together with mark wood, he made sure england wouldn't be made to bat again. and then in the final over of the day, he passed 100. it's too late to save the series.
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it might still be too little to save the match. but at long last, england have something to celebrate. patrick gearey, bbc news. yes, a brilliant innings from bairstow, however he and jos buttler both picked up hand injuries, so wicket—keeper sam billings has been added to the squad as cover. bairstow, though, is still hoping he can add more runs tomorrow. he's unbeaten 103 after his first century in over three years. i am absolutely over the moon, to be honest with you, it is the hardest one so far i think. as you say, with the circumstances. butjust put the graft in and obviously that partnership with ben was a big one and yeah, it was tough out there and i am really delighted with it. a second tennis player has had their visa cancelled by australian authorities. renata voracova joins
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novak djokovic in being denied entry into the country, because of their vaccination status — with the visas of other players being investigated too. djokovic fans have been protesting outside the hotel they're confined to in melbourne — where they'd been hoping to play in the australian open later this month. djokovic's appeal against the decision won't be heard until monday. and this afternoon djokovic has posted a message on social media. phillippe coutinho is back in the premier legaue. the brazilian midfielder�*s joined aston villa from barcelona, on loan until the end of the season, and there's an option to buy too. coutinhojoined barca in a £142 million move from liverpool in 2018. but he struggled to make the same impact in spain. however, he's reuniting with villa boss steven gerrard, who was his captain at liverpool. and somebody else back in the premier league is keiran trippier who's now been
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confirmed as newcastle's first signing since their new owners took over. the england full—back has joined from atletico madrid. he's played for boss eddie howe before at burnley and joins for £12 million. but newcastle fans will be hoping he's the first of many to come and can help the club battle against relegation from the premier league. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the manchester city footballer benjamin mendy has been granted bail ahead of his trial for rape and sexual assault. the french international will have to live at his home address, surrender his passport and not have contact with any of the people he is accused of attacking. mr mendy has been charged with seven counts of rape and one of sexual assault relating to five women. the former prime miniser theresa may hasjoined renewed calls for a hillsborough law to "break the cycle" of injustice for bereaved families. relatives of those who died at hillsborough have been taking
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part in an online event to call for changes to the justice system to prevent others going through what they experienced. 97 men, women and children died in the disaster in the fa cup semifinal between liverpool and nottingham forest, in sheffield in 1989. margaret aspinall, whose son james was among the victims, said new legislation will help others get the justice they deserve. these families deserve justice. the hillsborough law will not do any good for the hillsborough families but we are here today for us all united to change things because those 97 victims who died at hillsborough deserve the respect and a hillsborough law in honour of their name and if that does any good for the likes of other people going forward that is all that matters. they have not died in vain.
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theresa may says legislation needs to be changed, so that people affected by disasters are treated more fairly by the justice system. what happened at hillsborough, the death of 97 liverpool fans failed by the state, was tragedy enough for their families, but what followed was injustice heaped on injustice, years of beating their heads against a brick wall of government and the legal and judicial system, which added to their pain and suffering. i have been struck in the case of hillsborough but in other cases at the way in which the state and its various forms act to defend itself from blame. the very bodies we expect to protect and support the public seek instead to protect themselves. what matters now is that the government responds to the report and then acts, putting the interests of bereaved families first rather than the reputation of government departments.
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if we can change the system so that others do not have to suffer in the way that the hillsborough families did then it will be a valuable legacy for the 97. one of scotland's two remaining nuclear power stations, hunterston b in north ayrshire, is being permanently switched off this lunchtime — after running 21 years longer than originally planned. more than 100 jobs will be lost. environmental campaigners called the closure "inevitable". the number of adults living with dementia could triple over the coming decades. researchers say growing and ageing populations are the main causes — but add that there are also other reasons, like obesity and smoking, which can be tackled. professor sirjohn hardy from the university college of london institute of neurology, who is an expert in the field, gave me his reaction to the findings earlier. the findings are completely credible.
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this is what everyone who works on dementia is expecting because of the ageing increasing population. it is very important study but not surprising its conclusions. i wondered if you can help us through the statistics because the fear is that the number of adults living with dementia could triple and yet people are getting healthier and they are living longer. is it because we have more old people that there is likely to be more dementia? it is slightly complicated. there are more people and of course they are living longer as you say but as they get into those very high ages that is when they are developing dementia. that is one part of it. the other part of it is that a lot of the increase is in the second and third world where the population
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is ageing to an enormous extent and where there haven't yet been such great improvements in health and in those populations the things you have just mentioned, smoking and diabetes and vascular problems in general, are increasing for those reasons. and there are lifestyle changes that people can make to reduce their risk of getting dementia. yes, for sure. it seems based upon data from north america and from here in the uk the age specific incidence of dementia has gone down about 20 or 30% over the last 30 years and we believe that is largely to do with what we might call heart health, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, smoking cessation and so on, so those are the things we can do and the other things i believe
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are going to make a difference is i think we are getting closer to effective treatments for disease. fascinating. when i talk about effective treatments, and you have seen this with covid, there are two aspects. the first is getting treatment and the second is having a treatment which you can get to second and third world populations cheap enough and geographically spread enough so that there is both the research problem there and also the logistic problem if we manage to get reasonably—priced treatments. professor hardy. the headlines on bbc news: staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england have risen by 40% in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe.
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novak djokovic has thanked people for their support — and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive — after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements. two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families. now, many of us remember the tv drama grange hill for its gritty storylines and very catchy theme tune. it first aired in 1978, running for 30 years — and now it's going to be turned into film, with some of the original characters expected to return as grandparents. jayne mccubbin has been chatting to some of the original cast members. grange hill theme music. there was the theme tune... bom bom bom bom, ba—na ba—na nah nah, bam ba—na ba—na—na, bow bow bow... there was the gritty realism... move your arm, fat man.
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it was just like a real british show, wasn't it, showing kids in their natural habitats, so to speak. yeah, cheeky and naughty. what's he talking about? it's not true. controversial storylines. did you just say no in school? idid. good girl. just say no! now, like an unheard of decent school dinner, there is going to be a second helping. my name is neil mattocks, i am a higher level teaching assistant, i run a podcast about grange hill called sausage on a fork. the very first episode i remember watching, i was about six years old and there was lads fighting on the telly, and ijust thought, this is amazing. this is like nothing i've ever seen. i'm alison valentine and i played fay in grange hill, fay lucas. the biggest thing which caused the biggest stir was my thing, i'm not sure what it was,
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with my teacher, mr king. my name is lee macdonald - and i played zammo in grange hill. i so, the transformation from thisi happy—go—lucky zammo character, to stealing off of roland, i licking the drugs off the floor in one of the scenes at the end, you know, was horrific. - zammo! drown, you scum. the bbc expelled grange hill after a 30—year run in 2008, but open auditions for the nextgen grange hill silver screen stars start soon. my name is celynjones, i'm the co—writer of grange hill the movie and in a previous life i also played mr green in grange hill, the english teacher. sir phil redmond suggested that it was time to bring back grange hill. i think bringing back grange hill was sort of like the bat signal,
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that he couldn't ignore from wayne manor any longer! by taking the best of the old and mixing with the new, they hope it pulls in the parents for nostalgia and their teens for a new edgy outing. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. the duchess of cambridge will reach a milestone on sunday when she celebrates her 40th birthday. it's more than ten years since catherine middleton married into the royal family — and took on the role of future queen. so how has the public role and image of the duchess changed over the last decade? 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. a duchess at 40, a time to reflect a decade after her public life officially began. and it started here on anglesey, her first royal engagement
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still as kate middleton. katie griffiths, then just five, presented a photo to the royal couple. i remember i was really excited because i was meeting a real prince and princess. i thought they were going to be showing up in a massive dress and all that like prince charming and cinderella. the move from private, contained kate middleton to a public royal duchess of cambridge has had its challenges, adjusting to the attention, finding her voice. this, the duchess' first ever speech in 2012. you have all made me feel so welcome. i feel hugely honoured to be here to see this wonderful centre. almost ten years later, she is more confident and direct. addiction is not a choice. no—one chooses to become an addict. but it can happen to any one of us. well, the speech she gave last year
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was a landmark for us to have somebody in the royal family with credibility saying exactly those same messages, takes it out to a much wider audience. the duchess of cambridge has had to learn on the job, knowing there is an even bigger role ahead. i think she hasjust grown up. now she has a certain gravitas, | she certainly has got a stature| within the royal family. now, i think you look— at her when she walks into a room and she holds the room. when you are photographed and filmed this often, what you wear matters. she's taken a few more risks over the last few years and has really realised that if she makes a statement with her clothes that can really help elevate her position. i think one of kate's recent fashion successes was thejenny packham dress that she wore to the james bond premiere. she looked better than any bond girl. kate knows when to step up and how to do it. and there will be more stepping up in the decade ahead for the duchess who will one day be queen. daniela relph, bbc news.
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let's return to the pressure on the nhs due to covid—related staff absences in hospitals and care homes. across norfolk, there are currently 210 people in hospital who should be in a care setting. of those more than half need home care and the remainder require care home beds. but currently there is a dire shortage of available care with between 8% and 10% of the county's care staff are currently either isolating or ill with covid. nikki fox reports. morning, charles, just take your temperature. at this norfolk care home in stanton, devon, constant covid surveillance. more checks need more staff.
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and like many care homes, they haven't got the pool of workers they need. 0h, we've got three or four short. we've got about 25 residents at the moment. as the staff shortage worsens, more care home beds are needed. the majority of people here now have dementia and can be quite challenging at times. so mentally and physically, it's got a lot harder. so if you look there's loads of staff here doing long days and 14 hour shifts. so you're relying on the goodwill of the staff, what would you do if they couldn't work long hours like that? if i can't, then what would have to do is just have to put our hands up and say to the social workers, sorry, we can't provide the care, we don't have the staff. it's a bit of a ripple effect. so what's the issue? staff from many european countries left after brexit and mandatory vaccinations and pay is poor for the increased covid workload. friend of mine left at the end of march. she's better off retiring and getting benefits than she was to carry on working.
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bodge segal owns a small group of homes in norfolk, including this one. it's absolutely possible to pay staff more. and i would like to see rises of up to sort of 20% in their pay. but that means increasing our fees by 20% and having the local authorities agree to those sort of pay reviews. so raj is looking abroad to find workers. every single application is from overseas. which countries? primarily they tend to be from nigeria, the far east and and india. none locally at all. how important do you think that social care is to the whole of the health and social care system? very important because if there's no carers there's no care homes and if there's no care homes the hospitals are going to end up being blocked. social workers are going to end up
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going crazy because there's nowhere to actually place these people. carers are the main people that need to be recognised. with 90 people in norfolk�*s hospitals needing a care home who can't get one, it's already happening. and other elderly people with lives left to live could be sent to end of life hospices as they're the only beds left. nicky fox, bbc look east. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. a wintry look and feel to the weather across many parts of the uk. snow has been causing problems for some, particularly in parts of scotland, but it has also been bringing some beautiful scenes. this is the shower cloud that has been bringing some quite significant snow in places. this cloud here has brought some widespread rain and hill snow fringing into the southern half of wales, moving across the south—west of england. sunny spells but still one or two showers, becoming fewer and further between as we go towards the end
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of the afternoon. top temperatures three to eight degrees. quite windy as well. into the evening, the showers will fade. for a time, it will turn very cold under clear skies, maybe minus eight briefly in eastern scotland, but through the second half of the night cloud and rain with some snow for a time will come in from the west and things will start to turn milder — eight for belfast, ten for plymouth by the first part of saturday morning. this frontal system makes the weather for saturday, bringing outbreaks of rain and a zone of mild air between these two weather fronts. but we return to something colder from the west as the day goes on. outbreaks of rain pushing east through the day, some quite heavy bursts with the odd flash of lightning or rumble of thunder mixed in. the rain clears to leave sunnier spells but with a scattering of showers turning wintry again, especially over higher ground in the west. a windy day, gusts of 50 mph or more
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in some exposed spots. temperatures, by the middle of the afternoon they are going to fall away again as the cold air returns from the west. saturday night into sunday, this very weak ridge of high pressure comes in killing off some of the showers, although some will continue into sunday. some of those could be wintry. many places will see a fair amount of dry weather with some sunshine before a band of cloud and rain pushes back in from the west. sunday afternoon temperatures, four degrees in aberdeen, ten is the high in cardiff. into next week, high pressure will then build from the south, so more dry weather, still a bit of rain in the north, often quite windy, but it will feel a little milder.
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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at four... hollywood star sir sidney poitier has died aged 94. he was the first black man to be awarded best actor at the academy awards in 1964. staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england — have risen by 40 percent in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe. nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. given the pressures hospitals are facing, especially workforce pressures, like other workforces, if they are needing to self—isolate, this is understandable, but it is
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all part of trying to work together, providing the nhs every support it needs. novak djokovic has thanked fans for their support — and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive — after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements. addressing the nation. kazakhstan's president says he's given the order to fire without warning — and thanks president putin for sending russian troops. protesters have now left the streets. the labour party's deputy leader angela rayner has written to the prime minister's standards adviser, lord geidt, about the inquiry of the downing street flat refurbishment. two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families.
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our top story this hour... sidney poitier, the first black man to win a best actor 0scar, has died aged 94. born in the bahamas, he won the academy award in 1964 for his role in lillies of the field. he was made a knight commander of the british empire by the queen in 1974 and in 2016 he was given a bafta fellowship award for his outstanding contribution to film. lizo mzimba looks back at his life. # in the heat of the night...# sidney poitier�*s virgil tibbs, a man of authority... i'm a police officer. ..intelligence and a steely determination, never to back down. the kind of qualities that defined sidney poitier on screen and off. he made his cinema debut playing a doctor, a man of status, something almost unheard of for black performers then.
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with roles like an escaped convict in the defiant 0nes, and a struggling husband in a raisin in the sun, he tackled prejudice head on. maybe i will get down on my black knees. all right, mr great white father, give us that money and we will come out there and dirty up your white folks neighbourhood. the era meant he had a burden his white counterparts rarely had to carry, the weight of being a symbol, but he bore it with dignity. in lilies of the field playing a travelling handyman helping build a group of nuns a new chapel. the winner is sidney poitier. he won the academy award, the first black performer ever to receive the oscar for a leading role. in the years that followed he became hollywood's biggest star, redefining how audiences saw black characters, with films like to sir with love. you will call me sir. the young ladies will be addressed as miss.
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the boys by their surnames. more controversial was his role as a highly gifted, hugely successful doctor engaged to a white women in guess who's coming to dinner. i love your daughter. there is nothing i wouldn't do to try to keep her as happy as she was the day i met her. some criticised it, saying the impression it gave was of an interracial relationship that was only acceptable because the character was so perfect and accomplished. it was still a huge box office hit. he was also a trailblazer behind the camera. 1980's ocmedy stir crazy, which he directed, the first film from an african—american film—maker ever to pass the blockbuster $100 million mark in the united states. ladies and gentlemen, sidney poitier. when he was well into his 80s,
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an honorary 0scar. hollywood recognition for a star who blazed a trail for so many... they call me mr tibbs. ..and entertained millions more. sidney poitier, one of the greats. sidney poitier, who's died, aged 94. joining us now is contributing editor and columnist forfilm magazine empire, amon warmann. good afternoon. just watching that, ho efull good afternoon. just watching that, hopefully you _ good afternoon. just watching that, hopefully you could _ good afternoon. just watching that, hopefully you could hear _ good afternoon. just watching that, hopefully you could hear it, - good afternoon. just watching that, hopefully you could hear it, you i hopefully you could hear it, you could see what a pioneer sidney poitier was. could see what a pioneer sidney poitier was-— could see what a pioneer sidney poitier was. ., , ' :: :: , poitier was. pioneer is 10096 right, he is so influential, _ poitier was. pioneer is 10096 right, he is so influential, the _ poitier was. pioneer is 10096 right, he is so influential, the first i he is so influential, the first black actor to win an oscar. pave the way for so many in the industry
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to make their own mark, not least denzil washington who paid tribute to him when he won the oscar for the first time, such a tremendous loss. and he tackled issues of race and racism head on in his films. iie racism head on in his films. he really did. _ racism head on in his films. he: really did, these are —— your reporter did a greatjob of mentioning some of them. he was just so versatile, the roles he played, really helped change the game for how black actors were viewed at that time, the fact he became notjust one of the biggest and best black actors of that time but the biggest and best stars in the industry period. a, and best stars in the industry eriod. �* ~ , , ., period. a huge win. absolutely, what are our period. a huge win. absolutely, what are your favourite _ period. a huge win. absolutely, what are your favourite films? _ period. a huge win. absolutely, what are your favourite films? to - period. a huge win. absolutely, what are your favourite films? to sir i are your favourite films? to sir with love, _ are your favourite films? to sir with love, guess _ are your favourite films? to sir with love, guess who's - are your favourite films? to sir| with love, guess who's coming are your favourite films? to sir - with love, guess who's coming to dinner, and can for my top two sidney poitierfilms, i am looking forward to back into the catalogue and re—watching some of the greats, lilies of the field which he won the
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oscar for, lilies of the field which he won the oscarfor, that lilies of the field which he won the oscar for, that would lilies of the field which he won the oscarfor, that would be in the conversation. figs oscar for, that would be in the conversation.— oscar for, that would be in the conversation. �* , , . conversation. as the piece pointed out, he couldn't _ conversation. as the piece pointed out, he couldn't win _ conversation. as the piece pointed out, he couldn't win to _ conversation. as the piece pointed out, he couldn't win to a _ conversation. as the piece pointed out, he couldn't win to a certain i out, he couldn't win to a certain extent, s was coming to dinner period data centre time, some people thought he was only acceptable because he was so perfect. there are some two to — because he was so perfect. there are some two to that _ because he was so perfect. there are some two to that criticism, _ because he was so perfect. there are some two to that criticism, but - because he was so perfect. there are some two to that criticism, but i - some two to that criticism, but i feel like the winds made in his performance in that film far outweighed the cons, because it was one of the first movies of its kind. we hadn't seen that many interracial relationships on screen, he brought that to the screen in a beautiful way. nowadays with the benefit of hindsight with how far we have come in the industry now, 20 years or so longer removed from that, we want more from depictions of relationships like that, but back then that was a landmark movie and for good reason.— for good reason. there was also his screen presence. — for good reason. there was also his screen presence, very _ for good reason. there was also his screen presence, very magnetic, i screen presence, very magnetic,
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distinctive voice.— screen presence, very magnetic, distinctive voice. yes, absolutely. iconic lines. _ distinctive voice. yes, absolutely. iconic lines, iconic— distinctive voice. yes, absolutely. iconic lines, iconic performances. | iconic lines, iconic performances. sidney poitier is an actor who many people still admire and obviously go back and look on his full today and like, wow, look what he did, look what he did at the time, an example of what can be done at what can be achieved. as i say, tremendously to the industry, he will be remembered for blazing a trail in more ways than one. for blazing a trail in more ways than one-— for blazing a trail in more ways than one. ., ~ y., , . we have just had the latest covid figures for the uk. the latest figures for the uk. the latest figures are 178,000 250 new cases differ today —— 170 8250. that is a
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drop of about 1500. staff absences caused by covid are making hospital care unsafe — that's the warning from the main nursing union, the rcn. absences are up more than 40% in a week in england, and about one in eight hospitals are in a critical incident, which means they're struggling to provide core services. the armed forces have been called in to help — 200 personnel have been deployed in the capital, with another 1800 around the rest of the uk. our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. like many hospitals, kingston in south west london has been tackling a rise in covid admissions over christmas, and a busy a&e. that has been compounded by growing staff absences. li% of staff here are off work due to covid, and that is having a big impact on morale. checking in is really important. we learned that in the first wave — in the first five minutes, you check that everyone is ok and it goes a long way. the emotional support is key to allow people to be their best selves when they come to work.
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more than one in ten beds in england are occupied by patients who are fit enough to be discharged but need support from social care. 95—year—old jean brownlee had a fall on christmas day. she is still waiting for a care package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i could be at home now. i admit i can't see to do what i used to do, but i would be in my own environment. life would be much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity whilst seeing a sharp rise in staff shortages. 16 trusts are still in critical incident mode. the latest nhs data shows more than 35,000 staff at acute trusts were off each day on average, due to covid, up to the 2nd of january. that is li% of the workforce and up a1% on the previous week. but there are regional differences. the north east and yorkshire was hardest hit.
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there were more than 7,000 covid absences, which is 5% of staff and up by 79% on the previous week. in london, there were over 5,000 covid absences, or 3% of staff. that is down by li% on the week before. these figures are really stark. outside of health care, staffing shortages are closing shops and cancelling trains. but nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they're finding themselves being spread thinner and thinner, but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. the situation is not safe. from assisting paramedics to bolstering teams at testing sites and vaccination centres, more than 1,800 service personnel have already been deployed across the uk. around 90 are preparing to assist three health boards in scotland, while in england, 200 army medics and soldiers are being deployed across hospitals in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure on our nhs.
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it is our duty to be a sticking plasterfor the nhs to help get through a time of extraordinary crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there are early signs that cases may be slowing in london, it's too soon to know the full impact of the new omicron variant on hospitals. 7,000 army forces personnel are on standby if more reinforcements are needed. katharine da costa, bbc news. the health secretary sajid javid has been speaking to reporters after a visit to a hospital in central london. he says the nhs is in for a tough few weeks. we know omicron is less severe, it
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is 90% less than it was with delta, but it is also highly infectious, the ons estimated that last week they think about one in 15 people in london were infected, we haven't seen infection rates like that with covid before, so all that taken together means that with his high infection rate, despite the lower severity, we are seeing hospitalisation, so we should remain cautious and people are doing that, thatis cautious and people are doing that, that is why the prime minister has said we're sticking with plan b but i cannot stress enough the importance of getting vaccinated, already over 75% of people, adults in the country that are eligible are boosted, but we need more people to come forward, we have the vaccines, this centre is up and running, plenty of people, we just need more and more people to come forward to getting boosted. let's talk now about the pressure the nhs is under, particularly with the demands of the new booster programme. matthew taylor is the chief executive of the nhs confederation — a membership body for organisations
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that commission and provide nhs services in england. good afternoon. we are focusing very much today on staff shortages in the nhs. from your experience and knowledge, how bad is it? it is re knowledge, how bad is it? it is pretty bad _ knowledge, how bad is it? it is pretty bad overall, _ knowledge, how bad is it? it 3 pretty bad overall, i think covid is basically doubling the normal absence rate you would expect. the problem with sickness absence is it is unpredictable and lumpy, that is to say if somebody in a team get as far as other people in that team can get it, hospitals and the whole health system is quite a complex interconnected system. if a group of people are unable to do their work, nhs managers and leaders have to redeploy resources to keep things on the road. it is an issue across the system, it varies in its intensity, and because it is unpredictable
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managers are having to make adjustments day by day. tier? adjustments day by day. very stressful. _ adjustments day by day. very stressful, when _ adjustments day by day. very stressful, when you - adjustments day by day. very stressful, when you say - adjustments day by day. very stressful, when you say staff absences broadly double what it would normally be, so what is that in percentage terms are proportions? we are told that 89% broadly across the country, it changes every day —— 8% or 9%. it is different in different parts of the country, it has followed slightly in london, seems to be quite bad in a northwest, northeast, the midlands. this is the thing about staff absence, like the virus it is moving around the country, therefore in terms of how we respond to it, places that are having the most difficulty, what we have to do is adapter that. difficulty, what we have to do is adapter that-— difficulty, what we have to do is adapter that. this is why we are seeinr adapter that. this is why we are seeing critical _ adapter that. this is why we are seeing critical incidents - adapter that. this is why we are l seeing critical incidents declared? yes, critical incident declaration is a way for nhs managers of that particular trust to signal to staff, maybe staff who are on leave or a rest day, if they can come into work
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because of the pressures they are under. also it may be that hospital is not able to provide a full range of services and, as many hospitals have had to do, temporarily cancelled nonurgent procedures. 50 the government is putting forward 2000 military personnel to help with this situation. how helpful that be? we have worked with them throughout this crisis and we volleyed a contribution. we need to protect perspective, there are thousands of people off work with sickness and the nhs we are talking about 200 military personnel in london, every little helps, over the next few weeks we are just going to have to pull out all the stops. we all hope, and when we hear today that the infection rate is flattened, it is not a particularly reliable statistic but nevertheless we all hope that over the next few weeks we will get out of this, but we just are going to have to do everything
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we can, and ijust ask the public, if you are sick, the nhs is there for you, if you are sick, the nhs is there foryou, but if you are sick, the nhs is there for you, but be patient, recognise that the pressure is there, nhs staff have been battling this for two years, it might mean appointments and operations have to be cancelled, that is done is a very last resort, and please understand that it's only happening because of the very particular pressures we are under. it the very particular pressures we are under. , , , . the very particular pressures we are under. , , m ,, under. it is very difficult, because we have seen _ under. it is very difficult, because we have seen people _ under. it is very difficult, because we have seen people who - under. it is very difficult, because we have seen people who have i under. it is very difficult, because i we have seen people who have been waiting two years, three years for procedures that may not be deemed urgent but to then they are urgent, a hip replacement for example. yes. a hip replacement for example. yes, many hospitals. _ a hip replacement for example. us: many hospitals, despite these pressures, are continuing to try to make inroads into that backlog. those people wrapping waiting a long time. during the crisis, we have innovated, created spaces, we have built facilities which separate out those people having operations from people who have covid in order to
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help with infection control, so i talk to a lot of nhs leaders who pride themselves on managing to continue this work despite the pressures they are under, but that is not the case everywhere. everyone in the health service wants to get through this wave of the virus in order that we can get our teeth into that to years of backlog, because it is notjust people waiting, often those people have health that is deteriorating, that's one of the reasons we see greater pressures on emergency departments. this reasons we see greater pressures on emergency departments. as anything else that can — emergency departments. as anything else that can be _ emergency departments. as anything else that can be done _ emergency departments. as anything else that can be done to _ emergency departments. as anything else that can be done to help - emergency departments. as anything else that can be done to help ease i else that can be done to help ease the pressure on the nhs right now? the military assistance helps, it is really important, and i think things are improving, but there are still gaps that any nhs and care worker that he is to get a test can get a test but if you do not want people of work, it could be back at work, we need to do everything we can to get people out of hospital who do not need to be there, temporary placements while we work out a longer term care package for them.
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all of these things are being done, the whole nhs is at work trying to make things we get through this crisis and focus on people most in need, and it does still matter how we the public behave, responsibly and try to avoid getting as far as passing it on, treating the nhs responsibly and show empathy to nhs staff who is not only dealing with this crisis but have been for two years. this crisis but have been for two ears. . ~' this crisis but have been for two ears. . ~ , ., northamptonshire has declared a major covid—19 incident with hospitals, care homes and other services facing critical staff shortages. let's get more from our correspondent in wellingborough, ben schofield. bring us up—to—date. bring us up-to-date. this decision was taken by _ bring us up-to-date. this decision was taken by northamptonshire'sl was taken by northamptonshire's local local resilience forum which includes the likes of the hospital
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trust and public health leaders but also emergency services, some of whom are based behind me. they say they are facing three pressures, first off the routine went to pressures that that the nhs sees every year, and then there is the prospect of more patients coming forward with covid needing hospital treatment, and then third on top of those, the increasing numbers of staff going off ill at having to isolate because they have come down with the virus themselves. this major incident we have been told will allow agencies to swap and share staff so that gaps in the rotors can be more easily filled and critical services can be kept going. we were told this afternoon a press briefing that could mean firefighters driving ambulances, more than they already have been. or firefighters doing home safety check so people can be discharged from hospital safely. the hospital has said that they are cancelling,
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suspending some routine elective surgeries, they will be put off so that those hospitals in kettering and northampton and the county can provide extra capacity, extra facilities should more patients need treatment for covid because of the omicron variant. some of the numbers, on the 27th of december there were 50 patients and northampton general hospital with covid, by the lith of january it had gone up to 91, we were told today that some 15% of the hospital trust's beds are occupied by people with covid and i guess that they have 900 staff, 9% of their total workforce of six. roughly half of those because of covid. the fire service are similarly affected, one in ten of their staff are off sick. the message to the public, we were told that was to remain cautious when it comes to your socialising, to book your vaccine if you have not
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done so, or indeed to get boosted as well. and we were told if any procedure is cancelled by the nhs, someone should be in touch to help with rebooking. the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, has confirmed there won't be any changes to the coronavirus rules in the welsh government's latest review. mr drakeford said "the storm of omicron" had arrived in wales as positivity rates hit "astronomically high" levels. he said now isn't the time to make changes with case rates increasing. i was last here just before christmas, and since then the public health situation in wales has changed dramatically. at that time the omicron variant was still an approaching storm, coming towards us on the horizon. today that storm is fully upon us. omicron is now the dominant form of the virus in wales, and cases are rising
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rapidly and every day. the outcome of this week's review means that we will be staying at alert level two. there are no new changes to introduce this week. over the past days we have made some changes to the testing regime and the self—isolation rules. because cases of coronavirus are so high in the community at the moment, we no longer need routinely to take a follow—up pcr test after a positive lateral flow test result. the president of kazakhstan has said order has been largely restored to the country after a violent crackdown on anti—government protests. president tokayev blamed what he called �*foreign—trained terrorists' for demonstrations which have been going on since sunday in the main city of almaty. the unrest was sparked by a big increase in the price of fuel. at least 26 people have been killed.
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rayhan demeytrie sent this report. the aftermath of riots in kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. businesses and government buildings gutted. security forces have permission to shoot to kill those the president of kazakhstan calls terrorists and bandits. translation: the militants have not laid their arms, _ they continue to commit crimes or are preparing for them. the fight against them must be pursued till the end. whoever does not surrender will be destroyed. what started as peaceful nationwide protests against the rising cost of fuel turned violent, the worst of it in almaty. translation: it's really frightening because we feel in danger _ and we are not protected by our state. this has shown the failure of the state in general.
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this is the russian military deployed to kazakhstan, part of a moscow—led military block requested by the kazakh president to end unrest in his country. but many in kazakhstan are concerned about russian troops on the ground and what role they will play. normal life has been disrupted. with internet blackouts, they cannot use their bank cards. cash is in short supply. protesters wanted real change, political and economic reforms. those demands, for now, have been drowned out by the gunfire. rayhan demeytrie, bbc news. our correspondent abdujalil abdurasulov is kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. some of the biggest clashes took place here at the former presidential residence and the mayor's office, the buildings were burnt out and you can see these cars were also set on fire.
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you can hear the shots, maybe it is the military and police officers firing into the air to warn people not to approach the square, because they closed the square in order to prevent people from gathering. it is still not clear who those people who clashed with police forces are. protesters say that their movement is peaceful, and it was the authorities who provoked violence. but many people now hope that the order can be restored very quickly. we have not seen any signs of protest taking place in almaty today but we cannot say it is quiet because we heard shooting and some explosions. earlier today when we drove past we saw some dead bodies inside cars. maybe these people tried to storm in and drive through the police cordon during clashes or maybe they were simply caught up during the stand—off.
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benjamin mendy has been granted bail ahead of his trial for sexual assault. the french international will have to live at his home address, surrender his passport and not have contact with any of the people he is accused of attacking. mr mendy has been charged with seven counts of rape and one of sexual assault relating to five women. the attorney general says she is "carefully considering" whether to refer the edward colston statue case to the court of appeal. four people were cleared of the charge of criminal damage at bristol crown court this week. the case followed protest lastjune during which a statue of the 17th century slave trader was pulled down and thrown into the water and bristol harbour. the deputy leader of the labour party, angela rayner, has written to the prime minister's standards adviser, lord geidt, about the findings of his investigation on the downing street refurbishment. messages between borisjohnson and lord brownlow, who helped pay for the renovation, were published yesterday. the messages appear to show the prime minister offering the deputy leader of
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the labour party, angela rayner, i have the deputy leader of the labour party, angela rayner, the messages appear to show the prime minister offering support for a great exhibition — plans for a cultural festival which were being backed by lord brownlow. ms rayner says lord geidt�*s failure to revise his conclusions in light of those messages �*raises a number of serious concerns and questions'. dave penman is the general secretary of the first division association, which is the union representing senior civil servants. it is interesting, there is a lot of speculation around whether once these messages were disclosed, with a he would have designed, what he has chosen to do is use this episode to potentially strengthen his powers, it is clear from the exchange of letters how angry he is about what happened, but also that he appears to be extracting from the prime minister concessions around the powers of the independent adviser in the future and he expects them to be brought forward in the next couple of months, and anyone in that position faces a choice as his predecessor did, you can resign or potentially exploit a situation to
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try and strengthen your independence. we will see, depending on what the outcome of that is, whether lord geidt has made a wise choice and for the longer—term created a stronger independent authority overseeing the ministerial code. it has been a wintry end to the week for some of we have seen snow and ice causing disruption in places, ice will continue to be a problem through the first half of tonight as temperatures drop, however the second half of the night will bring milder but wetter weather. wintry showers at the moment, clear skies, tempter is plunging. icy stretches and then the early hours of saturday will bring cloud and rain from the west, by the end of the night attemptjust in the west 8—10 c.
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milder started the weekend, cloudy and wet, tomorrow will see bands of heavy, potentially thundery rain putting south—eastwards, accompanied ljy putting south—eastwards, accompanied by squally wind, sunshine and showers following behind, some of those turning wintry again because the air will start to turn colder. 5-10 c the air will start to turn colder. 5—10 c around 3pm. sunday still bringing showers, more in the way of dry weather, highs between six and 10 celsius. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: hollywood star sir sidney poitier has died aged 94. he was the first black man to win a best actor oscar and was a respected humanitarian. staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england have risen by 40% in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe.
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nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. given the pressures that hospitals are facing around the country, especially workforce pressures with their workforces, like other workforces, if they're infected needing to self isolate. this is understandable but it is all part of trying to work together and providing the nhs with every support it needs. novak djokovic has thanked fans for their support — and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive — after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements. addressing the nation. kazakhstan's president says he's given the order to fire without warning — and thanks president putin for sending russian troops. protesters have now left the streets. the labour party's deputy leader angela rayner has written to the prime minister's standards adviser, lord geidt,
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about the inquiry of the downing street flat refurbishment. two former prime ministers back calls for a so—called hillsborough law to ensure fairer treatment for bereaved families. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. jonny bairstow�*s given some respectability to england's batting after he scored their first century of this ashes series. it looked like england were hurtling to defeat at one point on day 3 in sydney. they's slumped to 36 for 1l but a crucial partnership between bairstow and ben stokes, who made 66 himself, steadied the ship for england and kept them alive in this lith test. they'll resume tonight on 258—7 — australia still in control, with a lead of 158 runs. i am absolutely over the moon, to be honest with you, it is the hardest one so far
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i think. as you say, with the circumstances. butjust put the graft in and obviously that partnership with ben was a big one and yeah, it was tough out there and i am really delighted with it. i thought our first two hours similar— i thought our first two hours similar to _ i thought our first two hours similar to what i was seeing for a lot of— similar to what i was seeing for a lot of this — similar to what i was seeing for a lot of this whole test series was relentless bullying from australian cricket _ relentless bullying from australian cricket i_ relentless bullying from australian cricket. i think we had relentless bullying from australian cricket. ithink we had nine maidens -- relentless — cricket. ithink we had nine maidens —— relentless bowling. then we had an incredible fightback. jonny bairstow a magnificent test 100. he .ot a bairstow a magnificent test 100. he got a rough knock on his thumb so a courageous— got a rough knock on his thumb so a
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courageous effort. a second tennis player has had their visa cancelled by australian authorities. renata voracuva joins novak djokovic in being denied entry into the country, because of their vaccination status — with the visas of other players being investigated too. djokovic fans have been protesting outside the hotel they're confined to in melbourne — where they'd been hoping to play in the australian open later this month. djokovic's appeal against the decision won't be heard until monday. and this afternoon djokovic has posted a message on social media... a former winner says he has sympathy with the world number one. it's difficult to constructively say something objectively whether the australian government should have or should have not decided this earlier or not. that's on their own decision. but looking at the situation, it's definitely incredible that this
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happened the way it did, especially to novak, that he got here, that this is still going on. definitely feeling very sorry for him. hope that this is going to be resolved very soon. phillippe coutinho is back in the premier legaue. the brazilian midfielder�*s joined aston villa from barcelona, on loan until the end of the season, and there's an option to buy too. coutinhojoined barca in a £142 million move from liverpool in 2018. but he struggled to make the same impact in spain. however, he's reuniting with villa boss steven gerrard, who was his captain at liverpool. and somebody else back in the premier league is keiran trippier, who's now been confirmed as newcastle's first signing since their new owners took over. the england full—back has joined from atletico madrid. he's played for boss eddie howe before at burnley and joins for £12 million. but newcastle fans will be hoping he's the first of many to come and can help the club battle against relegation
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from the premier league. he's a player i know really well from our time early together. i know he will bring a huge amount on and off the pitch, his leadership quality, winning mentality, he is driven to succeed and i think all his experiences he has accumulated in the game will help us in our current position. on the pitch i think he is an outstanding technical player who will attack very well and bring a level of calm to our play on the ball, and he is a top defender as well. we are delighted with the signing. that's all the sport for now. i will have more for you later. breaking news, labour and pjack
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dromey has died. the husband of harriet harman. he has served as acting leader of the party twice. our political correspondent can tell us more about what we know. this news has come — us more about what we know. this news has come to _ us more about what we know. this news has come to us _ us more about what we know. tn 3 news has come to usjust in the last news has come to us just in the last few moments via a statement released from jack dromey�*s family. it said that jack from jack dromey�*s family. it said thatjack dromey np died suddenly this morning aged 73 and his flat in burningham. he had been a dedicated member of parliament for birmingham adding that he was a much loved husband, father and grandfather, and he will be greatly missed. he was perhaps not a household name but certainly a significant figure in politics particularly in labour politics. he has been an mp since
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2010 when ed miliband was labour of the leader party and held various ministerial roles in the years between then and now. he didn't supportjeremy corbyn for the leader of the labour party but he continued to hold significant positions within the party and more recently has served as a shadow immigration minister under sir keir starmer�*s readership and he has been active in parliament up untiljust yesterday when he spoke in a debate on the afghan citizens resettlement scheme. he was in birmingham to hear circular star mark make his new year leadership speech —— hear sir keir starmer. active up until yesterday and this news has come very suddenly and this news has come very suddenly and we do not know any more circumstances as yet about his death, but he will be somebody who will be much missed, particularly by those in the labour party at
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westminster and beyond. as you mentioned in the introduction he was married to harriet harman the long serving labour mp and former deputy leader. they met in the 19705. both cleanly active and heavily involved in the trade unionist movement and jack dromey played a significant role in that and he was also party official. he settled i think is a bit more of a central striker after being elected and later in life, but he will be much missed and i am sure along with attributed to him we will see in the coming hours there will be a good deal of sympathy expressed towards harriet harman for her loss as well. some reaction is coming and including from harriet harman and jack dromey�*s son.
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clearly the family and i am sure many in westminster in a state of shock at this very sad news. jonathan blake, thank you very much indeed, our correspondent in westminster. more now on the news that the pioneering actor and activist sidney poitier — the first black male performer to win an oscar — has died at the age of 94. let's speak to the film criticjason solomons. the word for sidney poitier is pioneering. the word for sidney poitier is pioneering-— the word for sidney poitier is -~ioneerin. ., . . pioneering. pioneering and human bein: , pioneering. pioneering and human beina, if pioneering. pioneering and human being. if you _ pioneering. pioneering and human being, if you look _ pioneering. pioneering and human being, if you look back— pioneering. pioneering and human being, if you look back to - pioneering. pioneering and human being, if you look back to when i pioneering. pioneering and human being, if you look back to when he won his honorary oscar, i think what he brought to the screen was a dignified persona. he was the only black actor getting any part throughout the 505 and 605 in hollywood and it was crucial he played this role and brought the black persona onto the screen in a
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certain way so he was a pioneer in that respect but it was also the way we did that is why we are talking about him now. he brought dignity to the screen, sold race relations on the screen, sold race relations on the screen, sold race relations on the screen, on screen with tony curtis and rod steiger and spencer tracy and katharine hepburn, representative of an entire race of people on screen for such a long time, which is why he is a pioneer and legend of cinema. what time, which is why he is a pioneer and legend of cinema.— time, which is why he is a pioneer and legend of cinema. what sort of difficulties that _ and legend of cinema. what sort of difficulties that he _ and legend of cinema. what sort of difficulties that he face? _ and legend of cinema. what sort of difficulties that he face? did - and legend of cinema. what sort of difficulties that he face? did he - difficulties that he face? did he talk about them? he difficulties that he face? did he talk about them?— difficulties that he face? did he talk about them? he did. he had trouble representing _ talk about them? he did. he had trouble representing in _ talk about them? he did. he had trouble representing in such - talk about them? he did. he had trouble representing in such a i talk about them? he did. he had i trouble representing in such a way. he was given such a lot of roles that had to be dignified and controlled that he felt it was nice representative and he wanted to bring more complexity to his rule is that he had to shoulder the burden. he realised how important a role it was to be on broadway, in a play that changed black american literature forever. he realised the
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importance of what he could do, the symbolising of an entire change and shift in representation, a change in the way that his people were seen was actually crucial to high heaven and the profession went, so every single actor that has followed him, denzil washington said he followed in his footsteps. we all do. he was an extraordinary performer and person. an extraordinary performer and erson. ., , an extraordinary performer and erson. ., , ., ., person. hollywood has changed in all recoanition person. hollywood has changed in all recognition since _ person. hollywood has changed in all recognition since but _ person. hollywood has changed in all recognition since but still _ person. hollywood has changed in all recognition since but still we - person. hollywood has changed in all recognition since but still we have i recognition since but still we have years where the level of diversity is very low. it years where the level of diversity is very low-— years where the level of diversity is ve low. , .., . , . is very low. it is extraordinary. we have oscar— is very low. it is extraordinary. we have oscar so _ is very low. it is extraordinary. we have oscar so white _ is very low. it is extraordinary. we have oscar so white hashtags. - is very low. it is extraordinary. we have oscar so white hashtags. we| is very low. it is extraordinary. we - have oscar so white hashtags. we are shocked when there is not enough black representation at the highest level and this is something sidney poitier thought would change when he did in the heat of the night in 1967. he thought it would change when he did guess who is coming to dinner. things haven't changed but what has been crucial is that sidney
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poitier�*s role is recognised and taken on. if you look at the oscar winnerfor taken on. if you look at the oscar winner for greenburg taken on. if you look at the oscar winnerfor greenburg and taken on. if you look at the oscar winner for greenburg and may taken on. if you look at the oscar winnerfor greenburg and may be nominated again this year, his entire bidding on screen channelled sidney poitier. there is not a black performer who does not owe sidney poitier some debt. the fact they are allowed to be on screen is so much to do with sidney poitier. the problem is that there seems to be some sort of feeling that even sidney poitier�*s work could not break and still a lot of black actors cannot break that ceiling. it is an extraordinary handicap to hollywood. is an extraordinary handicap to hollywood-— is an extraordinary handicap to holl ood. ., , hollywood. there was, of course, as well as him — hollywood. there was, of course, as well as him being _ hollywood. there was, of course, as well as him being a _ hollywood. there was, of course, as well as him being a pioneer, - hollywood. there was, of course, as well as him being a pioneer, there i well as him being a pioneer, there was the very fact of his own distinctiveness, the dignity as you say, and the voice, which was unmistakable.— say, and the voice, which was unmistakable. ~ ., ., . ~ . unmistakable. wonderfulvoice. much to do with his — unmistakable. wonderfulvoice. much to do with his behaviour _ unmistakable. wonderfulvoice. much to do with his behaviour and - to do with his behaviour and upbringing and he had this very strong bahamas accent when he first arrived in new york and he had to
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get rid of it and he struggled to get rid of it and he struggled to get rid of it. he tried to get rid of it and because he was a black actor people said you can sing and dance but he couldn't so he trained himself and he trained his voice. that extraordinary dignity was worked on. all the actors will tell you you have to work and the performance and the look if you like but that look that sidney poitier had looked as in the eye and challenged as. the film with tony curtis, the defiant ones, he was defiant, dignified, anger burned with then hand, in charge of the classroom and the british film he made that i am sure many people fell in love with, and i think that was a very important thing as well. he was a sex symbol and that was almost forbidden. guess who is coming to dinner was the first depiction of an interracial romance on screen and it
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was almost a centre fall in love with sidney poitier. eatable? exactly. it would have been frowned upon. after two sir with love i think every british girl fell in love with sidney poitier. horse think every british girl fell in love with sidney poitier. how things have changed _ love with sidney poitier. how things have changed for _ love with sidney poitier. how things have changed for the _ love with sidney poitier. how things have changed for the better. - love with sidney poitier. how things have changed for the better. thank| have changed for the better. thank you so much, jason solomons. the headlines on bbc news: hollywood star sir sidney poitier has died aged 94. he was the first black man to be awarded best actor at the academy awards in 1964. staff absences caused by coronavirus at nhs hospitals across england have risen by 40% in a week. nursing unions say covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe. novak djokovic has thanked fans for their support — and remains in this hotel. the australian government rejects claims the grand slam champion is being held captive — after failing to meet vaccine entry requirements.
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the former prime miniser theresa may hasjoined renewed calls for a hillsborough law to "break the cycle" of injustice for bereaved families. relatives of those who died at hillsborough have been taking part in an online event to call for changes to the justice system to prevent others going through what they experienced. 97 men, women and children died in the disaster in the fa cup semifinal between liverpool and nottingham forest, in sheffield in 1989. margaret aspinall, whose son james was among the victims, said new legislation will help others get the justice they deserve. these families deserve justice. the hillsborough law will not do any good for the hillsborough families but we are here today for us all united to change things because those 97 victims who died at hillsborough deserve the respect
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and a hillsborough law in honour of their name and if that does any good for the likes of other people going forward that is all that matters. they have not died in vain. theresa may says legislation needs to be changed, so that people affected by disasters are treated more fairly by the justice system. what happened at hillsborough, the death of 97 liverpool fans failed by the state, was tragedy enough for their families, but what followed was injustice heaped on injustice, years of beating their heads against a brick wall of government and the legal and judicial system, which added untold pain and suffering. i have been struck in the case of hillsborough but in other cases at the way in which the state in its various forms acts to defend itself from blame. the very bodies we expect to protect and support the public seek instead
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to protect themselves. what matters now is that the government responds to the report and then acts, putting the interests of bereaved families first rather than the reputation of government departments. if we can change the system so that others do not have to suffer in the way that the hillsborough families did then it will be a valuable legacy for the 97. some older pupils in england are refusing to take lateral flow tests and wear face coverings in classrooms as they head back to school — according to both parents and children. charities say they are worried about the effects on vulnerable students of this advice being ignored. however, other parents say masks impact on their children's learning. earlier i spoke to mark tilling who is the headteacher of high tunstall school in hartlepool, and he said pupils at his school were quite happy to wear masks in classrooms. it has not been an issue at all. our young people are very compliant.
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we have had young people wearing masks really all the way through the pandemic when we have been opened, so since october we had them back on in corridors and communal areas and this week asked them to put them back on in classrooms and they have been very compliant. young people always have to be reminded, but certainly it doesn't seem to be an issue for us. have you heard it is an issue for neighbouring schools? i have heard there have been issues across the country and i think it is about how you work with families and educating young people making sure they understand the reasons why wearing a mask is important and working together. our young people are desperate to be in school and do not want to be at home, they want to be here being educated. they are working with us to keep the school open. what has the impact been on the staff?
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because lots of workforces are reporting people going off with covid. has that been an issue in school? yeah, it has been very challenging this week. 157 staff and about 30 were off this week. it is challenging us because we have all the young people in, 1100, we are educating them but the staff are supporting each other, covering for each other, spending as much time as they can, working together and making sure we work and educate the children as best we can. it is tough but what we have to do is sustain this over the next few weeks. about 25% of your staff? yes. not all of that is covid. some of it is covid. we have bereavements and things like that. 20% of the staff off and people are working together, part—time staff coming in full time, staff have given up break times.
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just working together as a team to make sure our children get educated the best we can. term has onlyjust started so you might have to cope with this for a few weeks. yes, it is going to be a long term. we have tested all the children this week so the testing centre has been open and our young people have been down and tested and we have caught about 20 young people before they have come into school positive. the young people and the staff are working together. there is a great atmosphere. kids are pleased to be here. it is going to be a tough term. sir keir starmer has paid tribute to jack dromer. he said he loved his commitment to social justice jack dromer. he said he loved his commitment to socialjustice every day and he went on the proud son of
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irish parents he dedicated his life to standing up for the trade union movement. he was recognised for his determination to stand up for his constituents, a highly respected and warmly regarded person across parliament, and that his thoughts and those of the whole labour movement are with harriet, that is harriet harman mp, their children, and all those who knew and loved jack. a stolen dog has been reunited with her owners, eight years after she taken from the garden. sussex police were able to return cassie the cocker spaniel following a series of raids last year. police footage of the first moment cassie's owners saw her again has been released. and cassie wasn't alone — she was accompanied by three puppies that are believed to be hers. let's take a look, how are you doing?
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oh, i said, who's going to be first, me or these guys? ok, so i think i know she's probably not the cassie that you remember when she was teeny tiny. it is to boys and a little girl. let me get this on camera. joining me now from merstham in surrey is cassie's owner, stuart wylie. good afternoon. i willjust get you to get your headphones on. i think
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we are having a little trouble with the headphones. we will give you a second and let me know when you can hear me. hello. ihi. second and let me know when you can hear me. hello. hi. we hadjust second and let me know when you can hear me. hello. hi. we had just seen hear me. hello. h . we had just seen some lovely footage of cassie
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