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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 7, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: # sweet [and of liberty...# us politicians hold a vigil on the steps of the capitol building, to mark one year since the attack, asjoe biden blames donald trump for the riot. the former president of the united states of america has created and spread a web of lies about the 2020 election. russian soldiers arrive in kazakhstan to help crush anti—government protests — reports say security forces have taken control of central almaty. the clashes are taking place just a few hundred metres away from where i am standing now.
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you can hear the sound of shooting and explosions. the family of novak djokovic launch a scathing attack on australia, as the tennis player is held in quarantine, fighting deportation from the country. # kiss is still a kiss... #. and the award—winning american film—maker, peter bogdanovich, has died at the age of 82. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. a candlelit vigil on the steps of the capitol building has marked the end of a day of remembering the first anniversary of the invasion of the us capitol. # lord bless america,
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land that i love, # stand beside her and guide her through the night # with a light from above...# members of congress, including house speaker nancy pelosi and senate majority leader chuck schumer, paid tribute to police officers and officials who had defended the us capitol. they held candles and observed a moment of silence as a band played patriotic music at the steps of the capitol building. earlier president biden says the rioters held a dagger to the throat of american democracy and accused them of acting after donald trump spun a web of lies. our north america correspondent aleem maqbool has the story. you'll never take back our country with weakness, you have to show strength. chant: stop the steal! these still staggering scenes were a last—ditch attempt to overturn the election loss of donald trump. chant: fight for trump! his supporters marched the short distance from a rally he'd been holding, to the capitol building, where congress was in session
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to confirm joe biden�*s win. a protester was shot dead at the doors of the speaker's lobby, and the attack went on for hours. four others died, including a police officer. nearly 140 of his security colleagues were injured. a year on, inside the very building that was attacked, a minute's silence was held in remembrance. reporter: mr president, how are you feeling - about the day, sir? joe biden delivered an impassioned speech to mark a day when he said a dagger had been held at the throat of democracy because of lies about the election spread by donald trump. because he sees his own interests as more important than his country's interests, than america's interests, and because his bruised ego matters more to him than our democracy or our constitution. he can't accept he lost. in the weeks that followed
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the storming of the capitol, hundreds of people were rounded up and charged for their involvement. it's banana republic stuff when political prisoners are arrested and denied due process. fast forward, and some republicans now refer to those arrested as political prisoners. joe kent's running for congress this year on a platform that the election was stolen. he's been endorsed by donald trump, in a battle against the party establishment. make no mistake, there is a civil war going on right now in the republican party for the direction of the republican party. i guess i believe the america first, the president trump movement, that we have the vast majority of the country and of the republican party. you don't think that some people would have looked to the events of january the 6th and thought, "actually, i don't want to be a part of that?" i think initially, there was a lot of people that did, and i think a lot of those folks now regret that. the mob was fed lies. they were provoked by the president and other powerful people. and in the days after
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the storming of the capitol, senior republicans condemned the attack, but when it came to action, the vast majority of republicans voted not to impeach and convict donald trump for incitement. he is not guilty as charged, the article of impeachment. for all the condemnation he's received in the last year over his involvement in those violent events, donald trump still enjoys the support of millions of americans, and in his party, it is those voices that continue to drown out the criticism. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in washington. let's get more from our washington correspondent nomia iqbal. what has it been like there today? what has it been like there toda ? , ., ., ., , today? here in dc, the mood has been really _ today? here in dc, the mood has been really sombre, _ today? here in dc, the mood has been really sombre, it _ today? here in dc, the mood has been really sombre, it has - today? here in dc, the mood has been really sombre, it has been. been really sombre, it has been reflective. of course, this is of the city where that attack happened. we saw lawmakers
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remembering that moment. everyone has had the conversation, where were you when the capitol riots happen. they talk about how they feared for their lives that day. i was here following the capital ride and speak to people and many were angry. —— capitol riot. and how it turned into a fortunate after that, especially in the lead up to the inauguration ofjoe biden, you had military fencing, soldiers and troops on the ground. you would think a crisis would pull the nation together but it has actually divided people. while here in dc there have been vigils and people reflecting, in other parts of the usa when you start talking about january the six and about the riots, people go down to the rabbit hole of conspiracy theory and back in
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the unsubstantiated claims of election fraud and say things like the f vi was behind january the sixth. —— that was the democratic party was behind them, they call people arrested political prisoners. while the media is some but there are many different opinions. what has been the _ many different opinions. what has been the response - many different opinions. what has been the response of- many different opinions. what has been the response of donald trump? he has been the response of donald trum - ? w ., has been the response of donald trum? .. ., trump? he reacted to joe biden's is _ trump? he reacted to joe biden's is forceful - trump? he reacted to joe biden's is forceful speech | trump? he reacted to joe - biden's is forceful speech when biden�*s is forceful speech when it comes to donald trump and donald trump hit out at president biden saying he was trying to distract from his own failures. it was interesting in that speech joe biden failures. it was interesting in that speechjoe biden gave, he does not really mention donald trump and he has made a point of not doing so throughout his presidency. he does not mention his name. he still did not mention donald trump by his name terms of that support for
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donald trump, it is still very much there if you believe some of the poles. 60% of republicans it shows still believe the election was rigged and back donald trump, thatjoe biden is the illegitimate president. it was interesting thatjoe biden mentioned he won the election fairly. if you look at this day of commemorating those who died in the riots and the police who helped as well and paying tribute to the capitol police force, there were really only two republicans in the house for the minutes of silence. only two and that gives a real sense of where the republican party is at at the moment. they still find donald trump incredibly invaluable because we have elections coming up and they want and need his support. we will be coming back to washington later in the programme but thank you.
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let's get some of the day's other news: thousands of people have taken to the streets in the sudanese capital, khartoum, to protest against military rule. security services have fired teargas at demonstrators near the presidential palace. it's the first organised protest since the resignation of the prime minister on sunday. doctors aligned with the protest movement say three people were shot dead in demonstrations in several cities. britain's ministry of defence has confirmed that a russian submarine collided with the sonar trailed by a royal navy warship while it was on patrol in the north atlantic. the incident occurred in the winter of 2020 and has only come to light now because a tv crew captured the moment the collision happened. a study has found that the number of adults suffering from dementia worldwide could nearly triple by the middle of the century. the research, published in the british medicaljournal, the lancet, says older and growing populations are the main drivers behind the increase. but higher rates of obesity, smoking and diabetes are also majorfactors.
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russian forces have arrived in kazakhstan following an appeal for help from the country's president. there's a total internet and mobile phone blackout in the country, which has been rocked by violent clashes and protests. they started when fuel prices went up sharply but have widened to include other political grievances. the government has restored a price cap on some fuels but the situation is still tense. from kazakhstan�*s largest city almaty our correspondent abdujilal abdurasulov sent this report. this is the aftermath of the mass unrest — violent clashes between riot police and protesters turned what used to be almaty�*s bustling square into a war zone. sparked by a hike of fuel prices, the roots of the protest movement go deep into the corrupt authoritarian system.
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and the turmoil continues. the armyjoined riot police to disperse the crowd. the number of casualties is rising. at night, the standoff grows particularly violent. stun grenades, rubber bullets and reportedly live rounds have been used to crack down on the protest. the clashes are taking place just a few hundred metres away from where i'm standing now. you can hear the sound of shooting and explosions, and judging by that sound, a real battle is going on the main square of almaty. we saw several armoured personnel carriers moving towards the square, where a small group of protesters had gathered. in response to the violence, the kazakh authoritites have appealed to russia—led regional security organisation, csto, to send troops to restore order. according to kazakhstan�*s president, the country is facing an external aggression. translation: given that
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these terrorist gangs - are international and have received extensive training abroad, their attack on kazakhstan can and should be considered an act of aggression. protesters claim that their movement was peaceful and blamed the authorities for provoking the violence. translation: when the president said i he's at war with thugs, he called us thugs, terrorists. we're neither thugs nor terrorists — we participate in rallies. when he said that, i was deeply disappointed. the events in kazakhstan are now quickly turning into a geopolitical crisis, as russia has sent its peacekeeping forces. these can help to stop the violence, but the public discontent that fueled the protests is likely to remain. abdujalil abdurasulov, bbc news, almaty. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the us film director known for the last picture show and paper moon has
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died aged 82. the japanese people are in mourning following the death of emperor hirohito. thousands converged on the imperial palace to pay their respects when it was announced he was dead. good grief. after half a century of delighting fans around the world, charlie brown and the rest of the gang are calling it quits. the singer paul simon starts his tour of- south africa tomorrow in spite of protests and violence - from some black activist groups. i they say international artists should continue to boycott south africa _ until majority rule is established. . around the world, people have been paying tribute to the iconic rock star david bowie, who sold 140 million albums in a career that spanned half a century. his family announced overnight that he died of cancer at the age of 69. the world's tallest skyscraper opens later today. the burj dubai has easily
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overtaken its nearest rivals. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: us members of congress have held a vigil on the steps of the capitol building, to mark one year since the attack, asjoe biden blames donald trump for the riot. russian soldiers have arrived in kazakhstan to help crush anti—government protests, reports say security forces have taken control of central almaty. returning to our top story, the insurrection onjanuary 6th has incited fear for a host of reasons. for many, it has rasied grave concerns about the health of american democracy, but for those elected officials barricaded inside the congressional chamber there was also a very immediate fear for their personal safety.
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this was the scene in those uncertain moments. shouting. that was recorded by peter welch, democratic representative for vermont. thank you very much for coming on the programme and thank you very much for coming on the programme and talking thank you very much for coming on the programme and talking to us. what is it like seeing that footage again? it’s us. what is it like seeing that footage again?— footage again? it's pretty alarming. _ footage again? it's pretty alarming, the _ footage again? it's pretty alarming, the day - footage again? it's pretty alarming, the day was . footage again? it's prettyl alarming, the day wasjust alarming, the day was just terrible. we were in a place where we thought, it was impossible to think you weren't safe and then suddenly there was an announcement that the building had been invaded, tear gas canisters had been fired. we saw the leadership in quickly escorted outside of the chamber. we heard the shot that was fired. we started hearing banging on the barricaded doors
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with the security people with their guns out and people breaking glass and breaking in, so it was pretty terrifying for everyone concerned but also astonishing, because we are in the capitol of the united states and even as this was happening and even as they heard the gunshot, i didn't believe that this was happening, because this was the united states capitol.— united states capitol. given that had given _ united states capitol. given that had given the - united states capitol. given that had given the vivid - that had given the vivid memories and all those questions raised at the time, what do you make of where the us is now one year on? it’s what do you make of where the us is now one year on?- us is now one year on? it's a “um us is now one year on? it's a jump on — us is now one year on? it's a jump on of— us is now one year on? it's a jump on of the _ us is now one year on? it's a jump on of the future - us is now one year on? it's a jump on of the future of- us is now one year on? it's a | jump on of the future of what the reality is of our democracy. this isn't the one year anniversary, democracy. this isn't the one yearanniversary, it's democracy. this isn't the one year anniversary, it's one year after and the reality is that on that date, violence is used, it was promoted very aggressively by president trump and i really appreciate president biden�*s outspokenness today, and it failed stopping the violence failed. but we
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were reconvening at 330 in the morning to finally certify president biden�*s election, the decision of the american people and 147 of my colleague voted against that. it's the first time in our history where violence was used as a political tactic in an effort to stop the peaceful transfer of power. and since then, what you are seeing is instead of maths repudiation of the islands, there is a view that this is ok, and as a whitewash and state capitals around the country, and state capitals around the country. ...— and state capitals around the country, just so you know, we have — country, just so you know, we have lost _ country, just so you know, we have lost your _ country, just so you know, we have lost your picture, - country, just so you know, we have lost your picture, but we have lost your picture, but we are watching julie alternative pictures, you are back now, thankfully. i wanted to say, you praised joe biden for coming out and pointing the finger today at donald trump, but the opposite of that is, i've remembered joe biden talking after the election
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about trying to bring the us as about trying to bring the us as a country together. it is difficult to see any metric in which he has actually been able to do that. it’s which he has actually been able to do that-— to do that. it's true but you can't solve _ to do that. it's true but you can't solve problems - to do that. it's true but you can't solve problems by - to do that. it's true but you - can't solve problems by denying problems stopping it sort of like how trump thought he was going to solve climate change by denying cyan, but what president biden did as he said essentially what we all know, there was an assault on democracy and a move towards authoritarianism. and that doesn't mean, that is not going to solve it, obviously, but it... , to solve it, obviously, but it... many republicans view it as a riot that _ it... many republicans view it as a riot that got _ it... many republicans view it as a riot that got out - it... many republicans view it as a riot that got out of - it... many republicans view it as a riot that got out of hand. j as a riot that got out of hand. laughter 147 of my colleague voted against certifying the election of a person that had been elected by the american people. it was the first time and our history that you had that many politicians are saying we, the
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politicians are saying we, the politicians should decide, not the american people. so they get upset about us naming that in calling them out for that, that's their problem, but we had to do everything we can to shore up democracy and make sure that it's the voters at the end of the day who decide who their leaders are.- who their leaders are. thank ou who their leaders are. thank you very _ who their leaders are. thank you very much _ who their leaders are. thank you very much indeed - who their leaders are. thank you very much indeed for - who their leaders are. thank - you very much indeed for coming on the programme, we appreciate your time. the men's tennis world number one novak djokovic has spent the night effectively under detention in a hotel in melbourne, after his visa was revoked in a row over covid precautions. his treatment has drawn criticism from the serbian government and his fans. here is his mum speaking. as a mother, here is his mum speaking. as a mother. what — here is his mum speaking. as a mother, what can _ here is his mum speaking. as a mother, what can i _ here is his mum speaking. as a mother, what can i say? - here is his mum speaking. as a mother, what can i say? i - here is his mum speaking. is —. mother, what can i say? i feel mother, what can i say? ifeel terrible. since yesterday, last 24 hours, they are keeping him as a prisoner. it'sjust 24 hours, they are keeping him as a prisoner. it's just not fair, it's not human. so i'd
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just hope that he will be strong, as we are trying also to be strong to give him some energy to keep on going. the award—winning american filmmaker, peter bogdanovich, has died at the age of 82. he started his career as a film producer and critic before directing the 1971 hit, the last picture show, which won two oscars. he went on to direct a string of successful movies, becoming a pillar of the new hollywood era of the 1970s. he later attracted new admirers as an actor playing a therapist in the tv series, the sopranos. i'm joined now by seth abramovitch, senior writer with the hollywood reporter, in los angeles. thanks very much for coming on the programme. mr; thanks very much for coming on the programme.— the programme. my pleasure. what do you _ the programme. my pleasure. what do you think _ the programme. my pleasure. what do you think he - the programme. my pleasure. what do you think he will - the programme. my pleasure. what do you think he will be l what do you think he will be remembered most for? just from eve one remembered most for? just from everyone i _ remembered most for? just from everyone i am — remembered most for? just from everyone i am talking _ remembered most for? just from everyone i am talking to - remembered most for? just from everyone i am talking to today, l everyone i am talking to today, his pure love of cinema. he was a walking encyclopaedia of
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cinema, and he was very happy to share that with as many people as possible, so he was a real treasure, there really is not a replacement for him, so it is a huge loss today for the world of cinema.— it is a huge loss today for the world of cinema. and i've had the pleasure _ world of cinema. and i've had the pleasure of— world of cinema. and i've had the pleasure of listening - world of cinema. and i've had the pleasure of listening to i the pleasure of listening to lots of interviews that he gave over the last few hours, and he comes across as certainly someone who enjoys telling a story, a funny person, what kind of man was he? very... he was smooth- — kind of man was he? very... he was smooth. he _ kind of man was he? very... he was smooth. he had _ kind of man was he? very... he was smooth. he had a - kind of man was he? very... he was smooth. he had a kind - kind of man was he? very... he was smooth. he had a kind of. was smooth. he had a kind of movie star quality to him but he loved sharing, like you said, all his experiences and he was a great to drop name. in one conversation with him you might hear, you know, some of the best filmmakers ever made, because he spent so much time with them, interviewing them at the beginning of his career and he learned so much from them, so it was a treat. if you ever had an audience with him, you
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were wrapped. had an audience with him, you were wrapped-— had an audience with him, you were wrapped. let's talk about the film his _ were wrapped. let's talk about the film his made, _ were wrapped. let's talk about the film his made, the - were wrapped. let's talk about the film his made, the last - the film his made, the last picture show specifically. what was his style, what did he bring to the screen?- was his style, what did he bring to the screen? this was a film that was _ bring to the screen? this was a film that was very _ bring to the screen? this was a film that was very out - bring to the screen? this was a film that was very out of - bring to the screen? this was a film that was very out of his - film that was very out of his wheelhouse. he came from new york and this was a film set in a dusty small town in texas, it was based on a larry mcmurphy novel but he told me on a podcast they did with him in 2020, he told me that three people on the same day recommended paperback to him and he thought it the title and then read it and he thought 0k, there is something here. and he had an amazing eye forecasting and also just a natural realist director who didn't push too hard. he wasn't into moments of melodrama, he wanted to capture moments that were much quieter than that. he also didn't use film scores, he liked to use songs, so that film had an
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original western soundtrack of real western songs, and ultimately he tapped into something universal with that film because it was declared an instant classic and to this day stands among, you know, one of the best american films ever made. �* ., , the best american films ever made. ~ . , ., , the best american films ever made. ~ ., .,, , the best american films ever made. , made. and as well as his legacy for his work. — made. and as well as his legacy for his work, as _ made. and as well as his legacy for his work, as you _ made. and as well as his legacy for his work, as you mentioned | for his work, as you mentioned earlier, he was a real expert in the craft and the art and the history. he knew everything about everything. that love for the cinema and i suppose, what hollywood has lost now is one of those beacons, one of those people that embodies hollywood at its best. yes people that embodies hollywood at its best. , ., people that embodies hollywood at its best. , . ., , at its best. yes and i was thinking _ at its best. yes and i was thinking about _ at its best. yes and i was thinking about it - at its best. yes and i was thinking about it today, l at its best. yes and i was i thinking about it today, we at its best. yes and i was - thinking about it today, we are at a real existential crossroads for cinema where people are wondering if it will continue to exist as we know it at all and you have a film like spider—man of course breaking through all of the covid restrictions to become a billion—dollar movie but
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everything else seems to be falling by the wayside and there was something particularly poignant about this loss today, i feel like a chapter has closed and we are entering a new age in cinema where it's not going to be the history that he cherished and tried to share with a new generation.— tried to share with a new generation. that is really interesting. _ generation. that is really interesting. and - generation. that is really interesting. and you - generation. that is really - interesting. and you mention your podcast sitting down with them, just talk to us about what that was like?- them, just talk to us about what that was like? well you know, i write _ what that was like? well you know, i write for _ what that was like? well you know, i write for the - what that was like? well you i know, i write for the hollywood reporter, it was a sort of a nostalgic podcast. i invited him to come in and he was so gracious and coming and he spent an extraordinary amount of time with us and telling us the most fantastic stories. orson welles, when he was down and out, lived in bogdanovich's belair estate and he told hilarious stories about orson welles burning down the curtains with his cigars and just being roommates with orson welles and there was a kind of a beautifulfull circle
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welles and there was a kind of a beautiful full circle nests because later he went bankrupt and quentin tarantino, huapai would is his heir apparent —— who i would say it is heir apparent in terms of his knowledge of cinema put him up in his guest house so that was great. i thought he would wear and ascot or some sort of scarf because he always had that tied around his neck and maybe people thought that was a bit highfalutin but he told me it was a western bandanna that he got on the set of the last picture show, and hejust started wearing it then and thatis started wearing it then and that is what he always wore, it was his uniform. he was incredible, as much personality as any of his stars.— as any of his stars. seth, thank you _ as any of his stars. seth, thank you so _ as any of his stars. seth, thank you so much - as any of his stars. seth, thank you so much for. as any of his stars. seth, - thank you so much for coming on and painting such a vivid picture of the man and his work. seth abramovich, thank you very much. that is at for this addition.
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you can get plenty more online of course. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones. i'm lewis vaughan jones i'm lewis vaughanjones and this is bbc news. goodbye. hello. well, it's going to be cold for another day or so, and after that, things will turn a little less cold, but there's a big low pressure out there in the atlantic. you can see the cold fronts sweeping across the uk. behind it, that speckled cloud, the shower clouds, some of them wintry, carried by a pretty cold current of air coming off the north atlantic. but i think come the weekend, this next low pressure — this is another one — will come our way and will also warm things up a little bit, but until then, still the risk of snow and ice through the early hours and into friday, mostly but not exclusively northern parts of the uk. so, here's the weather map, the forecast early friday. you can see wintry showers across the pennines, the highlands, parts of northern ireland, too. temperatures close to
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freezing early on friday, so icy patches possible. again, mostly across the northern half of the uk and the south, it's just a little bit too mild. on the whole, not a bad day for many of us across eastern areas of the uk. out towards the west, we'll have those showers and a good old breeze at least for the first half of the day. then in the southwest, we'll see a spell of rain sweeping through during the afternoon, so cardiff and plymouth, possibly portsmouth, will be wet for a time on friday before it dries out. here's the next low pressure. that's the one that's actually moving through right now, but this is the next one on friday. and here's the weather front, the cold front that moves through during the first half of saturday across the uk. rain and wind — a really unpleasant picture early in the day, but notice that it does tend to dry out at least somewhat second half of the day on saturday, although it could stay wet across eastern areas. you can see the temperatures back into double figures, so it's not going to be quite
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so cold, but the wind will make it feel pretty nippy. and then, sunday, actually we're in between weather systems — one out there in the north sea, this approaching. we're in between, so sunday isn't looking too bad at all. temperatures will be a little lower, between, say, 5—8 degrees for the most part, maybe a little bit milder in cornwall and devon. but on the whole, out of the two days, i think sunday is looking better. and thereafter, it really does turn just that little bit milder with temperatures perhaps reaching 13 degrees in some southern and southwestern areas. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: us members of congress have held a vigil on the steps of the capitol building, to mark one year since the attack, asjoe biden blames donald trump for the riot. president biden said the rioters held a dug into the throat of american democracy and accused them of acting after donald trump spread a web of lies. russian soldiers have arrived in kazakhstan to help crush a of anti—government protests which began over rising fuel prices. they were sent after an appealfrom rising fuel prices. they were sent after an appeal from help by kazakhstan's president. reports say security forces have taken control of central almaty. the men's tennis world number one, novak djokovic, remains under detention in a hotel in melbourne after his visa was revoked in a row whether covid precautions. his treatment has drawn criticism from the serbian government, as well as his family, who have called him the victim of a political witch—hunt.
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now on bbc news, it's time for take me to the opera,

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