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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 6, 2022 4:00pm-4:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm geeta guru—murthy. our top stories... on the anniversary of the attack on the us capitol, president biden has condemned has predecessor donald trump for threatening democracy. the former president of the united states of america has created and spread a web of lies about the 2020 election. he has done so because he values power over principle. i'm laura trevelyan on capitol hill — where president biden has warned americans there's a dagger at the throat of their democracy and the right to vote must be defended. a court hearing on whether novak djokovic is medically exempt from australia's covid entry requirements is adjourned until monday.
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former world number one rafael nadal responds. ifeel sorry for him, but at the same time, he knew the conditions since a lot of months ago. the uk prime minister borisjohnson has offered a "humble and sincere apology" over his failure to disclose key messages relating to the refurbishment of his downing street flat. this hello and welcome. the us presidentjoe biden has asked the people of his country to defend democracy from a future of political violence and election cheating, as he marked the anniversary of the january the 6th storming of capitol hill by donald trump's supporters. president biden called on americans
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to ensure their nation wouldn't be one that "lives in the shadow of lies" and "accepts political violence as a norm". mr biden said donald trump created a "web of lies" around the lost election, and carries "singular responsibility" for the attack. let's head straight to laura trevelyan who's on capitol hill. well, president biden speaking in the statuary hall of the us capitol, that somewhere were almost exactly one year ago rioters stormed the building, trying to prevent lawmakers from certifying the election victory ofjoe biden, believing somehow that the election had been improperly stolen from former president of donald trump. well, joe biden, who is under pressure from his own party to move forward on voting rights, to try to defend the right to vote against what democrats are claiming our republican efforts to limit it in
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key swing states. president biden was very clear and he blamed his predecessor, who he never likes to use his name, and he did note on this occasion, but he left no doubt about who he was blaming for the chaos of january six. we must be absolutely clear about what is true and what is a lie. and here's the truth — the former president of the united states of america has created and spread a web of lies about the 2020 election. he's done so because he values power over principle, because he sees his own interest as more important than his country's interest, than america's interest. and because his a bruised ego matters more to him that our democracy or our constitution. he can't accept that he lost, even though that's what 93 united states senators, his own attorney general, his own vice president,
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governors and state officials in every battleground state have all said. he lost. that's what 81 million of you did as you voted for a new way forward. he's done what no president in american history, the history of this country, has ever, ever done. he refused to accept the results of an election and the will of the american people. and the vice president, kamala harris, he was here in the us capitol one year ago, preparing to certify the election victory ofjoe biden when she was vice president—elect, she talked about what she believes the rioters were trying to achieve. what the extremists who roamed these halls targeted was not only the lives of elected leaders. what they sought to degrade and destroy was not only
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a building, hallowed as it is, what they were assaulting were the institutions, the values, the ideals that generations of americans have marched, picketed and shed blood to establish and defend. joining us now for more on what happened exactly a year ago as brian lanza. he is a former trump communications director. thank you so much for being with us. i know you are in regular contact with the former president's inner circle. you were very clear that you disavowed the violence of january six, so what does this day one year on mean to you? it does this day one year on mean to ou? , , , ~ you? it is still shocking. i live here in washington, - you? it is still shocking. i live here in washington, dc - you? it is still shocking. i live here in washington, dc still, |
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you? it is still shocking. i live i here in washington, dc still, dry you? it is still shocking. i live - here in washington, dc still, dry by the capitol quite often, you still have those images quite often of people climbing the walls, of the people climbing the walls, of the people marching down the street, this angry —looking mob. it is still shocking to think that it was only one year ago that happened. i think what is even more shocking is how the year of politics has completely changed. i remember being disillusioned, disgusted at the republican party, myself, for getting to this point. but now, one year later, you look at how this country has been run, you have almost forgotten what is taking place on january six. interesting oint. place on january six. interesting point- oddly _ place on january six. interesting point. oddly enough, _ place on january six. interesting point. oddly enough, i- place on january six. interesting point. oddly enough, ithink- place on january six. interesting - point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably _ point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably had _ point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably had the _ point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably had the best - point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably had the best tone i point. oddly enough, i think kamala harris probably had the best tone to i harris probably had the best tone to her remarks today, certainly much better than joe her remarks today, certainly much better thanjoe biden. i thinkjoe biden turned it into a purchase policy discussion, which just sort of further makes january six less of
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a landmark moment. we should have taken the politics out of it. can i 'ust ask taken the politics out of it. can i just ask you _ taken the politics out of it. can i just ask you what _ taken the politics out of it. can i just ask you what you _ taken the politics out of it. can i just ask you what you make - taken the politics out of it. can i just ask you what you make of. just ask you what you make of congressman matt gates, who is one of the real trump loyalists here in washington, who this morning, on steedman in�*s podcast, steve bannon who was formerly a counsellor to president trump, matt gate said we are ashamed of nothing, we are proud of the work we did onjanuary six. and he said we are going to work in the footsteps of the patriots later today. what do you make of that wing of the republican party, that is actually proud of what happened? they are seeking attention. if you want to have a serious discussion, there are plenty of people to have that with and you're going to get elevated and you're going to advance a particular cause. those guys came here without a cause, which leaves them defying any issue that gets them defying any issue that gets them on tv. i am not surprised that gates used that type of inflammatory
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language, i think yes recognise that that language allows him to be part of the news cycle, hence we are talking about it. i think that is part of the toxicity of our politics, but also our cable television that rewards those type of sensational comments and continues to be discussed and part of the narrative throughout the rest of the narrative throughout the rest of the narrative throughout the rest of the day. i am not surprised. from our standpoint, hopefully the media moves on from giving them attention. they are just moves on from giving them attention. they arejust going moves on from giving them attention. they are just going to be there for the next 20 years seeking the same attention. , , .., . attention. president trump cancelled attention. president trump cancelled a ress attention. president trump cancelled a press conference _ attention. president trump cancelled a press conference he _ attention. president trump cancelled a press conference he was _ attention. president trump cancelled a press conference he was going - attention. president trump cancelled a press conference he was going to i a press conference he was going to hold, former president trump, today. how do you explain the fact that when one year ago it looked like maybe his legacy was going to be january six, but now he seems to be more in control of the republican party perhaps than ever before? i have thought a lot about this one. the best that i can come up to answer as president clinton's
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campaign manager in 1982 was 100% correct, and i think it applies today. it is the economy stupid. what gives president trump the opportunity to occupy the space is the weakness of the american economy, where there is people looking at today, saying they were worse off than they were one year ago. that gives president trump supporters the oxygen they need to make their case and be listened to. if you had biden handled covid better and had less tests and spread than president trump, he would have had a stronger... his leadership would have looked stronger. but i think it is the economy, last year, his governance has created this opportunity for president trump to come back, and say in spite of january six, look how bad it is now. i tell people, you know, the question may be of the election in 2024, is it going to be insurrection
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versus inflation? if that is the choice, and it is the economy stupid, i think insurrection is going to win. stupid, i think insurrection is going to win-— stupid, i think insurrection is auoin towin. �* ., ., ., _, going to win. amazing. the analysis of where we — going to win. amazing. the analysis of where we stand _ going to win. amazing. the analysis of where we stand in _ going to win. amazing. the analysis of where we stand in american - of where we stand in american politics one year after the january six riots. for more on what happened and the investigation... i've been speaking to congressman pete aguilar who is a a member of the select committee to investigate the attack on the us capitol. i asked whether they are still considering criminal charges. that's not our sole task here and that's not the focus in front of us. it is on gathering as much evidence that we can find. and if there are things that other law enforcement agencies or organisations can use based on the documents that we gather, you know, we are comfortable with that. we are comfortable sharing that. and that is part of telling the full and complete story. but our purpose is to make sure that this never happens again, and if there are any legislative recommendations or suggestions that we need to make,
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then that is what our focus is going to be. and what is your recollection of that day? you were here at the us capitol when that mob tried to storm the building. i was here on the house floor as a member of democratic leadership, and i was maybe 15—20 feet away from the back door that ended up being broken. you know, my recollection was, and i keep a little notebook near me, and i didn't write a lot, but i did write that i was scared. so, at 2:34pm, people were being evacuated as readership —— so, at 2:34pm, people were being evacuated as leadership had been escorted out. you know, i knew something was wrong. at the time, i don't think all of us had the appreciation for how many people were outside of the capitol, but we knew that it wasn't right. the police in the building had told us some measures that we might need to take — using gas masks and evacuating — and so all of us kind of took a posture to reach out to our families, but to also be very protective and to get ready for anything. do you think it could happen again?
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you know, i think we are taking measures now to make the capitol more safe. i think that there can be more done to help the capitol police officers. but what i am worried about is fundamentally protecting democracy, and i think that is what is important to convey, is that we need to protect democracy, how fragile it is, and that a lot of things, you know, held up that day that might not have if some people would have made different decisions. does it trouble you when you say polls that suggest, some almost 40% of republicans think that little violence can be justified on occasion? —— political violence can be justified on occasion? and more than 20% of democrats agree with that, too. it's deeply troubling. and i think it kind of shows the divided nature of the country. but ourjob is to rise above that, it's to tell the facts of what happened that day, and hopefully instil some confidence in this democracy. so important to highlight
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the strength of our republic. we are not perfect, there are things we can do to strengthen this, but i think it is important to note that violence is never an answer. making your voice heard, writing letters and talking to your constituents, absolutely, but violence should never be exercised in the pursuit of this democracy experiment. congressman pete angular they are. he is on the special committee that is investigating that day. meanwhile, there are commemorations you're at the us capitol, but they are being led by the speaker of the house, nancy pelosi. it is important to note that republicans are not taking part in these official proceedings. top republicans are accusing democrats of using this anniversary of the attack to try to further divide an already extremely divided country. thank you very much for now.
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men's tennis world number 0ne novak djokovic is in a dramatic stand—off with authorities in australia — after having his visa revoked on arrival in melbourne for the first grand slam tournament of the year. djokovic, who has said publicly that he is opposed to vaccination, gained a medical exemption by tennis australia from having to be double jabbed against covid. but it was rejected by federal authorities on his arrival there, and he now faces deportation. djokovic is currently in a government detention hotel — he's launched an appeal and will have to wait till monday for the hearing. australia's deputy prime minister argues mr djokovic has no—one to blame but himself. he kind of denied himself. i mean, if he hasn't filled out the forms appropriately, then he is taking the sovereign capacity of another nation for a joke. that has seemed to be the determination of this and reading the facts. mr djokovic is entitled to the hundreds of millions of dollars he makes as a professional tennis player, and good luck to him and god bless him, but you cannotjust wander around the world thinking that because you are really rich, you are really above the laws of other nations. novak djokovic's mother spoke at a press conference, and argued the way her son
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is being treated is unfair. as a mother, what can i say? if you are a mother, you canjust imagine how can i feel. i feel terrible since yesterday, the last 24 hours. they are keeping him as a prisoner. it's just not fair, it's not human. ijust hope that he will be strong, as we are trying also to be strong, to give him some energy, to keep on going. i'm joined now by aleksander stoyanovic, a sports journalist based in serbia. thank you forjoining us. the australian deputy prime minister saying if he has broken the rules, not been honest about the forms, ultimately if you do not comply with the rules, you should not be let in and you have to be deported. that is fair, isn't it? and you have to be deported. that is fair. isn't it?— fair, isn't it? thank you for having me- yes. if _ fair, isn't it? thank you for having me. yes, if he didn't _ fair, isn't it? thank you for having me. yes, if he didn't follow the i me. yes, if he didn't follow the rules, my personalfeeling...
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so he was consistent from the beginning. he said, guys, ido so he was consistent from the beginning. he said, guys, i do not want to be vaccinated, can i enter the country but will they answer yes. he arrived at the border force and they say, listen, you did not fulfil your visa documents correctly. 0k, can we solve the problem or not? if we cannot solve the problem, please go home. if we can solve the problem, do not put one of the best athletes in history in detention overnight, with the prime minister and vice presidents and i do not know who else speaking to the media and sending some messages. ijust think it to the media and sending some messages. i just think it was unfair. if we follow the facts, it is like that.— is like that. why should he be treated any — is like that. why should he be treated any differently - is like that. why should he be treated any differently from i is like that. why should he be - treated any differently from anybody else who does not comply with the rules? in fact, else who does not comply with the rules? infact, does else who does not comply with the rules? in fact, does he not have a really big responsibility to make
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sure that every single rule, no matter how complicated, was followed? i matter how complicated, was followed? , matter how complicated, was followed?— matter how complicated, was followed? , , ., ., followed? i 'ust responded to that iuestion. followed? i 'ust responded to that question. if— followed? ijust responded to that question. if he _ followed? ijust responded to that question. if he follows _ followed? ijust responded to that question. if he follows the - followed? ijust responded to that question. if he follows the rules, | question. if he follows the rules, and i think that you did, he applied for the visa under the rules, he asked about, and they told him you can enter under some rules. if you know 23 players, if i am correct, work exempt because of that. 0nly he had a problem at the border. so it has to be something about documents and not about the facts, right? what and not about the facts, right? what is the general _ and not about the facts, right? what is the general response to this news in serbia? i is the general response to this news in serbia? ~ ., , ., .., in serbia? i think that you can assume that _ in serbia? i think that you can assume that people _ in serbia? i think that you can assume that people are - in serbia? i think that you can | assume that people are angry, in serbia? i think that you can - assume that people are angry, people feel that it is something personal, because it is novak djokovic. there are even some people in front of the national assembly, gathering and
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sending support to him because he is such a big role model to everybody here. �* ~ , ., such a big role model to everybody here. �* ,, ., ., . such a big role model to everybody here. �* ,, ., . ., ,, here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank ou so here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank you so much _ here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank you so much for— here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank you so much for your _ here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank you so much for your time - here. aleksander stoyanovic, thank you so much for your time today. . the uk prime minister borisjohnson has offered a "humble and sincere apology" over his failure to disclose key messages relating to the refurbishment of his flat at number 10 downing street. it comes as the uk's top adviser on ministerial standards — lord geidt — cleared the prime minister of breaking the ministerial code, after re—examining evidence. 0ur political correspondent helen catt is at westminster. helen, there has been an exchange of text messages revealed, which is very interesting. the question really is whether the prime minister asked for money from a conservative party donor and whether anything was offered in exchange for that funding, how much the prime minister knew about where the money was coming from, how much information was then disclosed to the
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independent adviser. you was then disclosed to the independent adviser. was then disclosed to the inde endent adviser. ., s, independent adviser. you are right. what we have _ independent adviser. you are right. what we have got _ independent adviser. you are right. what we have got today _ independent adviser. you are right. what we have got today as - independent adviser. you are right. what we have got today as an - what we have got today as an exchange of whatsapp messages from november 2020 between borisjohnson and a conservative donor, lord brownlow. it regards the refurbishment of the flat in which borisjohnson and his family live in downing street. there was a fairly pricey refurbishment of of it, over £100,000. there were a series of investigations into how that was paid for because, whilst boris johnson ended up putting the whole bill for that, johnson ended up putting the whole bill forthat, initially johnson ended up putting the whole bill for that, initially lord brownlow, conservative donor, had paid some of the initial bills. there was the involvement of the conservative party at some point, too. this exchange of whatsapp messages from november 2020, they were not seen by lord kite, the independent adviser on ministry's interest when he did his investigation last may. what they say is this. i have got them here. he says, from the prime minister to lord brownlow, he says hi, david, i'm afraid parts of our flat are still a bit of a tip and i am keen
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to allow lulu little to get with it. can i ask her to get in touch with you for approvals? a response on the 29th of novemberfrom you for approvals? a response on the 29th of november from lord brownlow. he says, of course, get lulu to call me, we will get it sorted asap. he goes on to say any further message, i should have said, as the trust is not set up yet, it will be in january, he refers to a charitable trust that was being looked at being set up to pay for work in downing street, says as it has not been set “p street, says as it has not been set up yet, approval is a doddle as it is only me and i know where the pound sign will come from. as soon as lulu calls, we can crack on. these messages have been published this afternoon. they were not available to lord geidt during his initial investigation, but it emerged that they existed later in the year when the electoral commission looked at the conservative party's role in this arrangement. and so lord geidt then went back and looked at this again to see whether these messages would have changed what he thought. what he says is it would not have changed
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his fundamental assessment that there was not a conflict of interest here, but he says that he doubts whether he would have made quite the same conclusion. he says he doubts whether he would have said without qualification that the prime minister had taken steps to meet the relevant declaration and seek advice at the point when the prime minister became aware. the tone of his exchange of letters is pretty cross. he has cross that these exchanges were not given to him and that they were not given to him and that they were not, even when they came to light injune. the reason they were not given to him it we are told is because boris johnson not given to him it we are told is because borisjohnson had changed his phone because of security issues. they were on an old phone and he had not remembered the exchange. they then turned up again later, i think injune, when the device was switched on again. later, i think in june, when the device was switched on again. thank ou ve device was switched on again. thank you very much _ device was switched on again. thank you very much indeed _ device was switched on again. thank you very much indeed for _ device was switched on again. thank you very much indeed for that - you very much indeed for that update. more online if you want to get more detail on that. these are the latest numbers on
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covid you're in the uk. 179,756 new cases, compared with hundred 94,747 yesterday. the number of deaths recorded is 231. that compares with 334 on wednesday. there is a bit of fluctuation and catch up after the new year and christmas holiday. still a very high number of cases and deaths sadly linked to covid at the moment you're in the uk. that is reflected right across the world. the head of the world health organization says the huge and rapid rise of covid infections of the 0micron variant is overwhelming the health systems around the world. speaking at a news briefing in geneva, dr tedros adhanom ghebreyesus, warned that 0micron might be producing less severe disease than the delta variant but it should not be described as mild. dr david nabarro is special envoy for the world health organization on covid—19 and joins me now.
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this question, doctor david nabarro, of overwhelmed health services is really important, isn't it, because thatis really important, isn't it, because that is what we are seeing here in the uk, the government saying perhaps you have to take yourself to hospital if you have had something very serious, even like a heart attack, because the systems cannot cope? attack, because the systems cannot co e? �* , , attack, because the systems cannot coe? ~ , attack, because the systems cannot co-�*e?, , ., attack, because the systems cannot co.e?,,, , ., ., cope? absolutely. good afternoon to eve bod cope? absolutely. good afternoon to everybody and _ cope? absolutely. good afternoon to everybody and thank _ cope? absolutely. good afternoon to everybody and thank you _ cope? absolutely. good afternoon to everybody and thank you for- cope? absolutely. good afternoon to everybody and thank you for the - everybody and thank you for the chance to be on. i wish everybody a happy new year. i think it is still 0k to happy new year. i think it is still ok to do that. of course, those of us working on the pandemic are really quite anxious about omicron. on the one hand, there is good news in that most of the people who are infected by this new variant seem not to become seriously ill in the way that sometimes they did with the other variants, like delta. way that sometimes they did with the othervariants, like delta. on way that sometimes they did with the other variants, like delta. on the other variants, like delta. on the other hand, as i think everybody
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realises, because they have seen covid all over the place, among their friends covid all over the place, among theirfriends and family covid all over the place, among their friends and family and workmates, it is everywhere. it is moving at incredible speed. and so it is that second factor, the incredible transmissibility of this new variant that is the cause of such concern. it is leading to two things. one isjust a lot of such concern. it is leading to two things. one is just a lot of people who are sick are turning up in hospital, perhaps not needing to go into intensive care, but they certainly need medical attention. at the same time, because the disease is so transmissible, an awful lot of health workers are actually pearly and are off and are not able to be at work because they feel rotten. so we have that double effect of extra burden and at the same time a lot of peoplejust not able burden and at the same time a lot of people just not able to work. that is creating a super tough situation all over the world, notjust in the
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uk. all over europe, north america, and it is also appearing now in parts of latin america, africa and asia. {iii parts of latin america, africa and asia. ., ,., , parts of latin america, africa and asia. ., , ., ., asia. of a so there is the ongoing roblem asia. of a so there is the ongoing problem of _ asia. of a so there is the ongoing problem of lack _ asia. of a so there is the ongoing problem of lack of _ asia. of a so there is the ongoing problem of lack of vaccines - asia. of a so there is the ongoing problem of lack of vaccines going | asia. of a so there is the ongoing i problem of lack of vaccines going to poorer parts of the world, but also those who refuse to have a vaccine. we are seeing that affect the sporting world. some governments are taking very tough action against those who are refusing vaccines because they are potentially clogging up the health service, aren't they?— clogging up the health service, aren't they? there has certainly been a lot _ aren't they? there has certainly been a lot of— aren't they? there has certainly been a lot of material— aren't they? there has certainly been a lot of material about - aren't they? there has certainly| been a lot of material about how people who are not vaccinated are the major source of sickness in hospitals. i have to say that in health care, you do not deny people treatment because they eat a lot or because they have got particular habits that make them more likely to get sick with particular diseases. sorry to interrupt, isn't the difference here that they do not
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threaten my acute welfare. if i need acute hospital treatment, i now cannot get it potentially in the uk because somebody who is unvaccinated is using up valuable resources. that is using up valuable resources. that is an argument. _ is using up valuable resources. that is an argument, it _ is using up valuable resources. t'isgt is an argument, it is being used by a number of political leaders. i just want to caution everybody to remember that the people who are not accepting vaccination, in the most part, are actually doing this for very genuine reasons. it is notjust to be difficult, notjust to cause difficulty to others. it is because they have real concerns about immunisation.— they have real concerns about immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut ou off. immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off- we _ immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off- we are _ immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off. we are out _ immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off. we are out of _ immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off. we are out of time - immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut you off. we are out of time for i immunisation. i'm so sorry to cut i you off. we are out of time for this moment. we hope to speak to you very soon. thank you so much. this is bbc news. we have seen some wintry scenes with
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some snow over the hills. the cold weather stays with us throughout the rest of the day and indeed as we go through the night and into tomorrow. this is the big driving area of low pressure, tightly packed isobars to go with these weather systems mean we have got some strong winds. a lot of it is rain at lower levels, but it is the snow over the hills we are seeing. behind it, lots of showers following and for the rest of the day. some sunshine interspersed further west and ahead of that system. as i say, it is a pretty blustery wind that is blowing. it is accentuating the child. it was a really cold start for many of us. temperatures have not risen that much and were likely to be around 2-3, much and were likely to be around 2—3, particularly in the north. further west, 2—3, particularly in the north. furtherwest, perhaps 2—3, particularly in the north. further west, perhaps with that added bit of sunshine, they get a little higher. through this evening and overnight, our the front starts to clear away to the east, behind it the cold air returns. we have got more snow showers to come. of course, with temperatures falling close to freezing, not as cold as last night, but they will be low enough for ice to form. later in the
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night, we'rejust enough for ice to form. later in the night, we're just watching the activity out to the west because we could have another little band of rain and hill snow coming into the south. some rather conditions on the roads in the next 24 hours. there are warnings out and you can find those warnings on our website. let's watch what is happening through tomorrow. the tightly backed isobars still with us, particularly in the south, with this weather system coming into that cold air. scattered snow showers in the last, potentially had lower levels, blowing around in that point. this area of rain is likely to turn to snow across some of the hills of south wales and southern england. loan and buy a really strong wind. that will accentuate the child. further north we will have scattered showers. there could be some thunder in amongst those as well. as we turn our attention towards the weekend, the next atlantic low pressure coming in, westerly winds dominating. those wessolly means mean we will see a change to milder conditions. wet, windy conditions sweeping their way gradually eastwards with plenty of showers following on behind. sunday looks a
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little quieter. i will show you that in a minute. at the moment it looks really quite wet for some on saturday, at least for three or four hours before that weather system clears out a way. high pressure for a time on sunday bringing a quieter speu a time on sunday bringing a quieter spell of weather. wetter and windier to start next week. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: on the anniversary of the attack on the us capitol, president biden has condemned his predecessor donald trump. he accused him of spinning a web of lies and trying to re—write history. a court hearing on whether novak djokovic is medically exempt from australia's covid entry requirements has been adjourned until monday.
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his family say he's being treated like a criminal.

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