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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 6, 2022 9:00am-9:31am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. novak djokovic will have to wait until monday to find out whether he'll avoid deportation from australia after a vaccine exemption backlash. on the issue of mr djokovic, rules are rules — and there are no special cases. there's little sympathy from his fellow tennis players — here's his rival rafa nadal. if people say we need to get vaccinated, we need to get the vaccine. a new report says plans to tackle record nhs waiting lists in england could be derailed by demands for emergency care and a lack of staff. are you or your loved ones waiting for nhs treatment? what's been your experience?
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what have you been told about how long you might have to wait? covid testing rules for international arrivals to england are being eased from tomorrow. the transport secretary says it's time to change the measures. having introduced these temporary measures but now seeing that omicron is everywhere, omicron testing has really outlived its usefulness and therefore we don't keep things in place when there's no longer any point to having them there. presidentjoe biden will blame donald trump for the us capitol riot as he marks the one year anniversary of the attack in a speech later. a picture of life as lived in 1921 — 100 years after it was first collected, the 1921 census of england and wales opens up to the public for the first time today. and, following in the footsteps of adele, celeste and sam smith, this year's winner of the bbc sound of prize
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is the singer pinkpantheress. the world's top—ranked tennis player novak djokovic will have to wait until monday to find out whether he is able to stay in australia and defend his title in the first grand slam of the year. he is facing deportation from australia after having his visa revoked when he arrived in melbourne. there was a public outcry when he was given a medical exemption from strict vaccine rules to defend his australian open title. tournament organisers said djokovic�*s medical exemption had been granted by two independent medical panels organised by tennis australia and victoria state. but border officials said he had "failed to provide appropriate evidence" for entry after arriving on wednesday from dubai.
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the decision is now with the courts, and the austrlian pm scott morrison said no one was being singled out — and rules are rules. djokovic�*s father, srdjan djokovic, said his son had been held in a room guarded by police at the airport, and that, "this is notjust a fight for novak, but a fight for the whole world." rafael nadal had little sympathy for long—time rival novak djokovic, saying "the world has suffered enough" and that he must face the consequences for not being vaccinated against coronavirus. the serbian player has not spoken about his vaccination status, but last year he said he was "opposed to vaccination." with the latest here's our correspondent phil mercer. the tennis world number one has been taken to a government detention hoteljust hours after arriving in melbourne. he was expecting to defend his australian open title, believing he was exempted from vaccination rules.
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novak djokovic had been detained at melbourne airport before border force officials announced that he had not met immigration regulations and would be deported. his father claimed the grand slam champion was being held captive. the serbian president, aleksandar vukic, said he was a victim of harassment. novak djokovic has been the king of melbourne park, but the government says he's no longer welcome. on the issue of mr djokovic, rules are rules — and there are no special cases. rules are rules. that's what i said to you yesterday, and that's the policy of the government and it has been our government's strong border protection policies and particularly in relation to the pandemic that has ensured that australia has one of the lowest death rates from covid anywhere in the world. djokovic�*s lawyers are challenging the deportation order in court. he could potentially apply for a new visa.
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the 34—year—old star hasn't publicly confirmed his covid—19 vaccination status. he flew to australia after being granted a controversial medical exemption. tennis authorities said he'd not received any special treatment. but many australians, who lived under some the world's toughest coronavirus restrictions, felt djokovic had abused the system. his defence of his australian open title could be over, even before the tournament begins. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. let's speak to our correspondent phil mercer, who's following events from sydney. there isn't going to be a ruling until monday and a lot of things are very unclear in this situation. this has been an _ very unclear in this situation.t'13 has been an extraordinary few very unclear in this situation. ti 3 has been an extraordinary few days for the world of tennis. recently
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novak djokovic was trumpeting this medical exemption he thought he had, wanting to come to australia to begin defending his title but now effectively he is an australian custody, certainly he will spend the night in immigration detention at a hotel in melbourne, quite possibly over the weekend, until the fed federal court case resumes on monday. tennis organisers of the australian open say they need an answer as to whether novak djokovic plays or doesn't by tuesday for scheduling purposes. this is an extraordinary build—up to the first grand slam of the year. extraordinary build-up to the first grand slam of the year.— extraordinary build-up to the first grand slam of the year. thank you very much- — there appears to be little sympathy for djokovic�*s stance among his fellow competitors — here's his rival rafa nadal. it's normal that the people here in australia get very
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frustrated with the case, because they have been going through a lot of very hard lockdowns. a lot of people were not able to come back. if people say we need to get vaccinated, we need to get the vaccine. for me the only clear thing is if you are vaccinated you can play in the australian open and everywhere. sam phillips is a sports reporter on the sydney morning herald. so, he was granted the exemption, now the border authorities are saying he didn't produce the right evidence to show justification saying he didn't produce the right evidence to showjustification for not having had the vaccine. it's really unclear exactly what the grounds for the exemption were and what the detailers. is. will it will become clear on monday? the fact it is in court now— become clear on monday? the fact it is in court now you _ become clear on monday? the fact it is in court now you would _ become clear on monday? the fact it is in court now you would think- is in court now you would think they'd have to flesh out some of the reasoning behind the exemption. i think the key is that the tennis australia chief executive wrote to the federal government onto a patient is at the end of last year
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asking whether the reason for the exemption would be a legitimate reason for him to be permitted into the country and he was told that wouldn't be a legitimate reason. despite that he was granted an exemption. so, it'sjust farcical it's reached this point and it's a bizarre situation that the messaging wasn't passed on from the federal government to the victorian government to the victorian government and to tennis australia. well that decision on monday bb definitive ruling? if he disagrees, can he fight it? the tennis authorities say they need to know by tuesday for scheduling reasons. (et monday at 10am we should know whether novak is going to be
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playing. i'm not sure i buy the reasoning it needs to be sorted by tuesday. they'll have multiple people pull out and will find lucky losers to play. i'm not sure about that but i think regardless, the court will want to get this over with on monday if possible. what court will want to get this over with on monday if possible. what has the wider reaction _ with on monday if possible. what has the wider reaction been? _ with on monday if possible. what has the wider reaction been? rafa - with on monday if possible. what has the wider reaction been? rafa nadal| the wider reaction been? rafa nadal doesn't have much sympathy. i spoke to another tap — doesn't have much sympathy. i spoke to another top ten _ doesn't have much sympathy. i spoke to another top ten players, _ doesn't have much sympathy. i spoke to another top ten players, matteo i to another top ten players, matteo berrettini and medvedev, they expressed their sentiments similar to rafa nadal. matteo had some sympathy for novak travelling all this way and spending 2a hours in captivity, as his father put it. but i think the fact they agree, i think most players are on the same page and the australian public is on that page too. has
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and the australian public is on that -a . e too. . , and the australian public is on that -ae~ too. ., and the australian public is on that naetoo. ., , page too. has he said anything himself, novak _ page too. has he said anything himself, novak djokovic? - page too. has he said anything himself, novak djokovic? we l page too. has he said anything - himself, novak djokovic? we heard from his father saying he's been treated unfairly. fist from his father saying he's been treated unfairly.— treated unfairly. at this point i would exoect _ treated unfairly. at this point i would expect we _ treated unfairly. at this point i would expect we may - treated unfairly. at this point i would expect we may hear - treated unfairly. at this point i l would expect we may hear from treated unfairly. at this point i - would expect we may hear from him would expect we may hearfrom him this evening via social media. i've got a hunch he's going to want to say something, although the way legal matters work perhaps he will be instructed not to. you would think that he was the one who announced to the world he had an exemption and that's what sparked the outrage in place. he probably wants to get on social media until his side of the story in the next 48 hours. it is not the only one with an exemption. what's the situation with other players? it's fascinating, at the moment we confirmed at least one player and one staff member had been permitted into the country on the that they had covid in the last six months and it's fascinating the australian border. saying that's not a legitimate reason or that novak couldn't prove that was the case but these guys were allowed in. it
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wouldn't surprise, with the way the government are making up rules on the run, that they were permitted into the country and probably went has scrutinised us novak was last night. at the same time, if novak is deported on monday, those people who have been allowed in will be out the door as well because there is now, not a witch hunt, but questions as to why anyone was allowed into the country based on that rule when novak wasn't allowed to last night. it is an election year in australia and some ascending politics in this, what's being said on that? what's the feeling on that?— what's being said on that? what's the feeling on that? scott morrison has probably _ the feeling on that? scott morrison has probably done _ the feeling on that? scott morrison has probably done himself - the feeling on that? scott morrison has probably done himself no - the feeling on that? scott morrison l has probably done himself no favours again in this situation. yesterday he didn't want to deal with it, he thought it was a victorian government matter or tennis australia matter and shifted the blame but as soon as there were some credit to be taken today for
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stopping him at the border, he claimed it was a federal government decision and it was a classic case of morrison running a line for the media, a snippet, but not following through with any sort of policy. but i think he could sense the outrage. i've never seen outrage like it when it was announced that novak was coming and he's tried to step in front of it and be the national hero. the australian public can see through mr morrison at this point. when you say you've never seen outrage like it, what sort of things have you seen? it’s outrage like it, what sort of things have you seen?— outrage like it, what sort of things have you seen? it's a strange world we live in on _ have you seen? it's a strange world we live in on twitter, _ have you seen? it's a strange world we live in on twitter, as _ we live in on twitter, as journalists you have to have a twitter account unfortunately and looking at twitter it was united, which is very rare, in its disapproval of the decision to let novak into the country. it was really vitriolic, it was 10:30pm and
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it was like it was happening at 6pm at prime time, it was going mental online. i think the reaction would have been if novak was allowed into the country, he would have been booedin the country, he would have been booed in between every point, every change of ends, every time he won a match, it would have been really farcical scenes at melbourne park. in a way i'm kind of glad that it looks like that may not happen but in a way it was also going to be fascinating to see how the australian public treated him if he was allowed to roam around in melbourne as he thought he was going to be able to do when he arrived last night. to be able to do when he arrived last night-— to be able to do when he arrived last niuht. ~ �* ., ., , ., last night. we'll have to see what the rulin: last night. we'll have to see what the ruling is _ last night. we'll have to see what the ruling is on _ last night. we'll have to see what the ruling is on monday. - last night. we'll have to see what the ruling is on monday. thank i last night. we'll have to see what l the ruling is on monday. thank you very much. plans to tackle record waiting lists in england could be derailed by demands for emergency care and a lack of staff, according to a new report. there are nearly six million people waiting for nhs treatment, but mps on the health and social care committee say this could grow unless more
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people are recruited. there's a backlog of gaps in the nhs workforce of 97,000. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has this report. the number of people caught up in delays for nhs treatment in england is by far the worst ever recorded. patients have been forced to wait while hospitals focus on emergency care for those with the virus. tackling the backlog is an unquantifiable challenge, according to the health select committee. its report sets out the scale of the problem. in september, 5.8 million people were waiting for planned care. 300,000 had waited more than a year for treatment, and 12,000 had waited more than two years. keith makepeace, a keen marathon runner with a family hotel business, in devon, was being treated for stage iv bowel cancer when the pandemic hit. his chemotherapy, which had been going well, was then delayed for six months. so the national health and cancer
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care, as far as i can see, completely fell apart. and by the time i did then see my oncologist, basically, my cancer had increased and spread to such a degree that they said i was no longer eligible for some of the drugs. nhs leaders have said workforce shortages are the key limiting factor and that funding new doctors and nurses is absolutely critical in order to clear the backlog. mps are now calling for the government to tackle staff shortages. my concern is, that unless you make some long term reform, in particular making sure that we are doing enough to train new doctors, we will lose the workforce that we currently have. they will give up in despair and we are already seeing that happening in general practice. and so i think doctors and nurses on the front line know that
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you can't solve these problems overnight, but what they want to know is that there is a plan for the future. that it's worth them staying in the profession. and that's why a massive overhaul of our workforce planning, which is frankly broken at the moment, is a top priority that we recommend. the committee is also urging the government to publish an independent assessment of projected staff numbers every two years. the government has said it has committed billions of pounds to tackling the backlog and is planning to recruit an extra 50,000 nurses by the end of the parliament. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. getting in touch with your experiences of waiting for treatment on the nhs. one says, i was told my skin cancer removalfrom on the nhs. one says, i was told my skin cancer removal from my face could be up to two years. meanwhile growing and causing more disfigurement. i had to pay for it using my husband's retirement fund.
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another says, using my husband's retirement fund. anothersays, i using my husband's retirement fund. another says, i was waiting eight months for a face—to—face consultant appointment to change my medication while struggling with chronic pain. i understand and support the nhs. another says, i understand and support the nhs. anothersays, i've i understand and support the nhs. another says, i've been waiting for an operation on my foot for four years, nine assessments, lost in early november when my consultation promised the operation would be done on the 30th. had a phone call on the 29th at 3pm, operation cancelled. now in so much pain i hardly go out at all. let's speak to dr layla mccay, director of policy, nhs confederation. welcome and thank you forjoining us. the mps' report says the backlog is caused by the pandemic is unquantifiable challenge, how would you define it? it is unquantifiable challenge, how would you define it?— you define it? it is an incredible challenae you define it? it is an incredible challenge that _ you define it? it is an incredible
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challenge that is _ you define it? it is an incredible challenge that is facing - you define it? it is an incredible challenge that is facing all - you define it? it is an incredible j challenge that is facing all parts of the nhs. we hear a lot about elective backlogs, people who had planned care in acute hospitals usually for all sorts of reasons. but there's also gp backlogs, mental health backlogs, community health care backlogs. everyone is facing this really big challenge because of the disruption that covid has caused to the health services over the past two years and alongside that and obviously quite enmeshed with that challenge, the staff absences and vacancies affecting ability to get on and deliver that care. hour vacancies affecting ability to get on and deliver that care. how does the nhs get _ on and deliver that care. how does the nhs get ahead _ on and deliver that care. how does the nhs get ahead of— on and deliver that care. how does the nhs get ahead of it? _ on and deliver that care. how does the nhs get ahead of it? those - the nhs get ahead of it? those vacancies, 93,000 nhs vacancies, what can be done to turbo—charge getting them filled and getting the
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backlogs reduced?— backlogs reduced? absolutely. a multipronged — backlogs reduced? absolutely. a multipronged approach - backlogs reduced? absolutely. a multipronged approach is - backlogs reduced? absolutely. a multipronged approach is going i backlogs reduced? absolutely. al multipronged approach is going to backlogs reduced? absolutely. a - multipronged approach is going to be needed here because this is a long—standing challenge that's existed before covid and has only been exacerbated by it. so, there needs to be first and foremost independently audited assessments at regular intervals of the nhs's actual workforce requirements so we can make sure that the plans put in place are meeting those needs. there needs to be all sorts of focus on recruitment, bringing in a pipeline of people and being able to retain those people by focusing on appropriate staff well—being and conditions. so, there are clearly short—term challenges which we need to address here and looking forward, we need to manage this so that in the long term, this doesn't continue
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to be a challenge. we speak to our members across the whole nhs and they tell us, almost nine in ten health care leaders have recently told us that a lack of staffing is putting patient safety and care at risk. this needs to be a priority. thank you. breaking news. a complaint by the northern ireland gay rights activist gareth lee that he was discriminated against when the christian owners of against when the christian owners of a belfast bakery refused to make him a belfast bakery refused to make him a cake iced with the slogan, support gay marriage, has been ruled inadmissible by the european court of human rights. the european court of human rights. the european court of human rights said he had failed to exhaust domestic remedies in his case. you may remember this has been going on for a long time. in 2018 the supreme court in the uk ruled he wasn't discriminated against when
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the bakery refused to make him a cake with the slogan supporting gay marriage. he then referred the case to the echr claiming the supreme court failed to give appropriate way to him under the european convention of human rights but the court has said arguments must be raised explicitly or in substance before the domestic authorities. he's not going to be able to mount that case in the european court of human rights. from tomorrow, travel rules for arrivals into england will be relaxed. it comes as the prime minister reiterated that the current plan b measures will stay for now — and will be reviewed by mps in another three weeks. let's take a look at the changes to the coronavirus measures across the uk. from 4am tomorrow morning, double vaccinated people will no longer need to take pre—departure tests when coming to england. they will also not have to self—isolate while waiting for their day two test — and from sunday — that can be a cheaper lateral flow test rather than a pcr. and across the uk —
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people who test positive with a lateral flow test do not need to order a follow—up pcr test if they do not have symptoms. anyone who has symptoms will still need to take a pcr test regardless, and anyone who tests positive with any test must self—isolate. the change is now in force in scotland, wales and northern ireland — and from 11th january in england. here's the transport secretary grant shapps on those changes to the travel rules. if you take a lateral flow test and you get your result immediately rather than waiting a day or sometimes more, then you can act faster on it, and the action of course is immediately to then have a pcr test. so in some senses, we will get to knowing that result quicker. people won't necessarily be waiting for the second day. they will get the result of that lateral flow straight away. so we will still keep very close tabs on this. i would say to you, i think we have to get away from the idea that somehow within the uk, we are all safe and there is somehow a safe haven, but the rest of the world is dangerous out there. that's not the case.
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omicron is everywhere. we have large numbers of comecon cases here. ——we have large numbers of omicron cases here. there are large numbers of omicron cases elsewhere. we are an international country. you will need to be able to travel. we have to travel to sometimes see family or do business and keep the economy going. so i think it's absolutely right that having introduced these temporary measures but now seeing that omicron is everywhere, omicron testing has really outlived its usefulness and therefore, we don't keep things in place when there is no longer any point to having them there. let's look into the changes to the covid tests — and speak to dr sarah pitt, virologist, university of brighton. thank you forjoining us. how do you see the use of testing now and the importance of it when grant shapps says it's everywhere, so in travel tendsit says it's everywhere, so in travel tends it makes no sense to keep testing? tends it makes no sense to keep testin: ? ~ , , ., testing? well, it is everywhere of course and _ testing? well, it is everywhere of course and so _ testing? well, it is everywhere of course and so it's _
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testing? well, it is everywhere of course and so it's important - testing? well, it is everywhere of course and so it's important to i course and so it's important to understand that probably about one in three people who have an active covid infection don't have any symptoms but can be infectious to other people. so, i think it's probably quite sensible to test people before they get on the plane and sit next to a lot of other people for a prolonged period of time. and also, when they get home, if it turns out that they did have covid, they will potentially infect people who are in close contact with them. they're saying you don't have to self—isolate, take a lateral flow after two days but you don't have to self—isolate while waiting for the result and also, so, you could infect people potentially. it's not that you're at special risk from having been travelling but people should be testing themselves regularly anyway. share should be testing themselves regularly anyway-— regularly anyway. are we in a situation _ regularly anyway. are we in a situation where _ regularly anyway. are we in a situation where we've -
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regularly anyway. are we in a situation where we've got i regularly anyway. are we in a situation where we've got so | regularly anyway. are we in a i situation where we've got so many people stuck at home either without symptoms or very minor symptoms who are fully vaccinated, and that's causing problems in itself? yes. are fully vaccinated, and that's causing problems in itself? yes, it is. when causing problems in itself? yes, it is- when you're — causing problems in itself? yes, it is. when you're talking _ causing problems in itself? yes, it is. when you're talking about i causing problems in itself? yes, it is. when you're talking about fullyj is. when you're talking about fully vaccinated, even people who have had the booster, it gives you 75% or so of protection from having actual symptoms of covid. but there's still, that means you've still got a one in four chance. if you bump into the will actually have an active covert infection. so you may have very mild symptoms but you will still be infectious. the amount of virus that we have in this country as well as across the world at the moment is such that there is very high chance of you bumping into it if you're out and about. so therefore, that one in four risk you might actually develop an active infection even if you had the booster is the thing that's quite
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important at the moment i think in terms of trying to stop the spread of the virus. i terms of trying to stop the spread of the virus-— of the virus. i want to kind of understand _ of the virus. i want to kind of understand the _ of the virus. i want to kind of understand the logic - of the virus. i want to kind of understand the logic of i of the virus. i want to kind of understand the logic of the l understand the logic of the decisions being taken on testing and how you see that, when there is no need now for someone who tests positive with a lateral flow to then confirm that with a pcr test. but if you've got symptoms and you test negative with a lateral flow, you still have to have a pcr test. how reliable are the lateral flow tests? how can they be effected in one circumstance and not the other? lateral flow tests are not very good at picking up the virus if there is not very much in your nose and throat. so, if you'rejust not very much in your nose and throat. so, if you're just at the early stages of an infection and there's not that much virus in your
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body yet. so, that's the reason why if you have symptoms and it looks as though you do have covid but you test negative on the lateral flow, that's why you need to have a pcr test to confirm it. on the other hand, if you have covid and you do a lateral flow and it tests positive, you can rely on that. it's definitely true that you will have covid. it's a 99% chance that that positive lateral flow test will be a genuine positive. that does mean one in a thousand cases people will test positive and they won't have it but if you have symptoms, then if the lateral flow is positive it's perfectly reasonable to say you don't need a pcr test to confirm it, from a scientific point of view you can say you have covid. people have been asked to do a follow—up pcr so they can be officially recorded by test and trace and access the
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support they need, sick pay, physical and psychological support for self—isolation. so, physical and psychological support forself—isolation. so, i presume that the new rules coming into place next week will allow you to upload your lateral flow test and that will get reported to test and trace and support you need and the testing, sorry, the tracing of your contacts will also be triggered by the positive lateral flow test. so, it's really a question of how the lateral flow works. you can trust a positive result but you can't really trust a negative result which is why you need confirmation if you test negative. need confirmation if you test ne . ative. need confirmation if you test neuative. , . , ., ., need confirmation if you test neuative. , . ., negative. the statistics are clear, hue negative. the statistics are clear, huge numbers — negative. the statistics are clear, huge numbers of— negative. the statistics are clear, huge numbers of cases _ negative. the statistics are clear, huge numbers of cases of - negative. the statistics are clear, huge numbers of cases of covid l negative. the statistics are clear, | huge numbers of cases of covid in proportion to that very small numbers of people being hospitalised and fewer still dying. where do you think we are on the scale of
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actuallyjust think we are on the scale of actually just living think we are on the scale of actuallyjust living with that, not having restrictions, saying if you've got no symptoms or they are minor, you don't have to isolate because it's endemic and life continues? you're shaking your head so tell us where you sit on the scale of that.— so tell us where you sit on the scale of that. ., ,., , ., , ., scale of that. the reason people are exoeriencing — scale of that. the reason people are experiencing mild-to-moderate i experiencing mild—to—moderate symptoms and not getting into hospital as much is the protection afforded by vaccination. it isn't the virus itself. the virus itself is still dangerous, it's still putting people into hospital and people are still dying from nick —— dying from omicron. the idea is become endemic, we shouldn't be allowing it to do what it wants. the vaccine is designed to give protection across the whole population such that the number of new cases is really low. so, what we
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need to do at the moment is do whatever we can to try and stop the spread of the virus from person to person, to give the vaccine a sporting chance of working. and the vision for the future, you were talking about it being endemic, is that it will be an unusual infection and you would have occasional outbreaks which would be easily dealt with by the public health system such that we have outbreaks sometimes of norovirus, for example. they can be quite just a canned hospital wards get closed and so on but it doesn't spread around the population. that's what we should be aiming for. but we need to give that vaccination in conjunction with other measures to try and bring virus numbers down. this is a preventable infectious disease, so we shouldn't really be accepting any level of death, i don't think, at this point in the pandemic. we know how to stop people dying, we should
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be doing whatever we can to stop

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