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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 5, 2022 10:45pm-11:01pm GMT

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�* can decide what they like. they jury can decide what they like. they can, jury can decide what they like. they can. you're — jury can decide what they like. they can. you're right. — jury can decide what they like. they can, you're right, one _ jury can decide what they like. they can, you're right, one is _ jury can decide what they like. he: can, you're right, one is saying this opens the door to mob rule, another says thejury can this opens the door to mob rule, another says the jury can be a kind of societal pressure release valve, and that there is zero chance of any jury and that there is zero chance of any jury deciding it would be fair game to destroy a statue of churchill, for example, because it's always the statue of churchill which keeps on cropping up. i think what's interesting, i can't member which paper i read it in, it might even be the telegraph — apparently there have been issues over this particular statue since the 1920s. 125 years it stood in the city, and there'll be many who say, "how do we get rid of statues that we think are past their sell by date?" you go back to the romans, i think, as soon
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as someone was out—of—favor, they just got rid of all the statues, everything went. i think when you wander around and look at statues, you think so often they are the same sort of people, or whatever. maybe now is the time to actually look at these things? i think most people would say we don't need to destroy history completely, thus the brilliant thing about places like britain — it is historical, we have all these amazing things. but there is a case for looking at these things on merit and saying let's change it, put it somewhere else. martin, one of the defences putting to the court was at the statue was in itself a hate crime — therefore the four who removed it could not be committing an offence because its very presence was a hate crime. it was really an extraordinary trial and verdict. it’s was really an extraordinary trial and verdict-— and verdict. it's a perverse verdict. — and verdict. it's a perverse verdict, which _ and verdict. it's a perverse verdict, which is _ and verdict. it's a perverse verdict, which is not - and verdict. it's a perverse
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verdict, which is not the i and verdict. it's a perverse l verdict, which is not the only and verdict. it's a perverse - verdict, which is not the only one in the _ verdict, which is not the only one in the history of these types of things — in the history of these types of things. i'm thinking in the 1980s of the protesters... and committed criminal— the protesters... and committed criminal damage there and were acquitted. there are clearly cases where _ acquitted. there are clearly cases where the — acquitted. there are clearly cases where the crime has technically been committed _ where the crime has technically been committed on paper and the jury says. _ committed on paper and the jury says. for— committed on paper and the jury says, for whatever reason, decides they want— says, for whatever reason, decides they want to incarcerate the people because _ they want to incarcerate the people because they have somebody for their cause _ because they have somebody for their cause the _ because they have somebody for their cause. the barrister quote says that it is a _ cause. the barrister quote says that it is a society— cause. the barrister quote says that it is a society will release valve. i don't _ it is a society will release valve. i don't think it means, as he says, that idon't think it means, as he says, that every— i don't think it means, as he says, that every statue around is suddenly vulnerable because differentjuries vulnerable because different juries would _ vulnerable because differentjuries would take a point of view. i think it was— would take a point of view. i think it was quite — would take a point of view. i think it was quite right that the law was enforced — it was quite right that the law was enforced by the police and prosecution services, it's not their 'ob prosecution services, it's not their job to _ prosecution services, it's not their job to make — prosecution services, it's not their job to make the decision, theyjust io job to make the decision, theyjust go with— job to make the decision, theyjust go with the — job to make the decision, theyjust go with the evidence put forth to the jury~ —
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go with the evidence put forth to thejury. but go with the evidence put forth to the jury. but as penny said, of course, — the jury. but as penny said, of course, there's a debate about which statues _ course, there's a debate about which statues should and shouldn't remain, whether— statues should and shouldn't remain, whether new ones should be put up or there's— whether new ones should be put up or there's a _ whether new ones should be put up or there's a commission looking at that ri-ht there's a commission looking at that right now— there's a commission looking at that right how in — there's a commission looking at that right now in london at the moment. but that— right now in london at the moment. but that should be done through a democratic forum in general, it shouldn't— democratic forum in general, it shouldn't be up to people taking a free—for—all against particular statues — free—for—all against particular statues - _ free—for—all against particular statues — in this case, people have done _ statues — in this case, people have done that— statues — in this case, people have done that and a jury has decided it's tolerable and acceptable on this occasion. but there's a democrat— this occasion. but there's a democrat as a broad principle, it's not democrat as a broad principle, it's hot the _ democrat as a broad principle, it's not the right way to do. an interesting _ not the right way to do. in interesting quote from one of the four, sage willoughby, saying, "we didn't change history, we rectified it." i suppose the question is for the police, where they write in bringing this prosecution for the first —— in the first place casilla as martin said, the point is the police are in a difficult position.
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that also depends on not having mob rule, but there are certain things like, as thejury rule, but there are certain things like, as the jury has seen where they said they aren't guilty because of the fact that it is actually something that should've been done. it has been discussed, as i said before. these things should perhaps before. these things should perhaps be discussed more anyway. they are being discussed but perhaps it should be more properly. and since this particular thing was looked at in the 1920s, it's obviously very, very difficult in the first place. the fact that he enslaved more africans than any other in british history was always going to be, you know, you can say yes, look at his philanthropic work, but you'll never wipe that stain off, can you was
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like we've discussed it tonight at length, thank you very much indeed for your thoughts. length, thank you very much indeed foryourthoughts. penny length, thank you very much indeed for your thoughts. penny smith and martin bentham, thank you both very much for being with us, and we are all back again at 11:30pm. goodbye for now. hello there, i'm tulsen tollett, and this is your sports news — where we start with football, and chelsea have one foot in the carabao cup final after a 2—0 win over tottenham in the first leg at stamford brisge. andy swiss was watching. guess who's back? antonio conte returning to chelsea for the first time since they sacked him. so could he get one over his old club? tottenham could be in real trouble here... tottenham could be in realtrouble here... ~ ., ~' tottenham could be in realtrouble here... ~ ., ~ , , here... well, not like this. his tottenham _ here... well, not like this. his tottenham team _ here... well, not like this. his tottenham team was - here... well, not like this. his tottenham team was true - here... well, not like this. his tottenham team was true the | here... well, not like this. his - tottenham team was true the micro soonin tottenham team was true the micro soon in trouble. first, they ushered
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in kai havertz to the fire chelsea ahead. and if that event he was bad, far worse was to come succulent oh dear! one of the most calamitous own goals you'll ever see. he headed it straight at ben davies and into the net. tottenham 2—0 down at the break — surely they couldn't get any worse? come the second half, they certainly improved. harry kane finally forcing a save — and while chelsea could've had a third had team over been a touch more clinical, they were grateful to their keeper for clinical, they were grateful to their keeperfor a fine clinical, they were grateful to their keeper for a fine late save. still, with a two goal advantage to take into the second leg, chelsea will feel the final is very much within their site. andy swiss, bbc news. liverpool's league cup semifinal against arsenal, scheduled for tomorrow, has been postponed because of a coronavirus outbreak at the merseyside club. liverpool had earlier confirmed that assistant manager, pep lijnders, who was in the dugout at chelsea at the weekend, had tested positive. he was in temporarily charge as managerjurgen klopp was isolating. following further numbers of positive cases, liverpool have closed their first
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team training centre. the first leg of the semifinal will now be played at anfield next week, with the return at the emirates on 20 january. a month before the start of the six nations, and the welsh rugby union is considering playing home matches in england because of crowd restrictions in cardiff. wales currently have limited numbers of spectators allowed at sporting events, while across the border in england, there are no restrictions. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says she hopes matches at murrayfield will "go ahead to crowds of supporters" next month. daffyd pritchard has more on the situation in cardiff. as things stand, the welsh rugby union are still planning to host its games in front of a full capacity crowd at the principality stadium in cardiff. but for that to happen, it needs the restrictions in wales for cove to be relaxed — at the moment, elite sport is effectively being played behind closed doors in wales because of the maximum of 50
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spectators for any sporting event in wales. and for the welsh rugby union, that really is a huge financial issue because last year, when they played 26 nations matches at home, they lost roughly £40 million in matched a revenue. and for them, that represents a massive chunk of their annual turnover. so for fewer financial reasons, chunk of their annual turnover. so forfewerfinancial reasons, in chunk of their annual turnover. so for fewer financial reasons, in case the surgeons are not used in terms democrat time for the first home match against scotland, they are exploring the possibility of moving their home matches outside of wales potentially to england, where some of the stadiums do hold a similar amount of people to the principality stadiums democrat stadium. so they're looking at stadiums like the london stadium and wimbley, and the tottenham hotspur is stadium, because they would represent that kind of capacity that would allow them to make the money usually on a six nations match day, roughly £7
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million per game. the ideal scenario is for them to have these restrictions used in wales so they can play these matches in front of a full crowd in cardiff. but if that's not possible, there is a possibility they'll move their home games to england. staying with rugby union — and saracens forward jackson wray will see a consultant this week, after fracturing his skull in their premiership win at northampton on sunday. the back rower spent the night in hospital after the match before being released. arsenal's ainsley maitland—niles is heading on loan to roma for the rest of the season. he's only started two league games this season, and has spoken of his frustration at a lack of playing time. maitland—niles will travel to italy for a medical ahead of the move. england captain, steph houghton, has returned to training after a four month lay off. the 33—year—old defender has been out with an ankle problem suffered while on lionesses dut, but she was back in training with her club side, manchester city, and tweeted that it was good to be back. —— duty.
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the second test between south africa and india looks set for an exciting climax. the hosts closed on 118—2 injohannesburg, needing 122 runs to win with eight wickets in hand. australia's world number one ashleigh barty marked her return to the court with victory against american teenager coco gauff in the adelaide international. it was the wimbledon champion's first competitive match since ending her 2021 season early because of quarantine rules. for the latest on the breaking story around novak djokovic having his australian visa cancelled and the fourth ashes test in sydney, visit the bbc sport website — that's bbc.co.uk/sport. but that's all the sport for now.
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hello. hard to believe that only a few mornings ago, we are starting the day with temperatures in the mid between this dust mid teens. we start thursday morning because my commute, temperatures even in the city centres below freezing, but it's into the countryside we see temperatures in the minus double digits. temperatures have risen to start the day across in northern ireland, and that's because we have cloud spilling and here i had of what will be a wet and windy day for a fair few. what will be a wet and windy day for a fairfew. sunshine giving what will be a wet and windy day for a fair few. sunshine giving way to the cloud, rain, it also helps know. the hill snow is happening because our weather first that arco system is pushing and,... plenty of sunshine across eastern areas to start the day, but through the morning commute, outbreaks of rain, a bit of hill sleet in northern ireland, spreading its part to england and wales, also in the lake district and pennines, a covering of snow in places, all born about by strong to gale force winds. the southeast will stay dry late in the
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afternoon and evening, even if it does cloud over. but here across many eastern areas, it'll be a cold day, even though there's a slice of mild air pushing and, three celsius, up mild air pushing and, three celsius, up to 8—9 somewhere in the west. taking us into friday, those showers turning wintry once again as temperatures drop. there could be some frost and ice around us we start friday morning, even though temperature is nowhere near as low as they will be to start thursday. another cold day on friday, we are almost between one system clearing, another pushing in, and we've got winds coming in from a north to north westerly direction. that'll bring frequent showers across north wales, given a covering of snow for some lower—level sites. have to watch this system spreading across southern counties, which could bring some longer spells of rain, even sleet and snow to the south. a cold day in the wind. then we flip around to something milder as we go into
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saturday. this next weather system pushes its way in. slightly milder, more extensive than we see on thursday. more and the way of rainfall around, gustus wins in the south, we will all see rain at some point, and colder to end the day and into sunday morning with a touch of the micro frost before more rain arrives in the west later on. take care.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... tennis champion novak djokovic is denied entry to australia to compete in the australian open amid a controversy over his covid vaccine exemption. the president of kazakhstan appeals for help from russia and neighbouring countries as protesters seize the international airport and several government buildings. as omicron infections continue to surge in europe, the french president says he intends to make life difficult for the unvaccinated. and investigating the capitol riots, nearly one year on. we have a special report on the conspiracy theories that helped spark the insurrection.
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live from our studio in singapore...

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