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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 5, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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the world's number one men's tennis player, novak djokovic, has been denied entry to australia to compete in the australian open after the authorities cancelled his visa. the president of kazakhstan is seeking help from a russian—led regional military alliance to quell nationwide protests. during the day, demonstrators seized the airport and several government buildings in the main city almaty. france has just recorded 335,000 new covid cases — a new daily record for europe, with other european countries also seeing records broken. french president emmanuel macron has warned he intends to make life difficult for unvaccinated people in france. and the us attorney general has promised to hold accountable all those involved in the deadly attack on congress in washington a year ago.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster penny smith, and evening standard's home affairs editor, martin bentham. thank you very much forjoining us. let's take a look at the front pages that are already in. not many so far. the telegraph sports section as men's tennis world number one, novac djokovic, faces deportation from australia in a row over complications with his visa. he plans to appeal the decision. meanwhile, the telegraph's front page has the story about four people being cleared of criminal damage after toppling the statue of slave trader, edward colston, in bristol. the guardian leads with this, too. the campaigners hailed thejury�*s decision in a press conference earlier today.
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and the yorkshire post spashes with warnings of an nhs staffing crisis as it reports nearly six million patients are waiting to be treated. let's start, penny, why don't you kick us off? novak djokovic, this is an extraordinary story because he just thought he'd be able to go, he thought he had his medical exemption — but there was outrage in australia because people were saying, "this is one rule for the famous, people like novak djokovic, and one rule for ordinary australians." it novak djokovic, and one rule for ordinary australians. "— novak djokovic, and one rule for ordinary australians. " ordinary australians." it looks more complicated — ordinary australians." it looks more complicated than _ ordinary australians." it looks more complicated than just _ ordinary australians." it looks more complicated than just the _ ordinary australians." it looks more complicated than just the fact - ordinary australians." it looks more complicated than just the fact that l complicated than just the fact that he perhaps is or is not vaccinated. because we still don't quite know what his status is, do we? he hasn't actually come out and said whether or not he has or hasn't had covid, and therefore there's some kind of exemption. the problem is he was in
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the airfrom dubai on a exemption. the problem is he was in the air from dubai on a scheduled airline, arrives in melbourne and told if he hasn't been double jab, he can't come in. it seems to me that someone somewhere has — there's been a cocked out, someone hasjust said, "sorry, you can't go." i don't know if you've done any travelling recently, ben, but you are faced with a mountain of things that you have to do — have you done this or that, have you had the check? so many things you are supposed to be checking, and i can't believe — he's got help, for gods sake, the rest of us just have to get on with it. surely somebody somewhere went, "have you got all the stuff you're supposed to have? have you got all printed out like the rest of us?" no! of course people are really
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annoyed and australia.- no! of course people are really annoyed and australia. martin, what do ou annoyed and australia. martin, what do you make — annoyed and australia. martin, what do you make of _ annoyed and australia. martin, what do you make of it? _ annoyed and australia. martin, what do you make of it? the _ annoyed and australia. martin, what do you make of it? the australians l do you make of it? the australians have been pretty firm on this, their deporting him and he's fighting it. he's out to see the world's best men's player because he is a fighter and he's not taking this lying down. i think it seems clear that he's come — i think it seems clear that he's come with_ i think it seems clear that he's come with a visa buddies got the wrong _ come with a visa buddies got the wrong visa, apparently, it doesn't allow— wrong visa, apparently, it doesn't allow an— wrong visa, apparently, it doesn't allow an exemption, so it's a technical_ allow an exemption, so it's a technical thing that's her receptor before this was cancelled, he said he didn't— before this was cancelled, he said he didn't want him in, no exceptions at all. _ he didn't want him in, no exceptions at all. the _ he didn't want him in, no exceptions at all, the rule that only vaccinated people can come in. and thate— vaccinated people can come in. and that's obvious what's behind, isn't it? clearly— that's obvious what's behind, isn't it? clearly he's stated in the past that he's— it? clearly he's stated in the past that he's against vaccination. we don't _ that he's against vaccination. we don't know— that he's against vaccination. we don't know how he's got this exemption, whether it's because he had covid _
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exemption, whether it's because he had covid recently — he obvious he hadn't _ had covid recently — he obvious he hadn't been — had covid recently — he obvious he hadn't been vaccinated before, otherwise he is still not be vaccinated. so is clearly not been vaccinated — vaccinated. so is clearly not been vaccinated. and yes, he's got this medicat— vaccinated. and yes, he's got this medical exemption, but we don't know on what _ medical exemption, but we don't know on what grounds, and presumably he's presented _ on what grounds, and presumably he's presented - _ on what grounds, and presumably he's presented — the assumption would be he's had _ presented — the assumption would be he's had a _ presented — the assumption would be he's had a friendly doctors somewhere not in australia who provided — somewhere not in australia who provided evidence to say he's got grounds — provided evidence to say he's got grounds for exemption. the independent panel has approved it, presumably, and people in australia decided _ presumably, and people in australia decided they don't like this in general, _ decided they don't like this in general, orthe prime minister decided they don't like this in general, or the prime minister has decided _ general, or the prime minister has decided it — general, or the prime minister has decided it. so the visa has been cancelled — decided it. so the visa has been cancelled. you would imagine that the real— cancelled. you would imagine that the real truth of the matter is that he hasn't — the real truth of the matter is that he hasn't been vaccinated, he's managed — he hasn't been vaccinated, he's managed to get an exemption which is frankly— managed to get an exemption which is frankly questionable — i suspect, given— frankly questionable — i suspect, given he's— frankly questionable — i suspect, given he's a great sport start, he make _ given he's a great sport start, he make cardiac inflation is one of the
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possible _ make cardiac inflation is one of the possible causes of an exemption. it seems _ possible causes of an exemption. it seems unlikely to have that sort —— have _ seems unlikely to have that sort —— have a _ seems unlikely to have that sort —— have a problem of that sort and still be — have a problem of that sort and still be the great tennis star he is. still be the great tennis star he is that's — still be the great tennis star he is. that's what happened. they've decided _ is. that's what happened. they've decided they don't want him, whether or not— decided they don't want him, whether or not he _ decided they don't want him, whether or not he can — decided they don't want him, whether or not he can manage to get his lawyers — or not he can manage to get his lawyers involved and raise an appeal and managed to get back into australia, we don't know. but he seems _ australia, we don't know. but he seems in — australia, we don't know. but he seems in a — australia, we don't know. but he seems in a pretty poor situation at the moment. seems in a pretty poor situation at the moment-— seems in a pretty poor situation at the moment. ., ., , ~ , ., ., the moment. normally the australian covernment the moment. normally the australian government would _ the moment. normally the australian government would love _ the moment. normally the australian government would love to _ the moment. normally the australian government would love to have - the moment. normally the australian government would love to have him l government would love to have him there, he's a global sporting icon, and obviously the tournament organisers would love to have him. but in terms of sheer politics, you can see the australian government don't want to be seen making separate rules for different people — and we just heard from scott morrison, the prime minister, who has said "rules are rules, especially when it comes to our borders. no one is above these rules." 0rdinary australians will like that kind of talk, i guess
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casilla two things there. i’pe like that kind of talk, i guess casilla two things there. i've got an australian _ casilla two things there. i've got an australian brother-in-law, i casilla two things there. i've got i an australian brother-in-law, they an australian brother—in—law, they are up to something about sport and australia — they are just obsessed with sport. so you've got that on one side, than the other side of it is people there have been under major lockdowns and had their freedoms curtailed. the rules are the rules, and people have a right to be very annoyed about somebody who thinks they can get away with it —— get around it by who they are. that's a long and short of it. it could run and run, though, conceivably if he won a legal battle against deportation, then the australian government would be in a tricky position. i australian government would be in a tricky position-— tricky position. i suppose so, althou:h tricky position. i suppose so, although you'd _ tricky position. i suppose so, although you'd imagine - tricky position. i suppose so, although you'd imagine they | tricky position. i suppose so, - although you'd imagine they have the power— although you'd imagine they have the power to— although you'd imagine they have the power to counter fail any appeal, you'd _ power to counter fail any appeal, you'd have — power to counter fail any appeal, you'd have to be an expert in australian— you'd have to be an expert in australian law to know what powers
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they have _ australian law to know what powers they have in that sphere. and then, there's— they have in that sphere. and then, there's more — they have in that sphere. and then, there's more pressure on the tournament organisers, that's another— tournament organisers, that's another aspect, tournament organisers, that's anotheraspect, butjust tournament organisers, that's another aspect, butjust talking another aspect, but just talking about— another aspect, butjust talking about the political side of it, you think— about the political side of it, you think about the kerfuffle in this country— think about the kerfuffle in this country quite rightly over downing street _ country quite rightly over downing street parties and so on, and this is a mirror— street parties and so on, and this is a mirror image of that in a different— is a mirror image of that in a different context as it were. there's _ different context as it were. there's a _ different context as it were. there's a feeling that someone who's rich and _ there's a feeling that someone who's rich and famous, in this case a successful— rich and famous, in this case a successful sports star, can get around — successful sports star, can get around the rules while other people are being _ around the rules while other people are being stuck in lockdown for ages and suffering all these restrictions. you think about this country's — restrictions. you think about this country's reaction to the differential treatment, and it's quite _ differential treatment, and it's quite right. but he could try to appeal. — quite right. but he could try to appeal, obviously he will try to
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appeat — appeal, obviously he will try to appeal. it'sjust not great coverage for the _ appeal. it'sjust not great coverage for the tournament, so we can ramble on for— for the tournament, so we can ramble on for some _ for the tournament, so we can ramble on for some time about whether it can be _ on for some time about whether it can be resolved in time with him trying _ can be resolved in time with him trying to— can be resolved in time with him trying to get out there and play and train, _ trying to get out there and play and train, and _ trying to get out there and play and train, and so on. it seems questionable at this stage. it�*s questionable at this stage. it's made the questionable at this stage. it�*s made the front pages of some of the papers, i think in the second editions will be a bigger story because it's quite a dramatic twist. let's move on to other stories. the guardian has a front page piece about the nhs, "millions of patients will suffer worse in quality of care unless ministers take immediate action to alleviate the staffing crisis engulfing the nhs." we've been thinking about this for a while now is the latest result of 0micron, just the sheer number of nhs staff who are not there in clinics and hospital to look after patients. that's the point, isn't it? when we
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first heard 0micron was going to be much more contagious, but in general it wasn't as problematic in terms of putting you in hospital — the problem of course now is that, i suppose it's a bit more like, for an awful lot of people, more like a cold, but nevertheless people have been told to take time off. and it's everywhere, and the nhs, as we've seen on your bulletins, is just like everywhere — people are having to stay often self—isolate, they feel rough and terrible because they can't go to work. so you've got this, and at the same time you've got this massive backlog of patients desperate to be seen. in the guardian, is talking about suggestions, talk about how nhs and social care staff should have the
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priority for lateral flow and pcr tests. i still can't find any lateral flow tests! 3pm seems to be the magic number, but they aren't there when i go back. pcr tests, you've got to self—isolate, perhaps being reviewed to see if it can be cut from ten days to five. i can tell you, that would make a huge difference. nhs staff absences, they say their double the normal for this time of year. that's where you just you double the normalfor the time of year. that's where you just you double the normal for the time of year. it's almost too big to comprehend, isn't it? the other suggestion that was in there, and i don't know if martin has a view on this, tens of thousands of medical students have been deployed onto wards and other health care settings. wards and other health care settinas. ~ ., ,~' a, wards and other health care settinas. ~ ., w a, ., settings. we will ask martin in a minute. moving _ settings. we will ask martin in a minute. moving on _ settings. we will ask martin in a minute. moving on to _ settings. we will ask martin in a minute. moving on to the - settings. we will ask martin in a | minute. moving on to the metro, they've got more about testing, and
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"just go with airflow" — they always have good headlines at the metro, i like their headlines. this is the news that anyone testing positive with an instant lateral flow test should isolate, but from tuesday there will be no need to take a pcr test and wait another 2a hours for the result. rules are changing day tjy the result. rules are changing day by day, you got to be really concentrating to follow all the rules and restrictions.- concentrating to follow all the rules and restrictions. that's true, also with the _ rules and restrictions. that's true, also with the easing _ rules and restrictions. that's true, also with the easing of _ rules and restrictions. that's true, also with the easing of testing - also with the easing of testing requirements for people coming into the country— requirements for people coming into the country — which probably makes sense, _ the country — which probably makes sense, given we've got so much omicron — sense, given we've got so much omicron that things are being reimposed to protect us from that being _ reimposed to protect us from that being brought in, wanting to delay the arrival— being brought in, wanting to delay the arrival of omicron, which everyone _ the arrival of omicron, which everyone knows there's no point in doing _ everyone knows there's no point in doing that, — everyone knows there's no point in doing that, we are washing pit. there's— doing that, we are washing pit. there's that side of that to make it, there's that side of that to make it. then — there's that side of that to make it, then there's the other point you made _ it, then there's the other point you made there — it, then there's the other point you made there that it's — obviously
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people — made there that it's — obviously people are _ made there that it's — obviously people are isolating and that's a good _ people are isolating and that's a good thing, in a sense, it's not a problem. — good thing, in a sense, it's not a problem, and the pcr tests is simply protect— problem, and the pcr tests is simply protect the _ problem, and the pcr tests is simply protect the supply of pcr tests. we have so _ protect the supply of pcr tests. we have so many people being infected and having to test because of being in contact _ and having to test because of being in contact with infected people. so there's— in contact with infected people. so there's a _ in contact with infected people. so there's a risk of running out, and therefore the need to preserve for people who really do need them. again, _ people who really do need them. again, the — people who really do need them. again, the probably makes sense in a practical— again, the probably makes sense in a practical step, and one of your correspondence earlier gave a good exuitation _ correspondence earlier gave a good exultation as to why lateral flow, which _ exultation as to why lateral flow, which used to be thought of as reliable. — which used to be thought of as reliable, —... reliable, you which used to be thought of as reliable, you get more false positives, which is not a problem if people _ positives, which is not a problem if people decide to isolate. that's less likely to happen because there more _ less likely to happen because there more people in the community who are infected. _ more people in the community who are
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infected, saying it's one in 15 in the country— infected, saying it's one in 15 in the country have been affected, and one in— the country have been affected, and one in ten— the country have been affected, and one in ten and london. therefore they— one in ten and london. therefore they are — one in ten and london. therefore they are much more accurate than they are much more accurate than they previously were. it all makes sense, _ they previously were. it all makes sense, but — they previously were. it all makes sense, but as you say, as a member of the _ sense, but as you say, as a member of the public, — sense, but as you say, as a member of the public, it's hard to keep track— of the public, it's hard to keep track of— of the public, it's hard to keep track of these things. lets of the public, it's hard to keep track of these things.- of the public, it's hard to keep track of these things. lets go to the telegraph. _ track of these things. lets go to the telegraph, there _ track of these things. lets go to the telegraph, there front - track of these things. lets go to the telegraph, there front page track of these things. lets go to i the telegraph, there front page - the telegraph, there front page — the front page on lots of papers — is the colston four, the black lives matter activist accused of toppling the edward colston statue. what do you make of this? because the telegraph angle is courting tory mps are saying this jury verdict sets a dangerous precedent, the result will be mobs seeking to tear down such across the country. but other people, legalacademics across the country. but other people, legal academics and so on
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saying this is the jury system, it iury saying this is the jury system, it jury can decide what they like. thea;r jury can decide what they like. they can, jury can decide what they like. they can. you're — jury can decide what they like. they can. you're right. — jury can decide what they like. they can, you're right, one _ jury can decide what they like. they can, you're right, one is _ jury can decide what they like. tie: can, you're right, one is saying this opens the door to mob rule, another says thejury can this opens the door to mob rule, another says the jury can be a kind of societal pressure release valve, and that there is zero chance of any iury and that there is zero chance of any jury deciding it would be fair game to destroy a statue of churchill, for example, because it's always the statue of churchill which keeps on cropping up. i think what's interesting, i can't member which paper i read it in, it might even be the telegraph — apparently there have been issues over this particular statue since the 1920s. 125 years it stood in the city, and there'll be many who say, "how do we get rid of statues that we think are past their sell by date?" you go back to the romans, i think, as soon
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as someone was out—of—favor, they just got rid of

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