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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 5, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. one in 15 people in england had covid in the run up to new year's eve, but borisjohnson�*s defends his decision to not bring in new restrictions. because of the balanced and the proportionate that we've taken to covid, we've been able to keep this country open, keep our economy moving, more open than any other comparable economy in europe. omicron continues to surge throughout europe. france has reported a record 335,000 new cases of covid—19. the us attorney general promises to hold accountable anyone who was involved in the deadly capitol attack almost a year ago — whatever their status. will he or won't he defend his australian open title?
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novak djokovic�*s apprearance at the tournament is in doubt, after problems with his visa. four people are cleared in bristol of criminal damage, this is a victory for anyone who wants to be on the right side of history. four people are cleared in bristol of criminal damage, after the toppling of a slave trader statue during a black lives matter protest. hello, welcome to viewers in the uk and around the world. lastest figures suggest one person in every in 15 in england had covid in the run up to new year's eve, the highest level of infections recorded by the office for national statistics. but the uk prime minister boris johnson's confirmed there'll be no new restrictions in england, saying the government was taking a "balanced approach" to covid. the rules on testing are changing
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in england and wales. anyone who has a positive lateral flow test, but no symptoms, won't have to confirm the result with a pcr test. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young has this report. two years into this pandemic, and it can feel as if time is standing still. but ministers and medics insist progress has been made. across the uk, governments are dealing with things differently. are you gambling with - the nhs, prime minister? borisjohnson has imposed fewer restrictions than elsewhere. his plan b — more masks, covid passports and working from home — will stay in place. in the commons, he was bullish about the strategy. because of the balanced and proportionate approach that we've taken to covid, we've been able to keep this country open, keep our economy moving, more open than any other comparable economy in europe, and they know it, mr speaker.
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with a huge rise in cases, the testing system has been under strain, so today a change in england and wales. if you don't have covid symptoms and your lateral flow test is positive, you'll still have to isolate but won't have to confirm the result with a pcr. staff shortages, though, remain a major problem. in hospitals and other sectors, services are being cancelled or delayed because so many are in isolation. the labour leader is one of them, after testing positive for the second time. his deputy stood in. doctors, nurses, carers, teachers and pupils can't get the tests they need now to do two tests a week. emergency workers are reportedly stuck in isolation because they can't get their hands on a test — the government has been asleep at the wheel, mr speaker, and the result is total shambles. before christmas, the prime minister was under huge pressure after his own mps defied him and he had to rely on labour votes to get his covid plans through.
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borisjohnson is the kind of politician who instinctively prefers to let people make their own decisions. but even if he wanted to introduce tighter restrictions, that would mean another damaging fight with his own mps. so for now, he's leaving things as they are while admitting that parts of the nhs might feel overwhelmed. today, tory mps were more supportive but are now pushing for an exit plan. it is not in the national interest to partially or wholly shut down sectors of our economy every time we see a new variant. so will my right honourable friend to take this opportunity to inform the house as to whether and how the government will be changing its approach when new variants arrive? we have got to have a plan to livel with this virus like normal forever. when is he going to set that plan out? l for now, though, mrjohnson is watching and waiting to see the full effects of this latest covid wave. vicki young, bbc news, westminster.
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rules requiring travellers to take a test before they arrive in england will be scrapped from 4am on friday. they also won't have to isolate while waiting for a negative pcr result. from sunday, travellers can take a lateral flow test no later than day two after they arrive, and if that's positive, they'll have to self—isolate and take a further pcr test, to identify any new variants. 0ur transport correspondent katy austin was at st pancras international station in london a little earlier and told us it was some better news for travellers and the travel industry. this marks a return to pre—0micron arrangements, making international travel cheaper and easier again for fully vaccinated passengers. as you say, from four o'clock on friday morning, they won't have to do a covid test within two days of setting off for england, nor will they have to self—isolate while they await for their post—arrival test.
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the result of their post—arrival test. and from 4am on sunday morning, they won't have to take a pcr test within two days of arriving into england. they can take a lateral flow test instead, although that can't be a free nhs one. if they test positive, they must take a pcr, and that can be a free nhs test. now, this has been welcomed by travel businesses, who had said that the testing measures introduced to stem the spread of 0micron were holding back the sector's recovery. firms are now feeling more optimistic, but the past couple of months have shown how quickly things can change, and a lot of other countries around the world have still got pretty stringent entry requirements in place. also this evening, wales has confirmed it will be following england's lead with these measures, but the welsh health minister said they're doing it reluctantly. across europe, governments are struggling to contain the 0micron variant, leading to a record number of cases in some countries. france has reported 335,000 new cases of covid—i9 — its highest everfigure
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for a single day. president macron used controversial language to say he wants to make life more difficult for those who are unvaccinated. and in the last hour, italy's government has announced mandatory vaccines for the over—50s. mark lowen reports now from rome. the youngest to be armed in the endless battle against covid. five—year—old eduardo gets his first jab as italy steps up vaccinations for children. maybe too small to grasp at the pandemic has changed their world. but, say parents, they, too, must fight it. why did you want to vaccinate your son? because i love him. his father and i really love him and want him and all his little friends to go back to a normal life. so, this is the least we can do.
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respect science and respect our children. "it was ok," says eduardo. "did it hurt?", i asked. "just a little bit." they do their best here to soften the experience, with certificates of bravery, a rite of passage for the pandemic generation. you can see the smile on their face when they ask to you, "now i can see my friend?" you can say yes, you can play with them and everything, because now the vaccine the covid—19 is so important for everything. when italy became the first country in the west to fall to the virus in 2020, it was the first in the world to impose a nationwide lockdown. but today, despite record cases, its streets are once again busy as it, like much of europe, tightens vaccine rules instead to some resistance.
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in france, a heated debate in parliament over mandatory vaccination for restaurants and trains were suspended amid opposition protests over an interview with president macron. he told a newspaper he aims to bar the unvaccinated from social activities, using the slang wor 0n the streets of paris, mixed views on the colourful language. i think that's a bit out of place for a president to say. the message is that he wants to improve things, but his form of words wasn't great. at the vaccine centre, they're ramping up shots before schools resume next week, hoping to stem the 0micron surge. among the messages, "my biggest dream is that covid ends." sometimes children just put it best. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. let's speak to professor andrew preston, a biologist at the university of bath. let's look at the situation here in the uk first of all. borisjohnson
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has said he believes we can write out the current wave of 0micron. do you think he is right? we out the current wave of omicron. do you think he is right?— you think he is right? we are certainly putting _ you think he is right? we are certainly putting into - you think he is right? we are certainly putting into the - you think he is right? we are | certainly putting into the test you think he is right? we are i certainly putting into the test at the moment. we have staggeringly high infection rates. 0ne the moment. we have staggeringly high infection rates. one in 15 is just a staggering number for acute infectious disease in this country, but fortunately we are not necessarily seeing the same leakage was hospitalisations and deaths as we did a year ago. 0therwise was hospitalisations and deaths as we did a year ago. otherwise we will be in real trouble. do we did a year ago. otherwise we will be in realtrouble._ be in real trouble. do you think we still might? _ be in real trouble. do you think we still might? certainly _ be in real trouble. do you think we still might? certainly we're - be in real trouble. do you think we still might? certainly we're going i still might? certainly we're going to see an increase _ still might? certainly we're going l to see an increase hospitalisations as those case rates still go up over the next couple of weeks, and we are pretty close to the nhs being under unsustainable, insurmountable pressure in some areas. i think it is still a knife edge, but we have some determination in government to stay this course. i5 some determination in government to stay this course-— stay this course. is this the right determination? _ stay this course. is this the right determination? in _ stay this course. is this the right determination? in other - stay this course. is this the right determination? in other words, | stay this course. is this the right. determination? in other words, is determination? in otherwords, is borisjohnson right to not bring in
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more restrictions? i boris johnson right to not bring in more restrictions?— more restrictions? i think we are ast the more restrictions? i think we are past the point — more restrictions? i think we are past the point where _ more restrictions? i think we are past the point where restrictions| past the point where restrictions have an effect. we are approaching the peak of infections, maybe it is already been reached in london, i would expect other regions to follow in the next weeks, so i think any effort to really suppress the top number, the time for that has gone, so it is a case now of having to write it out, i guess.— so it is a case now of having to write it out, i guess. some people have try to — write it out, i guess. some people have try to see — write it out, i guess. some people have try to see good _ write it out, i guess. some people have try to see good news - write it out, i guess. some people have try to see good news in - write it out, i guess. some people have try to see good news in oma| have try to see good news in 0ma krahn, in the sense that it is milder and is providing immunity for large numbers of the population —— in a macron. i struggle to see it that way, because we are still seeing either was of infection. we have decent levels of vaccination across the country, so you have expected cases of delta to stay where they were or decrease, so 0micron has been a major obstacle in this mythical road
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to the end of the pandemic, so, no, personally, such large number of cases, so many people in hospital and massive disruption to retail and industry in the lead to christmas and certainly throughout january, through staff absences, i struggle to see any good news in that, to be honest. �* , ., honest. and in terms of vaccinations, _ honest. and in terms of vaccinations, we've - honest. and in terms of vaccinations, we've in l honest. and in terms of- vaccinations, we've in france president macron trying to crack down on those not vaccinated. initially, we have seen they are gonna make it compulsory for it to be vaccinated for the over 50s. is that the right way to proceed, to in a way be more aggressive against those not vaccinated? know, to be honest, it those not vaccinated? know, to be honest. it is _ those not vaccinated? know, to be honest, it is not. _ those not vaccinated? know, to be honest, it is not. we _ those not vaccinated? know, to be honest, it is not. we have - those not vaccinated? know, to be honest, it is not. we have never i honest, it is not. we have never really enforced vaccinations in this country, nor do i thing that we should. we do have really high levels of vaccination. the booster uptake has been astounding. maybe it is up to people like myself to get the message across to those that are
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still wavering, but again if you open that can of worms of mandating vaccination against covid, then you have to consider it for a whole range of different scenarios, including we force people to take better preventative health against obesity and all sorts of public health issues? to take adjuster covid, i think if this variant comes up covid, i think if this variant comes up or another variant comes up that is ever a danger to other people, the argument slightly shifts, because then you're using vaccination to help others. at the moment, i think it would be hard to win that argument given that 0micron is not as significant as we initially feared. is not as significant as we initiall feared. , ., ~ initially feared. interesting. thank ou ve initially feared. interesting. thank you very much _ initially feared. interesting. thank you very much indeed, _ initially feared. interesting. thank you very much indeed, professor. you very much indeed, professor andrew preston from the university of bath. the us attorney general has vowed to hold accountable anyone who was involved in the deadly capitol attack almost a year ago. 0n the 6th of january 2021, supporters of donald trump stormed the capitol building in washington. a criminal investigation has led to hundreds of people being charged
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for their part in the riot. and a congressional committee has been piecing together what happened. in the last hour, attorney general merrick garland said his department's work is farfrom over. in the aftermath of the attack, the justice department began its work on what has become one of the largest, most complex and most resource—intensive investigations in our history. only a small number of perpetrators were arrested in the tumult of january 6 itself. every day since, we have worked to identify, investigate and apprehend offenders from across the country. let's get more from gary 0'donoghue in washington. gary, the attorney general was saying, we need to hold accountable all those involved in that attack a year ago. whatever their status, there can't be different rules for there can't be different rules for the powerful and the powerless, he said. is that a hint there to go
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after donald trump? it said. is that a hint there to go after donald trump? it certainly is t in: to after donald trump? it certainly is trying to address _ after donald trump? it certainly is trying to address empiricism - after donald trump? it certainly is trying to address empiricism he i after donald trump? it certainly is l trying to address empiricism he has faced, particularfrom the trying to address empiricism he has faced, particular from the left here, from democrat politicians, that he has not been pursuing people other than the foot soldiers, if you like, who stormed the capital itself. he has not been going far enough up the food chain to the organisers. he is saying he is going to do that if he can, take it where the evidence leads, but no commitment in any sense there to actually go after donald trump or any of his immediate lieutenants. and what are we going to hear from presidentjoe biden, because he is going to be talked about what happened a year ago? interestingly, he is auoin happened a year ago? interestingly, he is going to _ happened a year ago? interestingly, he is going to talk _ happened a year ago? interestingly, he is going to talk about _ happened a year ago? interestingly, he is going to talk about donald - he is going to talk about donald trump's particular responsibility for what happened on that day, that is why i love people are saying, hang on a minute, if you think he was in part responsible, why is your ministration, your department of justice, and up and go after him properly? he will talk about that tomorrow. i am sure he will talk
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about the threat to democracy january 6 presented and what his administration has been trying to shore up in the year since that, but he is trying to continue this year with a back to the american norm type idea, so he won't want to give too much ground tomorrow, but say, really, that the american people are in the middle ground and this is what they want and they don't want to see something that happen again. —— something like that happen again. gary, thank you very much indeed. gary, thank you very much indeed. gary 0'donoghue in washington. tomorrow at 2100gmt, there's a special programme on the bbc news channel and bbc world news about the us capitol attack. christian fraser will be speaking to some of the people who organised rallies that day, and he'll look at the profound divisions left across the united states. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: we will be looking at the backlash to novak djokovic getting an exemption to compete not fully vaccinated in the australian open.
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scotland's rules covering those who test positive for covid and their household contacts are being brought into line with the rest of the uk. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, explained the changes to the rules. there will now be an option to end isolation as long as you, firstly, have no fever and, secondly, you record two negative lateral flow tests, one no earlier than day six after testing positive and another at least 2a hours after that. the second change applies to close contacts of positive cases and, the second change applies to close contacts of positive cases, and this includes household contacts who are either under the age of 18 years, four months or who are older than that and fully vaccinated. and let me be clear, by fully vaccinated, we mean first, second and booster — or third — doses.
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for close contacts in these categories, the requirement to self—isolate will end and be replaced by a requirement to take a lateral flow test every day for seven days. welcome back. the men's world number one tennis player novak djokovic's entry into australia has been delayed, over an issue with his visa. and we have just had news and we havejust had news in and we have just had news in the last few seconds and we have just had news in the last few seconds that and we have just had news in the last few seconds that that and we have just had news in the last few seconds that that visa and we have just had news in the last few seconds that that visa has been revoked by the australian government. it has issued a letter, saying he will be deported. that's the rotors news agency quoted a source close to the australian open tournament. novak djokovic, we are hearing, is filing a federal injunction to stop his deportation, so a dramatic turn of events. the
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background to this is novak djokovic is on vaccinated. he had, we heard, thought he had secured a medical exemption so he could play in the tournament, trying to win his 21st grand slam tournament. let's go to catherine whitaker. what do you make of that news? i am suggesting _ do you make of that news? i am suggesting it, quite _ do you make of that news? i —n suggesting it, quite frankly for tibet has come in moments ago, i was still digesting the fact the world number one tennis player, night—time australian open champion, has been detained overnight, we have heard, by the australian border patrol at melbourne airport. he thought his visa had been granted with a medical exemption for being unvaccinated. he was then told there was an issue with that exemption, apparently the exception was granted by the state government, the victorian government, the victorian government, made an arrangement with
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tennis australia, but the federal government, who ran the border force, stepped in and wanted to review documentation. they found that documentation is not sufficient and they're deporting the world number one and nine time australian open champion. we expected this to 0pen champion. we expected this to be a bit of a saga, frankly, with novak djokovic stub is vaccination status has been in question for a long time, ever since the australian open announced they would have a 0pen announced they would have a minute tori vaccination policy. there is been a bit of a circus around the world number one, but the saga seems developed into drama and very quickly into farce. do saga seems developed into drama and very quickly into farce.— very quickly into farce. do you think this _ very quickly into farce. do you think this politics _ —— there is politics here? when he thought he could play in the tournament, there was outrage amongst many australians, because they said, hang on a minute, there is one rule for us and another roll for the world number one men's
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tennis star?— tennis star? the politicians, the prime minister, _ tennis star? the politicians, the prime minister, had _ tennis star? the politicians, the prime minister, had been - tennis star? the politicians, the prime minister, had been under pressure not prime minister, had been under ressure ., ., ., ., , ., quite possibly. the extent and the tone of the average is pretty extraordinary in australia. i think melbourne, the city internationally that he spent more time than any other in lockdown, more than 200 days, they've reached a vaccination level of more than 90% in melbourne. a lot of those people did not want to get vaccinated post up if not of the people who have got the vaccination, because of political policies in place require them to do so, you have to to go to bars and restaurants. this has hit hard. 0utrage is a bit of an understatement. i think novak misjudged, as he has done a lot in the pass over the course of his career, but the reception will be to this decision. he announced it via a prettyjolly this decision. he announced it via a pretty jolly social media this decision. he announced it via a prettyjolly social media post yesterday, saying, i've got my exemption, i'm on way to the aastra
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—— australian open. that did not go down well. the australian government would say there is not politics at play, but it is placeable there is. who knows? this is going to rebel on for a very long time. it is who knows? this is going to rebel on for a very long time.— for a very long time. it is going to rebel on partly because _ for a very long time. it is going to rebel on partly because he - for a very long time. it is going to l rebel on partly because he is going to fight it. novak djokovic is a fighter. it is part of what he is the best tennis player in the world, but he is, we are hearing, filing a federal injunction to stop himself being deported. he is not going to go down without a fight.— being deported. he is not going to go down without a fight. know, and it is these very _ go down without a fight. know, and it is these very qualities _ go down without a fight. know, and it is these very qualities that - go down without a fight. know, and it is these very qualities that lack i it is these very qualities that lack of self awareness, that defiance, that have beta between time grand slam champion, that might very well make him go down as the greatest male tennis player of all—time, but they've also caused him considerable pr issues over the years —— 2i they've also caused him considerable pr issues over the years —— 21 time it grand slam champion. it is not hard to see this is going to be the biggest of them all. i don't have anywhere near the legal
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qualifications to tell you how it is going to go down from here, with his federal injunction, but it is hard to see any kind of smooth be ending for any party. this is... completely unprecedented stop what it really is and we see what happens in the it really is and we will see what happens in the next few minutes. thank you to reacting to that news. police looking for a missing 20—year—old man, who was last seen leaving a nightclub in central london last month, say they've found a body in the river thames. officers say formal identification still needs to take place, but the family of harvey parker have been informed. police say the death is being treated as unexplained. the 64th annual grammy awards, which was due to take place at the end of this month, has been postponed amid concerns over the 0micron variant of coronavirus. in a statement, the recording academy and cbs said... "after consulting state officials,
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health experts and artists, the decision to press ahead with 2022's ceremony contained �*too many risks'. a future date for the grammy�*s will be announced in due course. with violent unrest continuing across kazakhstan, a nationwide state of emergency has been declared. there are reports that protesters have seized control of the airport of the country's biggest city, almaty. what started as a protest against rising fuel prices has become something bigger, although the extent of the rebellion is still not clear. kazakhstan's president has admitted he "botched" the fuel price increase — he's dismissed the government and appointed an acting prime minister. but the protests have continued. this was earlier in almaty, where demonstrators stormed the mayor's office. in response, security forces fired stun grenades and tear gas
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at the protestors, but the crowds refused to disperse. more than 200 people have been arrested since the unrest began. the white house has urged calm and restraint. here's our central asia correspondent, rayhan demetrie. the internet is down in almaty, but some users have managed to connect using vpn. i've seen some live footage which showed the main administrative building in the city of almaty being set ablaze. it also sounded like there was gunfire tht was used, it also sounded like there was gunfire that was used, but that is not confirmed. it'sjustjudging by the live pictures. similar pictures are emerging from other parts of the country.
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that's the latest there on the situation in kazakhstan. more on that throughout the day. you have been watching bbc news. hello. sunshine has been in short supply of late, but wednesday certainly made up for it with widespread blue skies across the uk. there is a price to pay for those clear skies. 0vernight tonight, temperatures falling very sharply. it will stay chilly across the uk through the next couple days and nights. in fact, chilly enough we'll see a top up of this snow across the highlands through thursday as these weather fronts start to work their way in. ahead of that, through the course of the night, with light winds and clear skies, the temperatures will fall away very sharply. where we have lying snow in some of the sheltered scottish glens, we could see temperatures as low as —10 degrees. even to the south of the uk, —6, —7. it will be milder by the end of the night for the likes of northern ireland,
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where the wind starts to pick up and the cloud arrives. and then this weather system runs into the cold air through thursday. for northern ireland, we're largely looking at rain, perhaps some snow briefly across the hills, but for scotland and northern england, not exclusively across the high ground but particularly for the high ground, there will be some heavy snowfall for a time. some briefly across north wales and the midlands. with strong winds, we could have blizzard conditions. also some heavy rain to the south as this front goes through. maybe even the odd flash of lightning or rumble of thunder. it is a cold afternoon even as things brighten behind the weather front. a few showers continuing to funnel in on a notable northwesterly wind. that stays with us overnight thursday into friday. because of the wind, it won't be quite so cold overnight thursday into friday. but we will still have a frosty start across the northern half of the uk, a risk of ice first thing and snow showers again for northern and western scotland. some for northern ireland,
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the west of scotland, getting down into the midlands, at lower levels as well. rain for the far southwest. a lot of sunshine, yes, but a cold feel. temperatures in the mid range of single figures at best. quite a change come saturday as this weather system comes in. it's got a big pocket of milder air tucked inside it and it will lift the temperatures quite notably, up into double figures once again. but the start of the weekend will see a return of some widespread cloud and also some fairly heavy outbreaks of rain.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i in 15 people in england had covid in the run up to new year's eve but borisjohnson's defends his decision to not bring in new restrictions. because of the balanced and proportionate approach that we've taken to covid we've been able to keep this country open, keep our economy improving, more open than any other probable economy in europe. novak djokovic australian visa canceled. he is now filing an injunction to stop insulting reported. it filing an injunction to stop insulting reported. it means the world number _ insulting reported. it means the world number one _ insulting reported. it means the world number one is _ insulting reported. it means the world number one is less - insulting reported. it means the world number one is less likely | insulting reported. it means the i world number one is less likely to appear at the world open. in europe... france has reported a record 335,000
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new cases of covid nineteen. italy's government has announced mandatory vaccinations italy's government has announced for the over 60s. for the us attorney general promises to hold accountable anyone who was involved in the deadly capitol attack almost a year ago — whatever their status. more now on our lead story and the impact the latest rise in coronavirus cases have been having. in a moment we'll hearfrom china — but first our health correspondent dominic hughes has been finding out how local health authorities in the uk have been coping with a steep rise in infections. across the north west of england, the 0micron variant is building. infections are spreading. and while it might be a relatively milder form of the virus, the numbers involved are mean
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hospitals are feeling the pressure. the rise in cases of 0micron is absolutely enormous. it is rising very, very rapidly indeed. i think what will probably happen is it will keep rising, but it will peak fairly soon, and our hope is that this lasts for weeks rather than months. most recent data shows how fast 0micron has spread in the north west of england. just before christmas, an estimated 3.2% of the population in the region had coronavirus, around one in 30 people. by new year's eve, that number had more than doubled to 7.8%, one in 15. january is always a very tough month for the health service, but as well as the usual winter pressures, there are now a growing number of covid patients arriving at hospitals as well as staff themselves falling sick or having to isolate because of the virus, and that is why the royal bolton is one of 17 hospitals across greater manchester where nonurgent surgery has been suspended. staff absences aren't just affecting hospitals.
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but community nursing teams and care homes too. yesterday, the prime minister talked of riding out this wave will stop local leaders warned there will be some tough weeks ahead. we believe we need to be more vigilant than that, and recognise that this month will present a real challenges. that was the message we were getting from our experts this morning. it is going to be a very difficult months. and as the virus spreads from its london epicentre, what is happening now in the north west could well be seen right across the country. there are huge pressures across the health care system wherever you look, and despite incredible and extraordinary effort on the front line, we have got patients who are waiting too long to have their 999 call answered, and also we have got people who are waiting too long to be seen in accident and emergency departments. we also know there are pressures in terms of people being able to access mental health and community services. with more sick patients
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and a growing number of absent staff, some hospitals are now approaching the limits of what counts a safe care, and that means taking some tough decisions on what they can and can't do. dominic hughes, bbc news, manchester. well, let's compare that now to the situation in china where authorities have been aggressively pursuing a zero covid strategy ahead of next month's winter olympics. beijing has put all 1.2 million residents of the the city of yuzhou in lockdown after the discovery of just 3 asymptomatic cases. another city, xian, with a population of 13 million, has been under lockdown for two weeks. 0ur correspondent, robin brant, sent this report. this is extreme, even by china's standards. a city shut down because ofjust three new cases with no symptoms. everyone is prohibited from leaving the city, the sign says. one million plus people are now in lockdown in yuzhou. the latest proof that
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china is very committed to its zero—covid strategy. translation: it doesn't bother me to do a covid test at midnight, - it's for our own safety. 300 miles away and two weeks ahead of yuzhou is xi'an, a city famed for its terracotta warriors, where 13 million people have now been locked down since before christmas. what started out a fortnight ago with a late—night army of officials welding gates shut has led to this. some people banned from leaving their tower blocks have taken to bartering with their neighbours. cigarettes for vegetables, other goods for sanitary towels. this is what most of china looks like. it's busy. yes, you have to have a mask when you get on the metro and there is a temperature check, but the government says its zero zero—covid strategy has achieved this for about 18 months now. that's a strategy that includes things like this, pop—up tents where you can get
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a booster on the way home, and win prizes as well. but it also includes very, very harsh measures that can be imposed on a city in a matter of hours. harsh measures, brutal enforcement. it's been part of china's covid containment since the beginning. just last month, some cities were parading covid spreading offenders in public. canada has announced compensation payouts worth $31 billion in compensation for indigenous children and families harmed by the so called on—reserve child welfare system. in 2016, a tribunal ruled that canada had underfunded first nations children's services compared with those for non—indigenous children. it's the largest class—action settlement in canadian history. the canadian prime minister says the settlement is the first step towards healing.
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for dar too long indigenous kids at risk were being removed from their communities, put into situations where they lose their language, they lose their culture, they face mistreatment. we need to recognise our responsibility collectively for that. but we also have to put an end to it going forward. cindy blackstock is executive director of first nations child and family caring society of canada and professor at mcgill university's school of social work. she joins us now from ottawa. thanks for being with us. can you just explain to us, and we have a global audience here, the significance of this in the background today's? right. if the federal government _ background today's? right. if the federal government does - background today's? right. if the federal government does this - background today's? right. if the| federal government does this this will be the first generation of first nations children they haven't
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received because their first nation. some of your viewers will remember over the summer with the on marked graves in these government residential schools, one of those reasons the children died is that the schools themselves were so dramatically underfunded in health care etc the children were more prone to disease. their own public health officer raise the alarm is early as 1907. but those inequalities were never addressed. so even after the schools were closed in 1996, ourfirst nations child that last because they were first nation. what that meant for families is that they were able to recover from the trauma of those residential schools. and they will put in horrible positions as parents. that kind of underfunding, one of the families that are spoken with, there is a cap on the number of feeding tubes for terminally ill children. so he had to make a decision, do i rewash these feeding tubes and breast re—infecting their children or do i not feed them at all? we have other children dying of suicide when their communities were pleading for mental health services
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that would have been available if they were for two more at first nation. the systemic underfunding is really created a chasm that we have more first nation children in foster care today than even at the height of those residential schools. the compensation — of those residential schools. the compensation payout that has been talked about, many billions of dollars as we said, is that sufficient in your view? well, were auoin to sufficient in your view? well, were going to see _ sufficient in your view? well, were going to see if— sufficient in your view? well, were going to see if it's _ sufficient in your view? well, were going to see if it's sufficient. - sufficient in your view? well, were going to see if it's sufficient. it - going to see if it's sufficient. it will go a big step forward to actually giving families a support services they need. there is half of that money to compensate the victims of canada's discrimination. including children sadly lost their lives. so the minimum value there should be $110,000, because that's what the courts have already awarded them. the other half of the money is going to fix the system to stop the discrimination that's happening right now to children. and the other piece of important work we have to do is actually fixed the government so that it doesn't do this to another generation of first nations
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children. eversince another generation of first nations children. ever since the country is been founded they've treated first nations children as if they're not worth the money. they're not with the same amount of money as other children and that's wrong and it needs stop. just children and that's wrong and it needs stop-— needs stop. just briefly, is this candidate in — needs stop. just briefly, is this candidate in a _ needs stop. just briefly, is this candidate in a sense _ needs stop. just briefly, is this candidate in a sense coming i needs stop. just briefly, is this candidate in a sense coming to needs stop. just briefly, is this - candidate in a sense coming to terms with its past? i candidate in a sense coming to terms with its past?— with its past? i think it is. and i think it is _ with its past? i think it is. and i think it is really _ with its past? i think it is. and i think it is really the _ with its past? i think it is. and i think it is really the canadian i think it is really the canadian public that was awakened by the unmarked graves, as many people around the world that started asking questions about what is happening now to first nations children. they started really pressing their members of parliament to implement solutions and couldn't understand why the government wasn't complying with the legal orders. it's thanks to that that i think we are starting to that that i think we are starting to see a real beacon of hope on the future. ,., ., ., ., ~ to see a real beacon of hope on the future. ., ., ~ ., i. in india, police say they've arrested three people in connection with an app that shared photos of prominent muslim women, saying they were up for sale. the app, which had an offensive term in its title has been blocked. the women who've been targeted say they feel
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humiliated and under threat. 0ur india correspondent yogita limaye has more. first, a bit of background on this story. a few days ago, scores of indian muslim women found that their photos had been shared on an app, and on it, they were presented as if they were up for sale or up for auction. this isn't the first time it's happened — it happened six months ago as well. then, too, a complaint had been registered, but no action had been taken. this time around, three arrests have been made by police, all of them very young people, among them, one 18—year—old woman. the women who've been targeted, many of them are prominent muslim women in india — journalists, activists and even politicians. and under prime minister's government. we have spoken to some of them, they have told the bbc about how they felt humiliated and threatened in one of them is a woman
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studying overseas was talked about how her parents felt extremely worried looking at this. some of them have also said they feel angry that no action was taken the first time this happened in the field that those motivated the perpetrators to try again. it is not clear whether or not it's the same people behind but these incidents and the police if they are investigating further to find out who exactly is behind this and what their motive was. but this is yet another instance of muslims in india feeling increasingly vulnerable under a hindu nationalist government. stay with us on bbc news, still to come — we'll speak to the lawyers of one of the four people cleared of criminal damage, after the toppling of a slave trader statue in bristol. a memorial to the 22 people killed in the manchester arena bombing, opened to the public today. the glade of light, near the city's cathedral, is a white marble "halo" bearing the names of those who died. andy gill reports.
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the new memorial garden has been built within sight of manchester arena, where suicide bomber salman abedi murdered 22 people in may 2017. the plants have been selected to reflect the seasons and give year round colour. but the centre piece is a halo of white marble bearing the names of those who were killed. what we have done here is a really beautiful tribute to what was a dark day in manchester's history and we really want to do justice to the strength of feeling from people who lost their loved ones and also those who were affected in manchester more broadly to create something that all year round people could come to pause and reflect and remember. two families had left flowers here on private visits before the garden was opened to the public. beneath the names of the victims and embedded in the memorial are memory capsules, donated by the victims�* families, containing mementos and messages to remember their loved ones.
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0livia campbell hardy from bury was one of the 22 who died. herfriend adam lawler was injured in the attack. i think it is somewhere i will always stop when i'm in town, you know? whether i am going to the pub or through to the shops orjust somewhere, anywhere i am going through, i will pass through, just to take a moment, you know? just to take a moment, you know, to remember. at the centre of the gardens is a hawthorn tree, which will bloom in may to coincide with the anniversary of the atrocity. this coming may there'll be an official opening to mark five years since it happened. andy gill, bbc north west today, manchester.
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let me bring you up—to—date with the latest situation regarding novak djokovic the world men's tennis number one. trying to play in the australian open to win his 21st grand slam, that was the aim. it looks like at the moment that is and could happen. he said he got a medical exemption for the countries covid—19 vaccination requirement so that he could play in the australian open. but we have heard from the australian authorities that in fact his visa has been cancelled by the australian border for us. his visa has been cancelled by the australian borderfor us. he's been detained at melbourne airport for more than seven hours according to some reports. he is now facing the prospect of being asked to board a plane to leave australia. in other words he's being deported. it is understood he's trying to appeal against that deportation decision so that he can say in australia. but at
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the moment it's looking very unlikely he's going to be in the australian open. the president of serbia has accused australia of the maltreatment of no back track of it. this is becoming quite in international route. —— novak djokovic. he is serbian and the president of serbia has said that australia has maltreated him. let me also bring you some breaking news on kazakhstan, we were showing you pictures of the unrest in the rcr was hours with what we are hearing that a moscow led alliance is sending peacekeeping forces to kazakhstan. those protests which were originally over fuel price rises which the president admitted had been mishandled and led to rioting with tear gas and stun grenades being fired by the other authorities well, it looks like
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there's a moscow led alliance sending peacekeeping forces to control the situation they are. for a limited period. that is coming to us through reuters news agency quoting the leader of our media as saying that is what's gonna happen. moscow and its allies sending peacekeeping forces to kazakhstan for a limited period. we don't know what exactly that means, what exactly peacekeeping forces mean, what exactly a limited period means. but they are being sent to quell the unrest there in kazakhstan. more details on that as it comes in. a british army officers become the first to reach sorrowful. check 700 miles in a0 days putting all of her equipment on a sledge. she faced temperatures of —a5 celsius and she said she wanted to encourage people
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to push boundaries and believe in themselves. here's our correspondent philip mackey. this was the moment she made it to the south pole. she braved 60 mile an hour winds while pulling a 90 kilograms led averaging 17 miles a day. after her grueling a0 day track she posted this message on her blog. i 40 day track she posted this message on her bloc. ., ., on her blog. i made it to the south pole where — on her blog. i made it to the south pole where it's _ on her blog. i made it to the south pole where it's snowing, _ on her blog. i made it to the south pole where it's snowing, feeling i on her blog. i made it to the south j pole where it's snowing, feeling so many emotions right now. the preparations — many emotions right now. the preparations weren't exactly easy either sunak either. she spent 27 days alone in greenland to prepare for the extreme conditions with up before she left she said she wanted to inspire others. this a before she left she said she wanted to inspire others.— to inspire others. as a woman of colour, to inspire others. as a woman of colour. as _ to inspire others. as a woman of colour. as an _ to inspire others. as a woman of colour, as an asian _ to inspire others. as a woman of colour, as an asian woman, - to inspire others. as a woman of| colour, as an asian woman, when people see me doing this again, the image they don't expect to see they are so excited. people have said to me that i'm such a role modeljust for them to see somebody that looks slightly like them. the for them to see somebody that looks slightly like them.— slightly like them. the trip cost £100,000. — slightly like them. the trip cost £100,000. the _ slightly like them. the trip cost £100,000. the fundraising - slightly like them. the trip cost j £100,000. the fundraising was
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organised by a charity called team army. i organised by a charity called team arm . ., , , ., organised by a charity called team arm. ., , , ., , army. i got the sense of tenacity, her ambition. _ army. i got the sense of tenacity, her ambition, her _ army. i got the sense of tenacity, her ambition, her drive _ army. i got the sense of tenacity, her ambition, her drive and - army. i got the sense of tenacity, her ambition, her drive and i - herambition, her drive and i thought. _ herambition, her drive and i thought, "oh my god, ijust have to help you _ thought, "oh my god, ijust have to help you “- — thought, "oh my god, i 'ust have to hel ou. “ ~ ., ~' thought, "oh my god, i 'ust have to hel ou. ~ . �*, help you. ". what you think she's achieved then? _ help you. ". what you think she's achieved then? she's _ help you. ". what you think she's achieved then? she's been - help you. ". what you think she's . achieved then? she's been amazing. absolutely exceeding _ achieved then? she's been amazing. absolutely exceeding everybody's i absolutely exceeding everybody's expectation. she reached the pole five days quicker than expected despite the sickness and exhaustion all of which melted away with the elation she achieved her goal. you are capable _ elation she achieved her goal. you are capable of _ elation she achieved her goal. yarn. are capable of anything you are from, where your start line is, everybody starts somewhere. i didn't want to just break the grass season two ceiling i want to smash it in pieces. two ceiling i want to smash it in ieces. ,, ., , ., pieces. she has gotten used to the solitude which _ pieces. she has gotten used to the solitude which is _ pieces. she has gotten used to the solitude which is a _ pieces. she has gotten used to the solitude which is a good _ pieces. she has gotten used to the solitude which is a good job. - solitude which is a good job. because an outbreak of covid means the flight crew that will bring her back a second isolation.
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lawyers for maxwell who is king victor last week of aiding jeffrey f saying says she deserves a fresh trial. that's afterjuror told the media that he shared his experience of sexual abuse during deliberations. maxwells lawyers have written to the judge who presided over the case to say there were incontrovertible new grounds for a new trial to serve the interest of justice. for people event during a black allies led impersonal. they were charged with after the monument after edward colston was brought out in 2020. they were found not guilty at bristol crown court. this report does contain some flashing images. emerging from court after weeks on trial. nicknamed the colston four, now found not guilty of criminal damage.
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we want to say thank you to so many people, it reverberated across the world, and now we know that he does 0ne one thing that we know now as colston — one thing that we know now as colston does not represent bristol. it was june the seventh 2020, during a black lives matter protest, the statue of slave trader edward colston tied up and toppled. the 125—year—old bronze, sprayed with graffiti and rolled into the water of the harbour nearby. this has been a case like no other in terms of that complete polarisation of public opinion. edward colston made his fortune in the transatlantic slave trade. across the city, buildings, pubs, streets and schools carried his name.
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the protest made headlines worldwide. many venues began dropping his name and conversations began about statues and monuments elsewhere. it is not about the statue, it is about the story that we tell ourselves, these heroes we lionised, and those that we now wish to perhaps move away from. found not guilty, defence lawyers today said the case should not have happened and said the defendants had played a small part in the fight against racism. raj charda is a criminal defence lawyer and represented jake skuse, one of the colston four. he joins us now from bristol. hejoins me on the phone. what is your reaction to the verdict? absolutely delighted. it fullyjustified the verdict and
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delighted for those four individuals.— delighted for those four individuals. �* . ., , individuals. and the defence was that the presence _ individuals. and the defence was that the presence of _ individuals. and the defence was that the presence of the - individuals. and the defence was that the presence of the statute | individuals. and the defence was - that the presence of the statute was a hate crime so therefore it wasn't an offence to remove it, is that right? an offence to remove it, is that riuht? ., , ., ., ., .,, right? the defendants had a laudable excuse for the _ right? the defendants had a laudable excuse for the actions _ right? the defendants had a laudable excuse for the actions that _ right? the defendants had a laudable excuse for the actions that they - excuse for the actions that they had. the statue itself was offensive, it causes distress to many people in bristol. and the authorities had failed to deal with this issues for many many years. events unfolded on the 7th ofjune which meant that the statue was toppled. which meant that the statue was to led. ~ ., ., ,, which meant that the statue was touled. ~ ., ., ~' which meant that the statue was touled.l ., ., ~ ., toppled. what do you think about the olices role toppled. what do you think about the polices role in — toppled. what do you think about the polices role in this _ toppled. what do you think about the polices role in this in _ toppled. what do you think about the polices role in this in their— polices role in this in their decision to press charges? they say they didn't have any choice. where they didn't have any choice. where the right to go ahead with these charges? well, prosecution always have a choice in deciding whether or not to charge someone with a criminal offense.— not to charge someone with a criminal offense. , ., ., , criminal offense. they have to base that on whether _ criminal offense. they have to base that on whether there _ criminal offense. they have to base that on whether there is _ criminal offense. they have to base that on whether there is sufficient l that on whether there is sufficient evidence with up and it whether it in the public interest. ifail to
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see how this could possibly have beenin see how this could possibly have been in the public interest. this must�*ve caused hundreds of thousands of pounds and it was in relation to a statue that federated a slave trader who was responsible for transportation of more africans than anyone else in history. now i think thatis anyone else in history. now i think that is pretty disgraceful.— that is pretty disgraceful. thank ou ve that is pretty disgraceful. thank you very much _ that is pretty disgraceful. thank you very much indeed _ that is pretty disgraceful. thank you very much indeed for - that is pretty disgraceful. thank| you very much indeed forjoining that is pretty disgraceful. thank . you very much indeed forjoining us on the line. very quickly the latest developments. 1 tennis star in the world, was denied entry into australia they have confirmed that he is been denied entry they are quote djokovic failed to provide evidence to meet the requirements for his visa. he is
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been subsequently canceled. that is the latest in a fast—moving story. we will see what happens next. you been watching bbc news. hello. some chilly weather around for the next few days, and indeed nights, although the frost will, i think, become less widespread towards the end of the week. for the weekend, signs though, that the weather will become a little milder, temperatures getting close to average values. it could be very mild by the time we get to monday. first thing thursday, though, no such thing. a widespread hard frost gets the day under way. weather fronts pushing into the west will lift the frost quickly from northern ireland, but as they run into the cold air across scotland, northern england, parts of the midlands and wales, we could see some significant snow. gusty winds accompanying the front on its way across the uk mean blizzard conditions are possible, and it will feel cold once again. temperatures in the mid—range of single figures.
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plenty of showers following on behind the weather front overnight thursday into friday, temperatures falling below freezing across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, so further accumulations of snow and a significant ice risk as we look at the start of friday. perhaps temperatures in the towns and cities to the south managing to stay slightly above, but certainly a chilly start to friday, just not quite as cold as we start thursday. however, with a north—westerly wind, another chilly—feeling day to come, and more snow showers for the north and west of scotland, for northern ireland, trickling down into the pennines, perhaps a few across wales too. showers for the south—west of england, yes, a possibility, but aside from across the tops of the moors, i think we are looking at rain here. cold, though, on friday — just 2 degrees in aberdeen, 3 in glasgow, 6 for london. so here comes the weekend, and here comes a change. we pick up a south—westerly airstream, milderaircoming in along with this frontal system. saturday quite
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a different—looking day. a lot of cloud around, a dreary day, some pretty wet weather. but it will feel quite different because of the milder air. temperatures return to double figures to the south of the uk, 6s and 7s further north. a little bit of late brightness, i think, for scotland and northern ireland. this frontal system should clear away eastwards for early sunday, and then we see a little ridge of high pressure building. for the second half of the weekend, fingers crossed we're going to be set up for some fairly decent sunshine. we will see a little bit more cloud, perhaps, approaching northern ireland, western parts of wales, the south—west of england through the afternoon, but not too much in the way of wet weather. in the sunshine, well, because of a north—westerly breeze, a little cooler than on saturday, but around average temperatures. i think definitely the quieter day of the two for the weekend. and then monday, another frontal system sitting to the north—west of the uk, some very mild air getting pulled up inside this system. monday, what a difference,
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for example, to thursday. a lot of cloud around potentially, maybejust bright rather than sunny spells. some rain at times across scotland and northern ireland, but look at the temperatures. 12 to 1a degrees, very much on the mild side for this point in the year. so which way will it go throughout the remainder of the week ahead? well, at the moment it looks like the jet stream will shift to the north of us, so if anything our temperatures will tend to around average values or perhaps slightly on the milder side for the time of year, as we have the potential for quite a big area of high pressure to build to the south. that will mean for england and wales, a significant chance of things staying dry and fine, but we could see some lingering fog. to the north, some more cloud and perhaps some rain.
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tonight at 10: the scale of the 0micron crisis is revealed, as new figures suggest one in every 15 people in the uk was infected in the run up to new year's eve. no more pcr tests to confirm a positive lateral flow result in england and wales, to help ease pressure on labs, if there are no symtoms. but fears remain, for hospitals... potentially of greatest concern, case rates are now rising rapidly among the older and more vulnerable, including doubling every week among those over 60, with the obvious risk that this will continue to increase the pressures on our nhs. but the prime minister insists the current level of covid restrictions in england is "helping take the edge, off the 0micron wave." also tonight... novak djokovic has his visa revoked to play in the australian open.
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it follows controversy over an exemption to covid vaccine rules.

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