Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 5, 2022 12:00pm-1:01pm GMT

12:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at midday... borisjohnson has been meeting his top team and they're expected not to impose any further covid restrictions in england. that's despite the current high levels of infection in the country. the nhs is under increasing strain from coronavirus. more trusts in england declare critical incidents, and 17 hospitals in greater manchester put some non—urgent surgery on hold. the government's finalising plans to drop the requirement in england that people who test positive on a lateral flow test should get a pcr to confirm it. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon is due to address parliament later today, as covid cases continue to rise. president macron warns he intends to make life difficult for people in france who have not been vaccinated against covid—19.
12:01 pm
the australian prime minister, scott morrison has warned tennis star novak djokovic will be "on the next plane home," without sufficient evidence to support his covid vaccination exemption to play at the australian open. we await his presentation and what evidence he provides to support that. if that evidence is insufficient, then he won't be treated any different to anyone else and he will be on the next plane home. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has been meeting his cabinet to ask them to back his decision not to impose any further covid restrictions in england, despite soaring levels of infection. ministers are also considering changing the rules on covid tests in england to ease staffing shortages by reducing self—isolation periods.
12:02 pm
last night, borisjohnson said he hopes the country could "ride out" the current wave, but accepted that part of the nhs would feel overwhelmed. it comes as string of hospital trusts in england have declared critical incidents. in scotland, nicola sturgeon is expected to announce whether she will be cutting self—isolation time for those testing positive from 10 days to 7 as the scottish parliament holds a special virtual session. the french president emmanuel macron has caused controversy by using a slang term for "annoy" to criticise and try to get unvaccinated people in france to have a covid vaccine. and novak djokovic will be "on the next plane home," if reasons for him being exempted from having a covid vaccine were insufficient. that's according to the prime minster, scott morrison, amid rising anger over an exemption granted by australia open organisers.
12:03 pm
the first of our reports from jon donnison is about the pressures on nhs. derriford hospital in plymouth is one of a growing number to declare a critical incident because of omicron pressures on staffing levels, as well as the growing burden of those needing care. hospitals in blackpool, norfolk, wiltshire, morecambe bay and lincoln have also raised the alarm. in plymouth, they are warning the situation is increasingly complex. we have got patients who are coming in, who are absolutely covid positive and they need to be in a designated area of the hospital. and those numbers are increasing. and then we've got patients in hospital, who have tested negative on admission, but then don't have symptoms, and then develop symptoms and then are testing positive. and in manchester last night, 17 hospitals put a pause on non—urgent surgery citing the rising impact of covid—19 and staff absence
12:04 pm
levels of around 15%. those hospitals are under pressure, notjust because of the number of patients coming in with covid, but also because, unfortunately, many of our staff are now isolating because they themselves have covid as well. and it's those two pressures, the patients coming in and the reduction in our staffing, staff being available, that is having the impact at present. although pressure on intensive care might be less severe than in previous waves, the omicron variant is so transmissible, it's seen the numbers with covid in hospital in england alone double in under a fortnight. the prime minister isn't thinking of more restrictions at the moment, but he admits the next few weeks will be hard. there will be a difficult period - for our wonderful nhs for the next few weeks because of omicron. ijust think that we have i to get through it as best as we possibly can. we will give the nhs - all the support that we can.
12:05 pm
but in the meantime, - the thing we've got to do, as responsible members of the public, is follow . the guidance, try to stop- transmission as much as we can and get boosted. there is some evidence that cases in young adults might be flattening off, but the worry now is that older adults are becoming infected, adding even more to the strain in the nhs. that's why government advisers are warning that hospital admissions could be going up for quite some time. jon donnison, bbc news. well, as we heard, the government is looking at removing the requirement for people in england who test positive for covid on a lateral flow device, but don't have symptoms, to get a follow up pcr test. here's the health minister gillian keegan speaking to bbc breakfast this morning. well, as i say, i don't have any official news on that. but i know the teams are looking at testing and testing regimes. as i say, we have introduced so many lateral flow tests now that, you know, people are...
12:06 pm
and they are very accurate, the lateral flow tests, you know, they are really accurate if people are infectious, so i guess they are looking at the regimes all the time in terms of what makes sense. but i don't have any, as i say, official news. but teams will announce it once they have come to their conclusions. i asked our political correspondent helen catt whether for borisjohnson today is all about defending his plan b and his decision not to introduce further restrictions for england. i think certainly that what we are expecting to hear later today. the prime minister is due to give a statement to parliament, he was meeting his cabinet this morning and made it clear at yesterday's press conference that what he would be recommending to the cabinet and asking them to get on—board with is this idea of continuing with plan b, he felt that was the right course to carry on without moving into any further restrictions in england. as you said, at the same time, he talked about the possibility or, that the nhs would be facing a very difficult time over
12:07 pm
the coming weeks. so i think at the moment, there is a review point, so we expect those plan b measures will continue. they are due to expire on the 26th of january, so i think there will be perhaps a lot of focus today on how long they might stay in place, whether they would be extended beyond that. that might not be a decision made now. the government has consistently wants to keep watching the data and see what's happening but certainly that's one of the questions that will be asked. also we've heard these plans that we understand are being finalised on testing, because we know there has been massive testing pressure, a massive increase in demand, so possible changes which maybe we will hear more detail on later for people who do not have symptoms who show up positive on a lateral flow test too, so lots of meetings happening this morning, but we should get a clearer idea in parliament later. plenty for opposition parties to question the prime minister about at pmqs.
12:08 pm
the later time today, 3pm rather than at noon. it will not be keir starmer, will it? sir keir starmer has tested positive for the second time today, last time was back in october. he has had to self—isolate four times, so this is not the first time he will be missing from pmqs, it will be his deputy, angela rayner, who will lead the questioning for labour. let's talk to professor alan mcnally, director of institute of microbiology and infection at birmingham university. i want to get your reaction to these plans to change the four people to have a pcr test if they test positive using a lateral. earlier in the pandemic, lateralflow tests were seen as not as good as pcr
12:09 pm
tests. , �* , . ., , were seen as not as good as pcr tests. , �* , _, , ., tests. yes, it's welcome news and has been required _ tests. yes, it's welcome news and has been required for _ tests. yes, it's welcome news and has been required for some - tests. yes, it's welcome news and has been required for some time. | tests. yes, it's welcome news and | has been required for some time. i take your point about the early days of the lateral flow tests. we were learning about the limitations but these tests are excellent at picking up these tests are excellent at picking up infections in people with symptoms with very, very very few full positives. if you had a positive result in a lateral local you can be fairly certain that means you have covid,. i think the time is right for the change. if you think about the pcr testing system under enormous strain since the beginning of december. if you go back even to the summer, last summer we were at the summer, last summer we were at the stage where we were running lots of pcr tests, but those pcr tests were not making any difference to the epidemic, the control. it's
12:10 pm
welcome news.— the epidemic, the control. it's welcome news. yes, but icy lots of --eole welcome news. yes, but icy lots of peeple seem _ welcome news. yes, but icy lots of peeple seem to — welcome news. yes, but icy lots of people seem to be _ welcome news. yes, but icy lots of people seem to be thinking - welcome news. yes, but icy lots of people seem to be thinking or - people seem to be thinking or commenting that this is being driven because of the pressure on the pcr testing system, that's what some people say, rather than scientific reasons. you are saying you think there's a good practical and scientific basis for moving towards lateral flow?— scientific basis for moving towards lateral flow? ~ , ,., , ., , lateral flow? absolutely. numerous publications — lateral flow? absolutely. numerous publications have _ lateral flow? absolutely. numerous publications have shown _ lateral flow? absolutely. numerous publications have shown they - lateral flow? absolutely. numerous publications have shown they are i publications have shown they are excellent for testing for covid—19 infections. people at the london school of and tropical medicine have published that showing the impact of switching to lateral flow, we know this is a move that will work. also, a comment i made last week i think, if you have 250,000 or 300, 400,000 cases of covid in a day in the country, you can't possibly hope to deliver a community pcr testing system. so yes, there are strains in
12:11 pm
the pcr testing and they do need to be addressed because otherwise we lose control of the numbers of infections per day, but i do think that the data supports the move to lateral flow, for community testing. i think what we need to do now is used pcr tests and that's probably for the most clinically vulnerable, clinical cases in hospitals and may be the idea of using them for key workers rather than lateral flow tests. i workers rather than lateral flow tests. . , workers rather than lateral flow tests. ., , ., ., ., ., tests. i was going to ask in what instances would _ tests. i was going to ask in what instances would pcr _ tests. i was going to ask in what instances would pcr tests - tests. i was going to ask in what instances would pcr tests be i instances would pcr tests be advisable. you talked about the strain on the pcr testing. there is a strain on the lateral flow tests since we started talking about this in the last hour, a number of viewers have been in touch to say they have ordered tests and weeks later they are still waiting. all of this working is on the basis that people can actually get their hands on these tests. that's a concern, isn't it? ., �* ., , ,
12:12 pm
isn't it? you're absolutely right, any switch _ isn't it? you're absolutely right, any switch to — isn't it? you're absolutely right, any switch to large-scale - isn't it? you're absolutely right, - any switch to large-scale community any switch to large—scale community lateral flow testing requires a really good logistics and flow of tests around the country. clearly there were issues with that over christmas and new year, but one would hope that with the government, it seems, now discussing this move to community lateral flow testing, the logistics and problems behind getting the tests delivered across the country are a key component of that and have been ironed out because yes, it's essential. what we can't have is what's currently the problem with pcr is at the moment people cannot ask access them. we need to make sure people need to take a cobra test because they have i , s essential. and if they have them at their disposal _ , s essential. and if they have them at their disposal is _ , s essential. and if they have them at their disposal is the _ , s essential. and if they have them at their disposal is the quick - , s essential. and if they have them at their disposal is the quick key - at their disposal is the quick key phrase. when people have lateral flow tests, we want them to use them in at timely way. what is the importance of time when it comes to
12:13 pm
taking a lateral flow test? what's the best way for people to use them? i think there are two things. it's really important when the government makes this move to make it clear the test results have to be reported. this will be our only way of keeping track of this epidemic wave. i think the other key thing to get across and something i have said since i was first using lateral flow tests for student testing this time last year, is that the wonderful positive result of, you can be absently sure. negative result means you were not negative when you took the test. that does not mean to say you had to not have the beginnings of a covid infection. i would encourage people if they have symptoms to test regularly and if they are taking a test to do an activity, do the test immediately before the activity. a lateral flow test result can change within a matter of 12—24 hours. take it as close to the reason you are taking a test because they can
12:14 pm
change quickly and that's key messaging to get across. a lateral flow test on a tuesday does not mean you can do something on wednesday night. you should take it immediately before you go about whatever business it is you're going to do. . ~ i. whatever business it is you're going to do. . ~' , whatever business it is you're going todo. . , . the scottish parliament will hold a special virtual session this afternoon, in response to the rise in omicron cases. a cabinet meeting before the session is discussing whether to reduce the period that people are required to isolate after contact with someone who has the virus. it's not thought that the first minister will announce any further restrictions, but she may give more details on financial help to businesses affected by the measures already in place. it seems to be the case that all the pressure, or a lot of the pressure, is in that direction, given that the other uk nations have made that move. there is also pressure from business and from the main opposition party in scotland against the snp government, the scottish conservatives. they have argued that omicron,
12:15 pm
the indications are it is a milder variant of coronavirus, so it poses less of a risk, and also they say this requirement to isolate for an extended period of time is putting extraordinary pressure on key services and businesses. we have certainly seen that rail services have changed, the timetables have changed, ferry services have been cancelled, other key parts of the economy have been affected, so a lot of the pressure at the moment that the scottish government in the cabinet meeting this morning discussing will be around that issue. we will have to wait until after 2pm to find out what the decision is. is it possible yet to say how the strategy in scotland, with more restrictions, is shaping up, versus the strategy in england, with fewer restrictions and how much pushback is nicola sturgeon getting from businesses who are greater restrictions in scotland ? that's a really interesting question, and a really important question. certainly the deputy first minister
12:16 pm
john swinney has tried to make the case that scotland has done better, because it has tighter restrictions. in reality, i think he was talking about a period of the pandemic a couple of weeks ago, when the full impact of omicron had not become apparent in scotland. i think that's really a live and urgent question for the scottish government. did they make the right decision in terms of going forward with tighter restrictions than some other parts of the uk? certainly cases have gone up dramatically in scotland, doubling over a fairly short period of time here. and also increases in people in hospital, although interestingly, not large increases in people in intensive care. i think that's a key question that nicola sturgeon is going to face this afternoon. that's the latest in scotland, let's go to wales now where schools
12:17 pm
that's the latest in scotland, let's go to wales now where schools are due to reopen tomorrow following the christmas break. our correspondent there is tomos morgan. news of money to help schools? an news of money to help schools? in extra hundred million pounds news of money to help schools? fifi extra hundred million pounds being supplied today as you mentioned. due to reopen tomorrow across the country. we are hearing some schools have deferred that until monday due to staff shortages. it looks like many will still reopen as planned tomorrow but it will come down to whether or not they do have enough staff. these schools across wales were given an extra two deals and yesterday to see whether they could open tomorrow. it will be interesting to see how many of them do that. i understand obviously it's a decision for the head teachers, but they will speak to the local authorities to see if they come to collective agreement if there is some collective agreement to be made. if not, they will open on an
12:18 pm
individual basis. much of whatjames said in scotland is the same here. very similar restrictions. our rule of six and hospitality settings, further with nightclubs being closed as well and all spectators banned from spectator sports and large events also called off. all those rules came in on boxing day. still a bit too early to say whether or not they have had any impact on reducing they have had any impact on reducing the numbers here, nevertheless the numbers are positive cases have risen substantially over the last few days and the number in hospitals has doubled compared to two weeks ago. however, that number is still far less than this time last year when the delta variant came in over the 2020 christmas break. interesting to see what mark drakeford interesting to see what mark dra keford says interesting to see what mark drakeford says in his press conference but certainly i would not expect to see easing of restrictions and i probably would not expect to see any restrictions for the time
12:19 pm
being because he is getting some heat from the hospitality sector which is calling for more money to help their industry which they say has been severely dampened having not been able to operate at max capacity over the christmas period and also they want to get back to normal as quickly as possible. {iii normal as quickly as possible. of course the decision in england not to introduce further restrictions as applying pressure trip first ministers in the rest of the uk. you have been looking at schools. give is a sense of the pressure and other parts of the system. the health system and so forth in wales. yesterday the head of nhs wales said its some nhs health trust, there was a 50% of staff of with covid. the rules did change like in england when it came to self isolation so thatis when it came to self isolation so that is down to seven days. we are waiting to hear whether scotland will follow the same pattern. that has made some difference but there has made some difference but there has been a huge trading on the nhs.
12:20 pm
huge pressure. the ambulance service still supported here by the military to help boost personnel. this is the third orfourth to help boost personnel. this is the third or fourth time to help boost personnel. this is the third orfourth time during to help boost personnel. this is the third or fourth time during the pandemic the military had to step into help the welsh ambulance service. no doubt pressures there. the key stats that often gets missed during this pandemic is the number of people occupying beds in hospitals. that has reached 86% in wales which is a huge number. at 90% it is really very struggling for many of the hospital trusts across the country. that number is rising. however, as i mentioned earlier, when it comes to seriously ill cases of covid, that remains stable. potentially a positive sign for the amount of people vaccinated, potentially positive as well because of the restrictions in place. some could argue. yes there is a strain because it's winter and the covid pressures as well, but at the moment when it comes to critically out,
12:21 pm
that number seems to be stable. thank you. vulnerable primary school children in northern ireland are expected to be offered a low—dose covid—19 vaccine to be offered a low—dose covid—19 vaccine in the coming weeks, in line with the rest of the uk. last month, the government's vaccine advisors said 5—to—11—year—olds with an underlying health condition, or who live with someone who is immunosuppressed, should receive two doses eight weeks apart. a decision on vaccinating all children in this age range has not yet been made. joining me now is our ireland correspondent chris page. tell us more about this plan. the latest measure _ tell us more about this plan. tie: latest measure announced by tell us more about this plan. ti2 latest measure announced by the authorities here in northern ireland as you see, some children aged 25 and 11 art to be offered vaccination. that's children in that age category who have underlying health conditions which means they
12:22 pm
are particularly vulnerable to the coronavirus and children who live with another person in their household who has a health condition which means they have asked a press immune system. that's the latest on the eligibility for vaccination. the devolved government continuing to make the point strongly that the best thing people can do to help play their part in this wave of the pandemic is to get their booster vaccination if they have not already. the latest government figures suggest northern ireland has the highest infection rate of the uk's for nations. to give you an idea of how that is playing out, yesterday the chief scientific adviser to the northern ireland executive, said of all the positive tests in northern ireland that have been recorded, since we have first heard of the coronavirus, 12% of those positive tests have come about in just the last seven days. omicron is spreading he said at an
12:23 pm
exceptional rate but the pressures on hospitals certainly have been mounting that the number of people being admitted to hospital with covid has been rising at a relatively slow level. while certainly health trusts are warning of the pressures on their staff, also the northern ireland ambulance service is warning there will be a knock—on effect potentially on the most urgent calls they have. there is no huge expectation when ministers meet tomorrow to review the covid situation that they will go ahead with tighter restrictions. also no expectation they will loosen the restrictions that have been in place here since boxing day so nightclubs had to close, back to the rule of six in all hospitality venues, table service only, in bars and restaurants. the regulations around masquerading has been tightened as well. indoor events that involve standing, concerts for
12:24 pm
example, are banned. you can only go to indoor events if it is fully seated. no restrictions on the capacity of sporting events. they are going ahead as planned with a full capacity although that has been a number of casualties in that sporting calendar owing to covid cases in football and rugby squad for example. tomorrow is the next staging post but no expectations there will be change one way or another, we can expect government ministers to reinforce the importance of everybody to stick to the regulations and guidance already enforced. that includes the recommendation if you are going to someone's home, no more than three households should socialise together indoors. we can see a reinforcement of those messages, more appeals for people to get their booster if they have not already but not necessarily any tightening of the laws as we
12:25 pm
have at the moment.— any tightening of the laws as we have at the moment. thank you very much. and you can find out how the nhs is coping in your area via the bbc�*s online nhs tracker. for an indication of a&e waiting times and how busy local services are in england, wales and scotland, visit bbc.co.uk/nhstracker. ajudge in new york is considering whether to dismiss a civil case accusing prince andrew of sexual assault. the prince's lawyers say his accuser, virginia giuffre, can't sue because of a deal she made in 2009, when she accepted damages from jeffrey epstein, in return for dropping her claims against him and any other "potential defendant." prince andrew has consistently denied her allegations. sarah krissoff is a former prosecutor for the southern district of new york. she's previously prosecuted sex trafficking cases and crimes against children and is now in private practice.
12:26 pm
thank you forjoining us today. this is a civil case, we should remind everyone rather than a criminal case, and we are still waiting on the decision from the judge. do you have any indication when that might come? , , come? the 'udge said yesterday he exected come? the judge said yesterday he exnected to — come? the judge said yesterday he expected to issue _ come? the judge said yesterday he expected to issue the _ come? the judge said yesterday he expected to issue the decision - come? the judge said yesterday he expected to issue the decision very| expected to issue the decision very quickly. i think we are probably talking a week or two here. i expect that when thejudge talking a week or two here. i expect that when the judge came out yesterday to hear the argument he had a pretty good idea where he was heading on this and just wanted to get the parties. i think likely he already had a decision drafted, putting the final touches on the decision and will issue it in the next few weeks.— decision and will issue it in the next few weeks. ~ . ., , next few weeks. where are we at this oint? the next few weeks. where are we at this point? the key _ next few weeks. where are we at this point? the key point _ next few weeks. where are we at this point? the key point of _ next few weeks. where are we at this point? the key point of law— next few weeks. where are we at this point? the key point of law being - point? the key point of law being considered. point? the key point of law being considered-— considered. this is still really earl in considered. this is still really early in a _ considered. this is still really early in a civil— considered. this is still really early in a civil litigation, - considered. this is still really early in a civil litigation, so . early in a civil litigation, so under the federal rules, the
12:27 pm
defendant here prince andrew, has an opportunity to move to dismiss the complaint, especially say there are allegations in the complaint even if you accept them as two are not sufficient to state any theory of liability. he has a very high burden on a motion to dismiss and essentially there cannot be any issues of fact and the law has to be very clear as well. that burden is very clear as well. that burden is very hard to meet, i don't expect he will meet that burden and i expect that thejudge will will meet that burden and i expect that the judge will let the case proceed to the next stage. and proceed to the next stage. and prince andrew _ proceed to the next stage. and prince andrew denies the allegations, has consistently denied the allegations made by virginia giuffre so we don't want to speculate too much in advance of the actual decision from the judge, but if his lawyers argument is dismissed, what would happen next? could he appeal at this stage or not? ., , .. ,
12:28 pm
could he appeal at this stage or not? ., , , ., ., not? not yet. the case would move into discovery _ not? not yet. the case would move into discovery period, _ not? not yet. the case would move into discovery period, where - not? not yet. the case would move into discovery period, where the - into discovery period, where the parties would exchange information, provide documents to each other, allow for depositions, essentially enquiries of the relevant witnesses and parties, and then it moves into something called a summaryjudgment phase which is another opportunity for the parties to say there are no issues of material fact, let's resolve this case without a trial. this is really a pivotal moment, a key moment in all of these proceedings?— key moment in all of these proceedings? key moment in all of these -~roceedins? ~ , , , proceedings? absolutely. this is sort of the _ proceedings? absolutely. this is sort of the key — proceedings? absolutely. this is sort of the key moment - proceedings? absolutely. this is sort of the key moment where l proceedings? absolutely. this is i sort of the key moment where the judge had says this case can proceed august case cannot proceed. {lilia august case cannot proceed. 0k, thank ou august case cannot proceed. 0k, thank you very — august case cannot proceed. 0k, thank you very much for your thoughts on all of that. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. chilly days lie ahead of us.
12:29 pm
some rural parts of scotland could see temperatures fall as low as —10. perfect conditions for a frost to develop with light wind through the evening, showers retreating to the coast and widespread expenses of clear sky. coast and widespread expenses of clearsky. northern coast and widespread expenses of clear sky. northern ireland are little milder here. more cloud around by the end of the night and the wind will start to pick up. as this frontal system approaches it will run into a love that cold air setting across the uk and as it does so we can expect to see significant snowfall for scotland, northern england, wales and the midlands as well. i ground could see ten centimetres of snow, some settling at blizzard conditions at a time, could feed in a few showers particularly western exposures even once that front is through. and it feels
12:30 pm
chilly. hello this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... hello this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... borisjohnson has been meeting his top team and they're expected not to impose any further covid restrictions in england — that's despite the current high levels of infection in the country. the nhs is under increasing strain from coronavirus — more trusts in england declare critical incidents — and 17 hospitals in greater manchester put some non urgent surgery on hold. the government's finalising plans to drop the requirement in england that people who test positive on a lateral flow test should get a pcr to confirm it. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon is due to address parliament later today as covid cases continue to rise,. president macron warns he intends to make life difficult for people in france who have not been vaccinated against covid—19. and australian prime minister scott morrison has warned tennis
12:31 pm
star novak djokovic will be "on the next plane home" without sufficient evidence to support his covid vaccination exemption to play at the australian open. more now on our main story, the potential change in england to drop the need for pcr tests after you've had a positive lateral flow. our head of statistics robert cuffe explained what it would mean. a lateral flow test, if you test about a thousand people, might give you may be one false positive. that doesn't mean a lot if about 40 people are testing positive who genuinely have the virus, and that is what is happening at the moment. the levels are so high. so if you have one false positive out of 41 people who have tested, there is not much value with getting them tested again with a pcr to weed out that one. back last summit was different because maybe only two people out of those tests would have coronavirus, so the tests haven't changed, but it
12:32 pm
is easier to spot coronavirus because there are so much more of it going around. find because there are so much more of it going around-— going around. and maybe it is about ressure going around. and maybe it is about pressure on — going around. and maybe it is about pressure on the _ going around. and maybe it is about pressure on the system _ going around. and maybe it is about pressure on the system as _ going around. and maybe it is about pressure on the system as well? - going around. and maybe it is about| pressure on the system as well? you have not pressure on the system as well? gm. have got around a quarter of people in the daily case is just before new year were people who tested positive on a lateral flow test, and a year were people who tested positive on a lateralflow test, and a good chunk of them went on to get a pcr. why take up that capacity if it is stretched in order to tell you something you pretty much already know? ., ., , ., , . ., ., know? how does all this affect data, because as l — know? how does all this affect data, because as i discussed _ know? how does all this affect data, because as i discussed with - know? how does all this affect data, because as i discussed with a - know? how does all this affect data, because as i discussed with a guest. because as i discussed with a guest a short while ago, because with a lateral flow test because you can't sequence that, but you can sequence a pcr test to see what is going on with that case of covid, what variant it is, etc. also there is a question that if people are doing lateral flows, question that if people are doing lateralflows, will question that if people are doing lateral flows, will everyone report the result of those? so what will this do to the amount of data that is available for the government to see? ., ., , see? there are two things there. one is the general — see? there are two things there. one is the general trends _ see? there are two things there. one is the general trends in _ see? there are two things there. one is the general trends in the _ is the general trends in the epidemic, and you are right it is harder to read general trends that are dependent on behaviour, like people not getting tested over
12:33 pm
christmas, people getting tested on the first day back at work or deciding to report on the lateral flows. but daily cases aren't the only things we have. we have things like surveys where you test people at random that don't depend on who decides to come forward or who get sick, so we can still get a sense of the trends. the second part is the sequencing. we are still doing hundreds of thousands of pcr test every day. this isjust hundreds of thousands of pcr test every day. this is just about a change in the people who happen to test positive on a lateral flow, and it is how best do you spend the resources that you have? because we are coming up close to the limits of the pcr system, so we are keeping a track on the sequencing, we can still sequence those but why would you spend them, as i said, telling you spend them, as i said, telling you things you already know about people who are already positive when you can get what you need from what you can get what you need from what you have? ilil" you can get what you need from what ou have? ., ., , ., , ., you have? our head of statistics there. the french president has warned
12:34 pm
he intends to make life difficult for people in france who have not been vaccinated against covid—19. emmanuel macron said he wanted to tighten measures, including requiring people to show proof of vaccination to access public venues and transport. more than 90% of its adult population are double—jabbed. earlier we spoke with our paris correspondent hugh schofield. he was giving the interview to a newspaper, a wide—ranging interview on his— newspaper, a wide—ranging interview on his likely— newspaper, a wide—ranging interview on his likely presidential bid in the elections coming up, and he was asked _ the elections coming up, and he was asked about — the elections coming up, and he was asked about covid, and a nurse on the panel— asked about covid, and a nurse on the panel asked him to react to the fact that _ the panel asked him to react to the fact that there were more and more people _ fact that there were more and more people non—vaccinated who are clogging — people non—vaccinated who are clogging up beds in intensive care units, _ clogging up beds in intensive care units, and — clogging up beds in intensive care units, and as a result she said cancer— units, and as a result she said cancer patients for example having operations — cancer patients for example having operations put off. and he said, in reply, _ operations put off. and he said, in reply. what— operations put off. and he said, in reply, what i can't do is force people — reply, what i can't do is force people to _ reply, what i can't do is force people to get vaccinated. we are not going _ people to get vaccinated. we are not going to _ people to get vaccinated. we are not going to introduce a law that makes it a legal— going to introduce a law that makes it a legal requirement. but what we can do— it a legal requirement. but what we can do is— it a legal requirement. but what we can do is make life as difficult as possible — can do is make life as difficult as possible for the non—vaccinated. and
12:35 pm
he assumes— possible for the non—vaccinated. and he assumes this policy very clearly. what _ he assumes this policy very clearly. what he _ he assumes this policy very clearly. what he said very clearly is what we can do _ what he said very clearly is what we can do is— what he said very clearly is what we can do is make life very difficult, they— can do is make life very difficult, they can't— can do is make life very difficult, they can't go to a bar, they can't io they can't go to a bar, they can't go to— they can't go to a bar, they can't go to a _ they can't go to a bar, they can't go to a cafe, _ they can't go to a bar, they can't go to a cafe, they can't go to a restaurant. _ go to a cafe, they can't go to a restaurant, they can't go on trains because _ restaurant, they can't go on trains because they need a vaccination certificate — because they need a vaccination certificate to do those things. and he use _ certificate to do those things. and he use a _ certificate to do those things. and he use a word which has slightly rude _ he use a word which has slightly rude overtones, it is a word that people _ rude overtones, it is a word that people will— rude overtones, it is a word that people will probably know, and france — people will probably know, and france is — people will probably know, and france is in a pre—election period and the _ france is in a pre—election period and the oppositionjumped on this to say, look— and the oppositionjumped on this to say, look at — and the oppositionjumped on this to say, look at this president, he is divisive. — say, look at this president, he is divisive. he _ say, look at this president, he is divisive, he claims to be speaking for all— divisive, he claims to be speaking for all of— divisive, he claims to be speaking for all of the french but here he is casting _ for all of the french but here he is casting this — for all of the french but here he is casting this sort of cloak of opprobrium on the 5 million people, not an— opprobrium on the 5 million people, not an insubstantial minority, who don't _ not an insubstantial minority, who don't want — not an insubstantial minority, who don't want to get vaccinated. but
12:36 pm
the president knew perfectly well what he _ the president knew perfectly well what he was doing, which was a calculated — what he was doing, which was a calculated manoeuvre, and as i say, it all has— calculated manoeuvre, and as i say, it all has to — calculated manoeuvre, and as i say, it all has to be seen through the prism _ it all has to be seen through the prism of— it all has to be seen through the prism of the upcoming elections. hugh— prism of the upcoming elections. hugh schofield in paris. the house of representatives committee investigating the storming of the us capitol almost exactly a year ago by supporters of donald trump says it wants to question one of the former president's closet allies in the media. text messages have been published that show the fox news presenter, sean hannity, was in close contact with mr trump and his senior staff before and after the attack. mark lobel examines the state of the criminal and congressional investigations. a year on since this brutal attempt to overturnjoe biden's win, in which five people died and dozens in law enforcement were injured, hundreds have been charged and many are behind bars, where some politicians think at least two of donald trump's allies belong. and america remains a divided country. a criminal investigation is ongoing.
12:37 pm
the 725 arrested and over 70 sentenced so far have come from right across america. an npr study shows most charged have no links to extremist groups and 13% have ties to military or law enforcement — suggesting extremist ideologies have moved into the mainstream. a democrat—led investigative committee has amassed tens of thousands of documents and interviewed over 300 witnesses, summoning over 50. the committee is recommending criminal contempt charges for two of trump's former aides for refusing to appear — steve bannon, who is due in court later this year, and mark meadows, who thejustice department is considering charges against. an aide so close to the president, his text messages reveal trump's son sought his help in getting through to his dad on the day.
12:38 pm
donald trumer texted again and again, urging action by the president. quote, "we need an oval office address. "he has to lead now. "it has gone too far and gotten out of hand." the committee is now seeking to speak to fox news host sean hannity, who is said to have texted trump's team onjanuary the 5th that he was very worried about the next 48 hours. the committee is under pressure to deliver before november's midterms, when they could be dissolved if the republicans do well, as they search to find out if federal and state officials were pressured into changing election results — and if the president really did consider using emergency powers to bring in the national guard to do just that. despite last year's shocking scenes, this remains far
12:39 pm
from a one—sided story. recent polling shows that 26% of republicans think the protesters who entered the capitol were "mostly violent," compared to 78% of democrats. 72% of republicans say trump doesn't really bear responsibility for what happened, compared to 60% of americans, who say he bears a great deal or good amount. a year on from urging his followers, in his own words, "to fight like hell after a rigged election," donald trump maintains he has done nothing wrong. but he has just cancelled a news conference scheduled forjanuary 6th, claiming "total bias and dishonesty" of what he called "the january 6th unselect committee" and "fake news media" — one reading of which is that the pressure may be starting to bite. mark lobel, bbc news.
12:40 pm
violent unrest is continuing across kazakhstan with major cities placed under a state of emergency. the protests were sparked by a government decision to double the price of fuel used in vehicles. the president of kazakhstan has dismissed the country's government and appointed an acting prime minister a two—week state of emergency has been declared in the country's biggest city — and police used tear gas to contain crowds after vehicles were set on fire. sylvia lennan—spence reports. this is not a sight you often see on the streets of almaty. thousands of protesters voicing their anger at price rises in the centre of kazakhstan's financial capital. in a country where most public demonstrations are illegal, protesters don't normally storm the mayor's office, but that's exactly what these people are doing. it didn't take the authorities long to react. police moved in and moved the protesters out of the main square with tear gas and grenades.
12:41 pm
the protests started in provinces. here in mangystau demonstrators took to the streets after the authorities lifted price caps on vehicle fuel, causing prices to surge. since then there have been big demonstrations in several cities and towns. internet services are down in the country. the president went on television with this warning. translation: those calls to attack the government and military - buildings are completely illegal. this is a crime that could be followed by punishment. the government will not fall. but we want mutual trust and dialogue rather than conflict. but mutual trust seems a long way off here. although the president has now ordered the government to regulate the price of fuel and other important goods stop increases increases in fuel costs are likely to affect the price of food, which has already seen steep increases since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. sylvia lennan—spence, bbc news.
12:42 pm
visitor numbers to our national parks have shot up during the pandemic, which means more work for mountain rescue teams when inexperienced walkers and climbers get into difficulty. last year, rescue teams in the lake district were called out 680 times. two of those were on christmas day — and the new year has brought more of the same, as mark mcalindon reports. this is the wasdale team in action, bringing a casualty down from the fells. it's become all too frequent these last 12 months. 680 call—outs in total — 154 for the keswick team alone. over the christmas period, the last eight days, the wasdale team has actually been out for 43 hours. including last night. volunteers looking for two young men trying to climb scafell pike who were badly underprepared. the two lads from manchester,
12:43 pm
no waterproofs, no map, no compass, no torch. they didn't even know where their car was parked. those two lads did well to survive last night, and if we hadn't found them, i think we'd have been looking for two bodies today. it's these avoidable incidents that really stretch teams across the national park. 2,500 person hours, 260 team members. it's incredible numbers, and we are all volunteers, we love doing what we're doing. but the pressure is intense. and with winter conditions, it's feared rescues could turn to tragedy. breaking news coming to us from that uk health security agency, and for people who test positive for covid—19 with no symptoms, follow pcr tests for people in those circumstances will no longer be required in england from january the
12:44 pm
11th, so that is next tuesday. the uk health security agency has confirmed it will suspend the need for people with no symptoms of covid who test positive on rapid lateral flow tests to take a follow—up pcr test to confirm the result. so just to confirm, this rule change applies to confirm, this rule change applies to england only at this stage, and it will take effect from january the 11th, that is next tuesday. the agency said it had previously suspended the requirement between january and march last year at a time of high virus prevalence, and it says it will review the requirement when the proportion of people with the virus in england drops to below 1% for a sustained period of time, so i think on reflection they're from health security agency of the pressure the testing system is under. but the headline as we have been reporting, it was expected that this change was going to happen, and indeed it has.
12:45 pm
it is for england only. people who test positive for coronavirus with a lateral flow test but who have no symptoms are not going to be required to take a follow—up pcr test from january the 11th. novak djokovic has been told he'll be put "on the next plane home" from australia if he fails to provide evidence that he should be exempt from the need for a covid vacine. the prime minister, scott morrison, said the world number one tennis player shouldn't be treated differently to anybody else. djokovic has been given a medical exemption so he can defend his australian open title, but no other details have been published. here's what scott morrison had to say. my my view is that any individual seeking exemption must provide evidence. if novak djokovic turns up, he has to, if he is not
12:46 pm
vaccinated, provide acceptable proof that he cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons to be able to access the same travel arrangements as fully vaccinated travellers. so we await his presentation on what evidence he provides. if that evidence he provides. if that evidence is insufficient, he won't be treated any differently to anyone else, and he will be on the next plane home. else, and he will be on the next plane home-— else, and he will be on the next lane home. ~ , ., ., plane home. the australian prime minister. here's what the british doubles player, jamie murray, had to say at a press conference earlier. i think if it was me that wasn't vaccinated, i wouldn't be getting an exemption, but well done to him getting _ exemption, but well done to him getting cleared to come to australia and compete. and australians have been reacting angrily to news of the tennis player's exemption, amidst strict pandemic rules. i think it's a disgrace. we have all done _ i think it's a disgrace. we have all done the — i think it's a disgrace. we have all done the right— i think it's a disgrace. we have all done the right thing, _ i think it's a disgrace. we have all done the right thing, we've - i think it's a disgrace. we have all done the right thing, we've gonel i think it's a disgrace. we have all. done the right thing, we've gone out and got _ done the right thing, we've gone out and got our— done the right thing, we've gone out and got ouriabs_ done the right thing, we've gone out and got ourjabs and _ done the right thing, we've gone out and got ourjabs and boosters, - done the right thing, we've gone out and got ourjabs and boosters, and l and got ourjabs and boosters, and we have _ and got ourjabs and boosters, and we have someone _ and got ourjabs and boosters, and we have someone that _ and got ourjabs and boosters, and we have someone that has - and got ourjabs and boosters, and we have someone that has come . and got ourjabs and boosters, and i we have someone that has come from overseas _ we have someone that has come from overseas and — we have someone that has come from overseas and all — we have someone that has come from overseas and all of _ we have someone that has come from overseas and all of a _ we have someone that has come from overseas and all of a sudden - we have someone that has come from overseas and all of a sudden he's - overseas and all of a sudden he's been _ overseas and all of a sudden he's
12:47 pm
been exempt— overseas and all of a sudden he's been exempt and _ overseas and all of a sudden he's been exempt and can _ overseas and all of a sudden he's been exempt and can play, - overseas and all of a sudden he's been exempt and can play, and l overseas and all of a sudden he's been exempt and can play, and i| been exempt and can play, and i think— been exempt and can play, and i think it _ been exempt and can play, and i think it is — been exempt and can play, and i think it is an— been exempt and can play, and i think it is an absolute _ been exempt and can play, and i think it is an absolute disgrace . been exempt and can play, and i. think it is an absolute disgrace and i think it is an absolute disgrace and wont _ think it is an absolute disgrace and wont be — think it is an absolute disgrace and i won't be watching. _ think it is an absolute disgrace and i won't be watching. [— think it is an absolute disgrace and i won't be watching.— i won't be watching. i think he miaht i won't be watching. i think he might even — i won't be watching. i think he might even get _ i won't be watching. i think he might even get booed - i won't be watching. i think he might even get booed when . i won't be watching. i think he| might even get booed when he i won't be watching. i think he - might even get booed when he gets up onto the _ might even get booed when he gets up onto the court. he might even get booed when he gets up onto the court-— onto the court. he shouldn't come. but his onto the court. he shouldn't come. lout his choice _ onto the court. he shouldn't come. but his choice not _ onto the court. he shouldn't come. but his choice not to _ onto the court. he shouldn't come. but his choice not to be _ onto the court. he shouldn't come. | but his choice not to be vaccinated, which is fine, and the government it has made the choice that you should be vaccinated. if has made the choice that you should be vaccinated.— be vaccinated. if he has actual medical problems, _ be vaccinated. if he has actual medical problems, but - be vaccinated. if he has actual medical problems, but if - be vaccinated. if he has actual medical problems, but if he i be vaccinated. if he has actual medical problems, but if he isj be vaccinated. if he has actual - medical problems, but if he isjust saying _ medical problems, but if he isjust saying it _ medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to— medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to get _ medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to get in— medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to get in and _ medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to get in and he - medical problems, but if he isjust saying it to get in and he doesn't. saying it to get in and he doesn't have _ saying it to get in and he doesn't have an — saying it to get in and he doesn't have an actual— saying it to get in and he doesn't have an actual reason _ saying it to get in and he doesn't have an actual reason for- saying it to get in and he doesn't have an actual reason for it, - saying it to get in and he doesn't have an actual reason for it, i. have an actual reason for it, i guess— have an actual reason for it, i guess that _ have an actual reason for it, i guess that is _ have an actual reason for it, i guess that is a _ have an actual reason for it, i guess that is a little - have an actual reason for it, i guess that is a little bit - have an actual reason for it, i guess that is a little bit more| have an actual reason for it, i i guess that is a little bit more if he. guess that is a little bit more if he, ., , , guess that is a little bit more if he. , , guess that is a little bit more if he. .,, , , ., ., he. so he has been playing for all these years _ he. so he has been playing for all these years with _ he. so he has been playing for all these years with a _ he. so he has been playing for all these years with a so-called - he. so he has been playing for all. these years with a so-called medical these years with a so—called medical condition. _ these years with a so—called medical condition, which i don't understand. my first— condition, which i don't understand. my first instinct was it is not fair, but i did read that it was a double—blind assessment, so who knows? on the basis it seems unfair. this year will mark the 40th anniversary of the falklands conflict — which claimed the lives of 255 british and 649 argentinian troops. our defence correspondentjonathan beale has been looking back at the events of 1982 — and speaking with some of the veterans who fought in the conflict.
12:48 pm
it was a war on the other side of the world. on april the 2nd,1982, argentine forces invaded the falkland islands and claimed it as their own. the task force, with all its power, is ready. britain has gathered its might, it must set its course. accompanied by the late brian hanrahan for the bbc, a task force of more than 100 ships had set sail within days to make the 8,000 milejourney. their task — to liberate the islands. i thought we had better get ready and take it seriously, but i'm not quite sure that i absolutely believed we would do it. but as they sailed south, resolve hardened. first with the controversial sinking of the argentine cruiser the general belgrano with the loss of 323 lives. we didn't cheer when she was sunk, because we were in a ship, as well. we knew there were argentine submarines. we could have ended up in the same boat, or the same water.
12:49 pm
so we suddenly realised that it was going to be a proper hot war. notjust a hot war, it would be the largest air and sea battle involving british forces since the second world war. 100 aircraft and more than 20 ships would either be destroyed or damaged. julian thompson was the man charged with the initial british landings at san carlos on the 21st of may. luckily it was thick fog. so the argentine air force never found us. we knew they were trying to find us. we could hear them zooming around and trying to find us. they might have created a bit of mayhem had they done so. that was the bit i was really worried about. once we had ourfeet on the ground, i knew we were on our way to winning. so great was the scale of victory that, four days after the surrender,
12:50 pm
nobody has had time to tidy up. goose green was the first time british paratroopers came face—to—face with the enemy. the british lost 18 men, among them friends of paul bishop, who was just 21. after we took casualties and friends had been killed, my feelings was hate towards them. we wanted to take out as many as we could. we wanted to remove them from the islands. later, paul witnessed this — the argentine attacks at bluff cove, where the british lost more than 50 men. he tried to help the dozens injured ashore, but the argentines weren't the only enemy to contend with. winter was coming. a lot of the guys, we just cuddled up together to keep warm at night, and when you woke up, you would do running on the spot or sit ups or press ups to try and get warm and fall back asleep for ten minutes again, wake up freezing cold. so, that's how difficult it was.
12:51 pm
we're now between the two gun lines and there's a right old artillery duel going on between them. the battle on the ground tookjust over a month. short, but victory would be bittersweet for robert lawrence, a young lieutenant in the scots guards who fought in one of the last battles at tumbledown. it became gutter fighting. ammunition, you know, re—supplies aren't going to happen in the middle of a battle, so once you're using up your ammunition, you start using whatever you can lay your hands on, including enemy weapons, and your bayonet. towards the end of the battle, robert was shot in the head by a sniper. the bullet had hit me in the back of the head and came out up here, just in my hairline above my right eye, removing 4.5 by 3.5 inches of skull and damaging the brain quite severely.
12:52 pm
on the 14th ofjune, the argentines surrendered. 649 of them lost their lives. the british had lost 255 men. so what will the 40th anniversary mean for these three veterans? i have great pride in what i've done. and i've always acknowledged that the injury i have is easier to live with emotionally because i did it in a sort of glorious event than i fell out of a hotel window or, you know, fell off a moped. i personally don't expect anything from the country, from the government. we just volunteered to do it and we did it. it would be nice to be remembered. i visit the san carlos cemetery and usually shed a tear there. | and look out over that - peaceful water and remember what it was like with guns firing and ships being hit _ and aeroplanes bombing. the contrast is really quite remarkable. i um, yeah.
12:53 pm
you still shed a tear about it? yeah, one does, yeah. 40 years on from a war on the other side of the world — but they are still remembered. jonathan beale, bbc news. now — what advancements can we expect from the scientific community in 2022? well, mega rockets will be launched in space, there will be another climate summit — cop27 — in egypt, the large hadron collider will be restarted in cern, antarctica will be further explored and the most advanced pictures of the universe will be taken. rebecca morelle, our science editor, has more. it's a big year for space, and we should see the launch of two mega rockets as america prepares to take astronauts back to the moon and beyond. there's starship from spacex. at 120 metres high, it's the tallest rocket ever built, and in 2022 it will attempt to fly around the earth.
12:54 pm
then there's nasa's ultra powerful space launch system, which will blast off and send a crew capsule called orion into orbit. no people will be on board for either of these test flights, but if they're a success, astronauts could soon be taking a ride. back on earth and it will be another critical year for climate change. at november's climate summit in glasgow a deal was reached to try and limit global warming. but it was clear that plans to cut emissions didn't go far enough, so in 2022 the world will meet again, this time in egypt. nations have been asked to return with more ambitious pledges. the question is, will this be enough to stop the worst impacts of climate change? and — remember the large hadron collider? it's the world's most powerful particle accelerator and its discoveries of the higgs boson and dozens of other subatomic particles have changed our understanding of physics. but for the last three years, it's not been operating.
12:55 pm
the shutdown was planned to undertake vital repairs and upgrade work, but the pandemic meant it's taken longer than expected. soon, the collider will be switched on again to start the next phase of experiments. and the uk's new polar research ship has arrived in antarctica, and soon it will be undergoing trials to see how it copes with the thick ice there. the vessel, which was almost called boaty mcboatface after a public vote, is now named after the british naturalist sir david attenborough. it's the most advanced polar vessel ever to set sail, and scientists will use it to study every aspect of this remote and rapidly changing ecosystem. and 2022 should be a dazzling year for the james webb space telescope — the most ambitious astronomy mission ever attempted. after its recent launch, the huge eye in the sky has been slowly unfurling in space to open up its giant sun shield and 6.5 metre wide mirror.
12:56 pm
by the summer it should be ready to send back its first images — giving us our best—ever view of the universe. rebecca morelle, bbc news. the first day back at work after the christmas period can be a bit of a slog — but not for the staff at london zoo. take a look at this. keepers were out in force yesterday, clutching clipboards and cameras, as they completed a labour of love also known as the annual stock take. they worked together to tally up more than 400 species that call the zoo home. it'll take them about a week to complete the count. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan. hello. we have more chilly weather to come for the rest of this week. below average temperatures through the next few days, probably highs in the next few days, probably highs in the mid—single figures at best, and by night we will be talking about a
12:57 pm
frost, particularly widespread frost, particularly widespread frost, overnight tonight, and a hard frost, overnight tonight, and a hard frost at that. clear skies as we move through the evening, showers retreating back to the coasts, the wind is pretty light for much of the uk into the small hours, perfect setup for a sharp frost to develop. rural lows of —5, perhaps even —10 in the sheltered glens of scotland. but northern ireland is comparatively mild, that is because it will be windier here by the end of the night as these fronts start to usher their way in, and we will see some rain, perhaps some snow across the highest ground initially. a little pocket of milder air tucked into this weather system working its way across the uk on thursday, but the extent of the mile there is such that i think it won't have much impact on this weather front as it comes through, bumping into the cold air ahead of comes through, bumping into the cold airahead of it. comes through, bumping into the cold air ahead of it. there is the potential for it to drop quite a lot of snow across scotland, particularly for the highlands and southern uplands and down into the pennines. some of the highest ground seeing up to ten centimetres, but lower levels may well see snow as
12:58 pm
well. blizzard conditions when you add in gusty winds as this frontal system moves through. the sky is clear behind it, they will be afternoon sunshine, it will still feel chilly but showers packing in on the north—westerly breeze that follows. that stays with us until friday, continuing to push showers into northern and western reaches through the small hours of friday, they could be some ice around first thing, particularly across scotland and northern england, and it looks like we will pick up more wintry showers through friday, a few for northern ireland as well, and largely we are looking at rain towards the south—west of england but we could even see something a little winter here across the moors. still chilly, temperatures for— six at best. here comes the weekend, here comes our next area of low pressure. a larger area of milder air tucked into that system will mean for saturday some of our highest temperatures for the next few days, but a lot of cloud around, a lot of rain as well. sunday ethics and then a little drier and brighter, but we willjust start
12:59 pm
and then a little drier and brighter, but we will just start to see temperatures nudging down slightly once again.
1:00 pm
borisjohnson meets his cabinet over his decision not to impose further covid restrictions in england — despite high levels of infection. it comes as health chiefs say the need for confirmatory pcr tests in england for people who don't have symptoms will be dropped. there are really accurate when you have a very infectious variant like omicron, so, actually, what we do all the time is look at what makes sense. in scotland, the government considers a reduction in the time people have to isolate from ten to seven days. and, in france, president macron causes uproar by using strong language about how he'd like to deal with the unvaccinated. also this lunchtime... in kazakhstan, a wave of protests over rising fuel prices — police use tear gas and stun grenades. there are 200 arrests
1:01 pm
and dozens injured.

45 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on