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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 4, 2022 10:00am-11:31am GMT

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hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire, and these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a day of critical court hearings for prince andrew and virginia guiffre — his lawyers in new york will argue that her civil case against him, alleging he sexually assaulted her when she was 17, should be thrown out. a university dropout who became a silicon valley success story has been convicted of fraud for lying about the technology that made her a billionaire. millions of pupils across the uk are back to school today, amid concerns about covid—related staff shortages. a month before the winter olympics, a second chinese city goes into full lockdown, as new covid infections are recorded. # 0h, # oh, you pretty things...
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and six years after his death, david bowie�*s estate sells his entire catalogue of songs for more than $250 million. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. lawyers for prince andrew will today try to convince a new yorkjudge to throw out a civil case brought by a woman who accuses him of sexually assaulting her when she was 17. the duke has consistently denied the claims. it follows the release of a document that shows the woman, virginia giuffre was paid half—a—million dollars in exchange for agreeing not to sue any "potential defendant" connected to the disgraced sex offenderjeffrey epstein. here's our legal correspondent dominic casciani. a woman making the gravest of allegations. the unprecedented defendant,
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a prince of the realm. and now, a day of critical court hearings for both virginia giuffre and the duke of york. she says she was sexually exploited by the man on the right, jeffrey epstein. ms giuffre, then known as roberts, said epstein coerced the then teenager into abuse by prince andrew. alleged events 20 years ago, but today's new york hearing focuses on the 2009 legal document. back then, ms giuffre, seen here at court in new york, accepted $500,000 to end her original case against epstein. in the settlement, virginia giuffre agreed to release, acquit, satisfy, and forever discharge epstein from further claims. the wording goes on to cover any other person who could have been a potential defendant. it's so wide, she promises not to bring any further case dating from the beginning of the world. prince andrew's lawyers say that means he can't be sued. but one lawyer who's represented some of epstein�*s alleged victims says it's too vague
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to be enforceable. this is one of the most bizarre pieces of a settlement agreement i have ever seen. i just cannot believe that a court would say, well, anyone who has wronged virginia, who was associated with epstein, is now released from liability. i mean, that would fly in the face of what our laws are now trying to do, which is open up claims for sexual abuse victims, allow them to come forward even years later, and bring perpetrators to justice. the duke's position remains unchanged since his november 2019 newsnight interview. you can say categorically that you don't recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp, or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia? yes, i can absolutely categorically tell you that never happened.
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do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts then or at any other time? none whatsoever. this afternoon, prince andrew's team will ask a new yorkjudge to throw out ms giuffre�*s case. her lawyers say she is confident that won't happen and one way or another, the duke will have to answer her allegations. dominic casciani, bbc news. let's talk to our royal correspondent sean coughlan. what are we expecting to happen today, potentially? the what are we expecting to happen today, potentially?— what are we expecting to happen today, potentially? the scene is set for a courtroom _ today, potentially? the scene is set for a courtroom battle _ today, potentially? the scene is set for a courtroom battle in _ today, potentially? the scene is set for a courtroom battle in new- today, potentially? the scene is set for a courtroom battle in new york, i for a courtroom battle in new york, prince andrew's lawyers say the court case should be thrown at straightaway because of the terms of the agreement with abstain, but virginia giuffre's lawyers will have the opposite view, it is a separate case and her k should be pursued —— the agreement with epstein. there might not be an outcome to date but i think it will set loosely the
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terms of battle.— i think it will set loosely the terms of battle. . ., ,~' , ., ., terms of battle. can i ask you in a broad sense. _ terms of battle. can i ask you in a broad sense, if _ terms of battle. can i ask you in a broad sense, if prince _ terms of battle. can i ask you in a broad sense, if prince andrew's . broad sense, if prince andrew's lawyers win and persuade the judge to throw the case out, is that it? i think yes for this part of the case, we do not know what else might emerge but prince andrew has denied all suggestions of wrongdoing, he has been very strong about that, it might be that itjust rolled back but if it does not it becomes much more complicated because andrew will face questions, depositions could be expected. face questions, depositions could be exected. ~ . , ., face questions, depositions could be expected._ people - face questions, depositions could be| expected._ people need expected. what is that? people need to make statements _ expected. what is that? people need to make statements of— expected. what is that? people need to make statements of what - expected. what is that? people need to make statements of what has - to make statements of what has happened on oath, both sides will put that version of events and this will be about both sides trying to persuade the lawyer what really happened, get the narrative across. if it gets further it will be a much bigger scale and andrew himself could face questions at a trial in
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new york, which would be a bombshell case. the alternative would be some sort of deal before that, an out—of—court settlement, possibly meaning a payment to virginia giuffre, which would potentially come with costs too.— giuffre, which would potentially come with costs too. with me now is barrister andrew taylor from apex chambers, who for over 25 years has specialised in criminal defence. this case being brought by viginia guifree is a civil case, which requires a lower standard of proof. just on that point, if andrew loses this bit of the civil case, can you see prince andrew's lawyers agreeing for him to testify in court in new york? i for him to testify in court in new york? a, ., for him to testify in court in new york? ., ., , york? i cannot imagine him being advised by _ york? i cannot imagine him being advised by any — york? i cannot imagine him being advised by any lawyer— york? i cannot imagine him being advised by any lawyer to - york? i cannot imagine him being advised by any lawyer to go - york? i cannot imagine him being advised by any lawyer to go to - advised by any lawyer to go to america. we know there is an fbi open investigation, i think the advice would be not to go to america. there may be a way in which these days people can testify from
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overseas, technology and courtroom, if you like, user—friendly practices allow people to give evidence even in serious criminal trials not from the courtroom itself but even from abroad, but i cannot imagine the advice being to go to america, go into the witness box. we know the job emily maitlis data into thousand 19, she is highly intelligent and an extremely skilful journalist that she is not an attorney or barrister —— but emily maitlis data in 2019. they would have not only the answer she extracted from the prince but other points, is it right you do not sweat, where is the medical evidence? you say that you do not hug people, there is evidence to suggest he does, you say you always worry shirt and tie, there is evidence to suggest that is not true. —— you say that in britain you always wear a shirt and tie. it might build up a picture that the
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prince was not telling the whole truth when answering those questions, so i cannot see him being advised to go to america. this is a civil case, not criminal, so there is no extradition available, so as far as the prince and his lawyers are concerned today, and all for rests on this ruling. 0ne are concerned today, and all for rests on this ruling. one of the things i suspect they will uses there is a precedent for this judge to kick this case out. it happened in the case of an extremely talented, well—known and well—respected american attorney at the top of the tree, he argued this point and succeeded and of course one of the things that happened in virginia roberts oh virginia giuffre's original claim was that she mentioned royalty in the claim, they will say it was in the contemplation of the claimant and her lawyers that there was a member of royalty involved, and he will say whatever the american lawyer has just opined that you signed that
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deal, you were advised, you entered into it as a willing participant, you had your $500,000 and therefore you had your $500,000 and therefore you are now prevented from bringing any further action against me. they hold restaurant today and i am sure that if he loses today that the publicity and the worry for the prince will be ratcheted up further. he denies the claims of sexual assault. with your legal experience, do you think this deal from 2009 will protect him now, i gave virginia giuffre essentially signed away her rights to sue anybody in the future? i away her rights to sue anybody in the future?— the future? i think there is a very aood the future? i think there is a very good chance _ the future? i think there is a very good chance that _ the future? i think there is a very good chance that he _ the future? i think there is a very good chance that he will - the future? i think there is a very| good chance that he will succeed, back lawyer succeeded and i'm sure the prince's lawyers will be succeeded —— in touch with those. the genuine dufresne also allege that batman assaulted her and he denied it? —— alleged that that man
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assaulted her. it is denied it? -- alleged that that man assaulted her.— assaulted her. it is all very well for the lawyers _ assaulted her. it is all very well for the lawyers acting _ assaulted her. it is all very well for the lawyers acting for- assaulted her. it is all very welll for the lawyers acting for victims to say they should not have drawn a patch agreement, she signed that as an adult with very, very good legal advice, entered into it willingly and the prince and his lawyers will say you are now going back on the deal. ~ ., �* ~' ., say you are now going back on the deal. ~ ., �* ~ ., ., deal. we don't know if the legal advice was _ deal. we don't know if the legal advice was good _ deal. we don't know if the legal advice was good or— deal. we don't know if the legal advice was good or not, - deal. we don't know if the legal advice was good or not, we - deal. we don't know if the legal| advice was good or not, we have deal. we don't know if the legal - advice was good or not, we have no idea, but if you think about nondisclosure agreements and the fact that many of those were signed over the years, i am notjust talking about the #metoo movement but employment situations, and the view is that they essentially guide an individual and are unfair and there are movements around the world to scrap them, legally —— they essentially gag an individual. to scrap them, legally -- they essentially gag an individual. many arc ue essentially gag an individual. many
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ara ue it is essentially gag an individual. many argue it is unfair, _ essentially gag an individual. many argue it is unfair, but _ essentially gag an individual. many argue it is unfair, but this - argue it is unfair, but this agreement was signed in 2009 with advice on both sides, the genuine dufresne's lawyers, jeffrey epstein�*s lawyers, it was very far—reaching —— virginia giuffre's lawyers. virginia roberts entered into that agreement and signed it, she was banned by a ten she had quite a lot of money as a result of that agreement. that she was bound by it and she had quite a lot of money. it was not an acceptance of liability, jeffrey epstein said, he did not say by paying this money that he was agreeing that she had been wronged in a criminal or civil contacts, so they cannot say that you must have been guilty or in the wrong because you signed it. many lawyers tell by clients all over the world sometimes when you enter into an agreement, it is not necessarily the agreement you want but it is
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like ensuring your house, you ensure a house in case it burns down, not because you wanted to. across—the—board, in civil cases across—the—boa rd, in civil cases across across—the—board, in civil cases across the world, notjust in america but across the world, that is what this means. 50 america but across the world, that is what this means.— is what this means. so are prince andrew's is what this means. so are prince andrevv's lawyers _ is what this means. so are prince andrew's lawyers accepting - is what this means. so are prince andrew's lawyers accepting he i is what this means. so are prince andrew's lawyers accepting he is| is what this means. so are prince. andrew's lawyers accepting he is a potential defendant, which is this key phrase? it is potential defendant, which is this key phrase?— potential defendant, which is this key phrase? it is anyone he was a otential key phrase? it is anyone he was a potential defendant, _ key phrase? it is anyone he was a potential defendant, of _ key phrase? it is anyone he was a potential defendant, of course . key phrase? it is anyone he was al potential defendant, of course you can be a defendant in civil proceedings and we much said that the only allegation she makes against the prince rna civil context, no criminal allegations against him, we need to be plain about that —— are in a civil context. about that -- are in a civil context-— about that -- are in a civil context. ., ., . ., ., context. for a civil case, a lower standard of _ context. for a civil case, a lower standard of proof _ context. for a civil case, a lower standard of proof is _ context. for a civil case, a lower standard of proof is required? in this country if you stand trial in standard of proof is required? ii this country if you stand trial in a criminal case, thejury this country if you stand trial in a criminal case, the jury or magistrates have to be sure beyond
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all reasonable doubt so that you are sure. it is a much lower standard and a civil case, on the balance of probability. so if it is more likely that thing happen band did not, you succeed. a . ~ that thing happen band did not, you succeed. 1, . ~ ., , , ., ., succeed. back to my question about prince andrew's _ succeed. back to my question about prince andrew's lawyers _ succeed. back to my question about prince andrew's lawyers accepting l succeed. back to my question about| prince andrew's lawyers accepting he is a potential defendant? the? prince andrew's lawyers accepting he is a potential defendant?— is a potential defendant? they would have to accept _ is a potential defendant? they would have to accept for _ is a potential defendant? they would have to accept for the _ is a potential defendant? they would have to accept for the purposes - is a potential defendant? they would have to accept for the purposes of i have to accept for the purposes of this argument that he is cupboard of the potential defendant, they can't have their cake and eat it, they are trying to say he is one of the people who would have been protected under the umbrella of the agreement drawn up byjeffrey epstein and his lawyers with victoria roberts, but the fact that she mentioned that those proceedings that she had been abused by royalty, one can only contemplate. the only person she might have had in mind was the
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prince, nobody else has been mentioned in this royal family or others across the world. she mentioned politicians, academics and businessmen, so today his lawyers will mount a robust argument that when she mentioned royalty, it must have been the prince, and in signing that agreement in 2009 she gave up any right to bring a civil suit against prince andrew, and that is the essence of it. i suspect the argument will be very long and complicated and we may not get a verdict or a ruling from the judge today. mostjudges, if they have important decisions like this, they want time to think and construct theirjudgments becausejudges want time to think and construct theirjudgments because judges do their judgments because judges do not theirjudgments because judges do not want to give a ruling on the hoof, and it may well be that following the ruling both sites might want to appeal, so i think the church will take time, just the
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arguments, take stock of the situation, so i would not necessarily hold our breath that we will get a final ruling by the end of play today. will get a final ruling by the end of play today-— will get a final ruling by the end ofla toda. ., , . of play today. thank you very much, barrister andrew _ of play today. thank you very much, barrister andrew taylor _ of play today. thank you very much, barrister andrew taylor from - of play today. thank you very much, barrister andrew taylor from apex l barrister andrew taylor from apex chambers. prince andrew denies the sexual assault allegations. her company at one point valued at nine billion dollars — but now elizabeth holmes has been found guilty of fraud and conspiracy following a four—month trial in california and awaits her sentence. the founder of the discredited blood testing company, theranos was accused of lying to investors and retail customers by overstating what the firm's machines were capable of and the accuracy of its tests. our technology correspondent james clayton reports we'd like to see a world in which every person gets access to this type of basic testing. elizabeth holmes had a vision that turned her into a billionaire — that she could create a machine that she called the edison that could detect hundreds of diseases with just a few drops of blood. the pitch convinced some very important people.
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media tycoon rupert murdoch invested, bill clinton was a fan. behind me are theranos's former head offices. very plush, very expensive and in the heart of silicon valley. and the great and the good came to visit theranos. evenjoe biden came to california and heaped praise on the company. success seemed inevitable. this is my certificate for theranos, showing my shares and it was actually signed by elizabeth holmes. so, it's kind of a bit of history? it really is. a sad bit of history, but history nevertheless. eileen lepera was a secretary in silicon valley. she heard about this amazing new company. my boss had indicated that it was going to be, in his words, "the next apple" and that i should get as many shares as i could, and so i did. it was six figures, which was a large amount for me. what eileen didn't know was that the dream elizabeth holmes was selling was a nightmare.
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the technology didn't work, but investors like eileen had no idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode, so that we had no idea whether it was going well or was on the brink of collapse. the retail giant walgreens had a contract with theranos to diagnose patients with its machines. however, the court heard that theranos wasn't using its edison machines, but was instead using openly available diagnostic equipment. the courts also heard that some patients had been misdiagnosed. i just really resent that somebody would make such a massive fraud, especially when so many people told her this isn't working. elizabeth holmes has argued at trial that she had always attempted to create a genuine product that worked and that she never intended to commit fraud. what happened behind those closed doors has led to a lot of introspection here in silicon valley. but there's still a culture
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of faking it till you make it here, and until that changes, people worry that what happened in theranos could happen again. james clayton, bbc news. with more on the verdict here's our north america correspondent, peter bowes. this is a very mixed verdict. yes, she has been found guilty on four counts of fraud and conspiracy, but also not guilty on four of those counts as well and the jury couldn't reach a decision on a further three charges. and it's evident that these jurors sitting for some seven days during their deliberations struggled with these decisions. and i think that is symptomatic of how difficult a case this was and perhaps reflects on how it's been followed extremely closely by silicon valley, with people coming down very firmly either in herfavour or against her as far as the details of this case were concerned. and it is symptomatic at least as far as some people see it of how
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silicon valley operates. almost a culture of invest now, ask questions later, and hope that the investment reaps rewards at some point in the future. of course, the difference with this case is this was a medical device. these were health screenings, real people were involved now, and in some cases were given incorrect results. millions of pupils across the uk are back to school today and over the next couple of days, amid concerns about staff shortages caused by the 0micron variant of covid. in england, secondary school students will have to take tests on—site before they can start their lessons as jayne mccubbin reports. for secondary school children this week, it is back to the classroom. back to masks, and in england at least, it will all kick off with a covid test on arrival in school. for ethan and louis, though, this is one last blow out before that begins. how are you feeling about it? a bit nervous.
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in my form, probably about, like, ten kids off at least. what, before christmas? yeah, yeah. how do you feel about wearing the masks again? well, ifeel like now i've gotten used to it, i don't think i'd mind it as much if you have a comfortable mask. it obviously protects other people, doesn't it? you're happy to do it? yeah, yeah. the gates of this school, like all other secondary schools in england, will this week starts to open for mass testing. it's one of ten schools in an academy chain which already has a staffing issue. as of one hour ago, 10% of staff who have tested positive for covid. and that is a big chunk, and you think it's going to rise? it will rise, probably another 5%. in scotland, pupils are being asked to test at home before they return to school and are being urged to then test twice a week. in wales, it's the same, preschool home test. but repeated three times a week. students in northern ireland are being asked to test 2a hours before returning as well. and there, 95% of schools have been provided with c02 monitors to identify poorly ventilated areas. ultimately, the government believes
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the biggest help anyone could offer is to take up the offer of a vaccine. 0ns figures suggest only 50% of eligible 12 to 15—year—olds have done this. just how this new term in this new year will pan out looks anything but certain. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. a number of rail companies in the uk are running reduced services as staffing continues to be hit by sickness, covid and self isolation. the rail delivery group says the latest figures show that nearly 10% of all rail staff are off work, and passengers have been warned of short—notice cancellations. well, ministers in the uk are meeting daily to assess shortages of workers across the economy. and there's to be a statement when parliament returns tomorrow about the scheduled review of plan b measures which are due to expire at the end of january. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is at westminster. it'll be interesting tomorrow, because i think tory mps will be
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looking for any clues about whether the plan b restrictions in england will be extended beyond january 26th, because that is when they are currently meant to expire, they are meant to be reviewed tomorrow. but yesterday boris johnson, when he was talking to the media, talked about pressure on the nhs over the next few weeks or more. which if you do your grammar and work out your plurals, that could take you beyond the end of january. so i wonder if there will be any clues tomorrow about the plan b review, about when plan b might actually come to an end. ministers are also meeting about what sort of contingency measures to put in place to deal with lots of absences in places like the railways. we know there is a back—up plan to prioritise access to testing if there is a real crunch on the supply of tests. this morning the vaccines minister maggie throup was talking about some of the other things that have been done. it's important that people know we've recently reduced the number of days of isolation from ten days to seven days, with two lateral flow tests taken that are negative.
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so, that's one step. and i'm sure listeners will appreciate that the government's looking at the data all the time and putting in contingency measures. it would be wrong of us if we didn't, it would be wrong of us if we didn't plan for more staff absences. we've also got to remember that as part of plan b people are asked to work from home, and that will help to ease some of the pressures on the rail operators and the nhs. and the leader of the labour party is giving a speech later, what do you think that will be about? politics getting back to normal after being about covid for a few weeks, but then we've seen that cycle play out and be reversed a few times already. but keir starmer�*s going to go to birmingham, and he's going to try and sound very patriotic. he's going to talk about the commonwealth games which will be held in the city there later this year, he's going to talk about the queen'sjubilee that's coming up this year, all sounding very, very british in a way his predecessor
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jeremy corbyn was accused of sometimes not sounding. also he'll talk about all of the policies labour has come forward with already to try to battle the accusation that they do not have any policies, it is a bit unfair, it is just that some of them are a bit vague here and there. and also the other buzzword that'll be in this speech is "respect." he means respect shown by labour to areas that used to vote labour and voted tory, and also he'll talk about how he as a former director of public prosecutions has respect for the rule of law. i wonder if he is suggesting that someone else doesn't. the world health organization has said again it's vital that covid vaccines are distributed more fairly around the world. the who says the world's most developed countries cannot boost their way out of the pandemic. a senior who epidemiologist maria van kerkhove was speaking to the bbc. we are asking, the director—general is asking, for 70% of the population in all countries to be vaccinated byjuly 2022. that is possible, with production
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capacity, but that will only happen if countries allow, and manufacturers allow, countries to be able to purchase those doses. we will not be able to boost our way out of this pandemic. we need to increase vaccination among those most at risk in every single country, and notjust boost some people in some countries over and over and over again. 0ur china correspondent robin brant has more on the new restrictions in yuzhou. they discovered three asymptomatic cases, three, and that has led within a very short period of time to a city of over 1 million people being shut down. no vehicles on the roads, virtually no vehicles, businesses and shops, restaurants shut. 0nly supermarkets supplying food are being allowed to stay open. everyone there being told to stay at—home as well, and a testing regime under way there.
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believe me, it's1 million people but it will be completed very, very quickly. as you say, this is yet the latest demonstration of china's immense effort to try and continue pursuing what it calls "a dynamic zero—covid strategy." this is the country where we saw the first—ever outbreak of covid—19, of course, two years ago. but the number of cases it's had, the number of people who have been killed by covid according to the official numbers remain very, very low. and as the olympic games approach, the winter games in beijing in just a matter of weeks, and of course that mass exodus that happens at what we call spring festival here and the rest of the world calls chinese new year when hundreds of millions of people are due to disperse across this country, they are the two key big events they are concerned about. 0ne, hosting a good games, and the second, trying to prevent the spread of potentially further outbreaks of covid—19 here when spring festival comes. i think that's why we're seeing this extreme vigilance in like yuzhou,
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acting on such a scale with such a small number of cases being discovered. in the indian capital delhi, the authorities have said they'll impose a weekend curfew. 0ur correspondent in mumbai, yogita limaye, has more. so, what the delhi government has just announced is they are basically telling people in the city do not go out over the weekend unless it's for essential needs like buying food or medicines, or unless there is an emergency happening. at the moment, there isn't clarity about what this means that establishments that currently are open like restaurants, for example, or shops which are selling nonessential items. but what the minister said in his press conference was that it would be a curfew, people are being told do not go out unless it's for essential needs. they've also announced that people working in government should be working from home unless they are engaged in essential services and that's why they have to be at the office. as far as private offices
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are concerned, they said they have to operate at 50% capacity. this is an addition to restrictions that have already been in place in delhi. so, restaurants for example can only operate even now at 50% capacity, cinema halls have been closed, auditoriums, banquet halls, sports complexes, these have been closed for a few days now. here in mumbai where i am, which is the worst affected city at the moment as well, we have a night curfew in place, restaurants again are only allowed to operate at 50% capacity. we had civic authorities here say that if they see the number of hospital admissions going up very rapidly they would also consider putting in further and more stringent restrictions. several french politicians say they've received death threats on social media in response to their support for a covid—19 vaccine pass currently being debated in parliament. the new law would ban people without proof of vaccination
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from public transport and a range of hospitality venues, removing the option of showing a negative test instead. it's expected to be approved this week, and comes in response to rising covid infections, despite a vaccination rate in adults of more than 9%. here's our paris correspondent hugh schofield. we know that they've happened and there have been many of them. i was just reading now about a garage of an mp up in the 0ise department north of paris was set on fire last week with graffiti tagged over the building as well. you know, "no to the new legislation," basically. it's not entirely new in the sense that the political climate has changed here as elsewhere in recent years and for a while now we've been reporting on threats to mp5, particularly mps from the ruling party, macron's party. it's linked of course to the rise of social media and the way opinions are sort of being rushed
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to the extremes by social media or certainly being encouraged down that road. in the wake of the gilets jaunes as well, a lot of very angry people out there who feel much less compunction than they used to about putting bullets in envelopes and sending them to mp5, and that's what's happened, i'm afraid. and then in terms of this legislation required for the pass to be made law, does there seem to be enough political support, is it likely to go ahead? well, relatively dramatic events in the national assembly last night. this was supposed to go through last night in its first vote in the national assembly, the lower house. but at about midnight, macron's party failed miserably in its management of the day's business because they were ambushed by the opposition, he decided to put a vote to the test to stop the debate there and then. it was to go on through the night but the opposition parties or some of them managed to get this boat
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three which meant there was this halt in proceedings last night, which means that the whole management of this bill through parliament has been thrown into disarray. —— managed to get this vote through. it was to have gone straight to the senate and then be ready for approval by the end of the week and that's not going to happen because of this procedural ambush that happened last night. ultimately, it will get into the statute, i'm pretty sure of that. macron's party has a big majority. but this goes to show that in an election time with the presidentials approaching, everything is becoming very political and even though many of the people who voted for this halt to proceedings last night are actually in favour of the bill, they want this vaccine passports, they did itjust to make macron's life difficult and that means that now in this climate, for three or four months before the elections, every bit of legislation will have to be fought for bitterly by the ruling party.
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it's been announced that more people in the uk are to become eligible for an automatic pardon for historical convictions for same sex and to have them wiped from their records. the uk government's widening the current scheme in an amendment to legislation currently going through parliament. 0ur correspondent matt graveling is with me now. tell us more about why these pardons are being widened, essentially. the are being widened, essentially. inez government are are being widened, essentially. "ii9 government are calling are being widened, essentially. i“i9 government are calling this are being widened, essentially. ii9 government are calling this righting the wrongs of the past. they are referring to the criminalisation of people for having same—sex relationships. historically there were a number of laws against same—sex relationships. they saw people fired from theirjobs and even sent to prison. 0bviously, people fired from theirjobs and even sent to prison. obviously, this people's lives, not only at the time but in the years that followed with people having it on their records. so, even today if they went a job they would have to disclose a conviction. i'll tell you about the
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changes the government are making but first i want to play a clip from the former lord mayor of manchester who is an raf veteran and in 1997 he was in the forces and was asked if he had had homosexual preferences. i realised that i either become true to myseif— realised that i either become true to myself or i lie about it. i burst into tears— to myself or i lie about it. i burst into tears and i lost myjob straightaway. i was marched off, given _ straightaway. i was marched off, given a _ straightaway. i was marched off, given a police escort and i could have _ given a police escort and i could have gone — given a police escort and i could have gone to prison. that was back in 97, _ have gone to prison. that was back in 97, for— have gone to prison. that was back in 97, for six— have gone to prison. that was back in 97, for six months, just for being — in 97, for six months, just for being gay _ in 97, for six months, just for being gay. you lost everything within — being gay. you lost everything within ten minutes i was marched off the camp, _ within ten minutes i was marched off the camp, i— within ten minutes i was marched off the camp, i was given police export, kicked _ the camp, i was given police export, kicked out — the camp, i was given police export, kicked out. as i say, 1997, it's within— kicked out. as i say, 1997, it's within our— kicked out. as i say, 1997, it's within our time. kicked out. as i say, 1997, it's within ourtime. i kicked out. as i say, 1997, it's within our time. i challenged it and i did within our time. i challenged it and i did sort— within our time. i challenged it and i did sort of— within our time. i challenged it and i did sort of write to tony blair, to my— i did sort of write to tony blair, to my mp. _ i did sort of write to tony blair, to my mp, to the nad and it was because — to my mp, to the nad and it was because i— to my mp, to the nad and it was because i was classed as
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incompatible to service life that being _ incompatible to service life that being a — incompatible to service life that being a homosexual. 25 incompatible to service life that being a homosexual.— incompatible to service life that being a homosexual. 25 years on you can still hear— being a homosexual. 25 years on you can still hear the _ being a homosexual. 25 years on you can still hear the upset _ being a homosexual. 25 years on you can still hear the upset there. - can still hear the upset there. since 2012 people in england and wales have been able to apply to have historical same—sex sexual cautions and convictions disregarded. however, campaigners said the list was too narrow and didn't include enough offences and that's what the government are looking to change. the home secretary said they would extend the government's disregard and pardon scheme to make sure anyone convicted or cautioned under laws that have since been abolished can have them wiped from their criminal records and this will also include people who have since passed away. that's one of the arguments, _ who have since passed away. that's one of the arguments, they - who have since passed away. that's one of the arguments, they shouldn't have to apply, it should just be done. have to apply, it should 'ust be done. ., ._ , done. the government say it will be for --eole done. the government say it will be for people who _ done. the government say it will be for people who have _ done. the government say it will be for people who have passed - done. the government say it will be for people who have passed away i done. the government say it will be for people who have passed away it| for people who have passed away it will be automatic because in 2017 they brought in shearing's law, named after alan turing, he was
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convicted of gross indecency and was pardoned after his death. in 2017 they brought in at automatic clearing of records for people who had passed on and say it will be a further adaptation of that. i want to bring you a response from stonewall, the charity for lgbt rights, and they say they welcome the news and tell me that countless 93v the news and tell me that countless gay and bisexual men have had their lives and careers turned upside down from the burden of carrying these unjust convictions on their record. while the grave harm this as a ready because it cannot be undone, the home secretary's decisive action is a huge step towards righting the wrongs of the past and make sure thousands of people will be able to move forward with their lives with a clean slate. move forward with their lives with a clean slate-— a man accused of setting south africa's parliament building on fire has appeared in court. the 49—year—old was arrested on sunday after he was allegedly found inside the building with an explosive device. he has been remanded in custody untiljanuary11th. firefighters say they've finally contained the fire after it reignited overnight. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with murder after another boy,
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also aged 16, died after a stabbing in west london last thursday. the incident at philpot�*s farm open space in hillingdon was the 30th teenage homicide in the capital in 2021. the metropolitan police said the suspect will appear in custody at ealing youth court today. formal identification of the victim has yet to take place. more now on our main story. lawyers for prince andrew will today try and convince a new york court to throw out a civil case brought by the woman has accused him of sexually assaulting her when she was 17. it follows the release of a document that shows the woman, virginia giuffre, was paid half—a—million dollars in exchange for agreeing not to sue any �*potential defendent�* connected to the disgraced sex offenderjeffrey epstein.
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liz stein was a 21—year—old student when she says ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein befriended her, then assaulted her a number of times over three years. she wasn't involved in the trial. earlier she spoke to bbc breakfast�*s sally nugent about when she first met the pair while working at in high—end retail store. what i would offer my clients at the store, i would frequently offer to bring their packages to either the hotel concierge or their doorman. i had a hard and fast rule where i didn't deliver to anyone directly but i would deliver to someone's building as a courtesy. and after shopping with her that day, i extended the offer to her. and she took me up on it. and ifind to make
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arrangements to deliver the packages after work that day and i was instructed to bring them to a hotel that was not very far away from where the store was located. and when i brought the packages to be concierge, the concierge let me know that ghislaine was in the bar area and that there was someone she wanted me to meet. so i went into the bar area and the person she wanted me to meet wasjeffrey epstein. wanted me to meet was jeffrey e stein. : ., wanted me to meet was jeffrey estein. : ., ., ,, m epstein. and then what happened? we soke, we epstein. and then what happened? we spoke, we ordered _ epstein. and then what happened? we spoke, we ordered drinks, _ epstein. and then what happened? we spoke, we ordered drinks, we - epstein. and then what happened? we spoke, we ordered drinks, we talked . spoke, we ordered drinks, we talked for a few minutes. soon after someone from the hotel came over to our table and let them know that the room was ready. i was a little bit
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confused because although i had just met her, it was my understanding that they lived close by and i was a little bit taken aback that they would be staying in a hotel so close to their home. and when i asked that question, they explain to me that there was renovations going on at there was renovations going on at the residents and they couldn't be there during renovations and they were staying at a local hotel for a few days while that was being taken care of. ,, ., few days while that was being taken care of. . :, �* few days while that was being taken care of. �* , a few days while that was being taken care of. �* , _ few days while that was being taken careof, �* , ,y :, care of. so, i'm struck by the word used to describe _ care of. so, i'm struck by the word used to describe ghislaine - care of. so, i'm struck by the word | used to describe ghislaine maxwell, you called her electrifying. what wasjeffrey you called her electrifying. what was jeffrey epstein you called her electrifying. what wasjeffrey epstein like? you called her electrifying. what was jeffrey epstein like? magnetic, the were was jeffrey epstein like? magnetic, they were almost _ was jeffrey epstein like? magnetic, they were almost the _ was jeffrey epstein like? magnetic, they were almost the perfect - was jeffrey epstein like? magnetic, i they were almost the perfect couple. they had an electricity that emanated from them. they were charming and gracious and captivating and inviting. it was
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really hard to not want to be around them. is really hard to not want to be around them. . . really hard to not want to be around them. , ., ., i. ., , them. is that how you felt at times, but ou them. is that how you felt at times, but you wanted _ them. is that how you felt at times, but you wanted to _ them. is that how you felt at times, but you wanted to be around - them. is that how you felt at times, but you wanted to be around them? initially, they were very interesting. they were intellectuals, they were... they thought differently and they were a fountain of knowledge. i felt like almost any topic that i could think of to talk about they could speak volumes on. and i was young, i was a sponge to knowledge, i wanted to learn and i felt like they were people who could teach me a lot about life. and inadvertently, they did. �* , , about life. and inadvertently, they did.“ , ,. ., ~ about life. and inadvertently, they did. �* , ,. ., ~ ., did. because things changed. at what oint did did. because things changed. at what point did you — did. because things changed. at what point did you feel, _ did. because things changed. at what point did you feel, where _ did. because things changed. at what point did you feel, where you - did. because things changed. at what point did you feel, where you are - point did you feel, where you are where the relationship was becoming abusive? b5
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where the relationship was becoming abusive? : . where the relationship was becoming abusive? : , ,, abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said, abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said. they — abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said, they found _ abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said, they found out _ abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said, they found out that - abusive? as we sat in the bar, like i said, they found out that their . i said, they found out that their hotel room was ready and they asked me to come upstairs to their hotel room, which was something that i just didn't do. i felt some pressure to perform for them as it was very important to me to offer a level of customer service that was just impeccable. so, ifelt customer service that was just impeccable. so, i felt like customer service that was just impeccable. so, ifelt like i had to kind of indulge them, even though my instincts may be the telling me differently. we went up to the rim and we were going to continue our drinks up there and that's what we did. we engaged in conversation and it seemed very friendly and normal, until it didn't. the conversation
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changed, the tone of conversation changed, the tone of conversation changed and it was in that room that first night that they assaulted me. more now on the staff shortages in the uk with many companies continuing to be affected by covid and self—isolation. earlier i spoke to alex hynes, the managing director of scotrail which is introducing a 8% reduction to services today. i asked him how this will affect consumers. on a typical day we operate around 2,000 services in scotrail, from today we are reducing our timetable by about 160 services a day so we can improve reliability of the service. customers tell us that reliability matters most, therefore it is important to publish a timetable that customers can depend on. around one in ten staff are off sick due to covid, you are right, many of these are train crew. we employ 5000 people,
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that is 500 people. many of these are train crew. that leads to these operational numbers we have seen due to record numbers of covid cases. 20,000 covid cases in scotland, just yesterday, the highest on record. with the new reduced timetable, can you guarantee passengers that those trains will show up? we can guarantee this timetable will be more reliable than the one we have been trying to operate for the last couple of weeks, and we have seen the benefit already this morning — better service reliability, fewer cancellations compared to recent weeks. it is a very dynamic situation, you are a fool to try to predict what will happen next with covid but forjanuary we are offering customers a robust timetable, we're asking people to check before they travel and plan accordingly. and then reassess at the end of the month?
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we reassess every day. slearly we are looking at staff absence data on a real—time basis and the punctuality of the services, this is something we review every day and it is likely that every seven days we will review whether it is still an appropriate timetable to offer customers. david bowie's estate has sold the singer's entire catalogue of songs to the warner music group. the amount hasn't been disclosed but is reported to be more than $250 million. tim allman reports. # there's a star man waiting in the sky. # he'd like to come and meet us. # but he thinks he'd blow our minds... the man who sold the world sells his back catalogue. well, technically, it was the estate of david bowie that did the deal. and quite a deal it is. the rights to more than 100 songs, a lucrative source of revenue.
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guy moot, the head of warner music, said... so often the trendsetter, this time bowie, or at least his estate, was following the examples set by others. in december 2020, bob dylan sold the rights to his music for an estimated $300 million. tina turner did a similar deal last october, believed to be worth $50 million. and only a few weeks ago, bruce springsteen sold his back catalogue for a cool half a billion dollars. # 0h you pretty things. # don't you know you're driving your mamas and papas insane..
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the bowie estate and other so—called heritage acts get a very large cheque, while the record companies get a steady and regular income, particularly important in the age of downloads and streaming. bowie himself saw the potential of technological change more than 20 years ago. i don't think we've even seen the tip of the iceberg. i think the potential for what the internet is going to do to society, both good and bad, is unimaginable. # let's dance. # put on your red shoes and dance the blues. in a few days' time the fans of david bowie will celebrate what would have been his 75th birthday. even after his death, his legacy endures. tim allman, bbc news. joining me now is drew hill, the managing director of proper music group — one of the uk's largest independent music distributors.
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so, if they sold it for just upwards of $250 million, we don't know the exact figure, that doesn't sound enough to me. what do you think? it sounds like a lot of money. bruce - sounds like a lot of money. bruce springsteen _ sounds like a lot of money. bruce springsteen was _ sounds like a lot of money. bruce springsteen was half— sounds like a lot of money. bruce springsteen was half a _ sounds like a lot of money. bruce springsteen was half a billion. - sounds like a lot of money. bruce i springsteen was half a billion. paul simon was 250 _ springsteen was half a billion. i9ii simon was 250 million, neil young was 150 million for 50% of the catalogue. some of deals, the figures being bandied around, sort of 20 times the last year's earnings which by any measure is a huge multiple if you are buying a company. you hear people talking about six, seven times but 20 times at huge numbers. these are songs that are going to earn money for years and years into the future. yeah. but not for the estate, not for the family. they've got this one off some, 0k, for the family. they've got this one off some, ok, it's loads of money but can you imagine selling, imagine if your dad is david bowie and you
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sell his music. i if your dad is david bowie and you sell his music.— if your dad is david bowie and you sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie- _ sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie. would _ sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie. would use _ sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie. would use sell- sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie. would use sell it - sell his music. i wish my dad were david bowie. would use sell it or. david bowie. would use sell it or would you _ david bowie. would use sell it or would you hang _ david bowie. would use sell it or would you hang onto _ david bowie. would use sell it or would you hang onto it _ david bowie. would use sell it or would you hang onto it and - david bowie. would use sell it or would you hang onto it and pass| david bowie. would use sell it or. would you hang onto it and pass it down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of — down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of a — down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of a bird _ down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of a bird in _ down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of a bird in hand, _ down to your kids and so on? maybe it's a bit of a bird in hand, who - it's a bit ofa bird in hand, who knows what the future is going to bring? all of these valuations at the moment are very much based around continued growth with streaming, expansion into new markets, tiktok being monetised, youtube. cannot continue forever? maybe not. i get why some of these heritage artists are thinking, let's take the cash now and not be beholden to the future. yeah. obviously _ beholden to the future. yeah. obviously we've _ beholden to the future. yeah. obviously we've got _ beholden to the future. yeah. obviously we've got no - beholden to the future. yeah. obviously we've got no idea i beholden to the future. yeah. i obviously we've got no idea what 0bviously we've got no idea what david bowie would think but what do you reckon? david bowie would think but what do ou reckon? ~ david bowie would think but what do you reckon?— you reckon? well, he was actually a real innovator, _ you reckon? well, he was actually a real innovator, not _ you reckon? well, he was actually a real innovator, not just _ you reckon? well, he was actually a real innovator, notjust musically i real innovator, notjust musically but in 1997 there were david bowie
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bonds available. he raised $55 million selling ten year bonds of his music. you could argue he was the first person to do this. so a deal that's been done by the estate now, it's almost like another reinvention of that, a bit like david often did with his music. b5 david often did with his music. as we head in that piece a few moments ago, when you describe people like him as a heritage act, what does that mean in practical terms? i think artists that are tried and tested, people like bruce springsteen, neilyoung, tina springsteen, neil young, tina turner, springsteen, neilyoung, tina turner, bob dylan, fleetwood mac. with these older catalogues of music, they are very, very reliable. the hits come on and they can always be gone tomorrow but these heritage artists' catalogues deliver year after year after year. they are not
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correlated to other things going on in the world and that's the attraction to buying these catalogues, whether they be covid pandemic or some sort of financial crash, music hinges and people turn to music often in tough times. i think this money coming from the city on the major record companies is being ploughed into these reliable investments for the future. imagine if david bowie was around and he would be using tiktok like there was no tomorrow, wouldn't he? absolutely. he would have been one of the first artists on there.- of the first artists on there. thank ou. as we've been reporting, china has been battling a fresh outbreak of covid cases — potentially throwing a shadow over the winter olympics — which beijing is due to host in exactly a month's time. the new strain is providing a potential logistical nightmare. china's solution is strict isolation bubbles for all those coming from omicron—affected areas. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell
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went to see how they will work. when athletes arrive in beijing from overseas, if their events in the mountains they will be able to take a high—speed train there, because some of these trains are operating completely within the bubble. ladies and gentlemen. _ completely within the bubble. ladies and gentlemen, welcome _ completely within the bubble. ladies and gentlemen, welcome to - completely within the bubble. ladies and gentlemen, welcome to this i and gentlemen, welcome to this train. then soon they will find themselves racing along at 350 kilometres an hour, zooming through beijing's arid north and taking in the views. though freezing cold, this is an area of low winter precipitation, meaning that mountains of artificial snow will be needed for the coming 0lympics. well, this is one of the main stations for the winter olympics. it's cold up here. from today, this entire station is closed to the public.
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the bubble walls are coming up. only those with olympic clearance on special trains can arrive or leave. on arrival, covid test results and travel histories are checked. here we are in the heart of one of the sites for the mountain events for the winter olympics. the reason there are no people here is the local ski resorts have already been closed in preparation for the games, which will start in just a month. 0ver there behind me where that big green screen is, that is where the medals will be awarded for the events in this area. but there won't be any general admission tickets available it seems. they haven't gone on sale yet and they probably won't so the spectators in the stands are likely to be from government organisations or the army or something along those lines. the challenge for games organisers though will be to host an event
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which can overcome the controversy which has surrounded this 0lympics following the allegations made by former chinese 0lympian and tennis star peng shuai in relation to the relationship she had with a former chinese leader. there has been a lot of pressure on the beijing olympics because of these allegations, but the organisers will be hoping that once the sport starts that it will take over and they can still host a successful games here. hundreds of thousands of americans lost electricity, government offices and schools closed, and flights were cancelled, as winter storms engulfed the us south—east and mid—atlantic states. mark lobel reports. one of america's most famous memorials, nestled in the seat of us power. now a winter wonderland. heavy snowfall that left over 200,000 without power in northern virginia.
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in delaware, a snow blanket meant treacherous conditions for cars. as the storm landed, hundreds of flights were cancelled and passengers delayed. no exception, it seems, for the president either, asjoe biden was stuck on air force one for a while before braving wild winds, having to improvise with a different type of facemask. as the white house, well, got whiter, the surrounding area soon got chillier. we did not prepare for this, however, we were not supposed to be in dc originally. yeah, that's why we don't have the right clothes! and everything is closed around here to buy anything. with government offices and schools temporarily shut down, spirits briefly lifted along washington's national mall. and close by at the smithsonian national zoo, where these giant panda cubs warmly embraced it too.
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following this snowstorm, wintry weather is expected to continue. freezing caused by low temperatures may cause further disruption. with some more snow predicted for later this week. mark lobel, bbc news. a body representing uk record labels says streaming now accounts for 83% of music consumption. the bpi says there were four weeks last year when there were more than 3 billion streams. it says adele's latest album was the best—selling album in the uk last year, followed by ed sheeran, who also had the biggest—selling single. apple has become the first us company to reach a market value of $3 trillion. the landmark was hit briefly on monday, with shares peaking at $182.88 a share.
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it passed the $2 trillion valuation in august 2020, now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. it's been a cold start to the day and it is going to continue in that vein through the day. we've got this weather front producing some rain across the south—east. cold air follows on behind, some ice this morning but also some snow at all levels across northern scotland accompanied by gales, even severe gales with exposure across the far north. that combination means we could see temporary blizzards and snow drifts on some of the higher areas. we lose this rain as we go through the afternoon. a lot of dry weather. in the brisk winds we could see further showers which will be wintry in places, primarily in the hills in the west. add on the wind chill and it will feel like “4 in aberdeen.
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as you can see, wherever you are it's going to feel cold today. through the evening and overnight, we hang onto the snow in scotland accompanied by strong winds. sedimentary showers coming in across northern ireland, north—west england, wales, south—west england and possibly as far south as the north and west midlands. another cold night with a widespread frost and risk of ice. we start on a windy night tomorrow with a ridge of high pressure building and things are settling down. the winds will ease, many showers fade, there could still be some coming in from the west, east and north. once again, feeling cold. these temperatures are closer to where they should be at this stage injanuary. as we move from wednesday into thursday, this high pressure moves away. we've got this warm front coming in, behind it something a bit milder. and then on its hills, this cold front. behind that, something a bit colder follows. as the rain bumps into the cold air ahead of it, we'll see some snow at all levels.
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and then as the warm front goes through, a return to rain. here comes the cold front behind it and the cooler conditions. eventually, we will see a return to some wintry showers. temperatures are six in the north to maybe ten towards plymouth with a change in wind direction to more of a south—westerly. heading into friday, the wind coming in from the west, not particularly strong. blowing in a fair few showers. the strongest winds through the irish sea and we could see some gales later in the day across parts of western scotland. temperatures three in the north to nine in the south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: a day of critical court hearings for prince andrew and virginia guiffre — his lawyers in new york will argue that her civil case against him, alleging he sexaully assaulted her when she was 17, should be thrown out. millions of pupils across the uk are back to school today — amid concerns about covid—related staff shortages. delays and cancellations on the rail network — as around one in ten staff are off work due to covid and isolating. a university drop—out who became a silicon valley success story has been convicted of fraud — for lying about the technology that made her a billionaire. sir keir starmer is to outline his vision for a labour government and what he calls a "new britain", we'll bring that speech to you live.
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the labour leader sir keir starmer has warned the party still needs to earn the public�*s trust, despite the government's "incompetence becoming plain". labour are looking to capitalise on their first signifcant lead in the opinion polls since borisjohnson became prime minister. sir keir will set out his vision for government in a speech in birmingham in the next few minutes. let's get more from our deputy political editor, vicki young, in birmingham. just a brief quote from the speech. tell us more about what he is expected to say.— expected to say. introductory comments — expected to say. introductory comments at _ expected to say. introductory comments at the _ expected to say. introductory comments at the moment i expected to say. introductory| comments at the moment and expected to say. introductory i comments at the moment and then expected to say. introductory - comments at the moment and then he
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will make his speech soon but wanting to start the new year as they would see it, capitalising on government mistakes. what they think is that the government now and boris johnson in particular there have been self—inflicted wounds by the conservative party and the government and they want to hammer borisjohnson when it comes to competence. today you will be hearing from circular star are not on specific policies yet although they are suggesting they think adulation could come as soon as spring next year that is not where they are at the moment. they want to talk about border values. you'll hear about patriotism, you will hear a lot about security, you will hear a lot about security, you will hear a lot about respect. so this is setting out values. i think labour strategist and lots of labour mps as well do know that it is not going to be as easy as just criticising the government. the government might well make mistakes but that would be enough for labour. they will have to flash out detailed policies as they get nearer to the time but they do think that he has achieved a lot in
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less than two years as leader but mainly in terms of internal party policies, if you like. moving on, as they would see it, from jeremy corbyn and's time but they know that will not be enough and they want more him in detail. iie will not be enough and they want more him in detail.— more him in detail. he has 'ust steed more him in detail. he has 'ust stepped up fl more him in detail. he has 'ust stepped up behind i more him in detail. he has 'ust stepped up behind you. i more him in detail. he hasjust stepped up behind you. let's i more him in detail. he hasjust| stepped up behind you. let's go more him in detail. he hasjust i stepped up behind you. let's go to him. , :, :, :, stepped up behind you. let's go to him. :, , , �* him. good morning, everybody. and ha-- new him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year- _ him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year. great _ him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year. great to _ him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year. great to be - him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year. great to be here i him. good morning, everybody. and happy new year. great to be here inj happy new year. great to be here in birmingham. the birthplace of the industrial— birmingham. the birthplace of the industrial revolution. and today i want _ industrial revolution. and today i want to _ industrial revolution. and today i want to do— industrial revolution. and today i want to do something that leaders of the opposition valley do. i wanted to celebrate the country be live then _ to celebrate the country be live then it — to celebrate the country be live then it is — to celebrate the country be live then. it is normally the of the opposition to criticise and to oppose _ opposition to criticise and to oppose but it can make us sound pretty— oppose but it can make us sound pretty miserable. it can make it sound _ pretty miserable. it can make it sound as — pretty miserable. it can make it sound as if— pretty miserable. it can make it sound as if we don't realise our own historic— sound as if we don't realise our own historic good — sound as if we don't realise our own historic good fortune. to be born into a _ historic good fortune. to be born into a peaceful, creative, liberal democracy. think of all that the
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british— democracy. think of all that the british have to be proud of. her majesty— british have to be proud of. her majesty the queen, universal public services. _ majesty the queen, universal public services. a _ majesty the queen, universal public services, a creative heritage. the envy— services, a creative heritage. the envy of— services, a creative heritage. the envy of the — services, a creative heritage. the envy of the world. and a thriving civil service. _ envy of the world. and a thriving civil service.— civil service. oh, well, unfortunately - civil service. oh, well, unfortunately we i civil service. oh, well, unfortunately we have | civil service. oh, well, i unfortunately we have got civil service. oh, well, _ unfortunately we have got technical issues with the sound which was glitchy and now it seems to have gone completely. we keep listening. we think we might have it back. thank you. today i want to describe a government that might be worthy of you. a government that might be worthy of you one _ a government that might be worthy of you one of— a government that might be worthy of you. one of the best characteristics of the _ you. one of the best characteristics of the british people is that we are fair—minded. 0ur instinct in a national— fair—minded. 0ur instinct in a national crisis is to give the government the benefit of the doubt and because the pandemic opposed an unprecedented problem we, her majesty's opposition, did the same. we supported where we did, we could
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cite where _ we supported where we did, we could cite where we had to, but the british— cite where we had to, but the british people do not like being taken _ british people do not like being taken for— british people do not like being taken for granted and they do not like being — taken for granted and they do not like being treated as fools. a government which refuses to follow the rules. _ government which refuses to follow the rules, it sets for the rest of us, the rules, it sets for the rest of us. loses — the rules, it sets for the rest of us, loses the moral right to set those _ us, loses the moral right to set those rules. sol us, loses the moral right to set those rules. so i think that, as we begin— those rules. so i think that, as we begin this — those rules. so i think that, as we begin this new year, britain has entered — begin this new year, britain has entered a — begin this new year, britain has entered a new phase. the colours 'ust entered a new phase. the colours just as _ entered a new phase. the colours just as government has revealed itself— just as government has revealed itself to— just as government has revealed itself to be unworthy of your trust, it's unconfident is that having plain — it's unconfident is that having plain the _ it's unconfident is that having plain. the cost of living is increasing. energy bills are going up. increasing. energy bills are going up wages— increasing. energy bills are going up. wages are stagnant. tax advisers are coming _ up. wages are stagnant. tax advisers are coming and able. too many people don't feel_ are coming and able. too many people don't feel safe in their own streets and good — don't feel safe in their own streets and good luck to anyone trying to -et and good luck to anyone trying to get a _ and good luck to anyone trying to get a quick— and good luck to anyone trying to get a quick gp appointment. i want to start _ get a quick gp appointment. i want to start the — get a quick gp appointment. i want to start the new year by making a
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pledge _ to start the new year by making a pledge of— to start the new year by making a pledge of straight leadership. today i pledge of straight leadership. today i want _ pledge of straight leadership. today l want to— pledge of straight leadership. today i want to introduce my contract with the british— i want to introduce my contract with the british people. this will be a solemn — the british people. this will be a solemn agreement about what this country— solemn agreement about what this country needs and have a good government should conduct itself. i am well_ government should conduct itself. i am well aware thatjust government should conduct itself. i am well aware that just because the tories _ am well aware that just because the tories lose — am well aware that just because the tories lose the public's trust, it does _ tories lose the public's trust, it does not — tories lose the public's trust, it does not mean that labour simply inherits _ does not mean that labour simply inherits it~ — does not mean that labour simply inherits it. trust has to be earned. i inherits it. trust has to be earned. lam _ inherits it. trust has to be earned. i am confident but not complacent about— i am confident but not complacent about the — i am confident but not complacent about the task ahead. so the very first clause — about the task ahead. so the very first clause in the contract is a binding — first clause in the contract is a binding commitment about decency. 0n standards— binding commitment about decency. 0n standards in_ binding commitment about decency. 0n standards in public life. of course the standards already exist. they are known— the standards already exist. they are known as the nolan principles. selflessness, integrity, objectivity. accountability, openness, honesty and leadership. so
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my solemn— openness, honesty and leadership. so my solemn promise to you will be always _ my solemn promise to you will be always to — my solemn promise to you will be always to run a government that honours — always to run a government that honours these principles. i have a very clear— honours these principles. i have a very clear idea of what a labour government would look like and in 2022l _ government would look like and in 20221 want to take my plans to the 2022| want to take my plans to the british— 20221 want to take my plans to the british people. now, i have spent a career— british people. now, i have spent a career working as a lawyer. so you are probably expecting about 1000 clauses. _ are probably expecting about 1000 clauses, seven appendixes, a list of definitions — clauses, seven appendixes, a list of definitions. well, my contract won't be anything like that. it will be a contract — be anything like that. it will be a contract based on three simple principles. security, prosperity, and respect. these are living principles— and respect. these are living principles and that is why, in the coming — principles and that is why, in the coming months, iwill principles and that is why, in the coming months, i will hold a series of events— coming months, i will hold a series of events around the country to persuade — of events around the country to persuade people to sign up to this new britain that we can create together _
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new britain that we can create together. the first time in the contract — together. the first time in the contract to security. everyone has the basic— contract to security. everyone has the basic right to feel safe in their— the basic right to feel safe in their own _ the basic right to feel safe in their own community. you'll need to know— their own community. you'll need to know that _ their own community. you'll need to know that the nhs is there for us when _ know that the nhs is there for us when we — know that the nhs is there for us when we needed. and that if we hard we should _ when we needed. and that if we hard we should also have a right tojob security — we should also have a right tojob security. the second term in the contract — security. the second term in the contract is — security. the second term in the contract is prosperity. everyone should — contract is prosperity. everyone should have the opportunity to thrive. — should have the opportunity to thrive. to— should have the opportunity to thrive, to realise our ambitions and make _ thrive, to realise our ambitions and make a _ thrive, to realise our ambitions and make a good life for ourselves. to have _ make a good life for ourselves. to have the _ make a good life for ourselves. to have the skills we need to prosper. and then _ have the skills we need to prosper. and then there is a third term in my contract _ and then there is a third term in my contract. respect. it is a less obvious— contract. respect. it is a less obvious political virtue than security _ obvious political virtue than security or prosperity but it is every — security or prosperity but it is every bit _ security or prosperity but it is every bit as important. everyone has the right— every bit as important. everyone has the right to — every bit as important. everyone has the right to live in places we care for. the right to live in places we care for to _ the right to live in places we care for to have _ the right to live in places we care for. to have lives and ambitions taken _ for. to have lives and ambitions taken seriously, to be valid for who we are _ taken seriously, to be valid for who we are and — taken seriously, to be valid for who we are and what we do. i want to create _ we are and what we do. i want to create a —
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we are and what we do. i want to create a contract defined by security _ create a contract defined by security, prosperity and respect. to create _ security, prosperity and respect. to create a _ security, prosperity and respect. to create a contract for a government worthy— create a contract for a government worthy of— create a contract for a government worthy of the fai nation which we live _ worthy of the fai nation which we live the — worthy of the fai nation which we live. the labour party is a deeply paediatric— live. the labour party is a deeply paediatric party. keir hardie once said that — paediatric party. keir hardie once said that british socialism must wear— said that british socialism must wear a — said that british socialism must wear a local guy. he meant that british— wear a local guy. he meant that british socialism was rooted in the everyday _ british socialism was rooted in the everyday concerns of working people. the titans _ everyday concerns of working people. the titans of 1945 were elected to power _ the titans of 1945 were elected to power on — the titans of 1945 were elected to power on the votes of the service men _ power on the votes of the service men and — power on the votes of the service men and women. that government took the spirit _ men and women. that government took the spirit of— men and women. that government took the spirit of collective sacrifice generated by the war and turned it into the _ generated by the war and turned it into the national health service for which _ into the national health service for which we _ into the national health service for which we are so thankful today. it was a _ which we are so thankful today. it was a page — which we are so thankful today. it was a page at a government. which understood — was a page at a government. which understood the importance of national— understood the importance of national defence. which created nato. _ national defence. which created nato. the — national defence. which created nato, the alliance that has preserve the peace _ nato, the alliance that has preserve the peace in europe ever since. and .ave the peace in europe ever since. and gave this _ the peace in europe ever since. and gave this country as independent nuclear— gave this country as independent nuclear deterrent. 1945 labour
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government laid the foundations for the end _ government laid the foundations for the end of— government laid the foundations for the end of empire at the beginning of the _ the end of empire at the beginning of the modern commonwealth. under wilson. _ of the modern commonwealth. under wilson. the _ of the modern commonwealth. under wilson, the open university extended higher— wilson, the open university extended higher education, the race relations act of— higher education, the race relations act of 1965— higher education, the race relations act of 1965 prohibited racial discrimination. barbara castle's egual— discrimination. barbara castle's equal pay— discrimination. barbara castle's equal pay act was a watershed moment in the _ equal pay act was a watershed moment in the fight _ equal pay act was a watershed moment in the fight for gender equality. the blair— in the fight for gender equality. the blair government introduced a national— the blair government introduced a national minimum wage and repaired the public— national minimum wage and repaired the public services that had been neglected under the tories. when i reflect— neglected under the tories. when i reflect on— neglected under the tories. when i reflect on previous labour governments, i have two thoughts. the first _ governments, i have two thoughts. the first is. — governments, i have two thoughts. the first is, what a record we have. these _ the first is, what a record we have. these three — the first is, what a record we have. these three chapters of change, attlee. — these three chapters of change, attlee, wilson and blair made britain — attlee, wilson and blair made britain a — attlee, wilson and blair made britain a better country. we must be the people _ britain a better country. we must be the people who write to the fourth chapter~ _ the people who write to the fourth chapter. the people who create a new
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britain _ chapter. the people who create a new britain in _ chapter. the people who create a new britain in the 21st—century. and second. — britain in the 21st—century. and second, nobody could look on that record _ second, nobody could look on that record and — second, nobody could look on that record and that labour is not a patriotic— record and that labour is not a patriotic party. those labour governments have the ambition to build _ governments have the ambition to build a _ governments have the ambition to build a society in which everyone can contribute and everyone is valued — can contribute and everyone is valued to _ can contribute and everyone is valued. to extend security, prosperity and respect to all. this is the _ prosperity and respect to all. this is the and — prosperity and respect to all. this is the and the mission we inherit. the first— is the and the mission we inherit. the first duty of government is the security— the first duty of government is the security of— the first duty of government is the security of its citizens. i was once the country's leading prosecutor. crime _ the country's leading prosecutor. crime and — the country's leading prosecutor. crime and anti—social behaviour are issues _ crime and anti—social behaviour are issues that— crime and anti—social behaviour are issues that matter to me personally. i've issues that matter to me personally. l've seen— issues that matter to me personally. i've seen too many victims of crime most _ i've seen too many victims of crime most them — i've seen too many victims of crime most them not at all well off, not to know _ most them not at all well off, not to know that security is a matter of social— to know that security is a matter of socialjustice. that's why labour will provide crime prevention teams in every— will provide crime prevention teams in every neighbourhood. police hubs will be _ in every neighbourhood. police hubs
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will be visible in every community. we will— will be visible in every community. we will introduce a tougher approach to closing _ we will introduce a tougher approach to closing down drug dens of new powers _ to closing down drug dens of new powers for— to closing down drug dens of new powers for local police and local authorities. security also means that knowing that the nhs is there for you _ that knowing that the nhs is there for you when you need it. and i'll be setting — for you when you need it. and i'll be setting down a long—term plan to show— be setting down a long—term plan to show a _ be setting down a long—term plan to show a labour government will shift the emphasis from emergency care to preventing _ the emphasis from emergency care to preventing people getting sick in the first— preventing people getting sick in the first place. we will also ensure that people feel more secure work by introducing _ that people feel more secure work by introducing the new protections for workers _ introducing the new protections for workers that angela rayner announced last year~ _ workers that angela rayner announced last year. one of the things the pandemic— last year. one of the things the pandemic has taught us is that everyone — pandemic has taught us is that everyone needs decent pay when they are sick _ everyone needs decent pay when they are sick. but that is not the case on millions— are sick. but that is not the case on millions of british workers. i know— on millions of british workers. i know the — on millions of british workers. i know the care workers looking after vulnerable — know the care workers looking after vulnerable people who can't afford to be _ vulnerable people who can't afford to be ill _ vulnerable people who can't afford to be ill because they won't get paid _ to be ill because they won't get paid that— to be ill because they won't get paid. that is not only unfair on them — paid. that is not only unfair on them it— paid. that is not only unfair on
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them it is— paid. that is not only unfair on them. it is unsafe for the country and a _ them. it is unsafe for the country and a labour government will fix it. labour— and a labour government will fix it. labour bit _ and a labour government will fix it. labour bit and must be a prosperous nation _ labour bit and must be a prosperous nation this — labour bit and must be a prosperous nation. this country needs an industrial— nation. this country needs an industrial strategy to improve our productivity, to ensure that we buy, make _ productivity, to ensure that we buy, make and _ productivity, to ensure that we buy, make and sell more in britain and to revive _ make and sell more in britain and to revive the _ make and sell more in britain and to revive the places that made britain wealthy _ revive the places that made britain wealthy. so, for example, at our conference — wealthy. so, for example, at our conference we pledged an extra £28 billion— conference we pledged an extra £28 billion a _ conference we pledged an extra £28 billion a year in capital investment to combat— billion a year in capital investment to combat climate change, to create the next _ to combat climate change, to create the next generation ofjobs and to inspire _ the next generation ofjobs and to inspire innovation for a clean future — inspire innovation for a clean future. and this promises a future to places — future. and this promises a future to places that were once defined by what they— to places that were once defined by what they made. let me give you a flavour _ what they made. let me give you a flavour of _ what they made. let me give you a flavour of what i think might be possible — flavour of what i think might be possible. not long ago, i visited the humber gasworks. the gas they still would _ the humber gasworks. the gas they still would help to keep the prices low. still would help to keep the prices low but— still would help to keep the prices low. but the government let it close in 2017~ _ low. but the government let it close in 2017~ and — low. but the government let it close in 2017. and you've seen what has happened — in 2017. and you've seen what has happened to gas prices since. but
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the workers that are not looking to the workers that are not looking to the past. _ the workers that are not looking to the past, they are convinced that with the — the past, they are convinced that with the right investment and government support the humber could become _ government support the humber could become a _ government support the humber could become a hub for the production of hydroged — become a hub for the production of hydrogen. these workers want to make historic— hydrogen. these workers want to make historic contribution to combating the climate crisis. they want to be in the _ the climate crisis. they want to be in the vanguard of the next industrial revolution. all they need is a government that shares their ambition— is a government that shares their ambition and runs with it. of all the things— ambition and runs with it. of all the things borisjohnson is done, the things borisjohnson is done, the one _ the things borisjohnson is done, the one that truly astonishes me was that a _ the one that truly astonishes me was that a prime — the one that truly astonishes me was that a prime minister who claims to be interested in levelling up tore up be interested in levelling up tore up their— be interested in levelling up tore up their own industrial strategy. what _ up their own industrial strategy. what an— up their own industrial strategy. what an extraordinary act of self—harm. labourwould what an extraordinary act of self—harm. labour would create 100.000 — self—harm. labour would create 100,000 new start—up businesses and new hubs— 100,000 new start—up businesses and new hubs of— 100,000 new start—up businesses and new hubs of excellence building on existing _ new hubs of excellence building on existing strengths such as video gaming — existing strengths such as video gaming in — existing strengths such as video gaming in dundee. bya existing strengths such as video gaming in dundee. by a farmer in
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cambridgeshire. and here birmingham a company— cambridgeshire. and here birmingham a company which began life as a pen manufacturer and the producers plates _ manufacturer and the producers plates for — manufacturer and the producers plates for hydrogen fuel cells, a technology that could help lorries have zero — technology that could help lorries have zero carbon emissions. in each of these _ have zero carbon emissions. in each of these examples new technologies bein- of these examples new technologies being used imaginatively to create prosperity. but that prosperous future — prosperity. but that prosperous future is — prosperity. but that prosperous future is only possible if we equip our people properly. this country has always — our people properly. this country has always made a world—class offer. to a small— has always made a world—class offer. to a small section of society. in the sub— to a small section of society. in the sub offer to those who do not take the — the sub offer to those who do not take the academic course. so be a virtual— take the academic course. so be a virtual clause in my contract and the task— virtual clause in my contract and the task for my skills advisory council— the task for my skills advisory council to— the task for my skills advisory council to ensure that the next generation of students is ready for work— generation of students is ready for work and _ generation of students is ready for work and ready for life. i believe passionately that everyone has the ti l ht passionately that everyone has the right to _ passionately that everyone has the right to be treated with respect. no
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places— right to be treated with respect. no places should be left behind and nobody — places should be left behind and nobody should be treated as if they don't _ nobody should be treated as if they don't matter. and i know this can happed — don't matter. and i know this can happen i— don't matter. and i know this can happen. i saw with my dad. my dad always— happen. i saw with my dad. my dad always felt— happen. i saw with my dad. my dad always felt undervalued because he worked _ always felt undervalued because he worked in _ always felt undervalued because he worked in a factory. he felt people look down — worked in a factory. he felt people look down on him and he wasn't wrong about— look down on him and he wasn't wrong about that _ look down on him and he wasn't wrong about that. people had their dignity and it— about that. people had their dignity and it needs to respected. i want to live in_ and it needs to respected. i want to live in a _ and it needs to respected. i want to live in a country in which skills are valued _ live in a country in which skills are valued in which everyone is respected _ are valued in which everyone is respected for what they contribute and in _ respected for what they contribute and in britain we make and we will always— and in britain we make and we will always play by the rules. i regard the rule — always play by the rules. i regard the rule of— always play by the rules. i regard the rule of law as one of the things that makes— the rule of law as one of the things that makes britain great. due process _ that makes britain great. due process. treating institutions with respect _ process. treating institutions with respect. the integrity of british justice — respect. the integrity of british justice has always been the envy of the world — justice has always been the envy of the world. it has always been a big part of— the world. it has always been a big part of our— the world. it has always been a big part of our economic success. a good reason _ part of our economic success. a good reason to— part of our economic success. a good reason to do— part of our economic success. a good reason to do business in britain is
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that you _ reason to do business in britain is that you never will be respected in that you never will be respected in that respect underwrites your investment. that is why doing the film investment. that is why doing the right things in the right way matters _ right things in the right way matters as much as doing the right things _ matters as much as doing the right things this— matters as much as doing the right things. this year i will set out what — things. this year i will set out what i — things. this year i will set out what i mean by respect. what it demands— what i mean by respect. what it demands of government and what a demand _ demands of government and what a demand of— demands of government and what a demand of all of us. because any successful— demand of all of us. because any successful contract is a two way deal~ _ successful contract is a two way deal~ you — successful contract is a two way deal. you can expect access to high—quality health care but there will be _ high—quality health care but there will be zero tolerance of abuse towards — will be zero tolerance of abuse towards nhs staff. you can expect the opportunity to acquire new skills— the opportunity to acquire new skills but— the opportunity to acquire new skills but you will be expected to work _ skills but you will be expected to work hard — skills but you will be expected to work hard and do your bit. you can expect— work hard and do your bit. you can expect better neighbourhood policing but you _ expect better neighbourhood policing but you will be expected to behave like good _ but you will be expected to behave like good neighbours in your community, too. i believe that these
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values. _ community, too. i believe that these values, security, prosperity and respect. — values, security, prosperity and respect, unite the whole of the united — respect, unite the whole of the united kingdom. the uk is a newly constructed of four countries. it is complex— constructed of four countries. it is complex and can easily be exploited for political gain, as we have seen. in for political gain, as we have seen. in northern — for political gain, as we have seen. in northern ireland the government is playing _ in northern ireland the government is playing fast and loose with the peace _ is playing fast and loose with the peace process as the price for getting — peace process as the price for getting brexit done. and a reckless government in westminster that doesn't — government in westminster that doesn't seem to care about what happens — doesn't seem to care about what happens in — doesn't seem to care about what happens in scotland erodes peoples faith in_ happens in scotland erodes peoples faith in our— happens in scotland erodes peoples faith in our common bonds. but i believe _ faith in our common bonds. but i believe in — faith in our common bonds. but i believe in a — faith in our common bonds. but i believe in a union of nations. i believe — believe in a union of nations. i believe we _ believe in a union of nations. i believe we are better together than any of— believe we are better together than any of us _ believe we are better together than any of us would be a part. i believe that each— any of us would be a part. i believe that each nation can speak with a progressive voice but we do need a new and _ progressive voice but we do need a new and durable constitutional second — new and durable constitutional second which is why i am delighted that gordon brown was that commission which are the new course for a union of nations. security, prosperity— for a union of nations. security, prosperity and respect. these are the values —
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prosperity and respect. these are the values that will inform britain was a _ the values that will inform britain was a role — the values that will inform britain was a role in the world. i'm determined that britain should profit — determined that britain should profit from our strong global relationships. that means notjust getting _ relationships. that means notjust getting brexit done but making brexit— getting brexit done but making brexit work. i spoke at the cbi last november— brexit work. i spoke at the cbi last november i described how we would approach _ november i described how we would approach this. making brexit work is painstaking work on slogans won't cut it _ painstaking work on slogans won't cut it my— painstaking work on slogans won't cut it. my goals will be to repair the alliances that this government is damaged while also ensuring that our borders remain safe and secure. the contract — our borders remain safe and secure. the contract l — our borders remain safe and secure. the contract i want to agree with the british— the contract i want to agree with the british people is motivated by a desire _ the british people is motivated by a desire to _ the british people is motivated by a desire to bring the country together. we don't find a nation by emphasising what divides us. we build _ emphasising what divides us. we build a _ emphasising what divides us. we build a nation from the common bonds
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between _ build a nation from the common bonds between us _ build a nation from the common bonds between us. our high streets, our community— between us. our high streets, our community centres, are places of worship. — community centres, are places of worship, the spaces that we share, the labour— worship, the spaces that we share, the labour party is not a nationalist party. it is a national party _ nationalist party. it is a national party as— nationalist party. it is a national party as a _ nationalist party. it is a national party. as a nation gives us a place to belong — party. as a nation gives us a place to belong. we are all shaped by the landscape _ to belong. we are all shaped by the landscape in the villages, and the towns _ landscape in the villages, and the towns in — landscape in the villages, and the towns in the cities where we live. for me _ towns in the cities where we live. for me a — towns in the cities where we live. for me a stadium will always be at the heart — for me a stadium will always be at the heart of any community. these are the _ the heart of any community. these are the places that give our lives meaning — are the places that give our lives meaning. that shape our identities. the businesses, the pubs, the place of worship _ the businesses, the pubs, the place of worship in which our lives unfold _ of worship in which our lives unfold. this is a remarkable nation with an _ unfold. this is a remarkable nation with an extraordinary cultural heritage _ with an extraordinary cultural heritage. british music, british fashion. — heritage. british music, british fashion, british advertising, british— fashion, british advertising, british acting, the soft diplomatic power— british acting, the soft diplomatic power wielded by the bbc, the world but i power wielded by the bbc, the world but i guit— power wielded by the bbc, the world but i quit as broadcaster which
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enjoys — but i quit as broadcaster which enjoys a — but i quit as broadcaster which enjoys a centenary this year. the side as— enjoys a centenary this year. the side as his — enjoys a centenary this year. the side as his wisdom is guiding us through— side as his wisdom is guiding us through the pandemic. a world—class pharmaceuticals and financial services _ pharmaceuticals and financial services. universities which are a magnet— services. universities which are a magnet for— services. universities which are a magnet for the best students the world _ magnet for the best students the world over. there is so much of which _ world over. there is so much of which we — world over. there is so much of which we can be proud. i'm personally thankful that i grew up in a country which had a national care _ in a country which had a national care service. _ in a country which had a national care service, national health service — care service, national health service to provide for my mum when she needed — service to provide for my mum when she needed it. that gave me the opportunity to go to university and to become — opportunity to go to university and to become a lawyer to fight for what is right _ to become a lawyer to fight for what is right. this country has presented me with _ is right. this country has presented me with great opportunities. it is a great _ me with great opportunities. it is a great place — me with great opportunities. it is a great place to live. but i don't think— great place to live. but i don't think you _ great place to live. but i don't think you cease to be patriotic because — think you cease to be patriotic because you notice your country has flaws _ because you notice your country has flaws on _ because you notice your country has flaws. 0n the contrary, the reason we in _ flaws. 0n the contrary, the reason we in the — flaws. 0n the contrary, the reason we in the labour party want to create — we in the labour party want to create those flaws is precisely
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because — create those flaws is precisely because we are patriotic. i came into politics to make things happen, notjust— into politics to make things happen, notjust to _ into politics to make things happen, notjust to talk into politics to make things happen, not just to talk about them. i don't think— not just to talk about them. i don't think politics is a branch of the entertainment industry. i think it is the _ entertainment industry. i think it is the serious business of getting things— is the serious business of getting things done. but i am afraid, at the moment. _ things done. but i am afraid, at the moment. we — things done. but i am afraid, at the moment, we are going backwards. we have a _ moment, we are going backwards. we have a prime _ moment, we are going backwards. we have a prime minister who thinks the rules apply— have a prime minister who thinks the rules apply to anyone but him. just when _ rules apply to anyone but him. just when trust — rules apply to anyone but him. just when trust in the government has become _ when trust in the government has become a — when trust in the government has become a matter of life and death for this— become a matter of life and death for this prime minister it has become _ for this prime minister it has become a _ for this prime minister it has become a matter of what he can get away with _ become a matter of what he can get away with. i've heard so many heartbreaking stories of people who missed _ heartbreaking stories of people who missed family funerals because they were abiding by the rules. meanwhile, the prime minister was at a cheese _ meanwhile, the prime minister was at a cheese and wine party in downing street _ a cheese and wine party in downing street and — a cheese and wine party in downing street. and let's be clear. it is the party— street. and let's be clear. it is the party that is the problem. this is not _ the party that is the problem. this is not about— the party that is the problem. this is not about the flaws of one individual. it's about the floors of
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a whole _ individual. it's about the floors of a whole style of government. the floors _ a whole style of government. the floors of — a whole style of government. the floors of an — a whole style of government. the floors of an ideology, of a political— floors of an ideology, of a political party that has been in power— political party that has been in power for— political party that has been in power for too long. after 12 years in power. — power for too long. after 12 years in power, while the country is trying — in power, while the country is trying to— in power, while the country is trying to stay safe and to make the tory party — trying to stay safe and to make the tory party is gearing up for a leadership fight, too busy squabbling over the leadership to provide _ squabbling over the leadership to provide any. meanwhile, the real problem — provide any. meanwhile, the real problem is — provide any. meanwhile, the real problem is the people face ijust ignored — problem is the people face ijust ignored. people need solutions. people — ignored. people need solutions. people are struggling. this government is simply turning away. this year. _ government is simply turning away. this year, 2022 is a big year. it is her majesty— this year, 2022 is a big year. it is her majesty the queen's platinum jubilee _ her majesty the queen's platinum jubilee. the city is looking forward to hosting — jubilee. the city is looking forward to hosting the commonwealth games. we will— to hosting the commonwealth games. we will host the women's euros and men's _ we will host the women's euros and men's teams will compete in the world _ men's teams will compete in the world cup— men's teams will compete in the world cup which gives us an opportunity, as there was in the
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european — opportunity, as there was in the european championships last year, to glimpse _ european championships last year, to glimpse the generous, the tolerant nation _ glimpse the generous, the tolerant nation that we are at our best. the england _ nation that we are at our best. the england team as a living embodiment of a successful nation. young men of many— of a successful nation. young men of many backgrounds united by their talent _ many backgrounds united by their talent and pride. i want to be the government that does right by them. i government that does right by them. i want _ government that does right by them. i want to— government that does right by them. i want to create a national community in which everyone feels secure _ community in which everyone feels secure and — community in which everyone feels secure and everyone feels that they belong _ secure and everyone feels that they belong. the britain i want is a country— belong. the britain i want is a country in _ belong. the britain i want is a country in which those who contribute get something back. because — contribute get something back. because 2022 is also the first year in which _ because 2022 is also the first year in which we — because 2022 is also the first year in which we make some really big challenges repairing after the pandemic, combating the climate crisis _ pandemic, combating the climate crisis. making brexit work. i believe _ crisis. making brexit work. i believe that the best still lies ahead — believe that the best still lies ahead for this country but only if
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we had — ahead for this country but only if we had the courage to create a new britain _ we had the courage to create a new britain a _ we had the courage to create a new britain. a country in which you and your— britain. a country in which you and your family— britain. a country in which you and your family get the security, the prosperity and the respect that you deserve _ prosperity and the respect that you deserve. my contract with the british— deserve. my contract with the british people set out how we can create _ british people set out how we can create that new britain. thank you for listening and happy new year to everyone _ for listening and happy new year to everyone. thank you. applause. i will now take some questions from the press _ i will now take some questions from the press i— i will now take some questions from the press. ithink i will now take some questions from the press. i think there i will now take some questions from the press. ithink there is i will now take some questions from the press. i think there is a i will now take some questions from the press. ithink there is a raving mic making — the press. ithink there is a raving mic making its way to you. ifi mic making its way to you. if i could ask _ mic making its way to you. if i could ask you _ mic making its way to you. if i could ask you a couple of questions, if that is all right. 0n covid, do you think the government is right to stick to plan b in england mean no further restrictions or do you think more should be done now? and when it comes to your leadership you spend a lot of time talking about
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patriotism, standing in front of a flag, very often, but some who want to know what specific policies you to know what specific policies you to help people in places like west brom who turn their back on labour at the last election? fin brom who turn their back on labour at the last election?— at the last election? on the question — at the last election? on the question plan _ at the last election? on the question plan b, _ at the last election? on the question plan b, the - at the last election? on the question plan b, the first i at the last election? on the i question plan b, the first thing i would _ question plan b, the first thing i would say— question plan b, the first thing i would say is we've not had those restrictions— would say is we've not had those restrictions in place of the labour party— restrictions in place of the labour party had — restrictions in place of the labour party had not voted them in the national— party had not voted them in the national interest because the prime minister— national interest because the prime minister was too weak to bring in the measures that he needed. now, we hope that— the measures that he needed. now, we hope that we don't need further restrictions. obviously there is concern — restrictions. obviously there is concern looking at the numbers but i firmly— concern looking at the numbers but i firmly believe that i think today is a classic— firmly believe that i think today is a classic example of that. the first day back— a classic example of that. the first day back at — a classic example of that. the first day back at school for many children _ day back at school for many children. we need better leadership from the _ children. we need better leadership from the government because if we are to _ from the government because if we are to keep— from the government because if we are to keep our schools open, and we must. _ are to keep our schools open, and we must. what _ are to keep our schools open, and we must, what we need is many more of our school— must, what we need is many more of our school children vaccinated, only about _ our school children vaccinated, only about half _ our school children vaccinated, only about half of those over 12 they were _ about half of those over 12 they were eligible to vaccinated have been _ were eligible to vaccinated have been vaccinated. we said to the
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government used the christmas period to vaccinate _ government used the christmas period to vaccinate their children. we need much _ to vaccinate their children. we need much better ventilation, we have been _ much better ventilation, we have been saying this for a year, to stop the virus _ been saying this for a year, to stop the virus spreading in schools. the government has got with 7000 ventilators that is but one above all the _ ventilators that is but one above all the schools that i needed. if you put— all the schools that i needed. if you put your coat and open the windows — you put your coat and open the windows and a mask and may be freezing — windows and a mask and may be freezing but you canjust windows and a mask and may be freezing but you can just about get on with— freezing but you can just about get on with learning. to use into a pandemic— on with learning. to use into a pandemic that is completely unacceptable. the third thing is we need _ unacceptable. the third thing is we need mass — unacceptable. the third thing is we need mass testing in schools. the government says, and it is right to say we _ government says, and it is right to say we need — government says, and it is right to say we need tests twice a week for those _ say we need tests twice a week for those in _ say we need tests twice a week for those in secondary school, but they're — those in secondary school, but they're nowhere near achieving that and the _ they're nowhere near achieving that and the numbers they were doing in december— and the numbers they were doing in december and and the numbers they were doing in decemberandl and the numbers they were doing in decemberand i think and the numbers they were doing in december and i think they need to go further— december and i think they need to go further so _ december and i think they need to go further so that if there is an outbreak— further so that if there is an outbreak in schools we can't go back to having _ outbreak in schools we can't go back to having bubbles of classes or going — to having bubbles of classes or going home. the children spent much time out _ going home. the children spent much time out of— going home. the children spent much time out of school for that so we need _ time out of school for that so we need mass — time out of school for that so we need mass testing where if you are contact _ need mass testing where if you are contact of— need mass testing where if you are contact of a — need mass testing where if you are contact of a schoolchild and you take _ contact of a schoolchild and you take a _ contact of a schoolchild and you take a test if it is positive you go home _ take a test if it is positive you go home and — take a test if it is positive you go home and if it is negative you stay
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so we _ home and if it is negative you stay so we can— home and if it is negative you stay so we can have children in schools. the second — so we can have children in schools. the second question about the flag. two points— the second question about the flag. two points in relation to that. i'm very— two points in relation to that. i'm very proud — two points in relation to that. i'm very proud to stand in front of the flag _ very proud to stand in front of the flag l've — very proud to stand in front of the flag. i've done it many times for including — flag. i've done it many times for including when i was director of public— including when i was director of public prosecutions representing our country— public prosecutions representing our country ten — public prosecutions representing our country ten years ago. sol public prosecutions representing our country ten years ago. so i have always _ country ten years ago. so i have always been very proud to do so but it is not— always been very proud to do so but it is notjust — always been very proud to do so but it is notjust the flag that always been very proud to do so but it is not just the flag that drives our patriotism. as i said in the speech— our patriotism. as i said in the speech it — our patriotism. as i said in the speech it is _ our patriotism. as i said in the speech it is really the values lie behind — speech it is really the values lie behind that. the values i've outlined _ behind that. the values i've outlined today of security and prosperity and respect. they are the three _ prosperity and respect. they are the three values that lie behind patriotism as far as i am concerned. thank— patriotism as far as i am concerned. thank you. — patriotism as far as i am concerned. thank you, vicky. | patriotism as far as i am concerned. thank you. vicky-— thank you, vicky. i will also ask two questions. _ thank you, vicky. i will also ask two questions. it _ thank you, vicky. i will also ask two questions. it is _ thank you, vicky. i will also ask two questions. it is not - thank you, vicky. i will also ask two questions. it is notjust i two questions. it is notjust schools that are problematic at the moment. we have got huge staff
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shortages because of sickness across hospitals, schools and in many areas where we've got key workers who we need right now to prevent chaos. you've tended to support the government in many areas on covid but i want to understand what you as a party would do about this right now. would you break from the government and call for the isolation period to be reduced from seven to five days like in the us and if not, what would you do to prevent the chaos? and just pushing on vicky's point you say you are a national party not a nationalist party. what does that mean in policy terms? fin party. what does that mean in policy terms? ., , ., ., terms? on the covid question, i do think that the — terms? on the covid question, i do think that the mass _ terms? on the covid question, i do think that the mass testing - terms? on the covid question, i do think that the mass testing is i terms? on the covid question, i do think that the mass testing is nowl terms? on the covid question, i do| think that the mass testing is now a really— think that the mass testing is now a really important part of the way forward — really important part of the way forward so that we can separate as quickly— forward so that we can separate as quickly as— forward so that we can separate as quickly as possible those that are infected — quickly as possible those that are infected and those that are not and make _ infected and those that are not and make sure — infected and those that are not and make sure that we keep the two apart _ make sure that we keep the two apart. now a lot of these cases are asymptomatic it is crucial that this is done _ asymptomatic it is crucial that this is done as— asymptomatic it is crucial that this is done as much as possible. you
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simply— is done as much as possible. you simply unacceptable for the best part of— simply unacceptable for the best part of two years into a pandemic for the _ part of two years into a pandemic for the government say we have not -ot for the government say we have not got enough — for the government say we have not got enough tests. lateral flow test orto got enough tests. lateral flow test or to be _ got enough tests. lateral flow test or to be available in sufficient quantity— or to be available in sufficient quantity to deal with the situation we now— quantity to deal with the situation we now find ourselves in. the idea they would be a variant was a known _ the idea they would be a variant was a known threat to six months ago, that is— a known threat to six months ago, that is not— a known threat to six months ago, that is not an excuse for the government not to have got the mass testing _ government not to have got the mass testing back in place. on the five day period, we've always taken the approach _ day period, we've always taken the approach of following the science. if approach of following the science. if the _ approach of following the science. if the scientific advice is that it is possible to go down to five days, we would _ is possible to go down to five days, we would support it. but we have followed — we would support it. but we have followed the science on this rather than gone — followed the science on this rather than gone out on our own. in terms of the — than gone out on our own. in terms of the policies behind us being a national— of the policies behind us being a national party, well, many of those were _ national party, well, many of those were shown — national party, well, many of those were shown at our party conference, where _ were shown at our party conference, where we _ were shown at our party conference, where we made a very clear commitment in relation to housing and adequate housing and affordable housing _ and adequate housing and affordable housing. we made a very strong
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commitment to employment rights.

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