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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 4, 2022 1:00am-1:31am GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: elizabeth holmes — the founder of health technology company theranos — is found guilty of conspiring to defraud investors of millions of dollars. a legal document signed between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein 12 years ago has been made public — it's potentially key to her civil case against prince andrew. with beijing's winter olympics just weeks away — we find out how china is preparing for spectators coming to a global event — in a global pandemic.
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and our seoul correspondent takes the g—force test to fly fighter jets as she reports on south korea's defence spending spree. they are still officially at war with north korea. there have been increasing air incursions over the country. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc world news — singapore, this is bbc world news. it's newsday. welcome to bbc news — broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. let's start with a story that's been breaking in the past half hour. a usjury has found
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elizabeth holmes, the founder of blood testing start up company theranos, guilty of conspiring to defraud investors. prosecutors said holmes swindled private investors by convincing them that theranos�* small machines could run a range of tests with a few drops of blood from a finger prick. we'll take a closer look at the details of the verdict in a moment, but first our north america tech reporter james clayton — on how theranos was founded. we like to see a world in which every person gets access to this type of basic testing. elizabeth holmes had a vision that turned her into a billionaire. that she could create a machine that she called the edison that could detect hundreds of diseases with just a few drops of blood. the pitch convinced some very important people. rupert murdoch invested, bill clinton was a fan. behind me are the
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four headquarters of theranos. plush, expensive and in the heart of silicon valley. and the great and the good came to visit theranos. evenjoe biden came to california and heaped praise upon the company. success seemed inevitable. this is my certificate _ success seemed inevitable. this is my certificate for _ success seemed inevitable. ti 3 is my certificate for theranos showing my shares and it was signed by elizabeth holmes. so it is a bit of history? it - it is a bit of history? it reall it is a bit of history? it really is. a sad bit of history but history nevertheless. this woman was — but history nevertheless. this woman was a _ but history nevertheless. this woman was a secretary - but history nevertheless. this woman was a secretary in silicon valley. she heard about the amazing new company. my boss had the amazing new company. m boss had indicated that the amazing new company. mg boss had indicated that it was going to be in his words the next apple and i should get as many shares as i could dig so i did. it was six figures, a large amount for me. what eileen didn't _ large amount for me. what eileen didn't know- large amount for me. what eileen didn't know was - large amount for me. whatj eileen didn't know was that large amount for me. what - eileen didn't know was that the dream that elizabeth holmes was selling was a nightmare. the technology didn't work but investors like eileen had no idea. . , ., , , .,
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idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode so that _ idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode so that we _ idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode so that we had - idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode so that we had no - idea. elizabeth was in stealth mode so that we had no idea| mode so that we had no idea whether it was going well on the brink of collapse. the retail giant _ the brink of collapse. the retail giant walgreens had a contract with theranos to diagnose patients with it machines. the court heard that theranos was not using its edison machines was instead using openly available diagnostic equipment. the court also heard that some patients had been misdiagnosed. l also heard that some patients had been misdiagnosed. i resent that somebody _ had been misdiagnosed. i resent that somebody would _ had been misdiagnosed. i resent that somebody would make - had been misdiagnosed. i resent that somebody would make such had been misdiagnosed. i resent. that somebody would make such a massive fraud, especially when so many people told her that this isn't working.— this isn't working. elizabeth holmes has _ this isn't working. elizabeth holmes has argued - this isn't working. elizabeth holmes has argued at - this isn't working. elizabeth holmes has argued at triall this isn't working. elizabeth . holmes has argued at trial that she had always attempted to create a genuine product that worked and she never intended to commit fraud. what happened behind those close doors has led to a lot of introspection here in silicon valley. but there is still a culture of faking it until you make it here and until that changes, people worry that what happened in theranos could happen again. james clayton, bbc news.
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peter bowes joins us live from los angeles. great to have you on the programme. just listening to that report from james there about the culture of fake it till you make it in silicon valley, something that the thoroughness —— theranos case has brought to light. how much of commentary do you think the decision in this case has been on that culture?— on that culture? well, this is a very mixed _ on that culture? well, this is a very mixed verdict. - on that culture? well, this is a very mixed verdict. yes - on that culture? well, this is| a very mixed verdict. yes she has been found guilty on four counts of fraud and conspiracy but also not guilty on four those counts as well and the jurors could not reach a decision on a further three charges. it is evident that these jurors think that some seven days during their deliberations struggled with these decisions and i think thatis these decisions and i think that is symptomatic of how
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difficult a case this was perhaps reflects on how it has been followed extremely closely by silicon valley with people coming down very firmly either in herfavour or against her as far as the details of this case were concerned. it is symptomatic, at least as far as some people see, of how silicon valley operates. almost a culture of invest now ask questions later and hope that the investment reaps rewards at some point in the future. the difference with this case is that this was a medical device and these were health screenings, people, real people were involved and owned in some were involved and owned in some were given incorrect results. on that, peter, the fact that we have seen the decision in this case show that elizabeth holmes has been found guilty of defrauding investors but not of
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patients. what is being made of that? ~ ., , , that? well, that is interesting and we are — that? well, that is interesting and we are getting _ that? well, that is interesting and we are getting into - that? well, that is interesting and we are getting into the i and we are getting into the detail now and you are absolutely right. it seems that the jury have come down on the guilty side as it applies to those investors and it has got to be said that during the entire course of this trial that i have not heard much sympathy for investors who perhaps have been throwing millions of dollars at this company without perhaps asking those very detailed questions about is the technology working? perhaps there is more sympathy for the individuals, the patients who were given spurious results and in one case a hiv test that was not positive as it had been indicated. clearly, thejurors for long and hard about this as to whether elizabeth holmes personally was responsible for those incorrect tests. very detailed. difficult as you can
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imagine with the hours and hours of evidence that they have to filter through. indeed and, have to filter through. indeed and. briefly. _ have to filter through. indeed and, briefly, where _ have to filter through. indeed and, briefly, where do - have to filter through. indeed and, briefly, where do we - have to filter through. indeed and, briefly, where do we go| and, briefly, where do we go from here? what is the next development in this legal proceeding?— development in this legal proceeding? each of these counts carries _ proceeding? each of these counts carries a _ proceeding? each of these counts carries a 20 - proceeding? each of these counts carries a 20 year. proceeding? each of these - counts carries a 20 year prison sentence so this will be seen as a victory for the prosecution. she has been found guilty on four counts and is still facing a long prison sentence. she will hear what that sentence is at a later date. �* ., , that sentence is at a later date. 1, , ., ~ i. date. peter bowes, thank you forjoining _ date. peter bowes, thank you forjoining us— date. peter bowes, thank you forjoining us on _ date. peter bowes, thank you forjoining us on the - date. peter bowes, thank you i forjoining us on the programme with the latest developments in that trial. moving another story now. a $500,000 legal settlement signed by virginia roberts giuffre and sex offenderjeffrey epstein in 2009 included an agreement that ms giuffrre wouldn't sue anyone connected to epstein. lawyers for prince andrew say the agreement, which has been made public in the last couple of hours, releases the prince from liability in the civil
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case brought by virginia giuffre, who accuses him of sexually assaulting her when she was 17. prince andrew has consistently denied the claims. our legal correspondent dominic casciani reports. a woman seeking her day in court. the unprecedented defendant, a prince of the realm. but have his lawyers now found a way to stop virginia giuffre's case from ever being heard? she says she was trafficked into sexual abuse and exploited by the man the right, jeffrey epstein. ms giuffre, then known as roberts, said epstein and his girlfriend coerced than teenager into abuse by prince andrew in london, new york and the caribbean. today, the release of a 12—year—old settlement in which ms giuffre accepted half $1 million to end her original case against epstein. the confidential deal has been made
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public because of its potential importance to prince andrew's defence. in the settlement, the junior giuffre agreed to release a quit satisfy and forever discharge geoffrey abstain from further claims. the wording goes on to cover any other person who could have been a potential defendant. it is so wide she promises not to bring any further case dating from the beginning of the world. prince andrew's lawyers say that means he cannot be sued but one lawyer who represented some of steen�*s alleged victims says it is too vague to be enforceable. this is one of— vague to be enforceable. this is one of the _ vague to be enforceable. this is one of the most _ vague to be enforceable. t1 3 is one of the most bizarre pieces i have ever seen. ijust cannot believe that a court would say well anyone who has wronged virginia who was associated with epstein is now released from liability. that would fly in the face of what our laws are trying to do now which is to open up claims for sexual abuse victims and allow them to come forward, even
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years later, and bring perpetrators to justice. the perpetrators to 'ustice. the dude's position _ perpetrators to justice. the dude's position remains unchanged since his november 2019 newsnight interview. you can sa 2019 newsnight interview. 7m, can say categorically that you do not recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house? l have sex with her in a bedroom in a house?— in a house? i can absolutely categorically _ in a house? i can absolutely categorically tell _ in a house? i can absolutely categorically tell you - in a house? i can absolutely categorically tell you it - in a house? i can absolutely| categorically tell you it never happened. do categorically tell you it never happened-— happened. do you recall any kind of sexual _ happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact - happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with l kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts or any other time? ., ., ,., time? none whatsoever. tomorrow. _ time? none whatsoever. tomorrow, prince - time? none whatsoever. | tomorrow, prince andrew time? none whatsoever. - tomorrow, prince andrew steam mollusca new york court to throw out the case. her lawyers say that the won't happen in one way or another the duke will have to answer her allegations. i've been speaking to moira penza, a former assistant us attorney for the eastern district of new york and an experienced prosecutor in civil trials and sex trafficking cases. she outlined what each
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side is arguing. in this case we are really dealing with the first procedural step which is the prince andrew made a motion to dismiss the case and he says based on a legal issue this case cannot go forward. and you have here the attorney for ms giuffre saying that the issue is insufficient. what we have seen today is that the issues related to the 2009 settlement and prince andrew's attorney argued that the broad language that has purported to exempt from liability anyone as a potential defendant against ms giuffre, that that should protect him from liability in this case. and what we see her
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attorney is arguing is that this provision is so broad that it is invalid and, furthermore, that because of the fact that prince andrew could not have been sued in florida at the time in which the 2009 law case was being bought that this provision could not apply to him. lh provision could not apply to him. , ., , . him. in your experience with these sorts _ him. in your experience with these sorts of— him. in your experience with these sorts of cases, - him. in your experience with these sorts of cases, can - him. in your experience with | these sorts of cases, can the judge make a determination based on the language that we have seen? it is very difficult, looking at the document to see howjudge kaplan would be able to make that decision that the lawsuit should be dismissed. the language is extraordinarily broad and this is a case of very broad language that lawyers sometimes think will be helpful for them lawyers sometimes think will be helpfulfor them but lawyers sometimes think will be helpful for them but often can result in finding that a
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provision is invalid because it is in fact too broad. right now while we're at a pre—trial stagejudge kaplan will while we're at a pre—trial stage judge kaplan will have to look at this and say, based on this document can we make a decision that this lawsuit should be dismissed and in general it is an uphill battle for a defendant at this stage because thejudge has for a defendant at this stage because the judge has to take the allegations in the complaint as true. what happens nextin complaint as true. what happens next in terms of where we go from here now that we have had this document released? tomorrow there is going to be oral arguments in the federal district court of new york. they are going to arguments from both sides about the document. as well as some other issues which prince andrew has raised in seeking to dismiss the lawsuit. in seeking to
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dismiss ms giuffre's lawsuit. he is arguing against the constitutionality of the statute that extended the statute that extended the statute of limitations for child sexual abuse victims, for example and so all of these issues will be heard tomorrow and we will not anticipate that there would be a ruling from judge kaplan tomorrow, rather we will probably see a written decision in some number of weeks. ., ., , decision in some number of weeks. . . , . ., ,, weeks. that was a former us attorney for _ weeks. that was a former us attorney for the _ weeks. that was a former us attorney for the eastern - attorney for the eastern district of new york speaking to me a little earlier on that story which we will be following every development of for you right here on bbc news. and you can find the full details of the allegations being made against prince andrew and his response — on the bbc news website — which you can also access via the bbc app. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: we'll tell you why our seoul correspondent has taken to the skies in a fighterjet.
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the japanese people are in the mourning following the death of emperor hirohito. thousands converged on the imperial palace to pay their respects when it was announced he was dead. good grief. after half a century of delighting fans around the world, charlie brown and the rest of the gang are calling it quits. the singer paul simon starts his tour of south africa tomorrow, in spite of protests and violence from some black activist groups. they say international artists should continue to boycott south africa until majority rule is established. around the world, people have been paying tribute to the iconic rock star david bowie, who sold 140 million albums in a career that spanned half a century. his family announced overnight that he died of cancer at the age of 69. the world's tallest skyscraper opens later today.
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the burj dubai has easily overtaken its nearest rivals. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our headlines: elizabeth holmes, the founder of health technology company theranos, is found guilty of conspiring to defraud investors of millions of dollars. a legal document signed between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein 12 years ago has been made public. it's potentially key to her civil case against prince andrew. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the us food and drug administration has expanded vaccine booster eligibility to allow 12— to 15—year—olds to receive a third shot of the pfizer—biontech vaccine. according to the latest data, coronavirus cases are currently
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averaging about 400,000 cases a day. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, has acknowledged that the health service will face considerable pressure in the coming weeks because of staff absences caused by the omicron variant of coronavirus. at least six health trusts in england have declared critical incidents in the last week. but mrjohnson insisted that further restrictions weren't necessary. india has begun rolling out vaccines for all 15 to 18—year—olds. more than four million teenagers took up the offer of a jab on the first day they were eligible. india has recorded its sharpest ever weekly rise in infections. mumbai and delhi are seeing the biggest increases. the resurgence of covid cases is a big concern in asia, with officials in singapore for instance saying that omicron cases now account
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for 17% of cases in the country and that a wave of omicron cases is imminent. but the data seems to suggest, at this point at least, that hospitalisations and deaths are still stable. china has been battling a fresh outbreak of covid cases too, potentially throwing a shadow over the winter olympics, which beijing is due to host in exactly a month's time. the new strain is providing a potential logistical nightmare. china's solution is strict isolation bubbles for all those coming from omicron—affected areas. our correspondent stephen mcdonell went to see how they will work. when athletes arrive in beijing from overseas, if their events are in
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the mountains, they'll be able to take a high—speed train there. that's because some of these trains are operating completely within the bubble. through speaker: ladies and gentlemen, welcome to take this train. soon, they'll find themselves racing along at 350 km an hour, zooming through beijing's arid north and taking in the views. though freezing cold, this is an area of low winter precipitation, meaning that mountains of artificial snow will be needed for the coming olympics. well, this is one of the main stations for the winter olympics. it's cold up here. from today, this entire station is closed to the public. the bubble walls are coming up. only those with olympic clearance on special trains can arrive or leave. on arrival, covid test results and travel histories are checked. well, here we are in the heart of one of the sites for the mountain events
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for the winter olympics. where are the people? well, the reason there are no people here is that the local ski reports have already been closed in preparation for the games, which will start in just a month. over there behind where that big green screen is, that's where the medals will be awarded for the events in this area. but there won't be any general admission tickets available, it seems. they haven't gone on sale yet and they probably won't, so the spectators in the stands are likely to be from government organisations or the army or something along those lines. the challenge for games organisers, though, will be to host an event which can overcome the controversy which has surrounded this olympics following the allegations made by former chinese olympian and tennis star peng shuai in relation to the relationship she had with a former chinese leader. there's been a lot of pressure on the beijing olympics
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because of these allegations, but the organisers will hope that once they sport starts, that it will take over, and they can still host successful games. stephen mcdonell there for us. south korea has pushed its defence budgets to new highs in the last four years, spending an extra $90 million a year on new technology. in 2021, it fired new missiles and even launched its own space programme. the country currently relies on the united states for its defence, but it appears seoul is keen to try to stand on its own two feet. our correspondent laura bicker has had exclusive access to south korean air force training. three, two, one. i am trying to pass a g—force test... one, two, three... oh, my god. ..and, well, it's not easy. i'm here training with
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the air force to find out more about south korea's aim to be a military powerhouse. but before i can fly, i have to stay conscious. keep going, keep going, keep going! ok, good. wow! wonderful. great, great! south korea has shown off its biggest military advancements yet in 2021. it fired an array of new missiles and launched its first rocket into space. the country is also one of only five in the world to train its own pilots on home—grownjets, but what's it like to fly in one? i don't know how i feel! want my mammy! ijust need to breathe, right? as we do loops in the sky, i hear that, from here, south korea can monitor movements in the north.
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that the country is now spending on defence perhaps shouldn't come as a surprise, because they're still officially at war with north korea. here, in the skies over the country, there have also been increasing air incursions from russia and from china. we face probably the most existential security threat. as you know, 68km from seoul, you have north korea armed to their teeth with nuclear weapons and long—range missiles and guns, but you also have china looming in the background, and the us is becoming weaker as we speak. so, even though the americans are our closest ally, we really have to spend much more money and attention on defence. what are we going to do now? another roll. 0k, 0k, 0k. the country has sought to pirouette between the world's great powers. it lies so close to china yet relies on the us to shield it from any potential war. president donald trump described that as "freeloading", and it's made some in seoul question
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the strength of the alliance. so, we will continue to work very closely with our american allies, but we also want to leave room for more autonomous, self—reliant defence. you want me to do a turn? the major even lets me fly the t—50 jet. are you ready? yeah. ok, make a right turn. south korea's feeling it's only too, slowly taking control over the future of its forces. and despite assurances from washington that the alliance does remain strong, the country is showing no signs of turning back. before we go, remind of our top story. elizabeth holmes, who set up the health technology company delta goodrem has been found guilty of conspiring to defraud investors —— found guilty of conspiring to defraud investors —— theranos. you can see her on your screens
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leaving the court. that is all the time we have on tuesday at this hour. thank you for joining us on the programme. do stay with us. hello. after what was an exceptionally mild start to the new year, we have now started to see quite a dramatic change in our weather. something much colder has been working its way in. a chilly—feeling day for tuesday — snow and gales for some of us, particularly in the north of the uk. the cold airfiltering in behind this band of cloud and rain with some sleet and snow on the back edge. ice a possible hazard across the northern half of the uk, where it will be a really chilly first part of the morning. wintry showers starting to pile up in northern scotland. in fact, snow showers even to low levels over the highest hills — 15 cm of accumulating snow. and with gales or severe gales, especially around northern coasts, there could be blizzard conditions for a time. a band of cloud and rain with a little bit of sleet and snow over the high ground will slowly clear the southeast corner, then we see some sunshine, some wintry showers, a mix of rain, sleet and hill
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snow, especially out towards the west. those are the average wind speeds. the gusts will be stronger than that with the wind coming down from the north, so it is going to feel really chilly. on the thermometer, single—digit temperatures, 4—8 degrees. factor in the strength of the wind, this it what it will feel like. it will feel subzero across many northern parts of the uk. now, as we move through tuesday night, there's more snow to come in northern scotland, more wintry showers in the west, some clear spells elsewhere. it's going to be a cold night with frost and ice, temperatures dropping close to freezing, below freezing in quite a few places. so, a widespread frost to start wednesday morning, but wednesday should bring some decent spells of sunshine. a few showers still close to the east coast, one or two out west and up towards northern scotland. more in the way of dry weather, some spells of sunshine, temperatures still between 4—8 degrees. but this is actually where we'd expect to be for early january. this approaches from the west. a little wedge of milder air with it, so some snow initially. then it'll tend to turn back to rain as that wedge of milder air works in, but then colder air returns from the west. wintry showers will start to push in, so only temporarily will temperatures be just a little bit higher. friday, another chilly—feeling
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day, highs of 5—8 degrees. we'll see a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers.
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we will have the headlines on stories for you at the top of our street after this programme.

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