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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 3, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. a legal document signed between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein 12 years ago has been made public. it's potentially key to her civil case against prince andrew. us regulators approve covid boosters for children aged 12—15 as the country battles a surge in omicron infections. three, two, one... our seoul correspondent takes the g—force test to fly fighter jets as she reports on south korea's defence spending spree. and with beijing's winter olympics just weeks away, we'll find out how china is preparing for a global event
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in a global pandemic. where are the people? well, the reason there are no people here is that the local ski resorts have already been closed in preparation for the games, which will start in just a month. live from our studio in singapore... this is bbc news. it's newsday. welcome to bbc new, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. a $500,000 legal settlement signed by virginia roberts giuffre and sex offenderjeffrey epstein in 2009 included an agreement that ms giuffre wouldn't sue anyone connected to epstein. lawyers for prince andrew say the agreement, which has been made public in the last couple of hours, releases the prince from liability in the civil case brought by virginia giuffre, who accuses him of sexually
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assaulting her when she was 17. prince andrew has consistently denied the claims. our legal correspondent, dominic casciani, reports. a woman seeking her day in court. the unprecedented defendant — a prince of the realm. but have his lawyers now found a way to stop virginia giuffre�*s case from ever being heard? she say she was trafficked for sexual abuse and exploited she says she was trafficked for sexual abuse and exploited by the man on the right, jeffrey epstein. ms giuffre, then known as roberts, says epstein and his girlfriend coerced the teenager into abuse by prince andrew in london, new york and the caribbean. today, the release of a 12—year—old settlement in which ms giuffre, seen here at court in new york, accepted half $1 million to end her original case against epstein. that confidential deal has been made public because of its potential importance to prince andrew's defence. in the settlement, virginia giuffre agreed to...
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the wording goes on to cover any other person who could have been a potential defendant. it's so wide, she promises not to bring any further case dating from the beginning of the world. prince andrew's lawyers say that means he can't be sued, but one lawyer who has represented some of epstein�*s alleged victims says it's too vague to be enforceable. this is one of the most bizarre pieces of a settlement agreement i have ever seen. i just cannot believe that a court would say, well, anyone who has wronged virginia, who was associated with epstein is now released from liability. that would fly in the face of what our laws are now trying to do, which is open up claims for sexual abuse victims, allow them to come forward, even years later, and bring perpetrators tojustice. the duke's position remains unchanged since his november 2019
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newsnight interview. you can say categorically that you don't recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia? i can absolutely categorically tell you it's never happened. - do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or any other time? none whatsoever. tomorrow, prince andrew's team will ask for the case to be thrown out. throughout miss giuffre�*s case, her lawyers say she is confident that won't happen, and one way or another, the duke will have to answer her allegations. i'm joined now by moira penza, former assistant us attorney for the eastern district of new york and an experienced prosecutor in civil trials and sex
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trafficking cases. it's wonderful to have you on newsday, moira. can i start by asking you in the first instance, can you spell out what both sides are arguing in this case?- can you spell out what both sides are arguing in this case? thank you. so, in this case, _ are arguing in this case? thank you. so, in this case, we're _ are arguing in this case? thank you. so, in this case, we're dealing - are arguing in this case? thank you. so, in this case, we're dealing withl so, in this case, we're dealing with the first procedural steps in most civil trials of the united states. prince andrew has neither motion to dismiss the case, and he is saying that based on legal issue, this case cannot go forward, and you have here miss giuffre's attorney saying this is then deficient. what we have seen are the issues related to the 2009 settlement agreement, and prince andrew's attorney argued this is broad language purported to exempt from his ability anyone who is a
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potential defendant against miss giuffre, that that should protect them from liability. what we see her attorneys is saying is this is so broad it's invalid. furthermore, because of the fact that prince andrew could not have been sued in florida at the time in which the 2009 lawsuit had been brought, that this provision could not apply to him. in this provision could not apply to him. , ., , . , him. in your experience with these sorts of cases. _ him. in your experience with these sorts of cases, can _ him. in your experience with these sorts of cases, can the _ him. in your experience with these sorts of cases, can the judge - him. in your experience with these j sorts of cases, can the judge make him. in your experience with these l sorts of cases, can the judge make a determination based on the language that we've seen? it’s determination based on the language that we've seen?— that we've seen? it's very difficult lookin: at that we've seen? it's very difficult looking at the _ that we've seen? it's very difficult looking at the four _ that we've seen? it's very difficult looking at the four corners. - that we've seen? it's very difficult looking at the four corners. just i that we've seen? it's very difficult| looking at the four corners. just to looking at the four corners. just to see howjudge kaplan would be able to make that decision, that this should dismiss prince andrew, but languages extraordinarily broad.
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this is the type of language that lawyers and sometimes think will be helpful for them, lawyers and sometimes think will be helpfulforthem, but lawyers and sometimes think will be helpful for them, but often can actually result in finding that a provision is invalid because it is in fact too broad. right now, while they are at this pretrial stage, judge kaplan will have to look at this and say, based on this document, can we make a decision that this lawsuit should be... and it's a very uphill battle in general for defendants at this stage, because thejudge for defendants at this stage, because the judge has to face the complaints in the allegations as true. ~ . complaints in the allegations as true. ., ., ,, , complaints in the allegations as true. ., , , complaints in the allegations as true. ., , true. what happens next in terms of where we go — true. what happens next in terms of where we go from _ true. what happens next in terms of where we go from here? _ true. what happens next in terms of where we go from here? now - true. what happens next in terms of where we go from here? now that i where we go from here? now that we've had this document released. we see we've had this document released. - see that tomorrow, there will be oral arguments in the southern district of new york. we will hear arguments from both sides about this document. as well as some other
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issues which prince andrew has raised in speaking to dismiss his lawsuit. it's to dismiss miss giuffre's lawsuit. he is arguing against the constitutionality. so, all of these issues will be heard tomorrow. we will not anticipate that there will be a ruling from judge kaplan tomorrow, but rather we will probably see a written decision in some number of weeks.- will probably see a written decision in some number of weeks. indeed. as ou in some number of weeks. indeed. as you mentioned. _ in some number of weeks. indeed. as you mentioned, the _ in some number of weeks. indeed. as you mentioned, the timeline - in some number of weeks. indeed. as you mentioned, the timeline for- in some number of weeks. indeed. as you mentioned, the timeline for this | you mentioned, the timeline for this progress is by some number of weeks. in the interim, are we likely to hear any further developments from your experience of these cases? you know, your experience of these cases? you know. often — your experience of these cases? m. know, often times, no because so much of this is happening behind the scenes and on the courtroom. there is a lot of discovering going on right now. there are discovery
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responses that are due in mid—january, and we would not necessarily get insight into it unless one of the parties move to compel in some way, which can happen, and then we may get more insight. the parties on both sides have been using legalfiling insight. the parties on both sides have been using legal filing to develop more of the narrative for their case, so if there is that document, that we might see more. moira penza, former assistant us attorney for the eastern district of new york, thank you forjoining us on newsday. we'll be following every development in this story here on bbc news, and you can find the full details of the allegations being made against prince andrew and his response on the bbc news website, which you can also access via the bbc app. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, has acknowledged that the health service will face "considerable" pressure in the coming weeks as it
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struggles with staff absences caused by the 0micron variant of coronavirus. at least six nhs trusts in england have declared critical incidents in the past week, but the government is not likely to introduce any new restrictions. in france, mps have been debating legislation that would require people to be vaccinated to enter public places such as bars and restaurants. earlier today, several mps said they had received death threats for supporting the vaccination pass. india has begun rolling out vaccines for all 15 to 18—year—olds. more than 4 million teenagers took up the offer of a jab on the first day they were eligible. india has recorded its sharpest ever weekly rise in infections. mumbai and delhi are seeing the biggest increases. the resurgence of covid cases
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is a big concern in asia — with officials in singapore for instance saying that 0micron cases now account for 17% of cases in the country, and that a wave of 0micron cases is imminent. but the data seems to suggest — at this point, at least — that hospitalisations and deaths are still stable. china has been battling a fresh outbreak of covid cases, too, potentially throwing a shadow over the winter olympics, which beijing is due to host in exactly a month's time. the new strain is providing a potential logistical nightmare. china's solution is strict isolation bubbles for all those coming from omicron—affected areas. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell went to see how they will work. when athletes arrive in beijing from
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overseas, they will be able to take a high—speed train there. some of these trains are operating completely within the bubble. ladies and gentlemen, welcome to take the strain of white soon, they'll find themselves racing along at 350 km an _ they'll find themselves racing along at 350 km an hour. _ they'll find themselves racing along at 350 km an hour. zooming - they'll find themselves racing along at 350 km an hour. zooming through beijing's arid north and taking the views. this is an area of low wintered precipitation. that means that mountains of artificial snow will be needed for the coming 0lympics. well, this is one of the main stations for the winter olympics. it's cold up here. from 0lympics. it's cold up here. from today, this station is close to the public. 0nly
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today, this station is close to the public. only those for clearance can arrive early. 0n public. only those for clearance can arrive early. on arrival,... here we are in the heart of one of the sites for the mountain events for the winter olympics. the reason there are no people is the local ski reports have already been close. 0ver there behind the green screen, that's where the metals will be awarded from the events in this area. but there won't be any general admission tickets available, it seems. they haven't gone on sale yet and they probably want, so the spectators in the stands are likely to be from government organisations or the army or something along those lines. the challenge for games organisers, though, will be to host an event which can overcome the controversial which is surrounded
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this 0lympics following the allegations made by former chinese 0lympian and tennis star in relation to the relationship she had with the former chinese leader. there's been a lot of pressure on the beijing olympics because of these 0lympics because of these allegations, but the organisers will hope that people take over and they can still host successful games. that was stephen mcdonell. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme — the hockey fan who spotted a vancouver canucks staffer�*s cancerous mole is given a medical school scholarship. the japanese people are in mourning following the death of emperor hirohito. thousands converged on the imperial palace to pay their respects when it was announced he was dead. good grief. after half a century of delighting
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fans around the world, charlie brown and the rest of the gang are calling it quits. the singer paul simon starts his tour of south africa tomorrow, in spite of protests and violence from some black activist groups. they say international artists should continue to boycott south africa until majority rule is established. around the world, people have been paying tribute to the iconic - rock star david bowie, - who sold 140 million albums in a career that spanned half a century. - his family announced i overnight that he died of cancer at the age of 69. the world's tallest skyscraper opens later today. the burj dubai has easily overtaken its nearest rivals. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. 0ur headlines...
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a legal document signed between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein 12 years ago has been made public. it's potentially key to her civil case against prince andrew. regulators in the us have expanded the use of covid—19 booster shots to children aged 12—15 as the country battles a surge of infections with the 0micron variant. staying in the united states, where coronavirus cases are currently averaging about 400,000 each day, according to data collected byjohns hopkins university. the us food and drug administration has now expanded vaccine booster eligibility to allow 12— to 15—year—olds to receive a third shot of the pfizer—biontech vaccine. i'm joined now by elizabeth stuart,
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associate dean for education atjohns hopkins bloomberg school of public health. it's wonderful to have you on the programme, elizabeth. can i start by asking you, the situation in the united states now, can you give us a sense of whether the number of infections is being matched by hospitalisations and deaths? it’s hospitalisations and deaths? it�*s wonderful to be here. like we've seenin wonderful to be here. like we've seen in many other countries, we are seeing some decoupling of cases with hospitalisations and deaths. all are very high and higher than we would want them to be, but we are seeing some of that decoupling here. i know that there is — some of that decoupling here. i know that there is some _ some of that decoupling here. i know that there is some debate, _ some of that decoupling here. i know that there is some debate, as - some of that decoupling here. i know that there is some debate, as there l that there is some debate, as there is in many other countries, about whether children should be going back to school in the united states,
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given the recent surge in infections. how are policymakers and educators able to mitigate the risks of some of this?— of some of this? yeah, it's an important _ of some of this? yeah, it's an important topic, _ of some of this? yeah, it's an important topic, and - of some of this? yeah, it's an important topic, and i - of some of this? yeah, it's an important topic, and i think . of some of this? yeah, it's an - important topic, and i think many policymakers and citizens recognise the importance of in person schooling, so are trying to figure out how to make schools open safely. we're seeing continually the layered approach is crucial, so building and vaccination of as many people as possible, improved ventilation, consistent mass wearing and more attention to high filtration masks, use of regular tests to monitor cases, and avoiding indoor crowding when possible. when a set of the strategies are in place, schools can open safely. strategies are in place, schools can open safely-— open safely. elizabeth, you talked about regular _ open safely. elizabeth, you talked about regular testing. _ open safely. elizabeth, you talked about regular testing. there - open safely. elizabeth, you talked about regular testing. there has l about regular testing. there has been a shortage of tests, i think it's fair to say, in the united
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states. some parents are saying they're unable to get one, to get their kids to go to school, so what's being done about that. we've got you back now, brilliant.- got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about _ got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about that. _ got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about that. i _ got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about that. i think— got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about that. i think testing i got you back now, brilliant. sorry! sorry about that. i think testing is | sorry about that. i think testing is a key part of reducing transmission, and we had limited supply, so many schools are using rapid tests to balance the transmission risk. i would hope all districts and the areas they are in would make it easy for families to get the tests they might need. i think one challenge has been that schools have often not been prioritised, so we need to be seeing prioritisation that schools
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receive tests that can be given out to families to use.— to families to use. elizabeth stuart, thank _ to families to use. elizabeth stuart, thank you _ to families to use. elizabeth stuart, thank you so - to families to use. elizabeth stuart, thank you so much l to families to use. elizabeth i stuart, thank you so much for joining us on newsday.- stuart, thank you so much for joining us on newsday. in other stories for you today, south korea has pushed its defence budgets to new highs in the last four years — spending an extra $90 million a year on new technology. in 2021, it fired new missiles and even launched its own space programme. the country currently relies on the united states for its defence, but it appears seoul is keen to try to stand on its own two feet. 0ur correspondent laura bicker has had exclusive access to south korean air force training. three, two, one. i am trying to pass a g force test. two, three... and, well, it's not easy.
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0h, oh, my god. i'm here training with the air force to find out more about south korea's aim to be a military powerhouse. but before i can fly, i have to stay conscious. keep going, keep going, keep going! 0k, good. wow! wonderful. great, great! south korea has shown off its biggest military advancements yet in 2021. it fired an array of new missiles and launched its first rocket into space. the country is also one of only five in the world to train its own pilots on home—grownjets, but what's it like to fly in one? i don't know how i feel! want my mammy! 0k. as we do loops in the sky, i hear that, from here, south korea can monitor movements in the north.
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0h, oh, my god. ijust need to. ijust oh, my god. i 'ust need to. i 'ust need to oh, my god. ijust need to. i 'ust need to breathe, i oh, my god. ijust need to. i 'ust need to breathe, right? i that the country is now spending on defence perhaps shouldn't come as a surprise, because they're still officially at war with north korea. here, in the skies over the country, there have also been increasing air incursions from russia and from china. we face probably the most existential security threat. as you know, 60 km from seoul, you have north korea armed to their teeth with nuclear weapons and long—range missiles and guns, but you also have china looming in the background, and the us is becoming weaker as we speak. so, even though the americans are our closest ally, we really have to spend much more money and attention on defence. what are we going to do now? another roll. 0k, 0k, 0k. the country has sought to pirouette between the world's great powers. it lies so close to china yet relies on the us to shield it from any potential war. president donald trump described that as "freeloading", and it's made some in seoul question
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the strength of the alliance. so, we will continue to work very closely with our american allies, but we also want to leave room for more autonomous, self—reliant defence. you want me to do a turn? the major even lets me fly the t—50 jet. are you ready? yeah. 0k, make a right turn. south korea's feeling it's only too slowly taking control over the future of its forces. and despite assurances from washington that the alliance does remain strong, the country is showing no signs of turning back. laura bicker, bbc news, seoul. and finally, some happier news. a woman who alerted a canadian hockey manager to a cancerous mole on the back of his neck has been awarded a $10,000 scholarship after a social media hunt by the vancouver canucks managed to track her down. assistant equipment manager brian "red" hamilton
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was in the middle of moving material during a game in seattle in october when he noticed nadia popovich behind the bench pressing her phone against the plexiglass. the message read, "the mole on the back of your neck "is possibly cancerous. "please go see a doctor!" well, it turned out nadia was right. she told us how she first came to spot the mole. it was really just a split second that read, or the stranger at the time, happened to walk in front of me and reached over to pass something to his co—worker, and when he did that, his jacket kind of fell a little bit behind his neck and he happened to be right in my point of view. my eyes immediately drew to this mole on the back of his neck, so i leaned in very close to the plexiglas and i saw that it had an irregular border, it was raised and
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discolored, and i knew thosejust with a little bit of a medical background that those were possibly indicators of skin cancer. well, brian hamilton soon saw a doctor and eventually had the mole removed. this was his initial reaction when he first saw nadia's message. i thought for sure she was going to ask me _ i thought for sure she was going to ask me for— i thought for sure she was going to ask me for a puck with the note on her phone, — ask me for a puck with the note on her phone, so, yeah. it threw me right— her phone, so, yeah. it threw me right off — her phone, so, yeah. it threw me right off i— her phone, so, yeah. it threw me right off. i read it, looked at her but kept — right off. i read it, looked at her but kept walking. and i didn't really— but kept walking. and i didn't really think a lot of it until the longer— really think a lot of it until the longer it— really think a lot of it until the longer it went on after i'd read it, the next — longer it went on after i'd read it, the next morning, i woke up at home. i the next morning, i woke up at home. i asked _ the next morning, i woke up at home. i asked my— the next morning, i woke up at home. i asked my wife jessica," do i have a mole _ i asked my wife jessica," do i have a mole on — i asked my wife jessica," do i have a mole on the back of my neck, because — a mole on the back of my neck, because i didn't know i had a mould?" and she said yes. it was an odd shape. — mould?" and she said yes. it was an odd shape. it — mould?" and she said yes. it was an odd shape, it wasn't like a freckle. i odd shape, it wasn't like a freckle. i asked _ odd shape, it wasn't like a freckle. i asked our— odd shape, it wasn't like a freckle. i asked our team doctor on tuesday,
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i asked our team doctor on tuesday, i followed up with our team doctor, and he _ i followed up with our team doctor, and he said — i followed up with our team doctor, and he said he didn't like the shape of it _ and he said he didn't like the shape of it he _ and he said he didn't like the shape of it. he would like to pull it out, and i_ of it. he would like to pull it out, and i had two options — he could pull it_ and i had two options — he could pull it out or _ and i had two options — he could pull it out or i could see a plastic surgeon — pull it out or i could see a plastic surgeon i— pull it out or i could see a plastic surgeon. i said i didn't even... let's _ surgeon. i said i didn't even... lel'sjust— surgeon. i said i didn't even... let'sjust get it surgeon. i said i didn't even... let's just get it out of my body. if you don't— let's just get it out of my body. if you don't like it in a stranger doesn't — you don't like it in a stranger doesn't like it, then i don't like it. doesn't like it, then i don't like it the — doesn't like it, then i don't like it. the following game thursday, he brought _ it. the following game thursday, he brought the appropriate tools and he cut it out _ remarkable story there. that's all the time we have for you. thanks for watching and do stay with bbc news. hello. after what was an exceptionally mild start to the new year, we have now started to see quite a dramatic change in our weather. something much colder has been working its way in. a chilly—feeling day for tuesday — snow and gales for some of us, particularly in the north of the uk. the cold airfiltering in behind
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this band of cloud and rain with some sleet and snow on the back edge. ice a possible hazard across the northern half of the uk, where it will be a really chilly first part of the morning. wintry showers starting to pile up in northern scotland. in fact, snow showers even to low levels over the highest hills — 15 cm of accumulating snow. and with gales or severe gales, especially around northern coasts, there could be blizzard conditions for a time. a band of cloud and rain with a little bit of sleet and snow over the high ground will slowly clear the southeast corner, then we see some sunshine, some wintry showers, a mix of rain, sleet and hill snow, especially out towards the west. those are the average wind speeds. the gusts will be stronger than that with the wind coming down from the north, so it is going to feel really chilly. 0n the thermometer, single—digit temperatures, 4—8 degrees. factor in the strength of the wind, this it what it will feel like. it will feel subzero across many northern parts of the uk. now, as we move through tuesday night, there's more snow to come
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in northern scotland, more wintry showers in the west, some clear spells elsewhere. it's going to be a cold night with frost and ice, temperatures dropping close to freezing, below freezing in quite a few places. so, a widespread frost to start wednesday morning, but wednesday should bring some decent spells of sunshine. a few showers still close to the east coast, one or two out west and up towards northern scotland. more scotland. in the way of dry weather, some spells more in the way of dry weather, some spells of sunshine, temperatures still between four and 8 degrees. but this is actually where it would expect to be. this approach is from the west. a little wedge of milder air with it. so some snow initially. then it'll tend to turn back to rain as that wedge of milderairworks in, but then colder air returns from the west. wintry showers will start to push in, so only temporarily will temperatures be just a little bit higher. friday, another chilly—feeling day, highs of 5—8 degrees. we'll see a mix of sunny
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spells and wintry showers.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes will stop a civil case against him in the us has been made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. the uk prime minister says there is no reason forfurther measures in england despite a surge of cases due to the 0micron variant. us regulators have authorised the use of a third dose
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of the pfizer vaccine for children aged 12 to 15, as the country

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