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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 3, 2022 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a legal document, which prince andrew's lawyer believes could stop a civil case against him in the us, has been made made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17 years old. lawyers on both sides of the atlantic will be scrutinising the document to see what impact — if any — it has on the case. the uk prime minister borisjohnson rules out further covid measures in england for now, despite the ongoing rise in omicron infections. the pressure on our nhs, on our hospitals is going to be considerable in the course of the next couple of weeks and maybe more, because there's no question omicron continues to surge through the country.
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and a hockey fan who spotted a cancerous mole on the neck of the opposing team's manager from the stands is being awarded a scholarship to medical school, in thanks for her life—saving intervention. we'll hear from them both this hour. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. if you have your company. a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes could stop a civil case against him in the us, has been made public. the duke of york, who isn't named in the document, has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. the document, which has been
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unsealed, is a settlement agreement between jeffrey epstein and virginia giuffre, also known as virginia roberts. it dismisses the case for damages brought by ms giufre, in return for the sum of $500,000, or £371,000. there was no admission of liability from epstein. it also adds that the document is a general release by virginia giuffre for any other person or entity who could have been included as a potential defendant, from all legal actions, including lawsuits — both state and federal. the agreement was overseen by the laws of florida, where it was agreed. it was signed by ms giuffre, who gave her address as being in new south wales, in australia. our legal correspondent dominic casciani has more details, he's been speaking to my colleague ben brown. so, this is a 12—page document signed in november 2009, which seems a whole world away, but you have to bear in mind
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the allegations virginia giuffre makes againstjeffrey epstein and people around him, including prince andrew, date back 20 years. now, this was part of her case where she was suing him in a court in florida. this is epstein. saying she been lured into a world of sexual abuse and she also had been abused by people around epstein and his closest confidantes. she talks about being abused by politicians and royalty who were not named in the document. she settled the case. she was paid about $500,000, about £371,000 by today's rates. in the document, this is the crucial bit, says she releases and forever discharges, in the legal language, epstein and any other person or entity who could have been a potential defendant in the action she was bringing in florida, and in doing so that she agrees not to bring any damages claim against anyone from the beginning of time effectively up until the date of that settlement. now the reason why this is important
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is because the prince's lawyers are going to go into court tomorrow in new york and say the plain language in this document makes clear that even though we say her allegations against the duke of york are baseless, she can't even try to bring them because she's effectively signed away her rights to sue anyone, so this is a really important document in this case. but the document really concerns allegations around what happened in florida, doesn't it? and geography�*s quite important here, isn't it? it could be. this is the really interesting thing about it, because ms giuffre�*s team seem incredibly confident that this document is going to be effectively irrelevant to their case. they've already said at legal filings before this release that when this document becomes public, as it has done today, it will be seen to be "outside the four corners of her case against prince andrew". it does not cover her claims against him — in particular
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she is alleging that she was abused by the duke of york in new york, in london and in the caribbean — nothing to do with florida, which is kind of the core of this case, and i think that's what's going to get argued about tomorrow. also, on top of that, the duke's lawyers are bringing all sorts of motions tomorrow in new york to have it thrown out. they're saying for technical reasons she can't bring that case since actually doesn't live in the us any more and they're saying effectively the whole thing will be stopped now but she is again saying, whatever this document says, we're happy for it to be unsealed because we say it is not actually stopping our case against the prince. prince andrew has consistently denied knowing virginia giuffre. here he is speaking to emily maitliss on the bbc�*s newsnight in 2019. i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don't remember meeting her? no. she says she met you in 2001, she dined with you, she danced with you, you bought her drinks, you were in tramp nightclub
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in london and she went on to have sex with you in a house in belgravia belonging to ghislaine maxwell. it didn't happen. earlier, i spoke to adam klasfeld, managing editor of the law & crime network in new york. i asked him first by both sides wanted to see this agreement unsealed. prince andrew's legal team thinks that this immunises him. it releases essentially anyone who is listed as an other potential defendant. that is, in extraordinary broad language, it could mean anyone. and the prince's lawyers argue that it includes him. from the beginning of the world to the present day. it's a general release. that's why they want this document out there. what ms giuffre�*s legal team is pointing to already is that the document does not
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mention prince andrew. it is signed in the southern district of florida, or was signed in the southern district of florida, in 2009. the jurisdiction question will indeed be very important, because we're already hearing ms giuffre�*s legal team argue that essentially the florida jurisdiction does not pertain to this case. this was a very similar argument on a very different level that happened in the case of ghislaine maxwell. there was a different non—prosecution agreement, on a criminal level, with the agreement that jeffrey epstein signed. and in that case as well, ms maxwell had argued that the existence of this non—prosecution agreement, meant to shield some co—conspirators, applied to her. do i assume from what you're saying that she was unsuccessful in making that claim? exactly. precisely. the federaljudge in new york found that that agreement did not apply
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because it was signed by federal prosecutors in florida. so that was a pre—trial ruling that paved the way for her trial. and you can easily see it being argued by ms giuffre�*s lawyers tomorrow that the same should happen regarding this civil agreement in 2009. two points that occur to me, listening to what you've said and what dominic was saying as well, in the immediate aftermath of the document being unsealed. one is very straightforwardly that this is an incredibly broad agreement. do courts tend to honour these kinds of agreements, or is there a bit of reluctance because, as you say, it even has the wording "from the beginning of the world" — which goes back considerably long before ms giuffre was even born. it sounds almost comical in the way it's framed. right, it is an extraordinarily broad agreement. and i asked an expert who i speak to quite often about these matters for his reaction.
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he said, by his reading of this agreement, that it would be possible to argue that if prince andrew were involved in a hit and run of ms giuffre during the relevant time period, that too would be immunised because the conduct isn't even specified. that's how broad this agreement is! sorry to interrupt you. i know you're pressed for time. just one more thought on this. is it possible that the kind of history of what's happened since in the united states — the metoo movement, the desire to bring people tojustice for historical crimes of sexual abuse. this is not a criminal application, this is a civil suing, but even so, that that might change the way that the court looks at agreements of this kind? well, that backdrop means that this will be a closely watched case. i expect tomorrow we're going to see judge kaplan really closely listening to the arguments on both sides, knowing that this has a massive international audience.
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but it's going to be confined largely to these technical issues. he said in the past, "let's cut the technicalities and get down to the substance." we are still at technical questions ofjurisdiction and release clauses, and they will be focusing on that with a global audience tomorrow. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, says there is no reason for further coronavirus measures in england — despite the surge of coronavirus cases caused by the 0micron variant. the government insists it's determined to keep schools open. speaking at a vaccination centre on monday, mrjohnson said current measures — including mask—wearing in secondary schools, working from home where possible, and covid passes for some venues — are enough for now. 157,758 new coronavirus cases were recorded in england and scotland in the past 2a hours. 20,217 of those were in scotland, a record daily figure.
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data for wales and northern ireland won't come until after the new year holiday. in france, children aged six and over are required to wear facemasks on public transport, shops and in other venues. in the netherlands, the government has announced that schools will reopen next week, despite cases remaining high and in india, vaccinations have opened to 15 to 18—year—olds. but the country has recorded its steepest weekly surge in infections — almost tripling, with 130,000 new cases registered. let's start though in the uk, and our health correspondent catherine burns. hello, how do you do? how are you? happy new year. another day, another visit to a vaccination centre for the prime minister. how was that? easy. cos they're so good at it, you barely feel it! other parts of the nhs are really feeling it, though. we're hearing that around six trusts, including the united lincolnshire hospitals nhs trust, have declared critical incidents in the last few days. this happens when they're worried that they can't provide
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all the critical services they need to. looking at the pressures on the nhs in the next couple of weeks and maybe longer, looking at the numbers of people who're going to be going into hospital, it will be absolute folly to say that this thing is all over now bar the shouting. we've got to remain cautious, we've got to stick with plan b, we've got to get boosted. in other words, no new restrictions in england at the moment. expect to hear more focus on boosterjabs, though. and nhs staff could be redeployed to help the busiest areas. it's not unusual to hear that the nhs is under pressure in january. winter always brings with it extra patients, and covid is adding to that. this year, though, there's another complication — the number of staff who are off because of the virus. now it's understood several hospital chief executives in england are saying their trusts are under the greatest sustained pressure they've seen. there are now more than 111,000
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patients with covid in hospitals in england. that's up almost 70% in a week. i've spoken to staff who do find treating unvaccinated patientsl who are seriously unwell, l they do find that upsetting, particularly if, as from time to time, the patient says, i "actually i wish i'd been vaccinated all along." i so, we're not here tojudge, - we're here to treat and we'll treat whoever comes and requires our care and our attention _ there are some early encouraging signs, though. i was talking to london chief execs last week. what they were saying is they were seeing some very concerning daily increases of the numbers of people coming into hospital — 9%, 15%, 9% on the 27th, 28 and 29th of december. but interestingly, in the last two days, those numbers have dropped, the increases, to 1% and 2%. back to school this week and back to masks in classrooms for secondary pupils in england. this brings them into line with the rest of the uk.
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labour says there still isn't enough focus on fresh air in classrooms, though. we've known now for 18 months that it will be essential to make sure that classrooms are properly ventilated, yet all we've seen from the government are 7,000 devices to be rolled out across hundreds of thousands of classrooms across england. itjust isn't good enough. ministers will look at rules about masks in schools again at the end of the month. catherine burns, bbc news. sudan's political future is in turmoil after prime minister abdalla hamdok announced his resignation — just six weeks after being reinstated as part of a political agreement with the military. in a televised speech on sunday, mr hamdok said the country was at a "dangerous turning point that threatens its whole survival". sudan's forces of freedom and change said mr hamdok�*s resignation was a direct result of the military coup. emmanuel igunza reports.
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as protesters demand a fully civilian government. as many other times before, security forces disbanded crowds. since the october military coup against prime minister abdalla hamdok. as news filtered in, the prime minister announced his resignation, throwing the country into further uncertainty. translation: i into further uncertainty. tuna/mom- into further uncertainty. translation: ., , , , into further uncertainty. translation: ., i, , ., translation: i have tried my best to sto the translation: i have tried my best to step the country _ translation: i have tried my best to stop the country from _ translation: i have tried my best to stop the country from sliding - stop the country from sliding towards disaster. that threatens its whole survival. in towards disaster. that threatens its whole survival.— whole survival. in view of the fragmentation _ whole survival. in view of the fragmentation of _ whole survival. in view of the fragmentation of political - whole survival. in view of the i fragmentation of political forces and conflict between the military and conflict between the military and civilian components of the transition, despite everything i try to reach a consensus. fulfil
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transition, despite everything i try to reach a consensus.— to reach a consensus. fulfil our promises _ to reach a consensus. fulfil our promises to — to reach a consensus. fulfil our promises to the _ to reach a consensus. fulfil our promises to the people, - to reach a consensus. fulfil our. promises to the people, security, peace, and avoid bloodshed. at all of this has not happened. the resignation of abdalla hamdok means— the resignation of abdalla hamdok means a _ the resignation of abdalla hamdok means a lot to us. he is a man that the whole _ means a lot to us. he is a man that the whole country agreed on. after his resignation, we feel that sudan lost an_ his resignation, we feel that sudan lost an important personality. we hope _ lost an important personality. we hope that — lost an important personality. we hope that he will make a comeback in the coming _ hope that he will make a comeback in the coming period as independent and become _ the coming period as independent and become the sudanese president. abdalla _ become the sudanese president. abdalla hamdok sent a message to all sudanese politicians. this abdalla hamdok sent a message to all sudanese politicians.— sudanese politicians. this is the best lesson. _ sudanese politicians. this is the best lesson. it _ sudanese politicians. this is the best lesson. it has _ sudanese politicians. this is the best lesson. it has never- sudanese politicians. this is the i best lesson. it has never happened in sudan's — best lesson. it has never happened in sudan's history, _ best lesson. it has never happened in sudan's history, to _ best lesson. it has never happened in sudan's history, to come - best lesson. it has never happened in sudan's history, to come out - best lesson. it has never happenedj in sudan's history, to come out and frankly— in sudan's history, to come out and frankly admit— in sudan's history, to come out and frankly admit his _ in sudan's history, to come out and frankly admit his defeat _ in sudan's history, to come out and frankly admit his defeat to - in sudan's history, to come out and frankly admit his defeat to the - frankly admit his defeat to the people — frankly admit his defeat to the peorrte. so _ frankly admit his defeat to the ”eole. ., ., ,
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frankly admit his defeat to the --eole. ., ., , ., , people. so far, the military leaders have broken _ people. so far, the military leaders have broken about _ people. so far, the military leaders have broken about abdalla - people. so far, the military leaders have broken about abdalla hamdok resignation. but allies say it is a huge blow to their desire to stay on in power. demonstrators say they will not end a push towards a full democratic government. the military, however, insists... at certain times, in a country thatjust three years ago had so much promise of coming in from the cold. just to add that sudan's forces and umbrella pro—democracy campaigners say that the prime minister's resignation effectively kills the november 21 agreement which the military signed with some political organisations with some political organisations with them. a woman who alerted a canadian hockey manager to a cancerous mole on the back of his neck has been awarded a $10,000 scholarship
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after a social media hunt by vancouver canucks managed to track her down. assistant equipment manager brian "red" hamilton was in the middle of moving equipment during a game in seattle in october when he noticed nadia popovici behind the bench pressing her phone against the plexiglass. the message read... "the mole on the back of your neck is possibly cancerous. please go see a doctor!" well, it turned out nadia was right. mr hamilton soon saw a doctor and had the mole removed. well, i'm delighted to say that nadia popovici and brian "red" hamilton from the vancouver canucks can bothjoin us now. nadia, first of all, what caught your eye about that mole? why weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank ou weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank you for— weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank you for having _ weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank you for having me. _ weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank you for having me. it _ weren't you watching the game? yeah, thank you for having me. it was - thank you for having me. it was really— thank you for having me. it was reattyiust— thank you for having me. it was reallyjust a split second that read. — reallyjust a split second that read. or— reallyjust a split second that read, orthe reallyjust a split second that read, or the stranger at the time, happened — read, or the stranger at the time, happened to walk in front of me and
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reached _ happened to walk in front of me and reached over to pass something to his co—worker. and when he did that, his co—worker. and when he did that, hisjacket_ his co—worker. and when he did that, hisjacket kind of felt his co—worker. and when he did that, his jacket kind of felt a little his co—worker. and when he did that, hisjacket kind of felt a little bit behind — hisjacket kind of felt a little bit behind his neck. and he happens to behind his neck. and he happens to be right— behind his neck. and he happens to be right in_ behind his neck. and he happens to be right in my point of view. and my eyes immediately drew to this mole on the _ eyes immediately drew to this mole on the back of his neck. sol eyes immediately drew to this mole on the back of his neck. so i leaned in very— on the back of his neck. so i leaned in very close — on the back of his neck. so i leaned in very close to the plexiglas and i saw that— in very close to the plexiglas and i saw that it — in very close to the plexiglas and i saw that it had an irregular border, it was— saw that it had an irregular border, it was raised — saw that it had an irregular border, it was raised and discoloured, and i knew_ it was raised and discoloured, and i knew with — it was raised and discoloured, and i knew withjust a it was raised and discoloured, and i knew with just a little bit of a medicai— knew with just a little bit of a medical background that there is possibly— medical background that there is possibly indicators skin cancer. 30 possibly indicators skin cancer. sc you possibly indicators skin cancer. you typed a possibly indicators skin cancer. if you typed a message possibly indicators skin cancer. 5r you typed a message on your phone and quickly rested. was it difficult to attract his attention? it and quickly rested. was it difficult to attract his attention?— to attract his attention? it wasn't difficult to grab _ to attract his attention? it wasn't difficult to grab his _ to attract his attention? it wasn't difficult to grab his attention, - to attract his attention? it wasn't| difficult to grab his attention, but it was— difficult to grab his attention, but it was difficult to find an appropriate moment, because i understand this is a very scary message _ understand this is a very scary message to pass along and i wanted to do so— message to pass along and i wanted to do so in— message to pass along and i wanted to do so in a — message to pass along and i wanted to do so in a somewhat private and sensitive _ to do so in a somewhat private and sensitive way. some are just so happens — sensitive way. some are just so happens to— sensitive way. some are just so happens to be an appropriate time at
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the very— happens to be an appropriate time at the very end of the period when all the very end of the period when all the players had left, most of the staff except red had left. so i hanged — staff except red had left. so i banged really hard on the plexiglas and i banged really hard on the plexiglas and i gave — banged really hard on the plexiglas and i gave a big smile, because i am in the _ and i gave a big smile, because i am in the enemy's attire, and ijust pointed — in the enemy's attire, and ijust pointed the most friendly face i could _ pointed the most friendly face i could muster up. luckily he saw it and he _ could muster up. luckily he saw it and he read — could muster up. luckily he saw it and he read-— and he read. brian, what did you think? initially _ and he read. brian, what did you think? initially someone - and he read. brian, what did you think? initially someone banging and he read. brian, what did you i think? initially someone banging on the plexiglas from the other side as it were would be something you would instinctively ignore. i it were would be something you would instinctively ignore.— instinctively ignore. i thought for sure she was _ instinctively ignore. i thought for sure she was going _ instinctively ignore. i thought for sure she was going to _ instinctively ignore. i thought for sure she was going to ask- instinctively ignore. i thought for sure she was going to ask me i instinctively ignore. i thought forj sure she was going to ask me for instinctively ignore. i thought for l sure she was going to ask me for a puck. i looked at it but i kept walking. i didn't really think a lot of it until the longer it went on. the next morning, i woke up, i had
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flown home, and i asked my wife, jessica, "do i have a mole on the back of my neck?" and she said, "yeah, it looks and odd shape." 50 "yeah, it looks and odd shape." so she hadn't noticed it either until you mentioned this message? ida. you mentioned this message? no. that's you mentioned this message? firm that's extraordinary. you mentioned this message? no. that's extraordinary. yeah, - you mentioned this message? no. that's extraordinary. yeah, it i that's extraordinary. yeah, it wasn't very — that's extraordinary. yeah, it wasn't very big. _ that's extraordinary. yeah, it wasn't very big. it _ that's extraordinary. yeah, it wasn't very big. it was - that's extraordinary. yeah, it wasn't very big. it was the i that's extraordinary. yeah, it. wasn't very big. it was the size that's extraordinary. yeah, it i wasn't very big. it was the size of the racer on the top of a pencil. it's not hugely surprising you hadn't noticed it. you would think your wife would. so it must have been pretty small. what did the doctors say to you when you went in? i asked our team doctor on tuesday. this happened on saturday. so on tuesday i followed up with our team doctor. and he said that he didn't like the shape of it and he would like the shape of it and he would like to pull it out. and i had two options, he could pull it out which could leave a scar, or i could go
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and see a plastic surgeon. i said i don't even know it's there so i am not going to see the scar. if you don't like it and the stranger doesn't like it, then i don't like it. the following game, thursday, he brought the appropriate tools and he cut it out and send it in. he called me three weeks later and said you have an angel. i am going to diagnose you with cancer and i'm going to cure you of cancer in the same phone call. you going to cure you of cancer in the same phone call.— going to cure you of cancer in the same phone call. you didn't know who this anael same phone call. you didn't know who this angel was- _ same phone call. you didn't know who this angel was. you _ same phone call. you didn't know who this angel was. you don't _ same phone call. you didn't know who this angel was. you don't know - same phone call. you didn't know who this angel was. you don't know it's i this angel was. you don't know it's nadia. you had never seen her before. i nadia. you had never seen her before. . , nadia. you had never seen her before. ., , ., ., before. i immediately went to our media staff _ before. i immediately went to our media staff and _ before. i immediately went to our media staff and told _ before. i immediately went to our media staff and told them - before. i immediately went to our media staff and told them the i before. i immediately went to our i media staff and told them the story. they worked with the seattle kraken, and they did some research on ticket members behind the bench. there is a doctor who has season tickets behind the bench. they reached out to her.
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she got back and said," sorry, not me." we were kind used twitter and instagram and wrote a letter. and the idea of the letter was to find her and celebrate what she did. �* , ., ., she did. bluntly, if nothing had been done. _ she did. bluntly, if nothing had been done, the _ she did. bluntly, if nothing had been done, the prognosis i she did. bluntly, if nothing had been done, the prognosis if i she did. bluntly, if nothing had been done, the prognosis if it i she did. bluntly, if nothing had i been done, the prognosis if it had been done, the prognosis if it had been left was pretty bad, wasn't it? the doctor told me five years. itrefoil. the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i the doctor told me five years. well. nadia. i know _ the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i know the _ the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i know the two _ the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i know the two of _ the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i know the two of you - the doctor told me five years. well. nadia, i know the two of you met up this weekend at a rematch, introduced for the first time. what did you think when you initially heard through the social media campaign that he was trying to get in touch? and then when you met for the first time afterwards, when he told you what had happened as a result of your, not to put too
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strong a word on it, diagnosis. hot strong a word on it, diagnosis. not a diagnosis. _ strong a word on it, diagnosis. not a diagnosis, just a suggestion. realty, — a diagnosis, just a suggestion. realty, it — a diagnosis, just a suggestion. really, it was shocking. first of all to— really, it was shocking. first of all to hear— really, it was shocking. first of all to hear that there was a viral manhunt — all to hear that there was a viral manhunt happening for me, of all people _ manhunt happening for me, of all people. second, to know that what i thought _ people. second, to know that what i thought it _ people. second, to know that what i thought it was, it actually was skin cancer~ _ thought it was, it actually was skin cancer~ and — thought it was, it actually was skin cancer. and that in itself is so incredible _ cancer. and that in itself is so incredible and baffling to me. and then to _ incredible and baffling to me. and then to note that i had the opportunity to look this one stranger— opportunity to look this one stranger in the eye and talk to him about— stranger in the eye and talk to him about what— stranger in the eye and talk to him about what he felt on the other side of the _ about what he felt on the other side of the glass, how scary, tojust hear— of the glass, how scary, tojust hear from _ of the glass, how scary, tojust hear from his family this entire emotionat— hear from his family this entire emotional process, absolutely incredible.— emotional process, absolutely incredible. ., ., , , incredible. and the two teams, this is the loveliest _ incredible. and the two teams, this is the loveliest story, _ incredible. and the two teams, this is the loveliest story, have - incredible. and the two teams, this is the loveliest story, have got i is the loveliest story, have got together to award you a scholarship. are you planning to go to medical couege are you planning to go to medical
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college anyway?— college anyway? yes, i'm already lucky enough _ college anyway? yes, i'm already lucky enough to — college anyway? yes, i'm already lucky enough to be _ college anyway? yes, i'm already lucky enough to be accepted i college anyway? yes, i'm already lucky enough to be accepted into | lucky enough to be accepted into multiple — lucky enough to be accepted into multiple medical schools. | lucky enough to be accepted into multiple medical schools.- multiple medical schools. i think $10,000 medical _ multiple medical schools. i think $10,000 medical scholarship, i multiple medical schools. i think. $10,000 medical scholarship, how $10,000 medicalscholarship, how much difference will it make? filth. $10,000 medical scholarship, how much difference will it make? oh, my cosh. the much difference will it make? oh, my gosh- they really _ much difference will it make? oh, my gosh. they really have _ much difference will it make? oh, my gosh. they really have no _ much difference will it make? oh, my gosh. they really have no idea. - much difference will it make? oh, my gosh. they really have no idea. i've . gosh. they really have no idea. i've already— gosh. they really have no idea. i've already been accepted into an hp sp scholarship, which means that i'm going _ scholarship, which means that i'm going to _ scholarship, which means that i'm going to be — scholarship, which means that i'm going to be an army physician. to pay for— going to be an army physician. to pay for medical school, this 10,000 will go _ pay for medical school, this 10,000 will go right to my education. i wouldn't — will go right to my education. i wouldn't have been able to afford it otherwise. — wouldn't have been able to afford it otherwise, really. it is wouldn't have been able to afford it otherwise, really.— otherwise, really. it is a happy endin: otherwise, really. it is a happy ending for— otherwise, really. it is a happy ending for both _ otherwise, really. it is a happy ending for both of— otherwise, really. it is a happy ending for both of you. - otherwise, really. it is a happy ending for both of you. great | otherwise, really. it is a happy i ending for both of you. great news, thank you both for telling the story. are you going to stay in touch? . story. are you going to stay in touch? , ., ., ., ., touch? our mums want to go for dinner. touch? our mums want to go for dinner- every — touch? our mums want to go for dinner. every time _ touch? our mums want to go for dinner. every time i _ touch? our mums want to go for dinner. every time i go, - touch? our mums want to go for dinner. every time i go, i- touch? our mums want to go for dinner. every time i go, iwill- dinner. every time i go, i will waive. dinner. every time i go, iwill waive. . ~ dinner. every time i go, iwill waive. ., ~' dinner. every time i go, iwill waive. ., ,, , dinner. every time i go, iwill waive. . ~' , . waive. thank you both very much. that is a great _
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waive. thank you both very much. that is a great story. _ waive. thank you both very much. that is a great story. that - waive. thank you both very much. that is a great story. that is - waive. thank you both very much. that is a great story. that is it i that is a great story. that is it from bbc news stop we will be back at the top of the hour. i'm gavin ramjaun with the latest from the bbc sport centre. manchester united have lost for the first time under their interim manager ralf rangnick. wolves beat them 1—0 at old trafford. the visitors were playing for the first time in 2 weeks. and had the best chance in the first half. ruben neves saw his effort tipped over by david. united really should have scored after the break, bruno fernandes came off the bench and rattled the wolves crossbar. wolves also hit the woodwork with a free kick but it wasjoao moutinho who came up with the winner inside the last 10 minutes. that goal securing wolves�* first win
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at old trafford in 42 years and moves them up to 8th in the table, one place behind united. if you look at today's performance, if i say i am 100% convinced that we will finish in the top four. i don't know if people would really believe that. for me, it is not taking next steps. we need to develop get better. even more so against the top teams in the league. make sure we can control the game defensively and at the same time create chances offensively. we come here with a big personality and a _ we come here with a big personality and a strong team. credit for my team _ and a strong team. credit for my team. because we come here with a plan to— team. because we come here with a plan to play— team. because we come here with a plan to play with the ball, and become — plan to play with the ball, and become with that a great performance for our— become with that a great performance for our side _ become with that a great performance for our side. a fantastic game for our boys — the fourth ashes test starts tomorrow night in sydney. england have already lost the series, and preparations have been badly hampered by a number
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of covid issues, with most of their coaching staff in isolation. joe root will become england's longest serving test captain, when he skippers the side for a 60th time. but his leadership has been questioned after their performances so far in australia. i'll look at the future at the end of this tour. i don't think i can afford to throw any more energy into anything else than the games themselves right now. we want to give people back home something to shout about, to show how much we care about this team, how much we care about test cricket and how desperate we are to do well. and, as i say, to win out here these last two games would be a really big step forward from, especially off the back of the first three games. india are one up in their test series in south africa, but had a shaky start to the second test injohannesburg. the tourists won the toss and batted first. skipper virat kohli pulled out of the game just before the start with a back—spasm, leaving kl rahul to lead the side,
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and he made 50 before being dismissed to leave india on 116 for five, that was one of four wickets for marco jansen. there wasn't much resistance from the tail, as they were eventually bowled out for 202. in response, south africa lost the early wicket of aidan markram, trapped by mohammed shami for seven, as they reached 35—1 at stumps. and britain's four—time tour de france champion chris froome says he doesn't know when he can start racing this year after an injury set—back in training. the former team ineos rider — now part of the israel start—up nation outfit — says he pushed himself too hard and has damaged a tendon in his knee. he says he'll take a week off the bike before a gradual return. and a reminder, catch the latest from the pdc world darts championship, over on the bbc sport website. it's 2020 champion peter wright, against michael smith — aiming for a first title. currently, wright 3—2 up. first to seven wins. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. this is bbc news with shaun ley.
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the headlines... a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes could stop a civil case against him in the us, has been made made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17 lawyers on both sides of the atlantic will be scrutinising the document to see what impact — if any — it has on the case. the uk prime minister borisjohnson rules out further covid measures in england for now, despite the ongoing rise in omicron infections. the pressure on our nhs, on our hospitals is going to be considerable in the course of the next couple of weeks and maybe more, because there's no question omicron continues to surge through the country. sudan faces a deepening political crisis after the resignation of its civilian prime minister, abdalla hamdok. sudan's forces of freedom and change said mr hamdok�*s resignation was a direct result of the military coup. now on bbc news — our world looks into
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targeted attacks in afghanistan. this film contains scenes which some viewers may find upsetting.

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