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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 3, 2022 5:00pm-5:36pm GMT

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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm ben brown. our top stories — in the last few minutes, a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes will stop a civil case against him in the us has been made made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. lawyers on both sides of the atlantic will be scrutinising the document which has just been unsealed to see what impact, if any, it will have on the case. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, rules out further covid measures in england for now despite the ongoing rise in omicron infections. the pressure on our nhs, on our hospitals is going to be considerable in the course
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of the next couple of weeks and maybe more, cos there's no question omicron continues to surge through the country. scotland records more than 20,000 new covid cases, its highest daily number since the start of the pandemic. france toughens its rules around facemasks — all children over six now have to wear them in shops and on public transport. india begins vaccinating 15—18—year—olds as the country records its sharpest—ever weekly rise in infections. hello, and welcome. a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes could stop a civil case against him in the us
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has been made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. the document, which has been unsealed, is a settlement agreement betweenjeffrey epstein and virginia giuffre, now known as virginia roberts. it dismisses the case for damages brought by ms giufrre, in return for the sum of $500,000. the question is what impact this is the question is what impact this is going to have on prince andrew in the case against him. our legal correspondent dominic casciani is here. this has just this hasjust come this has just come out, just been unsealed in the last few minutes. talk us through the crucial details. this is a document signed in november 2009 which seems the whole world away but you have to bear in
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mind the allegations virginia giuffre make againstjeffrey epstein and people around him date back 20 years. this is part of the case where she was suing him in a court in florida. this is her saying she been lured into a world of sexual abuse and it also been abused by people around jeffrey epstein and his closest confidence. he had been accused of abusing by politicians and royalty who were not named in the document. she was paid about $500,000, about £371,000 by today's rates. in the document, the crucial bits says sheet releases and forever discharges and legal language jeffrey epstein and any personal entity who could have been a vigilant defendant in the action she was bringing in florida, and in doing so that she agrees not to bring any damages claim against anyone from the beginning of time effectively up until the day of that settlement. now the reason why this is important is because the prince's
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lawyers are going to go into court tomorrow in new york it's a the plain language in this document makes clear that even though we say her allegations against the duke of york are baseless, she cannot even try to bring them because she has effectively signed away her rights to sue anyone as this is a really important document in this case. but the document really concerns allegations around what happened in florida. angiography is quite important here, is it not? it could be. this important here, is it not? it could be- this is — important here, is it not? it could be. this is the — important here, is it not? it could be. this is the interesting - important here, is it not? it could be. this is the interesting thing . be. this is the interesting thing about it because virginia giuffre's team seem incredibly confident that this document is going to be effectively ill or relevant to their case and they have already said at legal financial for this release that when this document becomes public as it has done today, it will be seen to be outside the four corners of her case against prince andrew. he does not cover her claims against him in in particular she is alleging that she was abused by the duke of york in new york, in london
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and in the caribbean and nothing to do with florida which is kind of the core of this case and i think that's what is going to get argued about tomorrow. also on top of that, the duke's lawyers are bringing all sorts of motions tomorrow in new york to have it thrown out. they say for technical reasons she cannot bring that case kristi does not live in the us any more and they are saying effectively the whole thing will be stopped now but she is again a safe whatever this document says, we are happy for her to be in pella because we say it is not actually stop our case against the prince. it will be argued about tomorrow in new york as you say emma will we get a decision by thejudge in york as you say emma will we get a decision by the judge in this case on the impact of this unsealed document in particular equipment difficult to say but i think you will hear from the judge... difficult to say but i think you will hear from the judge. .. will hear from the 'udge. .. tomorrow afternoon about — will hear from the judge. .. tomorrow afternoon about what _ will hear from the judge. .. tomorrow afternoon about what he _ will hear from the judge. .. tomorrow afternoon about what he says - will hear from the judge. .. tomorrow afternoon about what he says should| afternoon about what he says should be the timetable going forward. he has already set quite a tight timetable in terms of what he expects the duke of york and virginia giuffre to do in terms of releasing evidence. now that is
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interestingly a right side row going on there as well because recall the newsnight interview where prince andrew said to be really interesting things, that he could not have met this woman in a nightclub in london because she recalled him sweating and he said he did not sweat because of a medical condition and secondly on the night in question he had been in woking with his daughters. her team have said proof both of those things. prove you were there in woking in peru if you don't sway or did not sweat at the time. he is objecting to those disclosure requests saying they are breaches of privacy and he does not hold information in relation to the express. a lot of things being argued about here and that will carry on even if the judge reserves isjudgment on this carry on even if the judge reserves is judgment on this document so i think a lot of argument about disclosure and a lot of arguments about this and i think it's going to come in to some sort of very fine arguments about us lot which is a bit beyond me, to be honest. nothing is be ond bit beyond me, to be honest. nothing
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is beyond yom — bit beyond me, to be honest. nothing is beyond yom very— bit beyond me, to be honest. nothing is beyond you. very difficult, - bit beyond me, to be honest. nothing is beyond you. very difficult, that - is beyond you. very difficult, that one. fascinating _ is beyond you. very difficult, that one. fascinating this _ is beyond you. very difficult, that one. fascinating this document . is beyond you. very difficult, that i one. fascinating this document has been unsealed _ one. fascinating this document has been unsealed after _ one. fascinating this document has been unsealed after so _ one. fascinating this document has been unsealed after so many - one. fascinating this document has| been unsealed after so many years, originally signed and sealed in 2009. thank you very much indeed. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, says there is no reason for further coronavirus measures in england despite the surge of coronavirus cases caused by the 0micron variant. the government insists it's determined to keep schools open. speaking at a vaccination centre, mrjohnson said current measures — including mask—wearing in secondary schools, working from home where possible and covid passes for some venues — are enough for now. scotland has hit a record number of new cases. a further 20,217 people tested positive for covid—19 there, the highest daily figure of the pandemic. in france, children aged six and over are required to wear facemasks on public transport, shops and in other venues. in the netherlands, the government has announced that schools will reopen next week
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despite cases remaining high. and in india, vaccinations have opened to 15—18—year—olds, but the country has recorded its steepest weekly surge in infections, almost tripling with 130,000 new cases registered. let's start, though, in the uk and our political correspondent chris mason. happy new year, thank you very much for all you're doing. the prime minister in aylesbury in buckinghamshire this morning at a vaccination centre, as secondary schools in england are told to do what's already been happening in wales, northern ireland and scotland. pupils wearing masks in class. there's an increasing body of scientific support for the idea that facemasks can contain transmission. we don't want to keep them on, i don't like the idea of having facemasks in the classroom any more than anybody else does. we won't keep them on a day more than is necessary. this is what the start of term looked like in secondary schools in england in september, and it'll look pretty similar in the next few days, too, as pupils are tested at school
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before heading to lessons. this head teacher in solihull in the west midlands is a senior figure in the naht teachers�* union. it's going to be challenging. we are yet again going to slightly an unknown of knowing what the impact is, not only on students but i think, more importantly, on staffing and the ability to deliver the education that we want to deliver. i think i'd echo what everyone else has said. we want schools open, we want students in, but we are going into a little bit of the unknown. we have our staff to test, and we will be carrying out testing with students tomorrow, as the first day back. labour claimed the government hasn't done enough to make schools in england as safe as possible. 7000 air purifiers across hundreds of thousands of classrooms - in england just isn't good enough. they clearly recognise _ there is the need to take action, but for so many schools and so many l head teachers, the answer has justl been open windows and keep
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children in coats learning. - well, you know, we're in the middle of winter here, it'sjanuary. - i don't think it's - an adequate solution. meanwhile, nhs leaders are warning that they are seeing increasing numbers of staff not able to work because of covid, just as they're dealing with what has been a big increase in people being sent to hospital with it. but there is some evidence from those running hospitals in london that things might be improving. so, when i was talking to london chief execs last week, what they were saying is they were seeing some very concerning daily increases of the numbers of people coming into hospital. 9%, 15%, 9% on the 27th, 28th and 29th of december — but interestingly, in the last two days, those numbers have dropped, the increases, to 1% and 2%. but remember, there is a time lag between people being infected and some ending up in hospital, and the government does expect a big increase in people being admitted in the coming weeks.
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the uk government has released the latest coronavirus figures. let's take a look. the figures are that in terms of cases in the uk, 157,758 new cases of covid—19 and the latest 2a hour period. by way of comparing, but it's hard to compare because over the festive period the figures were quite limited. 0n the festive period the figures were quite limited. on sunday for example it was only for england and at 137,583 on sunday. that was just england and in this is the uk and it's england and in this is the uk and it'5157,758 england and in this is the uk and it's157,758 new cases. death of 42 recorded in 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. that compares if you can compare it to sunday's figure of 73 deaths but that was just for
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england and wales. so those are the latest figures and you can see also the figures there for vaccinations and total of 51 first dose vaccinations and 47 million second dose at 3a million in terms of the third or boosterjab. a critical incident has been declared at hospitals in lincolnshire because of covid—related staff shortages. the situation has been described as extreme and unprecedented by the nhs trust that runs them. it says essential services remain open. 0ur correspondent danny savage has the latest from lincoln. that critical incident was declared here across the lincolnshire hospitals trust on saturday night. so, that includes this big hospital here in lincoln, one in boston, one in grantham as well.
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and it meant that they felt they didn't have enough staff to safely cover all bases as it were. they've given an update today saying that all essential services are fine and if you need to come to hospital, you should come to hospital. but itjust underlines the fact that staffing levels are very stretched. and as numbers of covid cases go up in society, when all the medics and doctors and nurses, they live in society, too, and their cases are going up, too, so you've got more and more of them absent from work because they've got covid or they're isolating because of it. and this is just one of what we think is about six nhs trusts in england to have declared a critical incident over the last week. and we heard the prime minister say that he admits the nhs is under a lot of pressure at the moment. and what we have to see over the next few weeks whether or not the nhs is just going to struggle
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on by declaring these critical incidents here and there over the next ten days and two weeks and just about coping or whether there'll be more serious consequences, and that will be unknown. interesting to note of course, just mentioned in chris's report about the levels maybe dropping off a bit in london. you have to remember that outside of london, cases are growing rapidly. the wave of cases you saw in london hasn't been seen quite yet been seen in other places outside the capital. they've yet to see their peak. and this is one example of that here in lincolnshire. we are going to see more of these, i think, these critical
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incidences cropping up at nhs is across the country. it is a bit hard to gauge. if you go into the hospital here as it is a bank holiday it is pretty quiet. we will see what it is like tomorrow when we have a normal working day. we will see what will happen with services and what the patient experience is. that underlines the point that the prime minister was saying that 0micron, he says it is milder, but it is very transmissible and that is the real danger moving forward, the staff shortages where critical incidents have been declared like in lincolnshire. what happens if you have a lot of critical incidents in places that are close to each other and there's no help. or if they don't have extra staff to make up the gap. it is just existing staff picking up extra shifts. that is happening a lot in this part of the country. it is just the existing staff working harder. what happens if they catch covid but then they have to isolate? there are a lot of unknowns. the uk's sole distributor of covid lateral flow tests to pharmacies
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closed for four days over the christmas period. alliance health care received 2.5 million devices on christmas eve and then shut amid a nationwide shortage. we have heard from the shadow health secretary who said why on earth to the government not prepare for this and ensure that alternative options for delivery were secured? let's speak to thorrun govind, royal pharmaceutical society chair in england. can tell us a bit more about this ultimate does seem extraordinary. can you explain what happened? it's hard to understand why there was only one so distributor of these lateral flow tests in england and it's very frustrating for pharmacy teams who bore the brunt of the public reaction to not be able to
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access lateral flow tests. fiur public reaction to not be able to access lateral flow tests. our teams are ”uttin access lateral flow tests. our teams are putting up _ access lateral flow tests. our teams are putting up posters _ access lateral flow tests. our teams are putting up posters saying - access lateral flow tests. our teams are putting up posters saying no - are putting up posters saying no lateral flow tests available and we are still getting patients coming in and asking about them and we are getting phone calls off the hook. it's just been really unnecessary for our teams to have to deal with and they are already focused on supplying medication and also offering advice on that medication can be providing flu vaccines, covid—19 vaccines, you name it. our pharmacies have been very busy supplying and supporting local communities so it's very frustrating for this to have happened. i think this really need to be considered by the government why was it the case and there was only one sole distributor. it really is baffling. and that distributor had four days where it was closed over the holiday eriod. . , ., ., where it was closed over the holiday eriod. . ., ., , ., , period. clearly a lot of pharmacies were closed _ period. clearly a lot of pharmacies were closed and it _ period. clearly a lot of pharmacies were closed and it was _ period. clearly a lot of pharmacies were closed and it was in - period. clearly a lot of pharmacies i were closed and it was in possession of nearly half a million of these lateral flow device is so obsolete
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there was a shortage of getting them from pharmacies but there is not a shortage in terms of this distributor actually having possession of them. i distributor actually having possession of them. distributor actually having ossession of them. ~ f possession of them. i think they're cominu possession of them. i think they're coming there _ possession of them. i think they're coming there in _ possession of them. i think they're coming there in that _ possession of them. i think they're coming there in that matt - possession of them. i think they're coming there in that matt and - possession of them. i think they're coming there in that matt and a . possession of them. i think they'rej coming there in that matt and a lot of them will have enclosed over the christmas and new year, there was from a supervision across the country. so there were pharmacies which were open, which if they had them in stock or supplying those lateral flow tests to the public. so i think really when you think about going forward is is it appropriate for there to be only one so distributor of lateral flow tests to pharmacies and we also need to consider the impact of the lateral flow test being provided with a code which the public presume results in a lateral flow test being provided at that pharmacy like a collect order. it is definitely not your christmas turkey in the lateral flow test and we definitely don't have one immediately set aside for you as soon as you order your code at the moment. we really are keen to get more lateralflow
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moment. we really are keen to get more lateral flow tests into pharmacies and pharmacy teams are working externally hard to get them straight out to the public as soon as we get them in. sometimes they are not lasting more than an hour and we are getting a container full, about 56 boxes of lateral flow tests, and they really are going straight out the door as soon as we are getting them. hopefully we will see more coming into pharmacies over the next few days as everyone comes back from christmas break. and i think the other thing to think about is our health care team to incredibly hard, distributors etc and health care teams, pharmacists and health care teams, pharmacists and their support staff. they have been working incredibly hard during this whole pandemic so i don't think we can begrudge out of the distributors having been closed for a few days and indeed even our pharmacy teams having their doors closed for a few days although as a say there were pharmacies with provision across the country. the oint is provision across the country. the point is the _ provision across the country. the point is the authorities keep telling people to test, test, test,
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go testers that before you go into public spaces or bars or restaurants or whatever it is to see family and people want to test but they cannot. that is the point.— that is the point. absolutely in our harma that is the point. absolutely in our pharmacy teams — that is the point. absolutely in our pharmacy teams on _ that is the point. absolutely in our pharmacy teams on the _ that is the point. absolutely in our pharmacy teams on the front - that is the point. absolutely in our. pharmacy teams on the front lodging to be bearing the brunt of it but unfortunately it seems like this has been planned by people who have no concept of what it is like to work on the front line and me to think about how the impact of this behaviour of sometimes abusive behaviour of sometimes abusive behaviour is having on the morale of our pharmacy teams. goad behaviour is having on the morale of our pharmacy teams.— behaviour is having on the morale of our pharmacy teams. good to talk to ou. from our pharmacy teams. good to talk to you- from the _ our pharmacy teams. good to talk to you. from the royal— our pharmacy teams. good to talk to you. from the royal pharmaceuticall you. from the royal pharmaceutical society in england. thank you so much for your time. french mps are debating draught legislation that would require people to be vaccinated against covid—19 in order to enter public spaces such as bars, restaurants and long—distance public transport. known as the "vaccine pass", the bill is aimed at getting france's remaining 5 million unvaccinated people over the age of 12 to accept a dose. for more on the level of vaccine hestitancy in france, i've been speaking to our paris correspondent hugh schofield.
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one must be slightly cautious to say that they've always been vaccine—sceptic. certainly at the beginning, that was the popular belief, maybe even myth, that they would all turn into insurrectionaries and not knuckle under. but they did. it didn't take that much to make them do it. it took pressure from on top, and six months ago, macron, in the first phase of this, instituted the health pass, as it was called, which was a way of encouraging people to get vaccinated. it was the requirement to have a document on your phone or whatever which said you'd been vaccinated or had had a negative test recently in order to get access to all these things in public life. there was no huge uprising, people accepted it, and now he's pushing a little bit further, as you say. the result of that was a huge
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uptake in vaccination, and now, six months on, he wants to mop up the rest. there is this recalcitrant 5 million or so over 12 who are not taking it, that's about 5% of the population, and by turning the health pass into a vaccination pass — in other words, making it compulsory now to be vaccinated to get into these services — you're no longer going to be able to get in with just a negative test, that is going to put the pressure on. of course, the pressure is already on because the evidence is mounting more and more and more on those who are hesitant that, by being hesitant, they're exposing themselves to greater dangers and dangers which the rest of the population is not. so, he's pushing at a much more open or flexible door now, i would say, but there are in the country people who, as in other countries, arejust viscerally opposed to vaccination. and i guess there are some who will never change, but he thinks there are some who will change. young people in india
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aged between 15—18 have now become eligible for the coronavirus vaccines. it comes as the country records its sharpest ever weekly surge in infections. 0ur correspondent in mumbai yogita limaye has more. india is in the grips of another wave of covid—19. mumbai, at the moment, is the worst—affected city, accounting for a quarter of all new infections in this country. i've been speaking to doctors at both public and private hospitals who say that, for now, the number of people needing medical care is low, but it is increasing. they also warn that if a large number of people get infected very quickly, then even if a smaller percentage need hospital beds, it could still overwhelm public health infrastructure really quickly. they're reminding people of the second wave, which was devastating in this country. so many people died
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without even having a chance of being seen by a doctor. the other thing they are raising concern about is boosterjabs have not yet been ruled out for front—line health care workers, and many of them are falling sick, which could further affect capacity. the government has announced that these vaccinations will be rolled out next week. today, vaccines were rolled out for teenagers aged 15—18. the home—grown vaccine has been rolled out for teenagers. the other thing that's happening in the country is mass campaign rallies for upcoming regional elections where tens of thousands of people are gathering, many of them not wearing masks, many political leaders also not wearing masks on stage. we've seen that, including the prime minister, narendra modi. so doctors say the government need to get the messaging right. people need to be wearing masks and following social distancing protocols. let's show you some live pictures
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from south africa with the parliament building they're still on fire and we have just lost the picture. of the fire there in cape town has now restarted. there are not any reports of any casualties. a man has been arrested and charged with arson and is due in court tomorrow. so the those latest pictures there from that fire which has reignited in cape town, the historic parliament building there and you can see flames and smoke still bellowing out. a reminder of our breaking news. a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes could stop a civil case against him in the us has been made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. the document, which has been unsealed, is a settlement agreement between jeffrey epstein and virginia giuffre, also known as virginia roberts. it dismisses the case for damages brought by ms giuffre, in return for the sum of $500,000.
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much more on that throughout the day here may bbc news. i'm 0lly foster with the latest from the bbc sport centre. we're just a couple of minutes away from kick—off in the day's only match in the premier league. manchester united are taking on wolves at old trafford, and the standout team news for united is the return of philjones to their backline. it's his first game for almost two years after a terrible run of injuries. he comes into the heart of defence with rafael varane for harry maguire and eric bailly. cristiano ronaldo will captain united in maguire's absence. two changes for wolves, semedo and trincao coming into the side. you can listen to commentary of that match on radio 5live. there is live text commentary on the
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bc sport website. just two out of five championship fixtures took place today due to covid postponements. derby boss wayne rooney didn't travel to reading. he tested negative for coronavirus but has cold—like symptoms, so stayed at home as a precaution as his side drew 2—2. quite again. reading hadn't played a competitive game for 23 days. two goals from junior hoilett had them looking good for a win with five minutes to go, but a mistake from reading keeper luke southwood gifted derby a goal. colin kazim—richards pulled one back. and then in injury time, curtis davies saved a point for derby. they're still bottom, but unbeaten in four and are still 11 points behind reading, who are fourth—bottom. that other game in the championship was at stoke. and despite taking the lead, their push for the play—offs has been dented after losing 2—1 to preston. andrew hughes with the winner in the last ten minutes.
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the fourth ashes test starts tomorrow night in sydney. england have already lost the series and preparations have been badly hampered by a number of covid issues, which means most of the coaching staff have been self—isolating. we've heard from joe root today. he'll become england's longest serving test captain when he skippers the side for a 60th time, but his leadership has been questioned after their performances so far in australia. i'll look at the future at the end of this tour. i don't think i can afford to throw any more energy into anything else than the games themselves right now. we want to give people back home something to shout about, to show how much we care about this team, how much we care about test cricket, how desperate we are to do well. and, as i say, to win out here would be, these last two games, would be a really big step forward from, especially off the back of the first three games.
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contrast the mood in the england camp with australia. utterly dominant in the first three tests, and batsman steve smith says they have no intention of letting up. the guys are in a really good place, and we _ the guys are in a really good place, and we have — the guys are in a really good place, and we have played a really good cricket _ and we have played a really good cricket so — and we have played a really good cricket so far throughout. and we are still— cricket so far throughout. and we are still a — cricket so far throughout. and we are still a young side, building together— are still a young side, building together as a group, and we want to keep getting better as a team. so, whilst _ keep getting better as a team. so, whilst we _ keep getting better as a team. so, whilst we had at the foot on the throat _ whilst we had at the foot on the throat so — whilst we had at the foot on the throat so to speak and what we want to continue the momentum and have another_ to continue the momentum and have another good week out here in sydney — another good week out here in sydney. hopefully the weather holds off and _ sydney. hopefully the weather holds off and i'm sydney. hopefully the weather holds offand i'm here in the sydney. hopefully the weather holds off and i'm here in the forecast is not great, — off and i'm here in the forecast is not great, so hopefully we can get some _ not great, so hopefully we can get some good cricket amp and have another— some good cricket amp and have another good week. the first world champion of the year in any sport will be crowned tonight. peter "snake bite" wright takes on "bully—boy" michael smith in the pdc world darts final at alexandra palace. wright, who lifted the trophy in 2020, beat two—time winner gary anderson, the flying scotsman, 6—4 in a thrilling semifinal. wright threw a tournament record 2a
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180s, but revealed that he's been playing in pain with a knee injury. we will see how that goes tonight. we'll have more sport for you later, but coming up next on the bbc news channel, we look back at the year in science. 2021 was the year that world leaders agreed on a new plan to save the planet. hearing no objections, it is so decided. scientists warned that it was now or never to stop damaging climate change. the difference between 1.5 and 2.4 is really survival of millions and millions
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of people and species in the planet. environmentalists chopped down trees to save the planet. nasa's perseverance rover landed on mars. and there was a discovery of what might be another fundamental force of nature. welcome to the year in science. the earth's climate dominated this year in science. for a long time, scientists have warned that our current way of life would lead to dangerous and possibly irreversible damage to the earth's ecosystems. world leaders gathered at the un climate change conference were told now is the time to act.
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ready to start. world leaders gathered in glasgow in november to hammer out a deal to reduce carbon dioxide levels to stop dangerous global warming. and one of the biggest disputes was over the future of coal. for a while, it looked like negotiators couldn't reach a deal. then, the man at the centre of the talks, alok sharma, had to appeal to all the parties to cooperate. this is the moment of truth for our planet and it's a moment of truth for our children and our grandchildren. it did the trick. an agreement was reached. by the end of 2022, countries will have to update their climate pledges at a faster pace than before. by 2024, a package of long—term
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financial aid for the poorest nations have to be agreed. and then, by 2030, to avoid the worst of global warming, carbon emissions should be halved. but that will be made harder by china and india's insistence that coal should be phased down rather than phased out. so, as things stand, polar ice will still melt faster than ever, raising sea levels, and, together with heavier rain, threatening millions of people with flooding. we've already warmed by 1.1 degrees since pre—industrial times. world leaders said that limiting the rise to 1.5 was still possible, but projections suggest that we're headed for at least 1.8 — and that's only if every promise is kept. more realistically, we're on course for 2.4 degrees — a really dangerous level.
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the difference between 1.5 and 2.4 is really the survival of millions and millions of people and species in the planet. this is what is particularly true for the islands. but, according to a government adviser at the heart of the talks, the worst outcomes can be averted. we have kept 1.5 alive, but on the basis of delivering on those commitments, and that'll be our next task for us as the presidency but for all the countries, and it's on us to make sure that this is real in action. and sir david attenborough said the richest nations had a moral responsibility to help the most vulnerable. it would be really catastrophic if the developed nations - of the world, the more - powerful nations of the world simply ignored these problems. if we say, "well, it's nothing to do with us," and cross our arms, -
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we caused it. thousands of men, women and children who have lost everything — _ lost everything — can we just go - by and say it's no business of ours? an assessment by the environment agency said that the uk was not yet ready for the impact of climate change. in october, a street in cardiff became a dangerous river after a massive downpour. there was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there. in america, europe, south america and siberia, there were raging wildfires. the biggest shock came in germany injuly as a surge of water tore through communities. 200 people were killed. the weather events that we saw in europe this summer
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could happen here in england, and we need to be ready.

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