Skip to main content

tv   The Funeral of Archbishop...  BBC News  January 1, 2022 7:45am-10:01am GMT

7:45 am
' year's year's day and get come out on new year's day and get rained on. it will be nice to have a nice mild day. are rained on. it will be nice to have a nice mild day-— nice mild day. are very different feel this time. _ you're watching bbc breakfast. hello and welcome to bbc news. welcome to this special coverage of the funeral of archbishop desmond tutu. over the next few hours, we'll be bringing you events from st george's cathedral in cape town — where family members, worshippers and international dignitaries will be gathering to pay tribute to a man described as a "moral titan". desmond tutu was of course
7:46 am
the first black anglican archbishop of cape town. among his many great achievements — was winning the nobel peace prize in1981r — for combatting white minority rule in south africa. in the words of nelson mandela, his great ally and friend, "i believe that god is waiting for the archbishop. he is waiting to welcome desmond tutu with open arms". this is the scene live at st george's cathedral. only 100 invited guests will be allowed inside the parish in line with covid—19 protocols. armed police, sniffer dogs and scanners will ensure the safety of attending dignitaries. the archbishop requested a funeral without lavish
7:47 am
expense or ostentation. he requested the cheapest coffin and his remains will be interred behind the cathedral pulpit, from which he often used to preach against racial injustice. the final dignitaries are making their way to the pews. his coffin eventually _ their way to the pews. his coffin eventually once _ their way to the pews. his coffin eventually once the _ their way to the pews. his coffin eventually once the service - their way to the pews. his coffin i eventually once the service starts, just before, will be brought in by his grandchildren. our correspondent, nomsa maseko is at the cathedral in cape town. st georges cathedral. just over ten minutes from the beginning of the service, tell us what we are expecting to take place.
7:48 am
now the dignitaries including south africa's president cyril ramaphosa, are seated. we know archbishop tutu was involved in the planning of his own funeral and as a result all the games that will be sung inside the cathedral will have been chosen by him including thejohannesburg him including the johannesburg gospel choir, him including thejohannesburg gospel choir, which he loved very much. they will not be here in person but will perform remotely from johannesburg in line with covid protocols. the family of desmond tutu is also here, former presidents have gathered here. the archbishop has asked that he wants everything to run as simple as possible, no p°mp
7:49 am
to run as simple as possible, no pomp and ceremony, just one bouquet of carnations from his family that will be inside the cathedral. we can 'ust see will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their— will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their as _ will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their as you _ will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their as you said _ will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their as you said the - will be inside the cathedral. we can just see their as you said the final. just see their as you said the final dignitaries being lured to their seats. —— led to their seats. many have travelled from across the country to pay their respects to the man they fondly called arch. for two days he was late in the state in the cathedral, what were people saying to you? cathedral, what were people saying to ou? ., , ., to you? thousands of people over the ast two to you? thousands of people over the past two days — to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind — to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind up _ to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind up in _ to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind up in the - to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind up in the sun - to you? thousands of people over the past two days wind up in the sun and | past two days wind up in the sun and waited to file past the coffin of a man who was greatly revered, whom they respected, because he took on a
7:50 am
very difficult position and the responsibility was to try and do his best to reconcile a deeply divided nation to ensure there is some sort of forgiveness from the brutality that south africa had seen during the apartheid days. he took on that responsibility, he was not liked very much by the majority of white south africans here in this country. obviously his security was then at risk. he still was a man who spoke truth to power and that is why a lot of people who came here felt there was a need for them to be here. in fact, i spoke to one of them who travel to hitchhiking from more than 1000 kilometres, he had borrowed money from his relatives, some other people donated, he hitchhiked, he even spent a night at a filling station close by but he said the
7:51 am
fact he was able to file past the remains of archbishop desmond tutu, for him that was a fulfilling experience that he will take with him for the rest of his life. i know the bbc have _ him for the rest of his life. i know the bbc have also _ him for the rest of his life. i know the bbc have also spoken - him for the rest of his life. i know the bbc have also spoken to - him for the rest of his life. i know the bbc have also spoken to the i the bbc have also spoken to the doctor, the archbishop's daughter mpho tutu van furth, describing the qualities she felt her father possessed. and as much as my father did not believe that freedom was divisible, my father did believe flourishing was divisible, that in orderfor in orderfor any of us to truly flourish,
7:52 am
all of us must truly flourish. and so to select out a group of people on the basis of any piece of identity, whether that is gender, sexuality, sexual identity, race, religion or national origin, those are identifying characteristics that have nothing to do with the essence of who we are and the essence of who we are as human beings, children made in the image and likeness of god, each of whom deserves to be treated with dignity, respect and love. mpho tutu van furth. the daughter of archbishop desmond tutu, speaking about the qualities held by her father.
7:53 am
joining us for the next few hours is milton nkosi — he's a south african journalist and former bbc south africa correspondent. you had a friendship with the arch. he really fought to liberate the south africa that you started your early years in. tell us about him. yes, it is indeed a sad day in south africa but the archbishop has had good innings. everyone would say at 90 he achieved quite a lot. that many people would not be able to achieve in two lifetimes even if they had the opportunity to. he was they had the opportunity to. he was the epitome of commitment, the man was courageous, he was incredibly
7:54 am
committed to his christian belief and he had a greater sense of humour. that is how he carried the serious message of ending the evil system of racial segregation known as apartheid. when he started preaching from the pulpit about the rights and wrongs of the apartheid regime, we were there. i met him through may church, i was an altar boy in the anglican church when i was young, and he came to our church when he was a dean in the late 19705, that when he was a dean in the late 1970s, that is when i first met him and followed his teachings forever after that. we and followed his teachings forever after that. ~ , h, ,. after that. we 'ust saw the scene there inside _ after that. we just saw the scene there inside the _ after that. we just saw the scene there inside the cathedral, - after that. we just saw the scene there inside the cathedral, and i there inside the cathedral, and there inside the cathedral, and there he is now, dancing in those
7:55 am
purple robes. many people said he used those robes as something of a shield or rather they provided protection for him when he took on the apartheid regime. did he do that consciously? fill. the apartheid regime. did he do that consciously?— the apartheid regime. did he do that consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was ve much consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware _ consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware of— consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware of his _ consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware of his role - consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware of his role in - consciously? oh, yes indeed. he was very much aware of his role in the . very much aware of his role in the anti—apartheid struggle. what he was consciously aware of as well is that he did not want to politicise the pulpit, if you like. so he preached the gospel and how wrong apartheid was. remember, the apartheid regime also used the pulpit, france and is the dutch reformed church at the time had gone against the grain of the south african council of churches which desmond tutu led from 1978. so desmond tutu said god wants us to leave together. —— lived
7:56 am
together. he loves all of us without remainer. that was the protection of spirituality he used to fight apartheid came about, including wearing his religious garb. he apartheid came about, including wearing his religious garb. he was a sickly child- — wearing his religious garb. he was a sickly child. actually _ wearing his religious garb. he was a sickly child. actually paralysed - wearing his religious garb. he was a sickly child. actually paralysed on i sickly child. actually paralysed on one hand. unrealised dreams to be a doctor. he trained as a teacher. how then did he end up in the priesthood?— then did he end up in the priesthood? then did he end up in the riesthood? ~ ' then did he end up in the riesthood? ~ . , ' , ., , priesthood? when he was 14 years old, he priesthood? when he was 14 years old. he fell — priesthood? when he was 14 years old. he fell ill— priesthood? when he was 14 years old, he fell ill from _ priesthood? when he was 14 years old, he fell ill from tuberculosis i old, he fell ill from tuberculosis and he was in hospitalfor months on end, and while he was there an anglican priest known as father trevor huddleston came regularly to pray for the sick, including the
7:57 am
young desmond, who was a young teenager at the time. andy learned so much from father trevor huddleston. he was born in the methodist church and switched to the anglican church. that is how he grew up anglican church. that is how he grew up in the church and got his family to follow him as well. he up in the church and got his family to follow him as well.— to follow him as well. he did say that he met _ to follow him as well. he did say that he met trevor _ to follow him as well. he did say that he met trevor huddleston l to follow him as well. he did say| that he met trevor huddleston at to follow him as well. he did say - that he met trevor huddleston at the age of nine and that are stuck with him always nigh —— all his life. he called his mother madam and doffed his cap to her. another guest here on bbc news.
7:58 am
william gumede worked with archbishop tutu at the commission — he's now the chair of the democracy works foundation and joins me now from johannesburg. what has south africa and the world lost, you have spoken about his moral compass. he lost, you have spoken about his moral compass.— lost, you have spoken about his moral compass. lost, you have spoken about his moral comass. ., , ., ., . . moral compass. he was our moral and siritual moral compass. he was our moral and spiritual leader _ moral compass. he was our moral and spiritual leader especially _ moral compass. he was our moral and spiritual leader especially from - moral compass. he was our moral and spiritual leader especially from the - spiritual leader especially from the 19705 and 19805 during the apartheid era, but also in the post apartheid era. given the context we are right now in the country, there is a widespread sense that we have lost our moral compass is a country itself. in the last year or so, his voice was quiet because he was ill. now that he is not there, we are going to miss him. he now that he is not there, we are going to miss him.— now that he is not there, we are going to miss him. he was a great
7:59 am
orator at pulpit. — going to miss him. he was a great orator at pulpit, on _ going to miss him. he was a great orator at pulpit, on a _ going to miss him. he was a great orator at pulpit, on a stage, - going to miss him. he was a great orator at pulpit, on a stage, skills| orator at pulpit, on a stage, skills that have been admired, but he knew how to tell a story, put it into context and get his message across as well. he context and get his message across as well. . , context and get his message across as well. ., , ., ., ., , as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers- _ as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers- he _ as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers. he also _ as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers. he also was _ as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers. he also was a - as well. he was one of the greatest storytellers. he also was a man - as well. he was one of the greatest | storytellers. he also was a man with insecurities and vulnerabilities. he was very emotionally intelligent, and intuitive person. yes, people talk about his energy and his presence but he was a very genuinely caring person. he could relate closely with others, he could cry with you publicly. sometimes when a loss for words as we all sometimes are in the midst of terrible pain, he could touch you, give you a hug.
8:00 am
his doctor said he was a huggable person. in his final weapon, the weapon of prayer, he could pray for you. these were important. he had the gift of the gab. his sense of humour, sometimes he would make a joke which really would leave people without pain. it was a stunning ability to use other words humour, orjust touch up pray to ease people. he orjust touch up pray to ease --eole. ., . people. he once said he revelled in what he described _ people. he once said he revelled in what he described as _ people. he once said he revelled in what he described as his _ people. he once said he revelled in what he described as his role, - people. he once said he revelled in what he described as his role, i - what he described as his role, i love to be loved, i love that white people loved to hate me in his struggle against the apartheid regime.
8:01 am
this is st george's cathedral. the service is meant to start any time now. we can hear the music. the pallbearers taking the simple, pine coffin to its resting place at the top, nearthe coffin to its resting place at the top, near the pulpit. coffin to its resting place at the top, nearthe pulpit. his grandchildren will be there. that job will be done. the final honour that's. —— the final honour. let's listen in for a moment. 0k, ok, we arejust waiting ok, we are just waiting for the normal service to begin. the
8:02 am
preacher at the funeral service for archbishop desmond tutu will be right reverend michael nuttall, he is the retired bishop of natal and dean of the province for archbishop tutu. only100 dean of the province for archbishop tutu. only 100 guests are going to be paying the final respects within st george's cathedral itself because of the coronavirus protocols within the country. i wonder if i could just come back to you, milton. a voice of the voiceless is a phrase that mandela used to describe his best friend. they didn't always get on though, did they? yes. best friend. they didn't always get on though, did they?— on though, did they? yes, in fact the not on though, did they? yes, in fact they got on _ on though, did they? yes, in fact they got on very _ on though, did they? yes, in fact
8:03 am
they got on very well. _ on though, did they? yes, in fact they got on very well. mandela i they got on very well. mandela appointed desmond tt to be the chairman of the truth and reconciliation commission, a duty that the archbishop carried out with aplomb. he got along with nelson mandela up to a point. remember that they were neighbours in a township in soweto along a street that boasts two nobel peace prize laureates. they split their ways. desmond tutu told nelson mandela he did not like the colourful shirts he used to wear. mr mandela taunted —— retorted, i will not be told what to do. she, retorted, i will not be told what to do. �* ., .,
8:04 am
retorted, i will not be told what to do.�* ., ., , retorted, i will not be told what to do. ., ., , ~ ., do. a lot of people don't know about his early years- _ do. a lot of people don't know about his early years. why _ do. a lot of people don't know about his early years. why did _ do. a lot of people don't know about his early years. why did he - do. a lot of people don't know about his early years. why did he enter - his early years. why did he enter the priesthood? what did he say about it? he the priesthood? what did he say about it? , , . ., about it? he believed very much that that is the way _ about it? he believed very much that that is the way to _ about it? he believed very much that that is the way to resolve _ about it? he believed very much that that is the way to resolve some - about it? he believed very much that that is the way to resolve some of. that is the way to resolve some of south africa's intractable racial and colonisation problems. he was a deeply spiritual man. desmond tutu truly believed in this spirit of christianity, even though he later wrote a book called, god is not a christian, precisely because he believed that god loved everybody, irrespective of race, creed, gender and any other divisive characteristics. so he got into the church and became a priest after he had been a teacher and he wanted to
8:05 am
be a medical doctor that his family could not afford the fees. that was his journey into priesthood. could not afford the fees. that was hisjourney into priesthood. he ended up studying at king's college in london, he said that for many years and went back as well as the head of the world council of churches, where he was running the bureaucracy of the council. you mentioned _ bureaucracy of the council. you mentioned the _ bureaucracy of the council. you mentioned the trc. _ bureaucracy of the council. you mentioned the trc. many people remember him asking and talking about forgiveness, particularly when he spoke to winnie mandela. going back to forgiveness itself, the closest he actually came to say something was unforgivable was when he was talking about the attempts that were made on the lives of his children by the apartheid system of the ruling national party at the time. he was human, wasn't he? he
8:06 am
was not a saint when he was human, and he wrestled with that. itrier?r was not a saint when he was human, and he wrestled with that. very much so. even and he wrestled with that. very much so- even though _ and he wrestled with that. very much so. even though he _ and he wrestled with that. very much so. even though he was _ and he wrestled with that. very much so. even though he was against - and he wrestled with that. very much so. even though he was against the l so. even though he was against the african national congress and its operations, he supported sanctions instead of a violent solution to getting rid of apartheid. there were times when you could tell he would get incredibly angry, as wonderful a man as he was. you are right. that is being human. he was not perfect. he always said he is just as fallible as anyone else. he once stopped a mob trying to kill a man who was accused of being an apartheid sell—out, collaborator. he was incredibly angry that they
8:07 am
wanted to kill this man by dousing attire and putting it around someone's neck. he was physically inside the mob, dust and everything up inside the mob, dust and everything up in the air and pushing away, protecting the man from attack. {line protecting the man from attack. one ofthe protecting the man from attack. one of the four choir that are taking part in the funeral service has begun to sing. let's allow our viewers to listen.
8:08 am
8:09 am
that was the processional hymn that we've just heard. william, that was the processional hymn that we'vejust heard. william, i that was the processional hymn that we've just heard. william, i wonder if i could turn to you, please, before we start to hear the resurrection sentences from the service itself. did he come out of the fight for liberation from the apartheid regime unscathed? you know, i apartheid regime unscathed? you know. i don't— apartheid regime unscathed? you. know, i don't think he did. his faith was so important. his faith kept him centred. for him, to see so many people suffering from pain and having to deal with people because my problems, he had an open house. people could come to him with
8:10 am
issues, with their pain. he had to inspire them, keep to them. i cannot imagine he was unaffected but his faith held him together. he was a man who meditated. meditation is very important. it helped to balance and centre him. he would tell me he would meditate during difficult periods up to four hours a day. it was really tough, tough times. he was really tough, tough times. he was a man of words, certainly. admitting he liked to talk. he loved the silence. the company. it was part of his daily ritual. letters turn outlet as to return back to st george's cathedral.
8:11 am
jesus rose again. we shall always comfort one another.
8:12 am
you all that beautiful. happy new year~ _ you all that beautiful. happy new year. . , , you all that beautiful. happy new year. . , _ ., you all that beautiful. happy new year._ turned i you all that beautiful. happy new year._ turned to | you all that beautiful. happy new i year._ turned to the year. happy new year. turned to the erson year. happy new year. turned to the person next — year. happy new year. turned to the person next to _ year. happy new year. turned to the person next to you — year. happy new year. turned to the person next to you and _ year. happy new year. turned to the person next to you and say, - year. happy new year. turned to the person next to you and say, god i person next to you and say, god loves _ person next to you and say, god loves you — person next to you and say, god loves you. god loves you. god loves ou. the loves you. god loves you. god loves you- the lord _ loves you. god loves you. god loves you. the lord be _ loves you. god loves you. god loves you. the lord be with _ loves you. god loves you. god loves you. the lord be with you. - loves you. god loves you. god loves you. the lord be with you. our i loves you. god loves you. god loves you. the lord be with you. our god| you. the lord be with you. our god of race you. the lord be with you. our god of grace and _ you. the lord be with you. our god of grace and glory. _ you. the lord be with you. our god of grace and glory. we _ you. the lord be with you. our god of grace and glory. we remember | of grace and glory. we remember before _ of grace and glory. we remember before you — of grace and glory. we remember before you this day, our brother desmond — before you this day, our brother desmond mpilo tutu. we thank you for giving _ desmond mpilo tutu. we thank you for giving him _ desmond mpilo tutu. we thank you for giving him to us, to know and to love _ giving him to us, to know and to love as — giving him to us, to know and to love as a — giving him to us, to know and to love as a companion on our african pilgrimage — love as a companion on our african pilgrimage. the compassion and solace _ pilgrimage. the compassion and solace we — pilgrimage. the compassion and solace we mourn. give us faith and
8:13 am
eternal— solace we mourn. give us faith and eternal life — solace we mourn. give us faith and eternal life so that in quiet confidence we may continue our course — confidence we may continue our course on — confidence we may continue our course on earth. through confidence we may continue our course on earth. throuthesus christ, — oui’ ourlord,... his friends, all will mourn his passing _ his friends, all will mourn his passing. together will stop they
8:14 am
have _ passing. together will stop they have confidence in the days that can, _ have confidence in the days that can, through have confidence in the days that can, throuthesus christ, our lord, amen _ can, throuthesus christ, our lord, amen. please be seated. and so the labit, _ amen. please be seated. and so the labil. in_ amen. please be seated. and so the labil. inthat— amen. please be seated. and so the labit, in that spirit of you are beautiful— labit, in that spirit of you are beautiful and god loves you, i welcome _ beautiful and god loves you, i welcome you.— beautiful and god loves you, i welcome you. the family of the president and _ welcome you. the family of the president and all _ welcome you. the family of the president and all the _ welcome you. the family of the president and all the people i welcome you. the family of the president and all the people of| welcome you. the family of the i president and all the people of our land. our guests who have come all the way from durban. as we gather in this moment ijust want the way from durban. as we gather in this moment i just want to the way from durban. as we gather in this moment ijust want to be mindful we have brevity of time and yet we still want to do this time of fond farewell and joyful celebration
8:15 am
in a way that is trying to be expeditious but also good quality of time. i ask every person who has a part. where your name is mentioned, anticipated, to come forward. nobody will be calling you. you are familiar with where your name is in the liturgical script. i ask you to be mindful of that. also be cognisant of the many many people who would have loved to have been here on this occasion. in the absence we acknowledge them, be them in the valleys of our land, the people out there in constantia, many places. all the places where we are gathered, in brixton, palestine,
8:16 am
havana, wherever you are listening and viewing, we pray you will gain sustenance from this moment. in conclusion, i want to remind us of miss billie holliday. she could have been referencing father desmond when she sang the song, crazy he calls me. she said, like the wind that shakes the bow, me. she said, like the wind that shakes the how, he moves me with a smile. it is the key to smile from the heart of god. tutu smile. we saw it in photographs and television and we recognise that smile reminded us and emphasised in life that, i quote again, the gorgeous billie holiday,
8:17 am
the difficult i will do right now. but the impossible will take a little while. and so as we were reminded and from our recent history, we lived life to the full. because a child of god, he showed as god loves us. so god be praised.
8:18 am
piano plays # great is thy faithfulness! # morning by morning new mercies i see:
8:19 am
# all i have needed thy hand hath provided # great is thy faithfulness, lord, unto me! # summer and winter and springtime and harvest # sun, moon, and stars in their courses above # join with all nature in manifold witness # to thy great faithfulness, mercy, and love # great is thy faithfulness!
8:20 am
# morning by morning new mercies i see: # all i have needed thy hand hath provided # great is thy faithfulness lord, unto me! # pardon for sin and a peace that endureth # thine own dear presence to cheer and to guide # strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow # blessings all mine with 10,00 beside # great is thy faithfulness!
8:21 am
# morning by morning new mercies i see: # all i have needed thy hand hath provided # great is thy faithfulness lord, unto me! # good morning. iam good morning. i am standing good morning. iam standing here, representing those called the one we come too late to rest, daddy... and
8:22 am
the one whom he affectionately called jojo. i want to convey thanks in no way in which all of you have stepped forward to tell us of how much he loved daddy. i want to first apologise for all of us as a family because we have received so many messages on all kinds of media and we haven't been able to respond to all the prayers and good wishes that we have received. if you send us a message and you haven't heard from
8:23 am
the person you sent it to, it is not because we are ignoring or are ungrateful to the message, we have just received so many and we had just received so many and we had just been overwhelmed. daddy would say, the love the world has shown has warmed the cockles of our hearts. he then would say, i don't know what a cockle is but whatever it is, it has been warmed. since he was an english teacher, if he did not know what a cockle is, i definitely do not know what cockle is but cockles are warm. we thank you for loving our father, grandfather, husband, uncle, brother, brother—in—law. many of the
8:24 am
messages we received had said thank you for sharing him with the world. well, it actually is a two way street. because we shared him with the world can make you shed part of the world can make you shed part of the love you held for him with us. —— you shared. and so we are thankful. and we are thankful that all of you have gathered in your many places in person or via the wonders of technology, to be a part of celebrating daddy's life throughout this week. and lastly, to him who has gathered as here, we say, thank you, daddy, for the many
8:25 am
ways you showed us love, for there many times he challenged us, for there many times you comforted us. thank you. now a short tribute at the beginning of the serviceable archbishop desmond tutu. i want to start with sending my condolences and those of
8:26 am
all anglicans around the world to everyone. those who will miss him most and those who are closest. then i want to say that for myself or any archbishop of canterbury to a tribute to the archbishop is like chuka umunna archbishop desmond tutu lit up the world. south africa has given us so much in the last 30 years. —— is like... so much in this extraordinary example. about the fears towering over the world, president mandela and archbishop desmond tutu, in all the messages i
8:27 am
have received from round the world, whatsapp messages, the most striking theme has been when people have said, when we were in the dark he brought light. light has lit up countries globally that is struggling with fear, conflict, persecution, oppression where lives suffered. he never ceased to speak prophetically, he never ceased to speak powerfully, he never ceased to spread light. his light was the light of the last and that is why his light will go on shining because it is the light of christ. —— the light of christ. the price he said, he gave him courage and it means
8:28 am
that his light is not extinguished. —— the christ. he is not someone we will speak of as was but who is shedding light for those on the edge and who suffer to this day and in the future. many god rest his soul and his family and may god bless south africa. if you have just joined if you havejustjoined us here on bbc news, we are broadcasting a special on the funeral service of
8:29 am
desmond tutu. we heard from naomi tutu, the daughter. the reverend has spoken... can you tell us what she said? . .. spoken... can you tell us what she said? . ., , , . ~ said? reverend naomi tutu speaking there about how— said? reverend naomi tutu speaking there about how her— said? reverend naomi tutu speaking there about how her father _ said? reverend naomi tutu speaking there about how her father led i said? reverend naomi tutu speaking there about how her father led not i there about how her father led not just people outside of the family but also that he was a loving man, even at home. the reverend also recited the names of desmond tutu and there is a cultural reference in that when it rains, on the day of a person's funeral, there is some positivity there because they normally say that it means the soul of the departed has now reunited with his ancestors and that is why there was that significance when the
8:30 am
reverend, naomi tutu, recited her father's plan names. if you are of the simple coffin, part of his wishes to keep things simple, keep costs down as well. the archbishop hasjust simple, keep costs down as well. the archbishop has just started talking. bless it be god, father, son and holy spirit. almighty god, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known and no secrets are hidden. the
8:31 am
inspiration of your holy spirit. we love you and worldly magnify your holy name through christ our lord.
8:32 am
hymn continues. let us confess our sins. almighty god, our heavenly father, in paris
8:33 am
since we confess that we have sinned against you. in thought, word and deed. forthe against you. in thought, word and deed. for the sake of your son, christ our lord, forgive us all that has passed that we may serve you in unison to the glory of your name. almighty god who forgives, have mercy _ almighty god who forgives, have mercy on — almighty god who forgives, have mercy on you are parting your sins and set _ mercy on you are parting your sins and set you — mercy on you are parting your sins and set you free from them, confirm and set you free from them, confirm and strengthen you in goodness and keep you _ and strengthen you in goodness and keep you in — and strengthen you in goodness and keep you in eternal life injesus christ— keep you in eternal life injesus christ our— keep you in eternal life injesus christ our lord, amen. that us pray. god our—
8:34 am
christ our lord, amen. that us pray. god our father, your sonjesus christ— god our father, your sonjesus christ died _ god our father, your sonjesus christ died and rose again for our salvation — christ died and rose again for our salvation. we entrust to you the sole of— salvation. we entrust to you the sole of your servant desmond praying that he _ sole of your servant desmond praying that he and _ sole of your servant desmond praying that he and all the faithful departed may be revealed when christ shall come _ departed may be revealed when christ shall come again, your spirit we honour— shall come again, your spirit we honour and _ shall come again, your spirit we honour and glory now and for ever, amen _ honour and glory now and for ever, amen. please, be seated. the first reading is from the book of micah, chapter six versus 6—8. for what shall i come before the
8:35 am
lord, bow myself before god on high. should i come before him with offerings, carves a year old? with the lord be pleased with thousands of rams, tens of thousands of rivers of rams, tens of thousands of rivers of oil? shall i give my first—born for my transgression? the fruits of my body for the sin of my soul? he has told you mortal what is good. what does the lord require of you but to do justice, give kindness and to walk humbly? the word of the lord.
8:36 am
this psalm is in some 116 versus 9-17. the this psalm is in some 116 versus 9—17. the congregation will respond. i believed that they should perish because i was solely troubled and i said in my alarm everyone is a liar. i will lift up the cup of salvation and call— i will lift up the cup of salvation and call upon the name of the lord. pressures in the sight of the lord is the death of his faithful servants.
8:37 am
i will offer to you a sacrifice of thanksgiving and call upon the name of the _ thanksgiving and call upon the name of the lord — in the course of the house of the lord, in the midst of you, o lord, in the midst of you, 0 jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the siaht jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the si . ht of jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the sight of the — jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the sight of the lord. _ jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the sight of the lord. glory _ jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the sight of the lord. glory to - jerusalem, alleluia. precious in the sight of the lord. glory to the i sight of the lord. glory to the father— sight of the lord. glory to the father and _ sight of the lord. glory to the father and to— sight of the lord. glory to the father and to the _ sight of the lord. glory to the father and to the sun - sight of the lord. glory to the father and to the sun and i sight of the lord. glory to the father and to the sun and to. sight of the lord. glory to the i father and to the sun and to the holy— father and to the sun and to the holy spirit — father and to the sun and to the holy spirit as _ father and to the sun and to the holy spirit as it _ father and to the sun and to the holy spirit as it was _ father and to the sun and to the holy spirit as it was in _ father and to the sun and to the holy spirit as it was in the - holy spirit as it was in the beginning _ holy spirit as it was in the beginning is— holy spirit as it was in the beginning is now- holy spirit as it was in the beginning is now and i holy spirit as it was in the beginning is now and willi holy spirit as it was in the i beginning is now and will be forever, _ beginning is now and will be forever, amen. _
8:38 am
the second reading is from john chapter four versus 7—11. beloved, let us micro love one another because love is from god. everyone who loves is born of god and knows god. whoever does not love does not know god, for god is love. god's love was revealed among us in this way, god sent his only son into the world so that we might live through him. not that we loved god but that we love god and sends his son to be an atoning sacrifice for our sins. since god loved us so much we also ought to love one another. here the word of the lord.
8:39 am
studio: the funeral service of the late archbishop desmond tutu. we have just heard from a number of his grandchildren, and also his daughter naomi. we had and also his daughter naomi. we had
8:40 am
an introduction from many of us around the world to members of his family there. pretty evident if you were listening to the reverend naomi tutu, the sense of humour runs through the family. film. tutu, the sense of humour runs through the family.— tutu, the sense of humour runs through the family. oh, yes. that is how the family _ through the family. oh, yes. that is how the family has _ through the family. oh, yes. that is how the family has managed i through the family. oh, yes. that is how the family has managed to i through the family. oh, yes. that isj how the family has managed to deal with some of their difficult times that they have been through through the era of apartheid. i remember desmond tutu a few years ago, not so long ago, he has an oversized chess piece that he picked, a black
8:41 am
bishop. as i am walking alongside the archbishop he was looking at me with his mysterious look, getting this black bishop. we couldn't stop laughing about it. that sense of humour permeates throughout the tutu clan. he humour permeates throughout the tutu clan. . , ., . humour permeates throughout the tutu clan. ., ., . .. . humour permeates throughout the tutu clan. ., . ,, clan. he was holding an actual chess iece? clan. he was holding an actual chess piece? yes. — clan. he was holding an actual chess piece? yes. a _ clan. he was holding an actual chess piece? yes, a black— clan. he was holding an actual chess piece? yes, a black bishop- clan. he was holding an actual chess piece? yes, a black bishop chess i piece? yes, a black bishop chess iece. piece? yes, a black bishop chess piece. fantastic. _ piece? yes, a black bishop chess piece. fantastic. tell— piece? yes, a black bishop chess piece. fantastic. tell us - piece? yes, a black bishop chess piece. fantastic. tell us a i piece? yes, a black bishop chess piece. fantastic. tell us a little l piece. fantastic. tell us a little bit about his _ piece. fantastic. tell us a little bit about his family. _ piece. fantastic. tell us a little bit about his family. he - piece. fantastic. tell us a little bit about his family. he often l piece. fantastic. tell us a little i bit about his family. he often spoke about his wife, did she fully support his activism? leah. she has alwa s support his activism? leah. she has always been — support his activism? leah. she has always been a _ support his activism? leah. she has always been a rock _ support his activism? leah. she has always been a rock of _
8:42 am
support his activism? leah. she has always been a rock of support i always been a rock of support alongside the archbishop. she was not entirely supportive of the return to south africa from the united kingdom where the archbishop obtained his masters degree in the 19805, when they were supposed to come back to south africa she was reluctant to come back with the children because in the uk, when he walks on the pavement, no one has to make way for white people. reluctant to return to the difficult practical apartheid rules were black people had to move away from the pavement when a white person was approaching them. eventually, they had a discussion and she agreed to come back, and that is how they returned
8:43 am
to south africa. the back, and that is how they returned to south africa.— to south africa. the activism, milton, again, _ to south africa. the activism, milton, again, as _ to south africa. the activism, milton, again, as we - to south africa. the activism, milton, again, as we were i to south africa. the activism, | milton, again, as we were just milton, again, as we werejust listening and viewing some of his grandchildren there, he was an activist. and it looks like many of them. , , them. yes indeed. the referent is . uite them. yes indeed. the referent is quite active- _ them. yes indeed. the referent is quite active. the _ them. yes indeed. the referent is quite active. the archbishop i them. yes indeed. the referent is quite active. the archbishop not l quite active. the archbishop not only was challenging racial discrimination, he also challenged homophobia and introduced the concept that the church needs to decriminalise the lgbtq+ community. he was leading from the front, not just here but in the israeli — palestinian conflict, he always tried to point out where the wrong was done. he was involved in to bat,
8:44 am
his closest friend the dalai lama spent some time with him talking about that. he was notjust critical of racial discrimination and homophobia, he also criticised former uk pro minister tony blair and former american president george bush for their war in iraq. he has been an all—rounder, the world has lost an icon in the truest sense. thank you, milton. if you are joining us on
8:45 am
bbc news, that was milton nkosi. with us for the rest of the day. helping us go through the story of archbishop desmond tutu, michael nuttall. he was part of bishop tutu's wishes to be part of the service. to tutu's wishes to be part of the service. .. , , tutu's wishes to be part of the service. ., , , , . ., . ~ service. to pursue 'ustice, to walk kindl service. to pursue 'ustice, to walk renewe— service. to pursue 'ustice, to walk kindly with your i service. to pursue justice, to walk kindly with your god. _ service. to pursue justice, to walk kindly with your god. this - service. to pursue justice, to walk kindly with your god. this in i kindly with your god. this in desmond tutu was interwoven in a long—lived authenticity. that is why we loved him and respected him.
8:46 am
small and physical stature, he was a giant among us spiritually. he was authentic, not counterfeit, he lived even at great cost to himself in an inclusive, all embracing way. his friend nelson mandela putted perfectly when he said, sometimes strident, often tender, neverafraid and sell them without humour. desmond tutu's voice will always be the voice of the voiceless. i come here today in my octogenarian years sensitive to the awesomeness of the occasion, which is likely to catch
8:47 am
the cheerful and thankful rid of this our nation and the entire world. —— thankful mood. i come at the response of the express wish of the response of the express wish of the archbishop, my friend, for he asked me some years ago to do this at his funeral. how could i refuse? such an honour. first, let me say a few words to the chief mourner among us. my dear leah, distinguished member of the church. you and i are in a close solidarity in the ross. i
8:48 am
know something of what you must now be going through, that each person should be free to grieve in whichever way is most appropriate. many times you wiped away the tears of your husband, for as we all know he cried very easily and in the life of our country both past and present, he had much to cry about. not to mention a world which seems in many ways to be tearing itself apart. today we are here to try in a small way to wipe away your tears, though tears are of course a very necessary part of our grieving. allow me to give you and your family a comment sent to me for my comfort,
8:49 am
which i found helpful in the strange twists and turns of my own grieving. grief is not a disorder, a disease or a sign of weakness. it is an emotional, physicaland or a sign of weakness. it is an emotional, physical and spiritual necessity, the price you pay for love. the only cure for grief is to grieve. desmond and i became close in an unlikely partnership at a truly critical time in the life of our country from 1989 to 1996. he is archbishop of cape town and i as his deputy when i was elected by my
8:50 am
brother bishops to be also what was called dean of the province. i was asked during a pastoral visit we made together to jerusalem asked during a pastoral visit we made together tojerusalem what asked during a pastoral visit we made together to jerusalem what this cumbersome ecclesiastical title meant. my answer on the spur of the moment was that it meant number two to tutu. the nickname stuck. more importantly, at a deeper level our partnership struck a chord perhaps in the hearts and minds of many people, a dynamic black leader and his white deputy in the dying years of apartheid. hey presto, the heavens did not collapse. we were a foretaste, if you like, of what could be in our wayward, divided nation. what does the lord require
8:51 am
of you but to pursue justice, nation. what does the lord require of you but to pursuejustice, to love kindness and to walk humbly with your god? allow me to briefly unpack each of these qualities in relation to our esteemed archbishop. first, pursuejustice. desmond was not on some crusade of personal aggrandizement or egotism though he often admitted that he loved to be loved. and what is wrong with that? do we not all love to be loved? it is a human craving from the moment we are born. but, no, desmond's response to grave injustice came from the depths of his being. and often in response to what he called
8:52 am
the divine nudge. listen to what his favourite prophet, jeremiah, wrote. there is in my heart as it were a burning fire shut up in my bones. and i am weary with holding it in and! and i am weary with holding it in and i cannot. that is how desmond tutu lived and ministers management ministered in a system of brittleness in his own country. in did the fire in his breast die out in the eldridge. he was thrilled with the coming of democracy in 1994. watch out, watch out, watch out, he warned sternly when the new
8:53 am
government styled expediently in giving a visit to the dalai lama at the time of the arch's 80th birthday. he was knocked similarly turned down when he went to india for the dalai lama's 80th birthday, and together they produced a remarkable book called the book of joy- remarkable book called the book of joy. which is a special classic for our time and indeed for all time. a book crafted by deep and humorous conversation between a buddhist and a christian, and compiled beautifully by douglas abrams, who is a due. —— who is a due. there is a religiousjust order is a due. —— who is a due. there is a religious just order it so much
8:54 am
shameful intolerance and today's world. those who have ears to hear, let them hear secondly, love kindness, love kindness, this was our arch at his very best. his was not a harsh ideological quest for justice, always it was grounded in mercy. in chesed, to use the hebrew word. a warm smile, oh, yes, the warm smile. remember his fine book on the truth and reconciliation commission, that seminal body he chaired, titled
8:55 am
future without forgiveness. how could someone who had suffered so much histoty and disdain in his own country setting for such a conviction, such magnanimity? it was because all that he stood for and strove for was under goaded by a spirit of mercy towards everyone. did you ever received from him a phone call or a gift of flowers, a card, a handwritten letter or an e—mail? when my wife of 57 years died on all souls day in 2016 he was on the phone to me despite great physicalfrailty to on the phone to me despite great physical frailty to comfort me and to offer as he would say a little prayer from the heart.
8:56 am
to offer as he would say a little prayerfrom the heart. desmond to offer as he would say a little prayer from the heart. desmond was quite at ease preying on the telephone with others. actually, he prayed anywhere and everywhere, not only in churches and chapels. he also so wanted to be at my wife's funeral, and was truly pained that ill health prevented him. the flowers, of course, arrived. the flowers, of course, arrived. the flowers arrived. it isa it is a painful and beautiful memory for me. thirdly, walk humbly with your god. here is the mystery of the
8:57 am
interior pilgrimage of the soul. there were 3ps about our archbishop, the prophet, the pastor and the prayer but what many may not realise is that the guided, the prayer and all the rest... the daily eucharist was his custom regardless of circumstances. i remember having one with him in frankfurt airport when we were waiting for a connecting flight. it is utterly appropriate that his funeral service today is immersed in what we call a requiem eucharist and it would be his wish
8:58 am
all of us be free to receive the sacred body and blood of christ at this eucharist in memory of him. desmond was not only immersed in the liturgical prayer of the church, he was also up at four every morning to pray. to meditate, to contemplate and to intercede. in his intercessory work he would engage in a kirk's tour around the whole world. in his prayer, the world was his parish, and surely that was appropriate for a holder of the nobel peace prize. some give you, in memory of this holy and very human man, this humane person, this humane
8:59 am
leader, a accord which we too can try to emulate. pursue justice, leader, a accord which we too can try to emulate. pursuejustice, love kindness, and bulk humbly with your god. i conclude this intertwined sermon and eulogy with the words of a personal praise song looking back on our arch's remarkable life and held in awe by him going from us now. desmond mpilo tutu, born and raised where the gentle but live, land of the tree, his mother a domestic worker, his father a
9:00 am
teacher, polio survivor, tv survivor, visited unforgettably in hospital by one trevor huddlestone. a child living in the shadow of the great injustice. raised through sickness to a priestly calling. finding the fire in your breast that prevented silence, scholar, prophet, pastor, prayer, preacher of passion with arms stretched out. the diminutive person making presidents tremble. small person of the past becoming great in the unfolding purposes of god.
9:01 am
learning the art... visiting parish astride a harley learning a hardy way in the city of gold. bitter irony of red carpets icy stares back home. learning to lean on god and the safety valve of an irrepressible, self—deprecating humour. voice of the muted multitude, son of the dark mysterious land. cold at the height of crisis to the cape of storms to transform it into the cape of good
9:02 am
hope. take rest at last, our dearfriend the arch. you have attended the winds of noble strife, enter now into the full embrace of the great and generous god you served.
9:03 am
i believe in god, the father almighty... i believe injesus christ, son of god. he was crucified. he rose again. in heaven, seated at the right hand of the father. i believe in the holy spirit, the holy catholic church, the communion, i believe in the resurrection of the body and the life everlasting. amen.
9:04 am
for beloveds brother desmond, let us pray to our lord jesus christ, who said, i am pray to our lord jesus christ, who said, iam resurrection pray to our lord jesus christ, who said, i am resurrection and pray to our lord jesus christ, who said, iam resurrection and i pray to our lord jesus christ, who said, i am resurrection and i am life. lord, you consult martha and mary in their distress, draw near to us who mourn for desmond and dry the tears of those who weep. you wept at the grave of lazarus, your friend. comfort us in our sorrow, let our
9:05 am
faith he comfort us in our sorrow, let our faith be our consolation, and eternal life i hope —— are hope. you eternal life i hope -- are hope. you raised the — eternal life i hope -- are hope. you raised the dead _ eternal life i hope —— are hope. you raised the dead to life, give to our brother— raised the dead to life, give to our brother eternal life. you promised paradise _ brother eternal life. you promised paradise to — brother eternal life. you promised paradise to the teeth he repented, bring _ paradise to the teeth he repented, bring our— paradise to the teeth he repented, bring our brothers to the joys of living _ bring our brothers to the joys of living the — bring our brothers to the joys of living. the thief. our brother was washed _ living. the thief. our brother was washed in— living. the thief. our brother was washed in baptism and anointed with the holy— washed in baptism and anointed with the holy spirit. it him solution. ——
9:06 am
give _ the holy spirit. it him solution. —— give him _ the holy spirit. it him solution. —— give him solution. he the holy spirit. it him solution. -- give him solution.— the holy spirit. it him solution. -- give him solution. he was nursed by our give him solution. he was nursed by yourwords— give him solution. he was nursed by your words and _ give him solution. he was nursed by your words and fed _ give him solution. he was nursed by your words and fed by _ give him solution. he was nursed by your words and fed by your- your words and fed by your sacraments. grant him a place at the table in your heavenly kingdom. he was ordained and consecrated for holy service in your church. proclaiming the message with persistent faith, whether their time was favourable or unfavourable. convincing, rebuking, and encouraging with utmost patience in teaching. speak to him the words of
9:07 am
welcome and commendation. well done, good and faithful servant. enter into your best. —— your rest. pull out the abundance of your blessings on the church which he said with diligence and devotion and use as to carry on the good work you achieved in him. what he received and passed on to us we may faithfully hand on to those who come after us. lord jesus christ, we commend to you our brother, desmond, who was reborn by water and the spirit into your death and glorious
9:08 am
resurrection. grant that his death may recall to the seal victory over death and be an occasion for us to renew your trust in our father's love. thus, we pray, the faith to follow where you have led the way and may you live and reign with the father and the holy spirit to the ages of ages. christ first loved us. may a piece of the lord be always with you.
9:09 am
she sings in her own language. choir sings
9:10 am
9:11 am
they sing hakeleje
9:12 am
you are watching bbc news. the special coverage of the funeral of archbishop desmond tutu. this is the soweto gospel fan squire. they were unable to attend in person because of coronavirus protocols. this is their recording and contribution to their recording and contribution to the service itself. one of four requires that are performing as part of the service. one of archbishop tt'5 of the service. one of archbishop tt�*s many roles was as chair of south africa's truth and reconciliation commission, you had similar being alluded to in the service by some of those speaking.
9:13 am
this was an organisation created by the government of nelson mandela in 1995 to help the country to come to terms with its history. william worked with archbishop desmond tutu commission and he is also the chair of the democracy works foundation. hejoins me live of the democracy works foundation. he joins me live from johannesburg. you are actually with us throughout their service, thank you very much. he was asked by his friend, nelson mandela, to be part of the commission in 1996. what was his reaction to that and how did he reflect on that after it was closed and fully reported? the reflect on that after it was closed and fully reported?— reflect on that after it was closed and fully reported? the irony was that he was _ and fully reported? the irony was that he was retired _ and fully reported? the irony was that he was retired as _ and fully reported? the irony was that he was retired as the - that he was retired as the archbishop and was looking forward personally to rest and to spend more time with leah and his family. it
9:14 am
was a very big ask for nelson mandela but also a brilliant choice from nelson mandela to ask tutu because he was fit for purpose. it was very difficult. to get the truth of what happened, preside over, and here the victims tell their stories. it was contested as well. for those people to reconcile afterwards. i think the end for me most possibly was one of his biggest achievements in history. many anc leaders were not happy that he was also, the truth commission was also critical of the behaviour during the liberation struggle. i think you
9:15 am
know, it was his greatest achievement. for us, it is about focusing on the legacy of reconciliation stop the trauma that came out of the reconciliation was so visible. . , ., ~ . so visible. the images of the arch with his head _ so visible. the images of the arch with his head on _ so visible. the images of the arch with his head on the _ so visible. the images of the arch with his head on the desk, i so visible. the images of the arch l with his head on the desk, hurting. absolutely i cannot imagine anyone else who could have chaired the truth commission. really it was the pain of south africa, the pain of individuals, the pain of communities individuals, the pain of communities in the public at that for the world to see and also the perpetrators who came forward to tell their part of why they did what they did and to
9:16 am
seek, after telling the truth, to seek, after telling the truth, to seek amnesty. only a person like tutu was able, i think, to preside over that stop really, really heart—wrenching process of truth seeking and forgiveness and reconciliation.— seeking and forgiveness and reconciliation. let's turn to the fi . ht reconciliation. let's turn to the fight against — reconciliation. let's turn to the fight against the _ reconciliation. let's turn to the fight against the apartheid i reconciliation. let's turn to the i fight against the apartheid regime. pictured with his friend matt nelson mandela. when madiba was sent to robben island, was he asked to take on the burden of that struggle or did hejust do it on the burden of that struggle or did he just do it and on the burden of that struggle or did hejust do it and get on the burden of that struggle or did he just do it and get on with it? was he accepted by, for example, the anc? , , , i: , the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 70s and the 80s. — the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 70s and the 80s. he _
9:17 am
the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 70s and the 80s, he became _ the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 70s and the 80s, he became death i the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 705 and the 805, he became death face l the anc? tutu stepped in. in the 70s| and the 80s, he became death face of and the 805, he became death face of the south african struggle. —— the face. the anc was in exile. leaders like mandela were in prison. tutu was a key figure during that period. that period was of heightened repression by apartheid. people felt helpless and that the government was immovable. he was tutu providing the leadership. he also provided a nonracial leadership will stop —— leadership. he also appealed to white south africans to join the struggle forjustice. he was the leader to provide a non—violent principle. the struggle against apartheid had also become violent in
9:18 am
response to the violence of the apartheid government. plunging south africa into a culture of violence. the principles were of nonviolence. that was a really important counter position to have in the 19705 and 19805, the idea that nonviolence can lead to peace and lead to freedom and lead to reconciliation. haw lead to peace and lead to freedom and lead to reconciliation. how did he leveraged _ and lead to reconciliation. how did he leveraged his _ and lead to reconciliation. how did he leveraged his position - and lead to reconciliation. how did he leveraged his position to - he leveraged his position to internationalise the fight against apartheid? you internationalise the fight against aartheid? ., ~' ., internationalise the fight against aartheid? ., ~ ., ., apartheid? you know, the fact that he was archbishop _ apartheid? you know, the fact that he was archbishop gave _ apartheid? you know, the fact that he was archbishop gave him - apartheid? you know, the fact that he was archbishop gave him some | apartheid? you know, the fact that - he was archbishop gave him some kind of protection. if he was an ordinary priest he would not have had that kind of protection. the person, his
9:19 am
values, his sense of socialjustice, all of those things help. he was speaking the truth. probably the most important thing was speaking truth not only to the government but speaking the truth to liberation fighters. that gave him a moral authority. because he was an authentic person, he loved his values and it was an honest person and he spoke to the white oppressors and he spoke to the white oppressors and the black victims. i think that gave him a credibility that very few people could achieve. we gave him a credibility that very few people could achieve.— gave him a credibility that very few people could achieve. we will come to that. there _ people could achieve. we will come to that. there was _ people could achieve. we will come to that. there was a _ people could achieve. we will come to that. there was a well _ people could achieve. we will come to that. there was a well known - to that. there was a well known falling out with the former president, thabo mbeke, between desmond tutu and himself. speaking
9:20 am
truth to power, we have heard that over and again in the tributes. one of the first instances of this, possibly, was when apartheid was very clearly introduced and the education was instigated, the idea of allowing black children only to have enough language to take commands from employees and understand those commands. the next, possibly, you will correct me, william, was when he wrote a letter to the prime minister. and new tel aviv is what happened back in 1975? —— can you tell us what happened? he -- can you tell us what happened? he was —— can you tell us what happened? he: was a teacher first. the rebellion against apartheid was his rejection
9:21 am
of bantu education which was introduced later by foster, that black south africans should get limited education or education that made them really, or less education than white south africans. then the famous letter that he sent to the then prime minister foster, in that letter, he appealed... he spoke also in open letter to white south africans also. it was an interesting letter. his criticism of foster and the injustice of apartheid but also in that letter was addressed to the hearts and minds of white south africans, calling on them at the same time to see the injustice and do something about it. but also he
9:22 am
sent a positive message, a dream of what would be possible if white and black south africa in the future can all work together in both a rainbow nation. i all work together in both a rainbow nation. :, :, :, :, nation. i am going to turn to milton. nation. i am going to turn to milton- just _ nation. i am going to turn to milton. just picking - nation. i am going to turn to milton. just picking up - nation. i am going to turn to milton. just picking up the i nation. i am going to turn to - milton. just picking up the thread of the story, what he was warning came to be, and that was the soweto uprising of 1976. 600 schoolchildren died. reflecting on that moment, he said that those children who revolted, they showed us, they showed us up. we, the adults. they seemed to be ready even to die. milton... yes, indeed. he asked bj foster in that letter in 1976, he
9:23 am
was an apartheid prime minister in south africa and desmond tutu wrote him a letter berating the system of apartheid and asked the privileged white community how long did they think from the privileged and advantaged positions that people can endure the brutal system of apartheid and its violence. that was one of the most bold steps to take. these were the darkest days of apartheid. nobody dared to raise a hand otherwise a will being prisonlike nelson mandela. if
9:24 am
desmond tutu had the courage to pen a letter as a vicar to a very little, powerful apartheid state, a letter as a vicar to a very little, powerfulapartheid state, it tells you how much conviction he had in his spirituality and also in the correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william. _ correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william, we _ correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william, we will— correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william, we will pick- correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william, we will pick up - correctness of his beliefs. milton, and william, we will pick up his i and william, we will pick up his further criticism post apartheid and speaking truth to power and the anc. for now, let us take our viewers back to st george's cathedral in cape town.
9:25 am
the choir sings
9:26 am
0k, ok, as the mourners go through the taking of the wine and the bread but let's cross to our correspondent, who is actually outside st georgecathedral for us. obviously we are following the service from within. are the mourners who had gathered outside the cathedral and
9:27 am
also follow this final goodbye to desmond tutu? —— that can also follow. desmond tutu? -- that can also follow. ~ :, , ., ., ., follow. mourners have gathered at rand follow. mourners have gathered at grand parade _ follow. mourners have gathered at grand parade just _ follow. mourners have gathered at grand parade just opposite - follow. mourners have gathered at grand parade just opposite cape i follow. mourners have gathered at. grand parade just opposite cape town city hall. all of them really speaking about why it was important for them to brave the rain this morning, how they felt that they felt the life of the arch came full circle. it was at that spot where the arch welcome to nelson mandela on the day he was released from prison. all of them saying they felt it was important because they did not want to grieve alone at home and felt they wanted together with like—minded people and follow the proceedings here taking place at st george plasma cathedral. it is george plasma cathedral. it is interesting- — george plasma cathedral. it is interesting. you _ george plasma cathedral. it is interesting. you mention a key
9:28 am
moment in history. —— st george plasma cathedral. a lot of people saying this is one of the few remaining giants of a generation. do younger south africans fully grasp the role that the likes of mandela, certainly, but the likes of desmond tutu played in the future? weill. certainly, but the likes of desmond tutu played in the future?- tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly — tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly the _ tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly the end _ tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly the end of— tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly the end of an - tutu played in the future? well, it is certainly the end of an era. - is certainly the end of an era. desmond tutu was the last remaining nobel prize laureate. people do understand the significant role he played in ensuring that south africa does indeed become a democracy, which is why in schools, when it comes to history lessons, it is not just the politicians which are noted about the role they played in ensuring that apartheid ends in south africa. desmond tutu is also
9:29 am
being taught about and why it was important for such people, while the politicians who were locked up in prison, people like this could still speak even their own lives were at risk. ~ , , , :, :, , risk. when he stepped down from his role at archbishop, _ risk. when he stepped down from his role at archbishop, he _ risk. when he stepped down from his role at archbishop, he kept _ risk. when he stepped down from his role at archbishop, he kept busy - role at archbishop, he kept busy with international affairs, didn't he? , ., , :, with international affairs, didn't he? , :, , ., with international affairs, didn't he? , :, he? yes, it was not 'ust about south african politics. — he? yes, it was not 'ust about south african politics, it _ he? yes, it was notjust about south african politics, it was _ he? yes, it was notjust about south african politics, it was also - he? yes, it was notjust about south african politics, it was also about. african politics, it was also about the marginalised and oppressed people of palestine, also the gay and lesbian community, and the fact that he was a champion of saving the environment speaks to why he decided to choose a greener way of cremation, which is called aquamation, and he is going to be
9:30 am
aquamated after the service. his ashes will be interned at st george's cathedral. —— interred. irate george's cathedral. -- interred. we have a george's cathedral. —— interred. we have a description of aquamation on the bbc news website. can you explain what it is?— explain what it is? what we understand _ explain what it is? what we understand a _ explain what it is? what we understand a greener - explain what it is? what we understand a greener form | explain what it is? what we l understand a greener form of understand a greenerform of cremation, it is water, quite the complexities of it all. what we do know for sure is that it is a greener i have looked it to alkaline
9:31 am
heated the a desmond tutu spoke out against the injustices and human right violations and the regime of robert
9:32 am
mugabe. there was a lot of criticism that came from the xanu pf quarters. he said he would not be dictated to by a man who wears a purple dress. the nonstop desmond tutu from speaking out against all those injustices which sadly some people injustices which sadly some people in zimbabwe are still going through. something like that he would bat way, wouldn't he? for our viewers, the scene on the screen is coming live from cape town inside st george plasma cathedral where the funeral service of the archbishop desmond tutu is taking place. —— st george's cathedral. arch died on december the 26th, he had been suffering from
9:33 am
cancer. milton is with us as well. the anc and post apartheid. just because he fought against the apartheid regime, does not necessarily mean he was loyal without criticism to the anc. yes. without criticism to the anc. yes, indeed. without criticism to the anc. yes, indeed- the _ without criticism to the anc. yes, indeed. the archbishop _ without criticism to the anc. 1313 indeed. the archbishop was quite critical of the anc government when he felt that it was losing its way. that reared its head quite significantly under the jacob zuma administration, where there were huge allegations of corruption hanging on the neck of former presidentjacob zuma, which still due to this day. many cold cases lining up for him to go and clear his name. so archbishop desmond tutu was very angry also for the south
9:34 am
african government or refusing to allow the dalai lama his friend to get visa, obtain a visa from new delhi in india, to come to south africa. he criticised the government quite severely of that. at the same time, the government was worried about its china relations, the relationship they had in their multilateral body which includes brazil and india. multilateral body which includes braziland india. he also multilateral body which includes brazil and india. he also criticised under the mbeke administration. president robert mugabe of zimbabwe was so angry with the criticism of desmond tutu he described him as an angry and evil bishop. mani;
9:35 am
desmond tutu he described him as an angry and evil bishop.— angry and evil bishop. many others have seen that _ angry and evil bishop. many others have seen that clip. _ angry and evil bishop. many others have seen that clip. milton, - angry and evil bishop. many others have seen that clip. milton, i - have seen that clip. milton, i wonder if we could touch on his passions will stop charitable that though? —— shall we talk football? one of the most prominent times when the world saw desmond tutu on a grand scale was at the 2010 fifa world cup which was held in south africa and africa for the very first time. he had always been a huge supporter of football here in south africa, believing that it takes young people from the streets, where they are exposed for drugs and all they are exposed for drugs and all the ills of the world and bringing them back into society where they can thrive, succeed and realise their talents. can thrive, succeed and realise theirtalents. he can thrive, succeed and realise their talents. he was also fond of music. you saw the request, the soweto gospel choir be present. they couldn't for obvious restriction
9:36 am
reasons but also another choir which is currently singing at the service, they have been always alongside the archbishop in many of his sermons and services as well.— and services as well. perfect time to listen into _ and services as well. perfect time to listen into that _ and services as well. perfect time to listen into that choir. _ and services as well. perfect time to listen into that choir. thank- to listen into that choir. thank you.
9:37 am
choir sings.
9:38 am
9:39 am
give rest of christ the servant with his saints. you only are immortal reset. dust his saints. you only are immortal dust you are and to dust you shall return. all of us go down to the dust yet even in the grave soweto hallelujah.
9:40 am
give rest of christ to your servant with your saints.
9:41 am
into your hands, 0 most merciful saviour, we give you servant desmond
9:42 am
tutu. a lamb of your own flock, a sinner of your own forgiving, receive him into the arms of your mercy, into the blessed rest of the lasting peace and into the glorious company of the saints, amen. south africa national anthem.
9:43 am
o fedise dintwa le matshwenyeho, 0 se boloke, # 0 se boloke setjhaba # sa heso, setjhaba sa, sa heso, setjhaba sa, # south afrika, south afrika. # uit die blou van onse hemel, # uit die diepte van ons see # oor ons ewige gebergtes,
9:44 am
waar die kranse antwoord gee, # sounds the call to come together, and united we shall stand, # let us live and strive for freedom, in south africa our land.#. please, be seated.
9:45 am
it is an honour and a privilege bestowed upon me by my religious leaders that i invite the commander—in—chief, his excellency the president of the republic, to come and deliver the eulogy. mist or
9:46 am
president. shall we all rise please? i thank you. let us be seated.
9:47 am
archbishop thabo makgoba, in your capacity as programme director,, members of the tutu family. his majesty and her royal highness. former president thabo mbeki. former
9:48 am
deputy president and my brother. former president of ireland, my dear sister mary robinson. ministers, acting chiefjustice thabo —— ray zondo. the reverend michael weeder, leadership
9:49 am
of the anglican church of southern africa. leaders of the faith of nominations that are here present. leaders and representatives of political parties, general rudzani maphwanya, and fellow mourners. archbishop, soon after the passing of our father i went to
9:50 am
visit nomalizo leah tutu. afterward some journalist asked will it be a category one funeral? i said of course, but with religious characteristics, and may i say that today you may well have written another chapter in government orders and processes of what a category one funeral with religious characteristics is. thank you very much, i havejust seen it for myself. if archbishop desmond tutu were here, he would have said, hey, hey, why are you looking so glum? so unhappy? he would have wanted to
9:51 am
elicit a smile and laughter from amongst all of us. that was the type of person that he was. i am really delighted that government has been laid on this whole process by the church. we had after the passing of nelson mandela knowing that this moment would come. we have been discussing in government, how are we going to send archbishop desmond tutu onto the next world? we to give you it would be led by the church and i am rather pleased
9:52 am
government has taken a back—seat this time around. there is only a few amongst us, the rarest of souls, who attain the stature of global icon during their lifetime. in our modern age this term has come to be associated with celebrity and social media fame. yet if we are to understand a global icon to be someone of great moral stature, the exceptional qualities and service to humanity, there can be no doubt that it refers to the man we are laying to rest today. archbishop desmond tutu was without question a crusader in the struggle for freedom, for
9:53 am
justice, for a quality and for peace. not only in south africa, the country of his birth, but around the world as well. such was the overarching impact and influence that emeritus archbishop desmond tutu had that tributes have been received from current, past presidents, religious leaders, monarchs, lawmakers, political parties, musicians, artists and ordinary people from all corners of the world. climate
9:54 am
activists, community organisations, lgbtqi+ activists, community organisations, lgbtoi+ groups are just some of those who have played a match to a man who has given his life in the cause of freedom, a humble and brave human being who spoke for the oppressed, the downtrodden and the suffering of the world. in doing so, he walked in the footsteps of his mentor, father trevor huddleston. how fitting is it that his parents named him mpilo, meaning life. in his life, he enriched the lives of
9:55 am
all those who he met and got to know him. in the past week we have had many moving accounts and have also seen many images of desmond tutu's life. these accounts and images in many ways are a chronicle of a life of activism, statesmanship, ministry and pastoralism. there is one image taken in 1989 at a protest march here in cape town, in the black and white photograph we see archbishop desmond tutu and the late professor
9:56 am
alongside him wearing cat according of police who were to stop the march from proceeding. it is a striking photograph that captures the steely determination of the arch to challenge the authority of an unjust, illegitimate and oppressive regime. it was a vivid depiction of the confrontation between right, represented by those who were marching for democracy, and might, represented by the man in the uniform of the apartheid police. that photograph rings to mind the words he spoke following his arrest in 1988 during a clergy lead protest against the crackdown on
9:57 am
anti—apartheid groups. bible in hand, he told a news conference he would continue with his defiance. we are not defying the law, he declared, we are obeying god. there is the famous image taken in 1996 during the hearings of the truth and reconciliation commission of our arch, his head bent overfolded arms, his shoulders weighed down by the deep tragedy and the unspeakable cruelty that was being told of the apartheid crime. the trc had just heard heart—rending testimony from a veteran activist on how he was
9:58 am
tortured by the security police are so brutally that he was now confined as he testified to the trc in a wheelchair. overcome by emotion with what he had heard, archbishop desmond tutu dropped his head in his hands and wept. that is a photograph that has gone around the world for all to see. together, these photographs speak not only of the strength of his convictions, but to how deeply he felt the anguish and the suffering inflicted by others who were perpetrators of injustice. and intolerance. they are the many images we have of him speaking to crowds, his arms stretched out as
9:59 am
their embracing them, looking serenely up to the heavens. he was a man with a faith as deep as it was abiding. for him, opposing injustice, standing up for the oppressed, defying unjust laws was god's work. destiny had anointed him a champion of the immortal cause of justice. he took to heart and lift the words of the book of proverbs, chapter 31 versus eight — nine, which says and speak out for those who cannot speak, for the rights of all be destitute. speak out, judge
10:00 am
righteously, defended the rise of the poor and the needy. he was not content to decorate a at conferences —— decry apartheid at conferences, he was there with the freedom fighters, confronting the apartheid regime and comforting his victim. he was not content to preach about social justice from the was not content to preach about socialjustice from the pulpit, he was with the homeless, the helpless, the persecuted, these sick and the destitute in the streets, in additional touch and in homes. he embraced all who had everfelt additional touch and in homes. he embraced all who had ever felt the cold wind of exclusion and they in turn also embraced him.

59 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on